Names Categorized "music"

This is a list of names in which the categories include music.
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ADELAIDE   f   English, Italian, Portuguese
From the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman Emperor Otto the Great. The name became common in Britain in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.
ADELITA   f   Spanish (Latin American)
Spanish diminutive of ADELA. It is used especially in Mexico, where it is the name of a folk song about a female soldier.
ALICE   f   English, French, Portuguese, Italian
From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).
AMELIA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Variant of AMALIA, though it is sometimes confused with EMILIA, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of George II and George III. Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.
AOEDE   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of AOIDE.
AOIDE   f   Greek Mythology
Means "song" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was one of the original three muses, the muse of song.
ARETHA   f   English
Possibly derived from Greek αρετη (arete) meaning "virtue". This name was popularized in the 1960s by American singer Aretha Franklin (1942-).
ARIA   f   English
Means "song" or "melody" in Italian (literally means "air"). An aria is an elaborate vocal solo, the type usually performed in operas. As an English name, it has only been in use since the 20th century. It is not common in Italy.
AUBREY   m & f   English
Norman French form of the Germanic name ALBERICH. As an English masculine name it was common in the Middle Ages, and was revived in the 19th century. Since the mid-1970s it has more frequently been given to girls, due to Bread's 1972 song 'Aubrey' along with its similarity to the established feminine name Audrey.
CADENCE   f   English (Modern)
From an English word meaning "rhythm, flow". It has been in use only since the 20th century.
CARMEN   f   Spanish, English, Italian, Romanian
Medieval Spanish form of CARMEL influenced by the Latin word carmen "song". This was the name of the main character in George Bizet's opera 'Carmen' (1875).
CAROL (1)   f & m   English
Short form of CAROLINE. It was formerly a masculine name, derived from CAROLUS. The name can also be given in reference to the English vocabulary word, which means "song" or "hymn".
CECILIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Romanian, Finnish, German
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.... [more]
CELESTE   f & m   Italian, English
Italian feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS. It is also the English feminine form.
CHANTAL   f   French, English, Dutch
From a French surname which was derived from a place name meaning "stony". It was originally given in honour of Saint Jeanne-Françoise de Chantal, the founder of the Visitation Order in the 17th century. It has become associated with French chant "song".
CHANTEL   f   English
Variant of CHANTAL.
CHANTELLE   f   English
Variant of CHANTAL.
CONCORDIA   f   Roman Mythology
Means "harmony" in Latin. This was the name of the Roman goddess of harmony and peace.
DAINA   f   Lithuanian, Latvian
Means "song" in Lithuanian and Latvian.
DOINA   f   Romanian
Means "folk song", from Romanian doină.
EDITH   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
From the Old English name Eadgyð, derived from the elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gyð "war". It was popular among Anglo-Saxon royalty, being borne for example by Saint Eadgyeth;, the daughter of King Edgar the Peaceful. The name remained common after the Norman conquest. It became rare after the 15th century, but was revived in the 19th century.
ELEANOR   f   English
From the Old French form of the Occitan name Aliénor. Among the name's earliest bearers was the influential Eleanor of Aquitaine (12th century), who was the queen of Louis VII, the king of France, and later Henry II, the king of England. She was named Aenor after her mother, and was called by the Occitan phrase alia Aenor "the other AENOR" in order to distinguish her from her mother. However, there appear to be examples of bearers prior to Eleanor of Aquitaine. It is not clear whether they were in fact Aenors who were retroactively recorded as having the name Eleanor, or whether there is an alternative explanation for the name's origin.... [more]
FIFE   m   Scottish
From a Scottish place name which was formerly the name of a kingdom in Scotland. It is said to be named for the legendary Pictish hero Fib.
GITA   f   Indian, Hindi
Means "song" in Sanskrit. The word appears in the name of the 'Bhagavad Gita', a sacred text of Hinduism (meaning "divine song").
HARMONY   f   English
From the English word harmony, ultimately deriving from Greek ‘αρμονια (harmonia).
HARPER   f & m   English
From an Old English surname which originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps. A notable bearer was the American author Harper Lee (1926-2016), who wrote 'To Kill a Mockingbird'.
HEROD   m   Biblical
From the Greek name ‘Ηρωιδης (Heroides), which probably means "song of the hero" from ‘ηρως (heros) "hero, warrior" combined with ωιδη (oide) "song, ode". This was the name of several rulers of Judea during the period when it was part of the Roman Empire. This includes two who appear in the New Testament: Herod the Great, the king who ordered the slaughter of the children, and his son Herod Antipas, who had John the Baptist beheaded.
HERODES   m   Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Latin form of HEROD, as well as the usual biblical Greek transcription of ‘Ηρωιδης: after the Classical period, the ι in the sequence ωι (often written as a subscript) was not pronounced.
HERODIAS   f   Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Feminine form of HEROD. This was the name of a member of the Herodian ruling family of Judea, a sister of Herod Agrippa and the wife of Herod Antipas. She appears in the New Testament, where she contrives to have her husband Antipas imprison and execute John the Baptist.
HERODION   m   Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Diminutive of the Greek name Heroides (see HEROD). This name is mentioned briefly in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament.
HESIOD   m   Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name ‘Ησιοδος (Hesiodos), which probably means "to throw song" from ‘ιημι (hiemi) "to throw, to speak" and ωιδη (oide) "song, ode". This was the name of an 8th-century BC Greek poet.
JAMYANG   m & f   Tibetan, Bhutanese
Means "gentle song" in Tibetan, from འཇམ ('jam) meaning "gentle, soft" and དབྱངས (dbyangs) meaning "song, voice".
JUDE (1)   m   English, Biblical
Variant of JUDAS. It is used in many English versions of the New Testament to denote the second apostle named Judas, in order to distinguish him from Judas Iscariot. He was supposedly the author of the Epistle of Jude. In the English-speaking world, Jude has occasionally been used as a given name since the time of the Protestant Reformation.
KORA   f   German
German variant of CORA.
LEELO   f   Estonian
Means "folk song" in Estonian.
LIRON   m & f   Hebrew
Means "song for me" or "joy for me" in Hebrew.
LORELEI   f   Germanic Mythology
From a Germanic name meaning "luring rock". This is the name of a rock headland on the Rhine River. Legends say that a maiden named the Lorelei lives on the rock and lures fishermen to their death with her song.
LYRIC   f   English (Modern)
Means simply "lyric, songlike" from the English word, ultimately derived from Greek λυρικος (lyrikos).
MAJOR   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from the given name Mauger, an Old French form of the Germanic name Malger meaning "council spear". The name can also be given in reference to the English word major.
MELE   f   Hawaiian
Means "song" in Hawaiian. This name is also used as a Hawaiian and Samoan form of MARY.
MÉLODIE   f   French
French cognate of MELODY.
MELODY   f   English
From the English word melody, which is derived (via Old French and Late Latin) from Greek μελος (melos) "song" combined with αειδω (aeido) "to sing".
MELPOMENE   f   Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek μελπω (melpo) meaning "to sing, to celebrate with song". This was the name of one of the nine Muses in Greek mythology, the muse of tragedy.
MELPOMENI   f   Greek
Modern Greek form of MELPOMENE.
ODE   m   Medieval English
Medieval English form of Odo (see OTTO).
PHILOMELA   f   Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek φιλος (philos) "lover, friend" and μηλον (melon) "fruit". The second element has also been interpreted as Greek μελος (melos) "song". In Greek myth Philomela was the sister-in-law of Tereus, who raped her and cut out her tongue. Prokne avenged her sister by killing her son by Tereus, after which Tereus attempted to kill Philomela. However, the gods intervened and transformed her into a nightingale.
PIPER   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was originally given to a person who played on a pipe (a flute). It was popularized as a given name by a character from the television series 'Charmed', which debuted in 1998.
POLYMNIA   f   Greek Mythology
Means "abounding in song", derived from Greek πολυς (polys) "much" and ‘υμνος (hymnos) "song, hymn". In Greek mythology she was the goddess of dance and sacred songs, one of the nine Muses.
RANI (2)   f   Hebrew
Means "my joy" or "my song" in Hebrew.
REED   m   English
From an English surname which comes from multiple sources, including Old English read meaning "red" (originally a nickname given to a person with red hair or a ruddy complexion) and Old English ried meaning "clearing" (given to a person who lived in a clearing in the woods).
REI   f   Japanese
From Japanese (rei) meaning "bell", (rei) meaning "beautiful, lovely" or (rei) meaning "the tinkling of jade". This name can also be formed by other kanji with the same pronunciation.
RIYA   f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali
Means "singer" in Sanskrit.
RODION   m   Russian
Russian form of HERODION.
RODYA   m   Russian
Diminutive of RODION.
RON (2)   m & f   Hebrew
Means "song, joy" in Hebrew.
RONA (2)   f   Hebrew
Feminine variant of RON (2).
RONEN   m   Hebrew
Derived from Hebrew רוֹן (ron) meaning "song, joy".
RONI (1)   f   Hebrew
Means "my joy" or "my song" in Hebrew.
RONIT (2)   f   Hebrew
Strictly feminine form of RON (2).
ŞADİYE   f   Turkish
Turkish feminine form of SHADI (1).
SHADI (1)   m   Arabic
Means "singer" in Arabic.
SHADIYA   f   Arabic
Feminine form of SHADI (1).
SHADYA   f   Arabic
Variant transcription of SHADIYA.
SHIR (1)   f   Hebrew
Means "song" in Hebrew.
SHIRA   f   Hebrew
Means "poetry" or "singing" in Hebrew.
SHIRI   f   Hebrew
Means "my song" in Hebrew.
SYMPHONY   f   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word, ultimately deriving from Greek συμφωνος (symphonos) "concordant in sound".
TARANA   f   Azerbaijani
Means "music, song" in Persian.
TUBA   f   Arabic, Turkish
From the name of a type of tree that is believed to grow in heaven in Islamic tradition. It means "blessedness" in Arabic.
VIOLA   f   English, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Czech
Means "violet" in Latin. This was the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's play 'Twelfth Night' (1602).
WAKANA   f   Japanese
From Japanese (wa) meaning "harmony" and (kana) meaning "play music, complete", as well as other combinations of kanji which are pronounced the same way.
YARON   m   Hebrew
Means "to sing, to shout" in Hebrew.
ZIMRI   m   Biblical
Means "my praise" or "my music" in Hebrew. This is the name of a king of Israel in the Old Testament. He ruled for only seven days, when he was succeeded by the commander of the army Omri.
ZVONIMIR   m   Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements zvonu "sound, chime" and miru "peace, world".
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