Names Categorized "simpsons characters"

This is a list of names in which the categories include simpsons characters.
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ABE (1)   m   English
Short form of ABRAHAM.
ABRAHAM   m   English, Hebrew, Spanish, French, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
This name may be viewed either as meaning "father of many" in Hebrew or else as a contraction of ABRAM (1) and הָמוֹן (hamon) "many, multitude". The biblical patriarch Abraham was originally named Abram but God changed his name (see Genesis 17:5). With his father Terah, he led his wife Sarah, his nephew Lot and their other followers from Ur into Canaan. He is regarded by Jews as being the founder of the Hebrews through his son Isaac and by Muslims as being the founder of the Arabs through his son Ishmael.... [more]
AGNES   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Αγνη (Hagne), derived from Greek ‘αγνος (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe, being especially popular in England in the Middle Ages.
BARNEY   m   English
Diminutive of BARNABAS, BERNARD or BARNABY.
BART   m   English, Dutch
Short form of BARTHOLOMEW. This name is borne by a cartoon boy on the television series 'The Simpsons'.
BARTHOLOMEW   m   English, Biblical
From Βαρθολομαιος (Bartholomaios), which was the Greek form of an Aramaic name meaning "son of TALMAI". In the New Testament Bartholomew is the byname of an apostle, possibly the same person as the apostle Nathanael. According to tradition he was a missionary to India before returning westward to Armenia, where he was martyred by flaying. Due to the popularity of this saint the name became common in England during the Middle Ages.
BOB   m   English, Dutch
Short form of ROBERT. It arose later than Dob, Hob and Nob, which were medieval rhyming nicknames of Robert. It was borne by the character Bob Cratchit in Charles Dickens' novel 'A Christmas Carol' (1843). Other famous bearers include American folk musician Bob Dylan (1941-) and Jamaican reggae musician Bob Marley (1945-1981).
CARL   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
German form of CHARLES. Two noteworthy bearers of the name were the German mathematician Carl Gauss (1777-1855), who made contributions to number theory and algebra as well as physics and astronomy, and the Swiss psychologist Carl Jung (1875-1961), who founded analytical psychology. It was imported to America in the 19th century by German immigrants.
CLANCY   m   Irish, English (Rare)
From the Irish surname Mac Fhlannchaidh which means "son of Flannchadh". The Gaelic name Flannchadh means "red warrior".
EDNA (1)   f   Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of EITHNE.
EDNA (2)   f   Biblical
Means "pleasure" in Hebrew. This name appears in the Old Testament Apocrypha in the Book of Tobit.
HELEN   f   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
English form of the Greek ‘Ελενη (Helene), probably from Greek ‘ελενη (helene) "torch" or "corposant", or possibly related to σεληνη (selene) "moon". In Greek mythology Helen was the daughter of Zeus and Leda, whose kidnapping by Paris was the cause of the Trojan War. The name was also borne by the 4th-century Saint Helena, mother of the Roman emperor Constantine, who supposedly found the True Cross during a trip to Jerusalem.... [more]
HOMER   m   English, Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name ‘Ομηρος (Homeros), derived from ‘ομηρος (homeros) meaning "hostage, pledge". Homer was the Greek epic poet who wrote the 'Iliad', about the Trojan War, and the 'Odyssey', about Odysseus's journey home after the war. There is some debate about when he lived, or if he was even a real person, though most scholars place him in the 8th century BC. In the modern era, Homer has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world (chiefly in America) since the 18th century. This name is borne by the cartoon father on the television series 'The Simpsons'.
JACQUELINE   f   French, English
French feminine form of JACQUES, also commonly used in the English-speaking world.
JASPER   m   English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
Means "treasurer" in Persian. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.
KIRK   m   English
From an English and Scottish surname meaning "church" from Old Norse kirkja, ultimately from Greek. A famous bearer was American actor Kirk Douglas (1916-), whose birth name was Issur Danielovitch.
LENNY   m   English
Diminutive of LEONARD.
LING   f & m   Chinese
From Chinese (líng) meaning "spirit, soul", (líng) meaning "bell, chime", or other Chinese characters which are pronounced similarly.
LISA   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian
Short form of ELIZABETH, ELISABETH, ELISABET or ELISABETTA. This is the name of the subject of one of the world's most famous paintings, the 'Mona Lisa', the portrait of Lisa del Giocondo by Leonardo da Vinci.
LUANN   f   English
Either a combination of LOU and ANN or a variant of LUANA. It was popularized in the 1950s by the singer Lu Ann Simms (1933-2003).
MAGGIE   f   English
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MANJULA   f   Indian, Hindi, Telugu, Malayalam
Means "pleasing, beautiful" in Sanskrit.
MARGARET   f   English
Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", probably ultimately a borrowing from Sanskrit मञ्यरी (manyari). Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.... [more]
MARGE   f   English
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MARJORIE   f   English
Medieval variant of MARGERY, influenced by the name of the herb marjoram. After the Middle Ages this name was rare, but it was revived at the end of the 19th century.
MARTIN   m   English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish
From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god MARS. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.... [more]
MAUDE   f   English
Variant of MAUD.
MOE (1)   m   English
Short form of MAURICE or MORRIS, or sometimes of other names beginning with a similar sound.
MONTGOMERY   m   English
From an English surname meaning "GUMARICH's mountain" in Norman French. A notable bearer of this surname was Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976), a British army commander during World War II.
NED   m   English
Diminutive of EDWARD or EDMUND. It has been used since the 14th century, and may have had root in the medieval affectionate phrase mine Ed, which was later reinterpreted as my Ned.
NELSON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of NEIL". It was originally given in honour of the British admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805). His most famous battle was the Battle of Trafalgar, in which he destroyed a combined French and Spanish fleet, but was himself killed. Another notable bearer was the South African statesman Nelson Mandela (1918-2013). Mandela's birth name was Rolihlahla; as a child he was given the English name Nelson by a teacher.
OTTO   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
Later German form of Audo or Odo, originally a short form of various names beginning with the Germanic element aud meaning "wealth, fortune". This was the name of four kings of Germany, starting in the 10th century with Otto I, the first Holy Roman Emperor, who was known as Otto the Great. This name was also borne by a 19th-century king of Greece who was originally from Bavaria. Another notable bearer was the German chancellor Otto von Bismarck (1815-1898).
PATTY   f   English
Originally a variant of Matty, a 17th-century diminutive of MARTHA. It is now commonly used as a diminutive of PATRICIA.
RALPH   m   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Contracted form of the Old Norse name RÁÐÚLFR (or its Norman form Radulf). Scandinavian settlers introduced it to England before the Norman conquest, though afterwards it was bolstered by Norman influence. In the Middle Ages it was usually spelled Ralf, but by the 17th century it was most commonly Rafe, reflecting the normal pronunciation. The Ralph spelling appeared in the 18th century. A famous bearer of the name was Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American poet and author who wrote on transcendentalism.
ROD   m   English
Short form of RODERICK or RODNEY.
SARAH   f   English, French, German, Hebrew, Arabic, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "lady, princess, noblewoman" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of Abraham's wife, considered the matriarch of the Jewish people. She was barren until she unexpectedly became the pregnant with Isaac at the age of 90. Her name was originally Sarai, but God changed it at the same time Abraham's name was changed (see Genesis 17:15).... [more]
SELMA   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic
Meaning unknown, possibly a short form of ANSELMA. It could also have been inspired by James Macpherson's 18th-century poems, in which it is the name of Ossian's castle.
SEYMOUR   m   English
From a Norman surname which originally belonged to a person coming from the French town of Saint Maur (which means "Saint MAURUS").
SHAUNA   f   English
Feminine form of SHAUN.
SHERRI   f   English
Variant of SHERRY.
TERRI   f   English
Either a strictly feminine form of TERRY (1) or a diminutive of THERESA.
TIMOTHY   m   English, Biblical
English form of the Greek name Τιμοθεος (Timotheos) meaning "honouring God", derived from τιμαω (timao) "to honour" and θεος (theos) "god". Saint Timothy was a companion of Paul on his missionary journeys and was the recipient of two of Paul's epistles that appear in the New Testament. He was of both Jewish and Greek ancestry. According to tradition, he was martyred at Ephesus after protesting the worship of Artemis. As an English name, Timothy was not used until after the Protestant Reformation.
TODD   m   English
From a surname meaning "fox", derived from Middle English todde.
WAYLON   m   English
Variant of WAYLAND. This name was popularized by country music singer Waylon Jennings (1937-2002), who was originally named Wayland.
WILLIE   m & f   English
Masculine or feminine diminutive of WILLIAM. A notable bearer is the retired American baseball player Willie Mays (1931-).
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