Names Categorized "tolkien characters"

This is a list of names in which the categories include tolkien characters.
Filter Results       more options...
ADALBERTmAncient Germanic, German, Polish
Old Germanic form of ALBERT. This is the name of a patron saint of Bohemia, Poland and Prussia.
AMETHYSTfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the purple semi-precious stone, which is derived from the Greek negative prefix α (a) and μεθυστος (methystos) meaning "intoxicated, drunk", as it was believed to be a remedy against drunkenness.
ANGELICAfEnglish, Italian, Romanian, Literature
Derived from Latin angelicus meaning "angelic", ultimately related to Greek αγγελος (angelos) "messenger". The poets Boiardo and Ariosto used this name in their 'Orlando' poems (1495 and 1532), where it belongs to Orlando's love interest. It has been used as a given name since the 18th century.
ANSONmEnglish
From a surname meaning "son of AGNES".
ARAGORNmLiterature
Meaning unexplained, though the first element is presumably Sindarin ara "noble, kingly". This is the name of a character in 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien. In the book Aragorn is the heir of the Dúnedain kings of the north.
ARWENfLiterature
Means "noble maiden" in Sindarin. In 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Arwen was the daughter of Elrond and the lover of Aragorn.
BÅRDmNorwegian
Norwegian form of the Old Norse name Bárðr, which was derived from the elements baðu "battle" and friðr "peace".
BERTmEnglish, German, Dutch
Short form of ALBERT and other names containing the element bert, often derived from the Germanic element beraht meaning "bright".
BILBOmLiterature
This was the name of the hero of 'The Hobbit' (1937) by J. R. R. Tolkien. His real hobbit name was Bilba, which is of unknown meaning, but this was altered by Tolkien in order to use the more masculine o ending. In the novel Bilbo Baggins was recruited by the wizard Gandalf to join the quest to retake Mount Erebor from the dragon Smaug.
BILLmEnglish
Short form of WILLIAM. This spelling was first used in the 19th century. The change in the initial consonant may have been influenced by an earlier Irish pronunciation of the name. Famous bearers include basketball player Bill Russell (1934-), comedian Bill Cosby (1937-), American president Bill Clinton (1946-), and Microsoft founder Bill Gates (1955-).
BOBmEnglish, Dutch
Short form of ROBERT. It arose later than Dob, Hob and Nob, which were medieval rhyming nicknames of Robert. It was borne by the character Bob Cratchit in Charles Dickens' novel 'A Christmas Carol' (1843). Other famous bearers include American folk musician Bob Dylan (1941-) and Jamaican reggae musician Bob Marley (1945-1981).
BORmSlovene
Short form of names containing bor, such as BORISLAV or BORIS. It is also a South Slavic word meaning "pine tree".
BRANDmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname, a variant of BRANT.
BRUNOmGerman, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Croatian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element brun "armour, protection" or brun "brown". Saint Bruno of Cologne was a German monk of the 11th century who founded the Carthusian Order. The surname has belonged Giordano Bruno, a philosopher burned at the stake by the Inquisition.
CAMELLIAfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the flowering shrub, which was named for the botanist and missionary Georg Josef Kamel.
CARLmGerman, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
German form of CHARLES. Two noteworthy bearers of the name were the German mathematician Carl Gauss (1777-1855), who made contributions to number theory and algebra as well as physics and astronomy, and the Swiss psychologist Carl Jung (1875-1961), who founded analytical psychology. It was imported to America in the 19th century by German immigrants.
CELANDINEfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which derives from Greek χελιδων (chelidon) "swallow (bird)".
CHICAfPortuguese
Diminutive of FRANCISCA.
DAISYfEnglish
Simply from the English word for the white flower, ultimately derived from Old English dægeseage meaning "day eye". It was first used as a given name in the 19th century, at the same time many other plant and flower names were coined.
DIAMONDfEnglish (Modern)
From the English word diamond for the clear colourless precious stone, the birthstone of April. It is derived from Late Latin diamas, from Latin adamas, which is of Greek origin meaning "invincible, untamed".
DINA (1)fEnglish, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Variant of DINAH, and also the form used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
DORImHebrew
Means "my generation" in Hebrew.
DROGOmEnglish (Archaic)
Norman name, possibly derived from Gothic dragen "to carry" or Saxon drog "ghost". Alternatively, it could be from the Slavic element dragu "precious, dear". The Normans introduced this name to England.
EGLANTINEfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for the flower also known as sweetbrier. It was first used as a given name (in the form Eglentyne) in Geoffrey Chaucer's 14th-century story 'The Prioress's Tale'.
ELANORfLiterature
Means "star sun" in Sindarin. In 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien this is Sam's eldest daughter, named after a type of flower.
ELRONDmLiterature
Means "star dome" in Sindarin. In 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Elrond was the elven ruler of Rivendell.
ÉOWYNfLiterature
Means "horse joy" in Old English. This name was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien who used Old English to represent the Rohirric language. In his novel 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) Eowyn is the niece of King Theoden of Rohan. She slays the Lord of the Nazgul in the Battle of the Pelennor Fields.
ERLINGmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
Means "descendant of the jarl", a derivative of the Old Norse word jarl meaning "chieftain, nobleman, earl".
ESMERALDAfSpanish, Portuguese, English, Literature
Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since that time.
ESTELLAfEnglish
Latinate form of ESTELLE. This was the name of the heroine, Estella Havisham, in Charles Dickens' novel 'Great Expectations' (1860).
EVERARDmEnglish (Rare)
Means "brave boar", derived from the Germanic elements ebur "wild boar" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced it to England, where it joined the Old English cognate Eoforheard. It has only been rarely used since the Middle Ages. Modern use of the name may be inspired by the surname Everard, itself derived from the medieval name.
FERDINANDmGerman, French, Dutch, English, Czech, Slovene, Ancient Germanic
From Ferdinando, the old Spanish form of a Germanic name composed of the elements fardi "journey" and nand "daring, brave". The Visigoths brought the name to the Iberian Peninsula, where it entered into the royal families of Spain and Portugal. From there it became common among the Habsburg royal family of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria, starting with the Spanish-born Ferdinand I in the 16th century. A notable bearer was Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan (1480-1521), called Fernão de Magalhães in Portuguese, who was the leader of the first expedition to sail around the earth.
FILIBERTmGerman (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Means "much brightness" from the Germanic elements filu "much" and beraht "bright".
FRODOmLiterature
Derived from the Germanic element frod "wise". This was the name of the hobbit hero in 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien, who used Old English to translate some hobbit names (Frodo's real name was Maura). In the novel Frodo Baggins was the bearer of the One Ring on the quest to destroy it in Mount Doom.
GALADRIELfLiterature
Means "maiden crowned with a radiant garland" in Sindarin. Galadriel was a Noldorin elf princess renowned for her beauty and wisdom in J. R. R. Tolkien's novels. The elements are galad "radiant" and riel "garlanded maiden". Alatáriel is the Quenya form of her name.
GAMILmArabic (Egyptian)
Egyptian transcription of JAMIL.
GANDALFmNorse Mythology, Literature
Means "wand elf" in Old Norse, from the elements gandr "wand, staff, cane" and álfr "elf". This name belongs to a dwarf in the 'Völuspá', a 13th-century Scandinavian manuscript which forms part of the Poetic Edda. The author J. R. R. Tolkien borrowed the name for a wizard in his novels 'The Hobbit' (1937) and 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954).
GERDA (1)fGerman, Dutch
Feminine form of GERD (1).
GERONTIUSmLate Roman
From a Late Latin name which was derived from Greek γερων (geron) "old man".
HARDINGmEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from the Old English given name HEARD. A famous bearer of the surname was American president Warren G. Harding (1865-1923).
HARRYmEnglish
Medieval English form of HENRY. In modern times it is used as a diminutive of both Henry and HAROLD. A famous bearer was American president Harry S. Truman (1884-1972). It is also the name of the boy wizard in J. K. Rowling's 'Harry Potter' series of books, first released in 1997.
HILDAfEnglish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element hild "battle". The short form was used for both Old English and continental Germanic names. Saint Hilda of Whitby was a 7th-century English saint and abbess. The name became rare in England during the later Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century.
HOBmMedieval English
Medieval short form of ROBERT.
HUANf & mChinese
From Chinese (huān) meaning "happy, pleased", as well as other characters pronounced in a similar way.
HUGOmSpanish, Portuguese, English, Dutch, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of HUGH. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.
IDRILfLiterature
Means "sparkle brilliance" in Sindarin. In the 'Silmarillion' (1977) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Idril was the daughter of Turgon, the king of Gondolin. She escaped the destruction of that place with her husband Tuor and sailed with him into the west.
IVYfEnglish
From the English word for the climbing plant that has small yellow flowers. It is ultimately derived from Old English ifig.
JAGOmCornish
Cornish form of JACOB.
JESSAMINEfEnglish (Rare)
From a variant spelling of the English word jasmine (see JASMINE), used also to refer to flowering plants in the cestrum family.
LAURAfEnglish, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.... [more]
LAVENDERfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for the aromatic flower or the pale purple colour.
LEGOLASmLiterature
Means "green leaves" in Sindarin, from laeg "green" combined with go-lass "collection of leaves". In 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Legolas is the son of the elf lord Thranduil and a member of the Fellowship of the Ring.
LILYfEnglish
From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.
MADOCmWelsh
Possibly derived from Welsh mad "fortunate" combined with a diminutive suffix.
MARIGOLDfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which comes from a combination of MARY and the English word gold.
MATmEnglish
Short form of MATTHEW.
MAYfEnglish
Derived from the name of the month of May, which derives from Maia, the name of a Roman goddess. May is also another name of the hawthorn flower. It is also used as a diminutive of MARY, MARGARET or MABEL.
MERRY (2)mLiterature
The name of a hobbit in J. R. R. Tolkien's novel 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954). His full given name was Meriadoc, a semi-translation into English of his true hobbit name Kalimac meaning "jolly, merry".
MILOmEnglish, Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of MILES, as well as the Latinized form. This form of the name was used in official documents during the Middle Ages, and it has been used independently since the 19th century.
MIRABELLAfItalian
Latinate form of MIRABELLE.
MUNGOmScottish
Possibly derived from Welsh mwyn "gentle, kind". This was a nickname of the 6th-century Saint Kentigern.
MYRTLEfEnglish
Simply from the English word myrtle for the evergreen shrub, ultimately from Greek μυρτος (myrtos). It was first used as a given name in the 19th century, at the same time many other plant and flower names were coined.
NESSA (1)fEnglish
Short form of VANESSA and other names ending in nessa.
NINA (1)fRussian, Italian, English, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, Polish, Slovene, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian
Short form of names that end in nina, such as ANTONINA or GIANNINA. It was imported to Western Europe from Russia and Italy in the 19th century. This name also nearly coincides with the Spanish word niña meaning "little girl".
NORAfIrish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Italian
Short form of HONORA or ELEANOR. Henrik Ibsen used it for a character in his play 'A Doll's House' (1879).
ODOmAncient Germanic
Variant of Audo (see OTTO).
ODOVACARmAncient Germanic
From the Germanic name Audovacar meaning "wealthy and vigilant", derived from the elements aud "wealth" and wacar "vigilant". Odovacar, also called Odoacer, was a 5th-century Gothic leader who overthrew the last Western Roman emperor and became the first barbarian king of Italy.
ORIm & fHebrew
Means "my light" in Hebrew.
OTHOmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen of unknown meaning. This was the name of a short-lived 1st-century Roman emperor.
OTTOmGerman, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
Later German form of Audo or Odo, originally a short form of various names beginning with the Germanic element aud meaning "wealth, fortune". This was the name of four kings of Germany, starting in the 10th century with Otto I, the first Holy Roman emperor, who was known as Otto the Great. This name was also borne by a 19th-century king of Greece who was originally from Bavaria. Another notable bearer was the German chancellor Otto von Bismarck (1815-1898).
PANSYfEnglish
From the English word for a type of flower, ultimately deriving from Old French pensee "thought".
PEARLfEnglish
From the English word pearl for the concretions formed in the shells of some mollusks, ultimately from Late Latin perla. Like other gemstone names, it has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. The pearl is the birthstone for June, and it supposedly imparts health and wealth.
PEONYfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for the type of flower. It was originally believed to have healing qualities, so it was named after the Greek medical god Pæon.
PIPPIN (2)mLiterature
The name of a hobbit in 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien. His full given name was Peregrin, a semi-translation into English of his true hobbit name Razanur meaning "traveller".
POPPYfEnglish (British)
From the word for the red flower, derived from Old English popæg.
PRIMROSEfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for the flower, ultimately deriving from Latin prima rosa "first rose".
PRIMULAfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of a genus of several species of flowers, including the primrose. It is derived from the Latin word primulus meaning "very first".
PRISCAfBiblical, Dutch, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin
Feminine form of Priscus, a Roman family name which meant "ancient" in Latin. This name appears in the epistles in the New Testament, referring to Priscilla the wife of Aquila.
RÍANmIrish
Irish name (see RYAN).
ROBINm & fEnglish, Dutch, Swedish
Medieval diminutive of ROBERT. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor. In modern times it has also been used as a feminine name, and it may sometimes be given in reference to the red-breasted bird.
ROHAN (2)fLiterature
From the novel 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien, where it is a place name meaning "horse country" in Sindarin.
ROLLOmEnglish
Latinized form of Roul, the Old French form of ROLF. Rollo (or Rolf) the Ganger was an exiled Viking who, in the 10th century, became the first Duke of Normandy. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century.
ROSA (1)fSpanish, Italian, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Generally this can be considered a Latin form of ROSE, though originally it may have come from the Germanic name ROZA (2). This was the name of a 13th-century saint from Viterbo in Italy. In the English-speaking world it was first used in the 19th century. A famous bearer was civil rights activist Rosa Parks (1913-2005).
ROSEfEnglish, French
Originally a Norman form of a Germanic name, which was composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.
ROSIEfEnglish
Diminutive of ROSE.
ROWANm & fIrish, English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.
RUBYfEnglish
Simply from the name of the precious stone (which ultimately derives from Latin ruber "red"), which is the birthstone of July. It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
RUDOLPHmEnglish
English form of RUDOLF, imported from Germany in the 19th century. Robert L. May used it in 1939 for his Christmas character Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.
RUFUSmAncient Roman, English, Biblical
Roman cognomen which meant "red-haired" in Latin. Several early saints had this name, including one mentioned in one of Paul's epistles in the New Testament. As a nickname it was used by William II Rufus, a king of England, because of his red hair. It came into general use in the English-speaking world after the Protestant Reformation.
SAM (3)mLiterature
The name of a hobbit in J. R. R. Tolkien's novel 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954). His full given name was Samwise meaning "half wise" in Old English (the language used by Tolkien to represent the old hobbit speech).
SANCHOmSpanish, Portuguese
Possibly a Spanish and Portuguese form of the Late Latin name Sanctius, which was derived from the word sanctus meaning "saintly, holy". Alternatively, Sancho and Sanctius may be derived from an older Iberian name. This was the name of a 9th-century saint who was martyred by the Moors at Cordoba. It was also borne by several Spanish and Portuguese kings. Miguel de Cervantes used it in his novel 'Don Quixote' (1605), where it belongs to the squire of Don Quixote.
SAPPHIRAfBiblical
From the Greek name Σαπφειρη (Sappheire), which was from Greek σαπφειρος (sappheiros) meaning "sapphire" or "lapis lazuli" (ultimately derived from the Hebrew word סַפִּיר (sappir)). Sapphira is a character in Acts in the New Testament who is killed by God for lying.
TATAmAnglo-Saxon
Old English name of unknown meaning.
TEDmEnglish
Short form of EDWARD or THEODORE. A famous bearer was the American baseball player Ted Williams (1918-2002), who was born as Theodore.
THEOBALDmEnglish (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements theud "people" and bald "bold". The Normans brought the name to England, where it joined an existing Old English cognate. The medieval forms Tibald and Tebald were commonly Latinized as Theobaldus. It was rare by the 20th century.
TOM (1)mEnglish, Dutch, German, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Short form of THOMAS. Tom Sawyer was the main character in several of Mark Twain's novels, first appearing in 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer' (1876). Other famous bearers include American actors Tom Hanks (1956-) and Tom Cruise (1962-).
TUORmLiterature
Means "strength vigour" in Sindarin. In the 'Silmarillion' (1977) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Tuor was the mortal man who came to the hidden city of Gondolin to warn of its imminent doom. When Gondolin was attacked and destroyed he escaped with his wife Idril and son Eärendil, and sailed into the west.
TURINmLiterature
Means "victory mood" in Sindarin. In the 'Silmarillion' (1977) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Turin was a cursed hero, the slayer of the dragon Glaurung. He was also called Turambar, Mormegil, and other names. This is also the Anglicized name of the city of Torino in Italy.
VANAfMacedonian
Short form of IVANA or JOVANA.
VARDAfHebrew
Diminutive of VERED.
WILLmEnglish
Short form of WILLIAM or other names beginning with Will. A famous bearer is American actor Will Smith (1968-), whose full name is Willard.
WILLIAMmEnglish
From the Germanic name Willahelm, which was composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". Saint William of Gellone was an 8th-century cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England in the 11th century. It was later borne by three other English kings, as well as rulers of Scotland, Sicily (of Norman origin), the Netherlands and Prussia.... [more]
WILLIEm & fEnglish
Masculine or feminine diminutive of WILLIAM. A notable bearer is the retired American baseball player Willie Mays (1931-).
WULFmGerman
Variant of WOLF.