Names Categorized "power"

This is a list of names in which the categories include power.
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AL-AMIRmArabic (Rare)
Means "the commander, the prince" in Arabic. This was the name of a 10th-century Fatimid imam.
ALARICmAncient Germanic
From the Gothic name Alareiks which meant "ruler of all", derived from the Germanic element ala "all" combined with ric "ruler, power". This was the name of a king of the Visigoths who sacked Rome in the 5th century.
ALDRICmFrench, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name, derived from the elements ald "old" and ric "ruler, power". Saint Aldric was a 9th-century bishop of Le Mans.
AMALRICmAncient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements amal meaning "work, labour" and ric meaning "power". This was the name of a 6th-century king of the Visigoths, as well as two 12th-century rulers of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem.
ARNOLDmEnglish, German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "eagle power", derived from the elements arn "eagle" and wald "power". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Earnweald. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century.... [more]
'AZIZmArabic
Variant transcription of AZIZ.
AZIZmArabic, Persian, Urdu, Uzbek
Means "powerful, respected, beloved", derived from Arabic عزّ ('azza) meaning "to be powerful" or "to be cherished". In Islamic tradition العزيز (al-'Aziz) is one of the 99 names of Allah. A notable bearer of the name was Al-'Aziz, a 10th-century Fatimid caliph.
AZİZEfTurkish
Turkish feminine form of AZIZ.
DONALDmScottish, English
From the Gaelic name Domhnall which means "ruler of the world", composed of the old Celtic elements dumno "world" and val "rule". This was the name of two 9th-century kings of the Scots and Picts. It has traditionally been very popular in Scotland, and during the 20th century it became common in the rest of the English-speaking world. This is the name of one of Walt Disney's most popular cartoon characters, Donald Duck. It was also borne by Australian cricket player Donald Bradman (1908-2001).
ERICmEnglish, Swedish, German, Spanish
From the Old Norse name Eiríkr, derived from the elements ei "ever, always" and ríkr "ruler". A notable bearer was Eiríkr inn Rauda (Eric the Red in English), a 10th-century navigator and explorer who discovered Greenland. This was also the name of several early kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway.... [more]
EZIZmTurkmen
Turkmen form of AZIZ.
GERALDmEnglish, German
From a Germanic name meaning "rule of the spear", from the elements ger meaning "spear" and wald meaning "rule". The Normans brought this name to Britain. Though it died out in England during the Middle Ages, it remained common in Ireland. It was revived in the English-speaking world in 19th century.
GERALDINEfEnglish
Feminine form of GERALD.
GUMARICHmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements guma meaning "man" and ric meaning "power, rule".
HENRYmEnglish
From the Germanic name Heimirich which meant "home ruler", composed of the elements heim "home" and ric "power, ruler". It was later commonly spelled Heinrich, with the spelling altered due to the influence of other Germanic names like Haganrich, in which the first element is hagan "enclosure".... [more]
HULDERICmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hulda "merciful, graceful" and ric "power, rule". It has long been confused with the Germanic name Ulrich.
IRMHILDfGerman
Derived from the Germanic elements ermen "whole, universal" and hild "battle".
ISHITAfIndian, Hindi
Means "supremacy" in Sanskrit.
K'AWIILmMayan Mythology
Means "powerful" in Mayan. This is the name of the Maya god of lightning. He was sometimes depicted with one of his legs taking the form of a serpent.
LEOFRICmAnglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with ric "power".
OSWALDmEnglish, German, Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and weald "power, ruler". Saint Oswald was a king of Northumbria who introduced Christianity to northeast England in the 7th century before being killed in battle. There was also an Old Norse cognate Ásvaldr in use in England, being borne by the 10th-century Saint Oswald of Worcester, who was of Danish ancestry. Though the name had died out by the end of the Middle Ages, it was revived in the 19th century.
PHILOKRATESmAncient Greek
Means "friend of power" from Greek φιλος (philos) "lover, friend" and κρατος (kratos) "power".
REGINALDmEnglish
From Reginaldus, a Latinized form of REYNOLD.
RENAUDmFrench
French form of REYNOLD. This name was used in medieval French literature for the hero Renaud de Montauban, a young man who flees with his three brothers from the court of Charlemagne after killing the king's nephew. Charlemagne pardons the brothers on the condition that they enter the Crusades.
REYNAUDmFrench
French variant form of REYNOLD.
REYNOLDmEnglish
From the Germanic name Raginald, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and wald "rule". The Normans (who used forms like Reinald or Reinold) brought the name to Britain, where it reinforced rare Old English and Norse cognates already in existence. It was common during the Middle Ages, but became more rare after the 15th century.
RONALDmScottish, English
Scottish form of RAGNVALDR, a name introduced to Scotland by Scandinavian settlers and invaders. It became popular outside Scotland during the 20th century. A famous bearer was American actor and president Ronald Reagan (1911-2004).
TUDOR (1)mWelsh
From the older Welsh name Tudur, possibly from the hypothetical Celtic name Toutorix meaning "ruler of the people" (cognate with THEODORIC). As a surname it was borne by five monarchs of England beginning with Henry VII in the 15th century.
ULDERICOmItalian
Italian form of HULDERIC, sometimes considered a form of ULRICH.
ULRICHmGerman, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Odalric meaning "prosperity and power", from the element odal "heritage" combined with ric "power". It has long been confused with the Germanic name Hulderic. This was the name of two German saints. Another famous bearer was Ulrich Zwingli (1484-1531), also known as Huldrych, the leader of the Protestant Reformation in Switzerland.
ULRIKEfGerman
German feminine form of ULRICH.
UZZIAHmBiblical
Means "my power is YAHWEH" in Hebrew, from the roots עֹז ('oz) meaning "strength, power" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. This is the name of several Old Testament characters including a king of Judah.
VALDAfLatvian
Modern coinage from Germanic wald meaning "power, rule". It has been in use only since the 20th century.
VELDAfEnglish
Meaning unknown, possibly a derivative of the Germanic element wald meaning "power, rule".
WALTERmEnglish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Italian, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the army", composed of the elements wald "rule" and hari "army". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Wealdhere. A famous bearer of the name was Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), a Scottish novelist who wrote 'Ivanhoe' and other notable works.