Names Categorized "royalty"

This is a list of names in which the categories include royalty.
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ALBERT   m   English, French, Catalan, German, Polish, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Romanian, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalbert, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and beraht "bright". This name was common among medieval German royalty. The Normans introduced it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Æðelberht. Though it became rare in England by the 17th century, it was repopularized in the 19th century by the German-born Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.... [more]
BRENNUS   m   Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Latinized form of a Celtic name (or title) that possibly meant either "king, prince" or "raven". Brennus was a Gallic leader of the 4th century BC who attacked and sacked Rome.
BRENO   m   Portuguese
Portuguese form of BRENNUS.
CASIMIR   m   English, French
English form of the Polish name Kazimierz, derived from the Slavic element kaziti "to destroy" combined with miru "peace, world". Four kings of Poland have borne this name, including Casimir III the Great, who greatly strengthened the Polish state in the 14th century. It was also borne Saint Casimir, a 15th-century Polish prince and a patron saint of Poland and Lithuania. The name was imported into Western Europe via Germany, where it was borne by some royalty.
CLARENCE   m   English
From the Latin title Clarensis which belonged to members of the British royal family. The title ultimately derives from the name of the town of Clare in Suffolk. As a given name it has been in use since the 19th century.
CYNESIGE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and sige "victory".
FELIX   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.... [more]
FERDINAND   m   German, French, Dutch, English, Czech, Slovene, Ancient Germanic
From Ferdinando, the old Spanish form of a Germanic name composed of the elements fardi "journey" and nand "daring, brave". The Visigoths brought the name to the Iberian Peninsula, where it entered into the royal families of Spain and Portugal. From there it became common among the Habsburg royal family of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria, starting with the Spanish-born Ferdinand I in the 16th century. A notable bearer was Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan (1480-1521), called Fernão de Magalhães in Portuguese, who was the leader of the first expedition to sail around the earth.
FRANZISKA   f   German
German feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
GRUFFUDD   m   Welsh
Welsh name, the second element deriving from Welsh udd "lord, prince" but the first element being of uncertain meaning (possibly cryf "strong"). This was a common name among medieval Welsh royalty. Gruffudd (or Gruffydd) ap Llywelyn was an 11th-century Welsh ruler who fought against England.
JUDITH   f   English, Jewish, French, German, Spanish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יְהוּדִית (Yehudit) meaning "woman from Judea", Judea being an ancient region in Israel. In the Old Testament Judith is one of the Hittite wives of Esau. This is also the name of the main character of the apocryphal Book of Judith. She killed Holofernes, an invading Assyrian commander, by beheading him in his sleep.... [more]
KENELM   m   English (Rare)
From the Old English name Cenhelm, which was composed of the elements cene "bold, keen" and helm "helmet". Saint Kenelm was a 9th-century martyr from Mercia, where he was a member of the royal family. The name was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has since become rare.
KINGSLEY   m   English (Modern)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "king's wood" in Old English.
MELCHIOR   m   Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
Derived from Semitic roots meaning "king city". This was a name traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus.
RAJA (2)   m   Urdu, Tamil, Indian, Telugu, Malayalam, Kannada, Hindi, Marathi, Indonesian
Means "king, ruler", from Sanskrit राजन् (rajan).
RODDY   m   English, Scottish
Diminutive of RODERICK or RODNEY.
RODERICK   m   English, Scottish, Welsh
Means "famous power" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ric "power". This name was in use among the Visigoths; it was borne by their last king (also known as Rodrigo), who died fighting the Muslim invaders of Spain in the 8th century. It also had cognates in Old Norse and West Germanic, and Scandinavian settlers and Normans introduced it to England, though it died out after the Middle Ages. It was revived in the English-speaking world by Sir Walter Scott's poem 'The Vision of Don Roderick' (1811).
RORIE   m   Irish, Scottish
Variant of RORY.
RORY   m   Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of RUAIDHRÍ.
RUAIDHRÍ   m   Irish
Means "red king" from Irish ruadh "red" combined with "king". This was the name of the last high king of Ireland, reigning in the 12th century.
RUAIDRÍ   m   Irish
Variant of RUAIDHRÍ.
RUAIRI   m   Scottish
Scottish cognate of RUAIDHRÍ.
RUAIRÍ   m   Irish
Variant of RUAIDHRÍ.
RUAIRIDH   m   Scottish
Scottish cognate of RUAIDHRÍ.
RUARAIDH   m   Scottish
Scottish cognate of RUAIDHRÍ.
RUARIDH   m   Scottish
Scottish cognate of RUAIDHRÍ.
RYAN   m   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Riain meaning "descendant of Rían". The given name Rían probably means "little king" (from Irish "king" combined with a diminutive suffix).
SOPHIA   f   English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek
Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred during the reign of the emperor Hadrian. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which is the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.... [more]
STUART   m   English, Scottish
From an occupational surname originally belonging to a person who was a steward. It is ultimately derived from Old English stig "house" and weard "guard". As a given name, it arose in 19th-century Scotland in honour of the Stuart royal family, which produced several kings and queens of Scotland and Britain between the 14th and 18th centuries.
SULTAN   m & f   Arabic, Turkish, Urdu, Bengali, Avar
Means "ruler, king, sultan" in Arabic. In the Arab world this name is typically masculine, but Turkey it is given to both boys and girls.
TAKEHIKO   m   Japanese
From Japanese (take) meaning "military, martial" or (take) meaning "bamboo" combined with (hiko) meaning "boy, prince". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
WALDEMAR   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish
Germanic derivative of the Slavic name VLADIMIR (or perhaps a cognate composed of the Germanic elements wald "rule" and meri "famous"). It was introduced into Scandinavia by the 12th-century Danish king Waldemar (or Valdemar) who was named after a royal ancestor of his Ukrainian mother.
XOCHIPILLI   m   Aztec and Toltec Mythology, Native American, Nahuatl
Means "flower prince" in Nahuatl. He was the Aztec god of love, flowers, song and games, the twin brother of Xochiquetzal.
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