Names Categorized "unisex"

This is a list of names in which the categories include unisex.
Filter Results       more options...
AILBHE   f & m   Irish
Possibly derived from the old Gaelic root albho meaning "white". In Irish legend this was the name of a female warrior of the Fianna. It was also the name of a 6th-century masculine saint.
ALEXIS   m & f   German, French, English, Greek, Ancient Greek
From the Greek name Αλεξις (Alexis), which meant "helper" or "defender", derived from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, to help". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek comic poet, and also of several saints. It is used somewhat interchangeably with the related name Αλεξιος or Alexius, borne by five Byzantine emperors. In the English-speaking world it is more commonly used as a feminine name.
AMOR   m & f   Roman Mythology, Late Roman, Spanish, Portuguese
Means "love" in Latin. This was another name for the Roman god Cupid. It also means "love" in Spanish and Portuguese, and the name can be derived directly from this vocabulary word.
ANGEL   m & f   English, Bulgarian, Macedonian
From the medieval Latin masculine name Angelus which was derived from the name of the heavenly creature (itself derived from the Greek word αγγελος (angelos) meaning "messenger"). It has never been very common in the English-speaking world, where it is sometimes used as a feminine name in modern times.
ARLIE   f & m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "eagle wood" in Old English. This name can also be a diminutive of ARLENE.
ARYA   m & f   Persian, Indian, Hindi, Malayalam
From an old Indo-Iranian root meaning "Aryan, noble". In India, this is a transcription of both the masculine form आर्य and the feminine form आर्या. In Iran it is only a masculine name.
BAILEY   m & f   English
From a surname derived from Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", originally denoting one who was a bailiff.
BERLIN   f   Various
From the name of the city in Germany, which is of uncertain meaning.
BLAIR   m & f   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname which is derived from Gaelic blár meaning "plain, field, battlefield".
BRETT   m & f   English
From a Middle English surname meaning "a Breton", referring to an inhabitant of Brittany. A famous bearer is the American football quarterback Brett Favre (1969-).
BRIAR   m & f   English (Rare)
From the English word for the thorny plant.
BRYN   m & f   Welsh, English
Means "hill, mound" in Welsh. It is now used as a feminine name as well.
CADENCE   f   English (Modern)
From an English word meaning "rhythm, flow". It has been in use only since the 20th century.
CAMERON   m & f   English
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked nose" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and sròn "nose".
CAMILLE   f & m   French, English
French feminine and masculine form of CAMILLA. It is also used in the English-speaking world, where it is generally only feminine.
CHANDA   m & f   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi
Means "fierce, hot, passionate" in Sanskrit. This is a transcription of both the masculine form चण्ड and the feminine form चण्डा (an epithet of the Hindu goddess Durga).
CHANDRA   m & f   Hinduism, Bengali, Indian, Assamese, Hindi, Marathi, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Nepali
Means "moon" in Sanskrit, derived from चन्द (chand) meaning "to shine". This is a transcription of the masculine form चण्ड (a name of the moon in Hindu texts which is often personified as a deity) as well as the feminine form चण्डा.
CHRIS   m & f   English, Dutch
Short form of CHRISTOPHER, CHRISTIAN, CHRISTINE, and other names that begin with Chris.
CLAIR   m   French, English
French form of Clarus (see CLARA).
COLUMBA   m & f   Late Roman
Late Latin name meaning "dove". The dove is a symbol of the Holy Spirit in Christianity. This was the name of several early saints both masculine and feminine, most notably the 6th-century Irish monk Saint Columba (or Colum) who established a monastery on the island of Iona off the coast of Scotland. He is credited with the conversion of Scotland to Christianity.
CYAN   f & m   English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "greenish blue", ultimately derived from Greek κυανος (kyanos).
DAKOTA   m & f   English (Modern)
Means "allies, friends" in the Dakota language. This is the name of a Native American people of the northern Mississippi valley.
DARBY   m & f   English
From an English surname, which was derived from the name of the town of Derby, meaning "deer town" in Old Norse.
DARCY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Norman French d'Arcy, originally denoting one who came from Arcy in France. This was the surname of a character in Jane Austen's novel 'Pride and Prejudice' (1813).
DELANEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname: either the English surname DELANEY (1) or the Irish surname DELANEY (2).
EDEN   f & m   Hebrew, English (Modern)
Means "place of pleasure" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament the Garden of Eden was the place where the first people, Adam and Eve, lived before they were expelled.
ENNIS   f & m   Irish
From the name of a town in Ireland.
FALLON   f   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Fallamhain meaning "descendant of Fallamhan". The given name Fallamhan meant "leader". It was popularized in the 1980s by a character on the soap opera 'Dynasty'.
FERGIE   m & f   Scottish
Diminutive and feminine form of FERGUS.
FRANCIS   m & f   English, French
English form of the Late Latin name Franciscus which meant "Frenchman", ultimately from the Germanic tribe of the Franks, who were named for a type of spear that they used. This name was borne by the 13th-century Saint Francis of Assisi, who was originally named Giovanni but was given the nickname Francesco by his father, an admirer of the French. Francis went on to renounce his father's wealth and devote his life to the poor, founding the Franciscan order of friars. Later in his life he apparently received the stigmata.... [more]
GUL   m & f   Urdu, Pashto
Means "flower, rose" in Urdu and Pashto, ultimately from Persian.
HADLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a place name meaning "heather field" in Old English.
HARPER   f & m   English
From an Old English surname which originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps. A notable bearer was the American author Harper Lee (1926-2016), who wrote 'To Kill a Mockingbird'.
HAYDEN   m & f   English
From an English surname which was derived from place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
INGE   f & m   Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, German, Dutch
Short form of Scandinavian and German names beginning with the element ing, which refers to the Germanic god ING. In Sweden and Norway this is primarily a masculine name, elsewhere it is usually feminine.
JADEN   m & f   English (Modern)
An invented name, using the popular aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden, Hayden and Aidan. This name first became common in American in the 1990s when similar-sounding names were increasing in popularity. It is sometimes considered a variant of JADON.
JAYDEN   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of JADEN.
KELLY   m & f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of the Irish given name CEALLACH or the surname derived from it Ó Ceallaigh. As a surname, it has been borne by actor and dancer Gene Kelly (1912-1996) and actress and princess Grace Kelly (1929-1982).
LARK   f   English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of songbird.
LAUREN   f & m   English
Variant or feminine form of LAURENCE (1). Originally a masculine name, it was first popularized as a feminine name by actress Betty Jean Perske (1924-), who used Lauren Bacall as her stage name.
LESLIE   f & m   English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from a Scottish place name, probably derived from Gaelic leas celyn meaning "garden of holly". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century. In America it was more common as a feminine name after the 1940s.
LONDON   f & m   English (Modern)
From the name of the capital city of the United Kingdom, the meaning of which is uncertain. As a surname it was borne by the American author Jack London (1876-1916).
LOREN   m & f   English
Either a short form of LAURENCE (1) (masculine) or a variant of LAUREN (feminine).
LUCE   f   Italian, French
Italian and French variant of LUCIA. This also means "light" in Italian.
LYRIC   f   English (Modern)
Means simply "lyric, songlike" from the English word, ultimately derived from Greek λυρικος (lyrikos).
MAHLAH   f & m   Biblical
From the Hebrew name מַחְלָה (Machlah), possibly from חָלָה (chalah) meaning "weak" or "sick". This name is used in the Old Testament as both a feminine and masculine name. In some versions of the Bible the masculine name is spelled Mahalah.
MARLEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was taken from a place name meaning either "pleasant wood", "boundary wood" or "marten wood" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the Jamaican musician Bob Marley (1945-1981).
MERLE   f & m   English
Variant of MERRILL or MURIEL. The spelling has been influenced by the word merle meaning "blackbird" (via French, from Latin merula).
MICKEY   m & f   English
Diminutive or feminine form of MICHAEL. This was the name that Walt Disney gave to Ub Iwerks' cartoon character Mickey Mouse, who was originally named Mortimer Mouse. Another famous bearer was the American baseball player Mickey Mantle (1931-1995).
MONET   f & m   Various
From a French surname which was derived from either HAMON or EDMOND. This was the surname of the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
PHOENIX   m & f   English (Modern)
From the name of a beautiful immortal bird which appears in Egyptian and Greek mythology. After living for several centuries in the Arabian Desert, it would be consumed by fire and rise from its own ashes, with this cycle repeating every 500 years. The name of the bird was derived from Greek φοινιξ (phoinix) meaning "dark red".
REGAN   f   English
Meaning unknown, probably of Celtic origin. Shakespeare took the name from earlier British legends and used it in his tragedy 'King Lear' (1606) for a treacherous daughter of the king. In the modern era it has appeared in the horror movie 'The Exorcist' (1973) belonging to a girl possessed by the devil. This name can also be used as a variant of REAGAN.
REILLY   m & f   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname which was derived from the given name Raghailleach, meaning unknown.
RILEY   m & f   English
From a surname which comes from two distinct sources. As an Irish surname it is a variant of REILLY. As an English surname it is derived from a place name meaning "rye clearing" in Old English.
ROWAN   m & f   Irish, English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.
RYLEE   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of RILEY.
SAGE   f & m   English (Modern)
From the English word sage, which denotes either a type of spice or else a wise person.
SAL   f & m   English
Short form of SALLY, SALVADOR, and other names beginning with Sal.
SASCHA   m & f   German
German form of SASHA.
SASHA   m & f   Russian, Ukrainian, English, French
Russian and Ukrainian diminutive of ALEKSANDR or ALEKSANDRA.
SKY   f   English (Modern)
Simply from the English word sky, which was ultimately derived from Old Norse sky "cloud".
SKYE   f   English (Modern)
From the name of the Isle of Skye off the west coast of Scotland. It is sometimes considered a variant of SKY.
SLOAN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of SLOANE.
SLOANE   f   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from an Anglicized form of the given name SLUAGHADHÁN.
TATUM   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "Tata's homestead" in Old English.
TAYLOR   m & f   English
From an English surname which originally denoted someone who was a tailor, from Norman French tailleur, ultimately from Latin taliare "to cut". Its modern use as a feminine name may have been influenced by British author Taylor Caldwell (1900-1985).
TIERNEY   m & f   Irish, English (Rare)
Anglicized form of TIGHEARNACH. In part, it is from a surname derived from the given name.
VAL   m & f   English
Short form of VALENTINE (1), VALERIE, and other names beginning with Val.
WREN   f   English (Rare)
From the English word for the small songbird. It is ultimately derived from Old English wrenna.
70 results