Names Categorized "roseanne characters"

This is a list of names in which the categories include roseanne characters.
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ALmEnglish
Short form of ALBERT and other names beginning with Al. A notable bearer is American actor Al Pacino (1940-).
ALEXANDERmEnglish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, king of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.... [more]
ANDREA (2)fEnglish, German, Spanish, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Dutch, Croatian, Serbian
Feminine form of ANDREW. As an English name, it has been used since the 17th century, though it was not common until the 20th century.
ANDYm & fEnglish
Diminutive of ANDREW or sometimes ANDREA (2). American pop artist and filmmaker Andy Warhol (1928-1987) was a famous bearer of this name.
ANGELAfEnglish, Italian, German, Dutch, Romanian, Slovene, Slovak, Russian, Macedonian, Late Roman
Feminine form of Angelus (see ANGEL). As an English name, it came into use in the 18th century.
ARNIEmEnglish
Diminutive of ARNOLD.
ARNOLDmEnglish, German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "eagle power", derived from the elements arn "eagle" and wald "power". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Earnweald. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century.... [more]
ARTmEnglish
Short form of ARTHUR.
AUDREYfEnglish
Medieval diminutive of ÆÐELÞRYÐ. This was the name of a 7th-century saint, a princess of East Anglia who founded a monastery at Ely. It was also borne by a character in Shakespeare's comedy 'As You Like It' (1599). At the end of the Middle Ages the name became rare due to association with the word tawdry (which was derived from St. Audrey, the name of a fair where cheap lace was sold), but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was British actress Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).
BECKYfEnglish
Diminutive of REBECCA.
BEVfEnglish
Short form of BEVERLY.
BEVERLYf & mEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English city, itself meaning "beaver stream" in Old English. It came into use as a masculine given name in the 19th century, and it became common as an American feminine name after the publication of George Barr McCutcheon's novel 'Beverly of Graustark' (1904).
BOBmEnglish, Dutch
Short form of ROBERT. It arose later than Dob, Hob and Nob, which were medieval rhyming nicknames of Robert. It was borne by the character Bob Cratchit in Charles Dickens' novel 'A Christmas Carol' (1843). Other famous bearers include American folk musician Bob Dylan (1941-) and Jamaican reggae musician Bob Marley (1945-1981).
BONNIEfEnglish
Means "pretty" from the Scottish word bonnie, which was itself derived from Middle French bon "good". It has been in use as an American given name since the 19th century, and it became especially popular after the movie 'Gone with the Wind' (1939), in which it was the nickname of Scarlett's daughter.
BOOKERmEnglish
From an English occupational surname meaning "maker of books". A famous bearer was Booker T. Washington (1856-1915), an African-American leader.
CHARLOTTEfFrench, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.
CHIPmEnglish
Diminutive of CHARLES or CHRISTOPHER. It can also be from a nickname given in reference to the phrase a chip off the old block, used of a son who is similar to his father.
CHUCKmEnglish
Diminutive of CHARLES. It originated in America in the early 20th century. Two famous bearers of this name were pilot Chuck Yeager (1923-), the first man to travel faster than the speed of sound, and the musician Chuck Berry (1926-2017), one of the pioneers of rock music.
CLAIREfFrench, English
French form of CLARA.
CRYSTALfEnglish
From the English word crystal for the clear, colourless glass, sometimes cut into the shape of a gemstone. The English word derives ultimately from Greek κρυσταλλος (krystallos) meaning "ice". It has been in use as a given name since the 19th century.
DANIELmEnglish, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Armenian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge", from the roots דִּין (din) meaning "to judge" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.... [more]
DARLENEfEnglish
From the English word darling combined with the popular name suffix lene. This name has been in use since the beginning of the 20th century.
DAVIDmEnglish, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was derived from Hebrew דּוֹד (dod) meaning "beloved" or "uncle". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.... [more]
DEBBIEfEnglish
Diminutive of DEBORAH.
DWIGHTmEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from the medieval feminine name Diot, a diminutive of Dionysia, the feminine form of DIONYSIUS. In America it was sometimes given in honour of Yale president Timothy Dwight (1752-1817). A famous bearer was the American president Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890-1969).
EDmEnglish, Dutch
Short form of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
FREDmEnglish, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese
Short form of FREDERICK or other names containing the same element. A famous bearer was the American actor and dancer Fred Astaire (1899-1987).
GARYmEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from a Norman given name, which was itself originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ger meaning "spear". This name was popularized in the late 1920s the American actor Gary Cooper (1901-1961), who took his stage name from the city of Gary in Indiana where his agent was born.
GEORGEmEnglish, Romanian
From the Greek name Γεωργιος (Georgios) which was derived from the Greek word γεωργος (georgos) meaning "farmer, earthworker", itself derived from the elements γη (ge) "earth" and εργον (ergon) "work". Saint George was a 3rd-century Roman soldier from Palestine who was martyred during the persecutions of Emperor Diocletian. Later legends describe his defeat of a dragon, with which he was often depicted in medieval art.... [more]
HARRISmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from the given name HARRY.
HEATHERfEnglish
From the English word heather for the variety of small shrubs with pink or white flowers which commonly grow in rocky areas. It is derived from Middle English hather. It was first used as a given name in the late 19th century, though it did not become popular until the last half of the 20th century.
IRISfGreek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish, Greek
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow, also serving as a messenger to the gods. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.
JACKIEm & fEnglish
Diminutive of JACK or JACQUELINE. A notable bearer was baseball player Jackie Robinson (1919-1972), the first African-American to play in Major League Baseball.
JACOBmEnglish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Jewish, Biblical
From the Latin Iacobus, which was from the Greek Ιακωβος (Iakobos), which was from the Hebrew name יַעֲקֹב (Ya'aqov). In the Old Testament Jacob (later called Israel) is the son of Isaac and Rebecca and the father of the twelve founders of the twelve tribes of Israel. He was born holding his twin brother Esau's heel, and his name is explained as meaning "holder of the heel" or "supplanter", because he twice deprived his brother of his rights as the firstborn son (see Genesis 27:36). Other theories claim that it is in fact derived from a hypothetical name like יַעֲקֹבְאֵל (Ya'aqov'el) meaning "may God protect".... [more]
JACQUELINEfFrench, English
French feminine form of JACQUES, also commonly used in the English-speaking world.
JERRYm & fEnglish
Diminutive of JEREMY, JEROME, GERALD, GERALDINE, and other names beginning with the same sound. A notable bearer was American comedian Jerry Lewis (1926-2017).
JIMMYmEnglish
Diminutive of JAMES.
JUANITAfSpanish
Diminutive of JUANA.
KATHYfEnglish
Diminutive of KATHERINE.
LEONmEnglish, German, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek λεων (leon) meaning "lion". During the Christian era this Greek name was merged with the Latin cognate Leo, with the result that the two forms are used somewhat interchangeably across European languages. In England during the Middle Ages this was a common name among Jews. A famous bearer was Leon Trotsky (1879-1940), a Russian Communist revolutionary.
LONNIEmEnglish
Short form of ALONZO and other names containing the same sound.
LOUf & mEnglish, French
Short form of LOUISE or LOUIS. Famous bearers include the baseball player Lou Gehrig (1903-1941) and the musician Lou Reed (1942-2013).
MARKmEnglish, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical
Form of MARCUS. Saint Mark was the author of the second gospel in the New Testament. Though the author's identity is not certain, some traditions hold him to be the same person as the John Mark who appears in the Book of Acts. He is the patron saint of Venice, where he is supposedly buried. Though in use during the Middle Ages, Mark was not common in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when it began to be used alongside the classical form Marcus.... [more]
MARLAfEnglish
Shortened form of MARLENE.
MARSHAfEnglish
Variant of MARCIA.
MARVINmEnglish, German
Probably from an English surname which was derived from the given name MERVYN. A famous bearer was the American musician Marvin Gaye (1939-1984).
MARYfEnglish, Biblical
Usual English form of Maria, the Latin form of the New Testament Greek names Μαριαμ (Mariam) and Μαρια (Maria) - the spellings are interchangeable - which were from Hebrew מִרְיָם (Miryam), a name borne by the sister of Moses in the Old Testament. The meaning is not known for certain, but there are several theories including "sea of bitterness", "rebelliousness", and "wished for child". However it was most likely originally an Egyptian name, perhaps derived in part from mry "beloved" or mr "love".... [more]
MEGfEnglish
Medieval diminutive of MARGARET.
MOLLYfEnglish
Diminutive of MARY. It developed from Malle and Molle, other medieval diminutives. James Joyce used this name in his novel 'Ulysses' (1920), where it belongs to Molly Bloom, the wife of the main character.
NANCYfEnglish
Previously a medieval diminutive of ANNIS, though since the 18th century it has been a diminutive of ANN. It is now usually regarded as an independent name. During the 20th century it became very popular in the United States. A city in the Lorraine region of France bears this name, though it derives from a different source.
NICKmEnglish, Dutch
Short form of NICHOLAS.
REBECCAfEnglish, Italian, Swedish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name רִבְקָה (Rivqah) from an unattested root probably meaning "join, tie, snare". This is the name of the wife of Isaac and the mother of Esau and Jacob in the Old Testament. It came into use as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular with the Puritans in the 17th century.
RONNIEm & fEnglish
Diminutive of RONALD or VERONICA.
SCOTTmEnglish, Scottish
From an English and Scottish surname which referred to a person from Scotland or a person who spoke Scottish Gaelic. It is derived from Latin Scoti meaning "Gaelic speaker", with the ultimate origin uncertain.
SONNYmEnglish
From a nickname which is commonly used to denote a young boy, derived from the English word son.
SONYAfRussian, English
Russian diminutive of SOPHIA. This is the name of a character in Leo Tolstoy's novel 'War and Peace' (1869, English translation 1886).
STACEYf & mEnglish
Variant of STACY.
SYLVIAfEnglish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German
Variant of SILVIA. This has been the most common English spelling since the 19th century.
TODDmEnglish
From a surname meaning "fox", derived from Middle English todde.
TRAVISmEnglish
From the English surname Travis (a variant of TRAVERS). It was used in America in honour of William Travis (1809-1836), the commander of the Texan forces at the Battle of the Alamo.
TYmEnglish
Short form of TYLER, TYSON, TYRONE, and other names beginning with Ty.
VONDAfEnglish
Variant of WANDA, reflecting the Polish pronunciation.
WALTERmEnglish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Italian, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the army", composed of the elements wald "rule" and hari "army". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Wealdhere. A famous bearer of the name was Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), a Scottish novelist who wrote 'Ivanhoe' and other notable works.
WILLYm & fEnglish, German, Dutch
Diminutive of WILLIAM, WILHELM or WILLEM. It is both masculine and feminine in Dutch.