Names Categorized "the legend of zelda characters"

This is a list of names in which the categories include the legend of zelda characters.
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ABE (1)mEnglish
Short form of ABRAHAM.
AGUSmIndonesian
Variant of BAGUS.
ALDOmItalian, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element ald "old", and possibly also with adal "noble".
ASTRIDfSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French
Modern form of ÁSTRÍÐR. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of 'Pippi Longstocking'.
AYAfJapanese
From Japanese (aya) meaning "colour", (aya) meaning "design", or other kanji characters with the same pronunciation.
BARTAmHungarian
Hungarian short form of BERTALAN.
BELLAfEnglish
Short form of ISABELLA and other names ending in bella. It is also associated with the Italian word bella meaning "beautiful".
BENNYmEnglish
Diminutive of BENJAMIN or BENEDICT.
BERRY (2)fEnglish (Rare)
From the English word referring to the small fruit. It is ultimately derived from Old English berie. This name has only been in use since the 20th century.
BERTIEm & fEnglish
Diminutive of ALBERT, HERBERT, and other names containing bert (often derived from the Germanic element beraht meaning "bright").
BETHfEnglish
Short form of ELIZABETH, or sometimes BETHANY.
BLOSSOMfEnglish
From the English word blossom, ultimately from Old English blóstm. It came into use as a rare given name in the 19th century.
BO (1)mSwedish, Danish
From the Old Norse byname Búi which was derived from Old Norse bua meaning "to live".
BRANTmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from the Old Norse name BRANDR.
BRENTmEnglish
From an English surname, originally taken from various place names, perhaps derived from a Celtic word meaning "hill".
BYRNEmEnglish (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Broin meaning "descendant of BRAN (1)".
CANDYfEnglish
Diminutive of CANDACE. It is also influenced by the English word candy.
CARAfEnglish
From an Italian word meaning "beloved". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century, though it did not become popular until after the 1950s.
CHRISTINEfFrench, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French form of CHRISTINA, as well as a variant in other languages.
COLIN (1)mScottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of CAILEAN or COILEAN.
DAImWelsh
Derived from the old Celtic word dei meaning "to shine". This name is also used as a Welsh diminutive of DAVID.
DALIA (1)fSpanish (Latin American), American (Hispanic)
Spanish form of DAHLIA. The Dahlia is the national flower of Mexico.
DANTEmItalian
Medieval short form of DURANTE. The most notable bearer of this name was Dante Alighieri, the 13th-century Italian poet who wrote the 'Divine Comedy'.
DAVEmEnglish
Short form of DAVID.
DIMITRImRussian, French
Variant of DMITRIY, using the Church Slavic spelling.
DINA (2)fItalian, Portuguese
Short form of names ending in dina.
DMITRImRussian
Variant transcription of DMITRIY.
DOYLEmIrish
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Dubhghaill meaning "descendant of Dubhghall" (see DOUGAL). Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) was the author of the Sherlock Holmes mystery stories.
ELMAfDutch, German, English
Short form of WILHELMINE or names ending in elma, such as ANSELMA. It has also been recorded as a combination of ELIZABETH and MARY, as in the case of the 19th-century daughter of the Earl of Elgin, who was named using her mother's first and middle names.
EPONAfCeltic Mythology
Derived from Gaulish epos meaning "horse". This was the name of the Celtic goddess of horses.
ERNESTOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of ERNEST.
ESSAmArabic
Variant transcription of ISA (1).
EVANmWelsh, English
Anglicized form of Iefan, a Welsh form of JOHN.
FIFIfFrench
Diminutive of JOSÉPHINE.
FINLEYm & fIrish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of FIONNLAGH.
GAGEmEnglish (Modern)
From an English surname of Old French origin meaning either "measure", originally denoting one who was an assayer, or "pledge", referring to a moneylender. It was popularized as a given name by a character from the book 'Pet Sematary' (1983) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1989).
GALE (1)fEnglish
Variant of GAIL.
GILLIANfEnglish
Medieval English feminine form of JULIAN. This spelling has been in use since the 13th century, though it was not declared a distinct name from Julian until the 17th century.
GINAfItalian, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of GEORGINA, REGINA, LUIGINA, and other names ending in gina. It can also be used as a diminutive of VIRGINIA or EUGENIA. It was popularized in the 1950s by Italian actress Gina Lollobrigida (1927-), whose birth name was Luigina.
GRETAfGerman, Italian, Lithuanian, Swedish, English
Short form of MARGARETA. A famous bearer of this name was the Swedish actress Greta Garbo (1905-1990).
GUSTAFmSwedish, German
Swedish and German variant of GUSTAV.
GUYmEnglish, French
Norman French form of WIDO. The Normans introduced it to England, where it was common until the time of Guy Fawkes (1570-1606), a revolutionary who attempted to blow up the British parliament. The name was revived in the 19th century, due in part to characters in the novels 'Guy Mannering' (1815) by Sir Walter Scott and 'The Heir of Redclyffe' (1854) by C. M. Yonge.
HAGEN (1)mGerman, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic element hagan meaning "enclosure". In the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied' he is the half-brother of Günther. He killed the hero Siegfried by luring him onto a hunting expedition and then stabbing him with a javelin in his one vulnerable spot.
HANNAHfEnglish, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Arabic, Biblical
From the Hebrew name חַנָּה (Channah) meaning "favour, grace", derived from the root חָנַן (chanan). In the Old Testament this is the name of the wife of Elkanah. Her rival was Elkanah's other wife Peninnah, who had children while Hannah remained barren. After a blessing from Eli she finally became pregnant with Samuel.... [more]
HARLOWf & mEnglish
From a surname which was from a place name which was derived from Old English hær "rock" or here "army", combined with hlaw "hill".
HENAfYiddish
Yiddish form of HANNAH.
HERBmEnglish
Short form of HERBERT.
HILDAfEnglish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element hild "battle". The short form was used for both Old English and continental Germanic names. Saint Hilda of Whitby was a 7th-century English saint and abbess. The name became rare in England during the later Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century.
HOLLYfEnglish
From the English word for the holly tree, ultimately derived from Old English holen.
HONEYfEnglish (Rare)
Simply from the English word honey, ultimately from Old English hunig. This was originally a nickname for a sweet person.
HUDSONmEnglish
From an English surname which meant "son of HUDDE". A famous bearer of the surname was the English explorer Henry Hudson (1570-1611).
ICHIROmJapanese
Variant transcription of ICHIROU.
ILARImRussian, Finnish
Russian and Finnish form of HILARIUS.
IRENEfEnglish, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Ειρηνη (Eirene), derived from a word meaning "peace". This was the name of the Greek goddess who personified peace, one of the ‘Ωραι (Horai). It was also borne by several early Christian saints. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, notably being borne by an 8th-century empress, who was the first woman to lead the empire. She originally served as regent for her son, but later had him killed and ruled alone.... [more]
IRISfGreek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish, Greek
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow, also serving as a messenger to the gods. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.
ISHAf & mIndian, Hindi, Marathi, Hinduism
Means "master, lord" in Sanskrit. This is a transcription of both the feminine form ईशा and the masculine form ईश (an epithet of the Hindu god Shiva). It is also the name of one of the Upanishads, which are parts of Hindu scripture.
IZAfPolish
Short form of IZABELA.
JASMINEfEnglish, French
From the English word for the climbing plant with fragrant flowers which is used for making perfumes. It is derived from Persian یاسمن (yasamen) (which is also a Persian name).
JIMmEnglish
Medieval diminutive of JAMES.
JIROmJapanese
Variant transcription of JIROU.
JOANNAfEnglish, Polish, Biblical
English and Polish form of Latin Iohanna, which was derived from Greek Ιωαννα (Ioanna), the feminine form of Ioannes (see JOHN). This is the spelling used in the English New Testament, where it belongs to a follower of Jesus who is regarded as a saint. In the Middle Ages in England it was used as a Latinized form of Joan (the usual feminine form of John) and it became common as a given name in the 19th century.
JOELmEnglish, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Finnish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יוֹאֵל (Yo'el) meaning "YAHWEH is God", from the elements יוֹ (yo) and אֵל (el), both referring to the Hebrew God. Joel is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Joel, which describes a plague of locusts. In England, it was first used as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation.
JOHNNYmEnglish
Diminutive of JOHN. A famous bearer is American actor Johnny Depp (1963-).
JOLENEfEnglish
Formed from JO and the popular name suffix lene. This name was created in the 20th century.
JULES (2)f & mEnglish
Diminutive of JULIA or JULIAN.
JUNEfEnglish
From the name of the month, which was originally derived from the name of the Roman goddess Juno. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
KALANIm & fHawaiian
Means "the heavens" from Hawaiian ka "the" and lani "heaven, sky, royal, majesty".
KIKIfEnglish, German, Greek
Diminutive of names beginning with or containing the sound K.
KYRAfEnglish
Variant of KIRA (2), sometimes considered a feminine form of CYRUS.
LAINEfEstonian
Means "wave" in Estonian.
LANAfEnglish, Russian, Croatian, Serbian
Short form of ALANA (English) or SVETLANA (Russian). In the English-speaking world, it was popularized by actress Lana Turner (1921-1995).
LEEm & fEnglish
From a surname which was derived from Old English leah meaning "clearing". The surname belonged to Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), commander of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. In his honour, it has been commonly used as a given name in the American South.
LEENAfFinnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian short form of HELENA or MATLEENA.
LEILAfArabic, Persian, English, Georgian
Variant of LAYLA. This spelling was used by Lord Byron for characters in 'The Giaour' (1813) and 'Don Juan' (1819), and it is through him that the name was introduced to the English-speaking world.
LIANAfItalian, Portuguese, Romanian, English
Short form of JULIANA, LILIANA, and other names that end in liana. This is also the word for a type of vine that grows in jungles.
LINDAfEnglish, Dutch, German, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, French, Latvian, Finnish, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Ancient Germanic
Originally a medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element lind meaning "flexible, soft, mild". It also coincides with the Spanish and Portuguese word linda meaning "beautiful".
LOUISEfFrench, English, Danish, Swedish, Dutch, German
French feminine form of LOUIS.
LULU (1)fGerman
Diminutive of names that begin with Lu, especially LUISE.
MACK (1)mEnglish
From a surname which was originally a shortened form of various Gaelic surnames beginning with Mac or Mc (from Gaelic mac meaning "son"). It is also used as a generic slang term for a man.
MAGGIEfEnglish
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MAIKEfFrisian, German
Frisian diminutive of MARIA.
MALENAfSwedish, Spanish, Czech
Swedish and Spanish short form of MAGDALENA, and a Czech short form of MAHULENA.
MANNYmEnglish
Short form of EMMANUEL.
MARCYfEnglish
Diminutive of MARCIA.
MARIEf & mFrench, Czech, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
French and Czech form of MARIA. A notable bearer of this name was Marie Antoinette, a queen of France who was executed by guillotine during the French Revolution. Another was Marie Curie (1867-1934), a physicist and chemist who studied radioactivity with her husband Pierre.... [more]
MARINmFrench, Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian
French, Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian and Macedonian form of MARINUS.
MARSHALLmEnglish
From a surname which originally denoted a person who was a marshal. The word marshal originally derives from Germanic marah "horse" and scalc "servant".
MARTHAfEnglish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, Greek, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From Aramaic מַרְתָּא (marta') meaning "the lady, the mistress", feminine form of מַר (mar) meaning "master". In the New Testament this is the name of the sister of Lazarus and Mary of Bethany (who is sometimes identified with Mary Magdalene). She was a witness to Jesus restoring her dead brother to life.... [more]
MAUDfEnglish, French, Dutch
Usual medieval form of MATILDA. Though it became rare after the 14th century, it was revived and once more grew popular in the 19th century, perhaps due to Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem 'Maud' (1855).
MAXmGerman, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Russian
Short form of MAXIMILIAN (or sometimes of MAXWELL in English). It is also a variant transcription of Russian MAKS.
MEI (2)fJapanese
From Japanese (me) meaning "bud, sprout" combined with (i) meaning "rely on", (i) meaning "life" or (i) meaning "clothing, garment". Other kanji combinations are possible.
MIAfSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Scandinavian, Dutch and German diminutive of MARIA. It coincides with the Italian word mia meaning "mine".
MIKEmEnglish
Short form of MICHAEL.
MILAfRussian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear".
MIMIfEnglish, Italian
Diminutive of MARIA and other names beginning with M.
MINA (1)fEnglish, Dutch, Limburgish
Short form of WILHELMINA and other names ending in mina. This was the name of a character in the novel 'Dracula' (1897) by Bram Stoker.
MISHAmRussian
Russian diminutive of MIKHAIL.
MISSYfEnglish
Diminutive of MELISSA. This is also a slang term meaning "young woman".
MOE (1)mEnglish
Short form of MAURICE or MORRIS, or sometimes of other names beginning with a similar sound.
NELLfEnglish
Medieval diminutive of names beginning with El, such as ELEANOR, ELLEN (1) or HELEN. It may have arisen from the medieval affectionate phrase mine El, which was later reinterpreted as my Nel.
NELLIEfEnglish
Diminutive of NELL.
NIKOmFinnish, Croatian, Slovene, Georgian, German
Finnish form of NICHOLAS, as well as a Croatian, Slovene, Georgian and German short form.
PAMELAfEnglish
This name was invented in the late 16th century by the poet Sir Philip Sidney for use in his poem 'Arcadia'. He possibly intended it to mean "all sweetness" from Greek παν (pan) "all" and μελι (meli) "honey". It was later employed by author Samuel Richardson for the heroine in his novel 'Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded' (1740), after which time it became used as a given name. It did not become popular until the 20th century.
PASHAmRussian
Diminutive of PAVEL.
PAULmEnglish, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Biblical
From the Roman family name Paulus, which meant "small" or "humble" in Latin. Paul was an important leader of the early Christian church. According to Acts in the New Testament, he was a Jewish Roman citizen who converted to Christianity after the resurrected Jesus appeared to him. After this he travelled the eastern Mediterranean as a missionary. His original Hebrew name was Saul. Many of the epistles in the New Testament were authored by him.... [more]
PEARLEfEnglish
Variant of PEARL.
PERCYmEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from the name of a Norman town Perci, which was itself perhaps derived from a Gaulish given name which was Latinized as Persius. The surname was borne by a noble English family, and it first used as a given name in their honour. A famous bearer was Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), an English romantic poet whose works include 'Adonais' and 'Ozymandias'. This name can also be used as a short form of PERCIVAL.
PIERREmFrench, Swedish
French form of PETER. This name was borne by Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919), a French impressionist painter, and by Pierre Curie (1859-1906), a physicist who discovered radioactivity with his wife Marie.
PINAfItalian
Short form of names ending in pina.
PIPERfEnglish (Modern)
From a surname which was originally given to a person who played on a pipe (a flute). It was popularized as a given name by a character from the television series 'Charmed', which debuted in 1998.
PIPPIN (1)mAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of PÉPIN.
RALPHmEnglish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Contracted form of the Old Norse name RÁÐÚLFR (or its Norman form Radulf). Scandinavian settlers introduced it to England before the Norman conquest, though afterwards it was bolstered by Norman influence. In the Middle Ages it was usually spelled Ralf, but by the 17th century it was most commonly Rafe, reflecting the normal pronunciation. The Ralph spelling appeared in the 18th century. A famous bearer of the name was Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American poet and author who wrote on transcendentalism.
RICHARDmEnglish, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave power", derived from the Germanic elements ric "power, rule" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, and it has been very common there since that time. It was borne by three kings of England including Richard I the Lionheart, one of the leaders of the Third Crusade in the 12th century.... [more]
RICKYmEnglish
Diminutive of RICHARD.
ROBBIEm & fEnglish
Diminutive of ROBERT or ROBERTA.
ROHAN (1)mIndian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Kannada
Derived from Sanskrit रोहण (rohana) meaning "ascending".
ROLANDmEnglish, French, German, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian, Medieval French
From the Germanic elements hrod meaning "fame" and landa meaning "land", though some theories hold that the second element was originally nand meaning "brave". Roland was a semi-legendary French hero whose story is told in the medieval epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which he is a nephew of Charlemagne killed in battle with the Saracens. The Normans introduced this name to England.
ROLFmGerman, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
From the Germanic name Hrolf (or its Old Norse cognate Hrólfr), a contracted form of Hrodulf (see RUDOLF). The Normans introduced this name to England but it soon became rare. In the modern era it has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world as a German import.
RONNYmEnglish
Diminutive of RONALD.
ROSA (1)fSpanish, Italian, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Generally this can be considered a Latin form of ROSE, though originally it may have come from the Germanic name ROZA (2). This was the name of a 13th-century saint from Viterbo in Italy. In the English-speaking world it was first used in the 19th century. A famous bearer was civil rights activist Rosa Parks (1913-2005).
ROSEfEnglish, French
Originally a Norman form of a Germanic name, which was composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.
SALVATOREmItalian
Italian cognate of SALVADOR.
SERAfEnglish (Rare)
Either a variant of SARAH or a short form of SERAPHINA.
SHAD (1)mArabic
Means "happy" in Arabic.
SHIROmJapanese
Variant transcription of SHIROU.
SIMON (1)mEnglish, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From Σιμων (Simon), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name שִׁםְעוֹן (Shim'on) which meant "he has heard". This name is spelled Simeon, based on Greek Συμεων, in many translations of the Old Testament, where it is borne by the second son of Jacob. The New Testament spelling may show influence from the otherwise unrelated Greek name SIMON (2).... [more]
TALONmEnglish (Modern)
From the English meaning "talon, claw", ultimately derived (via Norman French) from Latin talus "anklebone".
TEDDYmEnglish
Diminutive of EDWARD or THEODORE.
TELMAfPortuguese
Either a Portuguese form of THELMA or a feminine form of TELMO.
TERAfEnglish
Variant of TARA (1).
THOMASmEnglish, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Greek form of the Aramaic name תָּאוֹמָא (Ta'oma') which meant "twin". In the New Testament this is the name of an apostle. When he heard that Jesus had risen from the dead he initially doubted the story, until Jesus appeared before him and he examined his wounds himself. According to tradition he was martyred in India. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world.... [more]
TINAfEnglish, Italian, Dutch, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian
Short form of CHRISTINA, MARTINA, and other names ending in tina. In addition to these names, it is also used in Dutch as a diminutive of CATHARINA and in Croatian as a diminutive of KATARINA.
TOMA (1)fRussian
Diminutive of TAMARA.
VERA (1)fRussian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Georgian
Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.
VERONAfVarious
From the name of the city in Italy, which is itself of unknown meaning.
VICTORIAfEnglish, Spanish, Romanian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Means "victory" in Latin, being borne by the Roman goddess of victory. It is also a feminine form of VICTORIUS. This name was borne by a 4th-century saint and martyr from North Africa.... [more]
WALTONmEnglish
From a surname which was originally taken from various Old English place names meaning "stream town", "wood town", or "wall town".
WILLImGerman
Diminutive of WILHELM.
ZELDA (2)fEnglish
Short form of GRISELDA.
ZORAfCzech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
From a South and West Slavic word meaning "dawn, aurora".
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