Names Categorized "unisex"

This is a list of names in which the categories include unisex.
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ACE (1)   m   English
From the English word meaning "highest rank". More commonly a nickname, it is occasionally used as a given name.
AGRIPPA   m & f   Ancient Roman, Biblical
Roman cognomen of unknown meaning, possibly from Greek αγριος (agrios) "wild" and ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse" or possibly of Etruscan origin. It was also used as a praenomen, or given name, by the Furia and Menenia families. In the New Testament this name was borne by Herod Agrippa (a grandson of Herod the Great), the king of Israel who put the apostle James to death. It was also borne by the 1st-century BC Roman general Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa.
AILBHE   f & m   Irish
Possibly derived from the old Gaelic root albho meaning "white". In Irish legend this was the name of a female warrior of the Fianna. It was also the name of a 6th-century masculine saint.
AINSLEY   f & m   Scottish, English (Modern)
From a surname which was from a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".
AKIRA   m & f   Japanese
From Japanese (akira) meaning "bright", (akira) meaning "bright" or (akira) meaning "clear". Other kanji with the same pronunciation can also form this name.
AL   m   English
Short form of ALBERT and other names beginning with Al. A notable bearer is American actor Al Pacino (1940-).
ALEX   m & f   English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Russian
Short form of ALEXANDER, ALEXANDRA, and other names beginning with Alex.
ALEXIS   m & f   German, French, English, Greek, Ancient Greek
From the Greek name Αλεξις (Alexis), which meant "helper" or "defender", derived from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, to help". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek comic poet, and also of several saints. It is used somewhat interchangeably with the related name Αλεξιος or Alexius, borne by five Byzantine emperors. In the English-speaking world it is more commonly used as a feminine name.
ALIX   f   French
Medieval French variant of ALICE.
ALLIE   f   English
Diminutive of ALISON, ALEXANDRA or other names beginning with the same sound.
ALLY (1)   f   English
Diminutive of ALISON, ALEXANDRA or other names beginning with the same sound.
ALPHA   f & m   English
From the name of the first letter in the Greek alphabet, Α.
ALYX   f   English (Rare)
Feminine variant of ALEX.
AMOR   m & f   Roman Mythology, Late Roman, Spanish, Portuguese
Means "love" in Latin. This was another name for the Roman god Cupid. It also means "love" in Spanish and Portuguese, and the name can be derived directly from this vocabulary word.
ANAT (2)   f & m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Original Hebrew form of ANATH (1). In modern times it is often used as a feminine name.
ANGEL   m & f   English, Bulgarian, Macedonian
From the medieval Latin masculine name Angelus which was derived from the name of the heavenly creature (itself derived from the Greek word αγγελος (angelos) meaning "messenger"). It has never been very common in the English-speaking world, where it is sometimes used as a feminine name in modern times.
ANNE (2)   m & f   Frisian
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element arn "eagle".
AQUILA   m & f   Biblical, Ancient Roman
From a Roman cognomen which meant "eagle" in Latin. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lives with Aquila and his wife Priscilla (or Prisca) for a time.
ARDEN   m & f   English
From an English surname, originally taken from various place names, which were derived from a Celtic word meaning "high".
ARLIE   f & m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "eagle wood" in Old English. This name can also be a diminutive of ARLENE.
ARYA   m & f   Persian, Indian, Hindi, Malayalam
From an old Indo-Iranian root meaning "Aryan, noble". In India, this is a transcription of both the masculine form आर्य and the feminine form आर्या. In Iran it is only a masculine name.
ASPEN   f   English (Modern)
From the English word for the tree, derived from Old English æspe. It is also the name of a ski resort in Colorado.
ASUN   f   Spanish
Short form of ASUNCIÓN.
ASUNCIÓN   f   Spanish
Means "assumption" in Spanish. This name is given in reference to the assumption of the Virgin Mary into heaven.
ATIYA   m & f   Arabic
Means "gift" in Arabic.
AUBREY   m & f   English
Norman French form of the Germanic name ALBERICH. As an English masculine name it was common in the Middle Ages, and was revived in the 19th century. Since the mid-1970s it has more frequently been given to girls, due to Bread's 1972 song 'Aubrey' along with its similarity to the established feminine name Audrey.
AVERY   m & f   English
From a surname which was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.
AZAR   f & m   Persian
Means "fire" in Persian.
AZURE   f   English (Rare)
From the English word that means "sky blue". It is ultimately (via Old French, Latin and Arabic) from Persian لاجورد (lajvard) meaning "azure, lapis lazuli".
BAILEY   m & f   English
From a surname derived from Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", originally denoting one who was a bailiff.
BEE   f   English
Short form of BEATRIX and other names beginning with B.
BERLIN   f   Various
From the name of the city in Germany, which is of uncertain meaning.
BLAIR   m & f   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname which is derived from Gaelic blár meaning "plain, field, battlefield".
BLAKE   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English blæc "black" or blac "pale". A famous bearer of the surname was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).
BLYTHE   f & m   English (Rare)
From a surname which meant "cheerful" in Old English.
BO (2)   m & f   Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "wave", as well as other characters with a similar pronunciation.
BRAELYN   f   English (Modern)
A recently created name, formed using the popular name suffix lyn.
BRETT   m & f   English
From a Middle English surname meaning "a Breton", referring to an inhabitant of Brittany. A famous bearer is the American football quarterback Brett Favre (1969-).
BRIAR   m & f   English (Rare)
From the English word for the thorny plant.
BRITTON   m   English
Derived from a Middle English surname meaning "a Briton" (a Celt of England) or "a Breton" (an inhabitant of Brittany).
BROOKLYN   f   English (Modern)
From the name of the borough of New York City, originally derived from Dutch Breukelen meaning "broken land". It can also be viewed as a combination of BROOK and the popular name suffix lyn.
BRYN   m & f   Welsh, English
Means "hill, mound" in Welsh. It is now used as a feminine name as well.
BUNNY   f   English
Diminutive of BERENICE.
CADENCE   f   English (Modern)
From an English word meaning "rhythm, flow". It has been in use only since the 20th century.
CAELAN   m & f   English (Rare)
Anglicized form of CAOLÁN or CAOILFHIONN.
CAMERON   m & f   English
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked nose" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and sròn "nose".
CAMILLE   f & m   French, English
French feminine and masculine form of CAMILLA. It is also used in the English-speaking world, where it is generally only feminine.
CAROL (1)   f & m   English
Short form of CAROLINE. It was formerly a masculine name, derived from CAROLUS. The name can also be given in reference to the English vocabulary word, which means "song" or "hymn".
CASEY   m & f   English, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cathasaigh meaning "descendant of CATHASACH". This name can be given in honour of Casey Jones (1863-1900), a train engineer who sacrificed his life to save his passengers. In his case, Casey was a nickname acquired because he was raised in the town of Cayce, Kentucky.
CASSIDY   f & m   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Caiside meaning "descendant of CAISIDE".
CAT   f & m   English
Diminutive of CATHERINE. It can also be a nickname from the English word for the animal.
CHANDA   m & f   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi
Means "fierce, hot, passionate" in Sanskrit. This is a transcription of both the masculine form चण्ड and the feminine form चण्डा (an epithet of the Hindu goddess Durga).
CHANDRA   m & f   Hinduism, Bengali, Indian, Assamese, Hindi, Marathi, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Nepali
Means "moon" in Sanskrit, derived from चन्द (chand) meaning "to shine". This is a transcription of the masculine form चण्ड (a name of the moon in Hindu texts which is often personified as a deity) as well as the feminine form चण्डा.
CHAO   m & f   Chinese
From Chinese (chāo) meaning "surpass, leap over" (which is usually only masculine), (cháo) meaning "tide, flow, damp", or other characters which are pronounced similarly.
CHARLIE   m & f   English
Diminutive or feminine form of CHARLES. A famous bearer is Charlie Brown, the main character in the comic strip 'Peanuts' by Charles Schulz.
CHEA   m & f   Khmer
Means "healthy" in Khmer.
CHRIS   m & f   English, Dutch
Short form of CHRISTOPHER, CHRISTIAN, CHRISTINE, and other names that begin with Chris.
CLAIRE   f   French, English
French form of CLARA.
CLARE   f   English
Medieval English form of CLARA. This is also the name of an Irish county, which was originally named for the Norman invader Richard de Clare (known as Strongbow), whose surname was derived from the name of an English river.
CODIE   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CODY.
CODY   m   English, Irish
From the Gaelic surname Ó Cuidighthigh, which means "descendant of CUIDIGHTHEACH". A famous bearer of the surname was the American frontiersman and showman Buffalo Bill Cody (1846-1917).
COLUMBA   m & f   Late Roman
Late Latin name meaning "dove". The dove is a symbol of the Holy Spirit in Christianity. This was the name of several early saints both masculine and feminine, most notably the 6th-century Irish monk Saint Columba (or Colum) who established a monastery on the island of Iona off the coast of Scotland. He is credited with the conversion of Scotland to Christianity.
CONNIE   f & m   English
Diminutive of CONSTANCE and other names beginning with Con. It is occasionally a masculine name, a diminutive of CORNELIUS or CONRAD.
CORI   f   English
Feminine form of COREY.
CORIE   f   English
Variant of CORRIE.
CORRIE   f   English, Dutch
Diminutive of CORINNA, CORA, CORNELIA and other names starting with Cor. Since the 1970s it has also been used as a feminine form of COREY.
COURTNEY   f & m   English
From an aristocratic English surname which was derived either from the French place name Courtenay (originally a derivative of the personal name Curtenus, itself derived from Latin curtus "short") or else from a Norman nickname meaning "short nose". As a feminine name in America, it first became popular during the 1970s.
CRUZ   f & m   Spanish, Portuguese
Means "cross" in Spanish or Portuguese, referring to the cross of the crucifixion.
CYAN   f & m   English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "greenish blue", ultimately derived from Greek κυανος (kyanos).
DAKOTA   m & f   English (Modern)
Means "allies, friends" in the Dakota language. This is the name of a Native American people of the northern Mississippi valley.
DALE   m & f   English
From an English surname which originally belonged to a person who lived near a dale or valley.
DANA (2)   m & f   English
From a surname which originally belonged to a person who was Danish. It was originally given in honour of American lawyer Richard Henry Dana (1815-1882), the author of 'Two Years Before the Mast'.
DANA (4)   m & f   Persian, Arabic
Means "wise" in Persian.
DANNIE   m   English
Diminutive of DANIEL.
DARA (2)   f & m   Khmer
Means "star" in Khmer, ultimately from Sanskrit.
DARBY   m & f   English
From an English surname, which was derived from the name of the town of Derby, meaning "deer town" in Old Norse.
DARCY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Norman French d'Arcy, originally denoting one who came from Arcy in France. This was the surname of a character in Jane Austen's novel 'Pride and Prejudice' (1813).
DELANEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname: either the English surname DELANEY (1) or the Irish surname DELANEY (2).
DIAN   m & f   Indonesian
Means "candle" in Indonesian.
DÎYAR   f & m   Kurdish
Means "gift" in Kurdish.
DREW   m   English
Short form of ANDREW.
DUYGU   m & f   Turkish
Means "emotion, sensation" in Turkish.
EDEN   f & m   Hebrew, English (Modern)
Means "place of pleasure" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament the Garden of Eden was the place where the first people, Adam and Eve, lived before they were expelled.
EMERY   m & f   English
Norman form of EMMERICH. The Normans introduced it to England, and though it was never popular, it survived until the end of the Middle Ages. As a modern given name, it is likely inspired by the surname Emery, which was itself derived from the medieval given name. It can also be given in reference to the hard black substance called emery.
EMORY   m   English
Variant of EMERY.
ENNIS   f & m   Irish
From the name of a town in Ireland.
FALLON   f   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Fallamhain meaning "descendant of Fallamhan". The given name Fallamhan meant "leader". It was popularized in the 1980s by a character on the soap opera 'Dynasty'.
FERGIE   m & f   Scottish
Diminutive and feminine form of FERGUS.
FINLEY   m & f   Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of FIONNLAGH.
FLORENCE   f & m   English, French
From the Latin name Florentius or the feminine form Florentia, which were derived from florens "prosperous, flourishing". Florentius was borne by many early Christian saints, and it was occasionally used in their honour through the Middle Ages. In modern times it is mostly feminine.... [more]
FORTUNE   f   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word fortune, ultimately from Latin fortuna, a derivative of fors "luck".
FRANCIS   m & f   English, French
English form of the Late Latin name Franciscus which meant "Frenchman", ultimately from the Germanic tribe of the Franks, who were named for a type of spear that they used. This name was borne by the 13th-century Saint Francis of Assisi, who was originally named Giovanni but was given the nickname Francesco by his father, an admirer of the French. Francis went on to renounce his father's wealth and devote his life to the poor, founding the Franciscan order of friars. Later in his life he apparently received the stigmata.... [more]
FU   m & f   Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "abundant, rich, wealthy", () meaning "hibiscus, lotus" or () meaning "begin, man, father", in addition to other characters with a similar pronunciation. A famous bearer was the 8th-century Tang dynasty poet Du Fu, whose given was .
GLAW   m & f   Welsh
Means "rain" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
GUL   m & f   Urdu, Pashto
Means "flower, rose" in Urdu and Pashto, ultimately from Persian.
HADLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a place name meaning "heather field" in Old English.
HADYN   m   English (Rare)
Variant of HAYDEN.
HAPPY   f & m   English (Rare)
From the English word happy.
HARPER   f & m   English
From an Old English surname which originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps. A notable bearer was the American author Harper Lee (1926-2016), who wrote 'To Kill a Mockingbird'.
HAVEN   f & m   English
From the English word for a safe place, derived ultimately from Old English hæfen.
HAYDEN   m & f   English
From an English surname which was derived from place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
HEAVEN   f   English (Modern)
From the English vocabulary word meaning "paradise".
HONOR   f   English (Rare)
Variant of HONOUR, using the American spelling.
HONOUR   f   English (Rare)
From the English word honour, which is of Latin origin. This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century. It can also be viewed as a form of HONORIA or HONORATA, which are ultimately derived from the same source.
HUNTER   m & f   English
From an occupational English surname for a hunter, derived from Old English hunta. A famous bearer was the eccentric American journalist Hunter S. Thompson (1937-2005).
IHAB   m & f   Arabic
Means "gift" in Arabic.
IMANI   f & m   Eastern African, Swahili, African American
Means "faith" in Swahili, ultimately of Arabic origin.
INDY   m   Popular Culture
Diminutive of INDIANA. This is the nickname of the hero of the 'Indiana Jones' movies, starring Harrison Ford.
INGE   f & m   Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, German, Dutch
Short form of Scandinavian and German names beginning with the element ing, which refers to the Germanic god ING. In Sweden and Norway this is primarily a masculine name, elsewhere it is usually feminine.
JACKI   f   English
Diminutive of JACQUELINE.
JACKIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of JACK or JACQUELINE. A notable bearer was baseball player Jackie Robinson (1919-1972), the first African-American to play in Major League Baseball.
JACKY   m   French
Diminutive of JACQUES.
JACQUI   f   English (British)
Short form of JACQUELINE.
JADE   f & m   English, French
From the name of the precious stone that is often used in carvings. It is derived from Spanish (piedra de la) ijada meaning "(stone of the) flank", relating to the belief that jade could cure renal colic. As a given name, it came into general use during the 1970s. It was initially unisex, though it is now mostly feminine.
JADEN   m & f   English (Modern)
An invented name, using the popular aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden, Hayden and Aidan. This name first became common in American in the 1990s when similar-sounding names were increasing in popularity. It is sometimes considered a variant of JADON.
JAEL   f   Biblical
From the Hebrew name יָעֵל (Ya'el) meaning "ibex, mountain goat". This name appears in the Old Testament belonging to the wife of Heber the Kenite. After Sisera, the captain of the Canaanite army, was defeated in battle by Deborah and Barak he took refuge in Heber's tent. When he fell asleep Jael killed him by hammering a tent peg into his head.
JAKI   f   English (Rare)
Diminutive of JACQUELINE.
JAMIE   m & f   Scottish, English
Originally a Lowland Scots diminutive of JAMES. Since the late 19th century it has also been used as a feminine form.
JAY (1)   m   English
Short form of names beginning with the sound J, such as JAMES or JASON. It was originally used in America in honour of founding father John Jay (1749-1825), whose surname was derived from the jaybird.
JAYDEN   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of JADEN.
JAYE   f   English
Feminine variant of JAY (1).
JAYME   f   English
Variant of JAMIE.
JIMI   m   English
Diminutive of JAMES. A famous bearer was the rock musician Jimi Hendrix (1942-1970).
JI-MIN   f & m   Korean
From Sino-Korean (ji) meaning "will, purpose, ambition" or (ji) meaning "wisdom, intellect" combined with (min) meaning "gentle, affable", (min) meaning "quick, clever, sharp" or (min) meaning "jade, stone resembling jade". Other hanja character combinations are possible.
JI-U   f & m   Korean
From Sino-Korean (ji) meaning "sesame" or (ji) meaning "will, purpose, ambition" combined with (u) meaning "rain" or (u) meaning "house, eaves, universe". Other combinations of hanja characters can form this name as well.
JI-YEONG   f & m   Korean
From Sino-Korean (ji) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (ji) meaning "know, perceive, comprehend" combined with (yeong) meaning "flower, petal, brave, hero" or (yeong) meaning "glory, honour, flourish, prosper". Many other hanja character combinations are possible.
JODY   f & m   English
Probably either a variant of JUDY or a diminutive of JOSEPH. It was popularized by the young hero in Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings' novel 'The Yearling' (1938) and the subsequent film adaptation (1946).
JOEY   m & f   English
Diminutive of JOSEPH. It is occasionally used as a feminine diminutive of JOSEPHINE or JOHANNA.
JORDAN   m & f   English, Macedonian
From the name of the river which flows between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". In the New Testament John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name in Europe after crusaders brought water back from the river to baptize their children. There may have been some influence from the Germanic name JORDANES, notably borne by a 6th-century Gothic historian.... [more]
JORDON   m   English
Variant of JORDAN.
JORDYN   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of JORDAN.
JOYCE   f & m   English
From the medieval masculine name Josse, which was derived from the earlier Iudocus, which was a Latinized form of the Breton name Judoc meaning "lord". The name belonged to a 7th-century Breton saint, and Breton settlers introduced it to England after the Norman conquest. It became rare after the 14th century, but was later revived as a feminine name, perhaps because of similarity to the Middle English word joise "to rejoice". This given name also formed the basis for a surname, as in the case of the Irish novelist James Joyce (1882-1941).
KALI   f & m   Hinduism, Bengali, Tamil
Means "the black one" in Sanskrit. The Hindu goddess Kali is the fierce destructive form of the wife of Shiva. She is usually depicted with black skin and four arms, holding a severed head and brandishing a sword. As a personal name, it is generally masculine in India.
KANTA   f & m   Indian, Hindi, Bengali
Means "desired, beautiful" in Sanskrit. This is a transcription of both the feminine form कान्ता and the masculine form कान्त.
KATLEGO   m & f   Southern African, Tswana
Means "success" in Tswana.
KEEGAN   m   Irish, English
From an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mac Aodhagáin, which means "descendant of Aodhagán". The given name Aodhagán is a double diminutive of AODH.
KEELAN   f & m   Irish
Anglicized form of CAOILFHIONN, sometimes used as a masculine name.
KELLY   m & f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of the Irish given name CEALLACH or the surname derived from it Ó Ceallaigh. As a surname, it has been borne by actor and dancer Gene Kelly (1912-1996) and actress and princess Grace Kelly (1929-1982).
KENDALL   m & f   English
From a surname which comes from the name of the city of Kendale in northwest England meaning "valley on the river Kent".
KENNEDY   f & m   English, Irish
From an irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cinnéidigh meaning "descendant of CENNÉTIG". The name is often given in honour of assassinated American president John F. Kennedy (1917-1963).
KENZIE   m & f   English
Short form of MACKENZIE.
KERRY   m & f   English
From the name of the Irish county, called Ciarraí in Irish Gaelic, which means "CIAR's people".
KIM (1)   f & m   English
At the present it is usually considered a short form of KIMBERLY, but it in fact predates it as a given name. The author Rudyard Kipling used it for the title hero of his novel 'Kim' (1901), though in this case it was short for KIMBALL. In her novel 'Show Boat' (1926) Edna Ferber used it for a female character who was born on the Mississippi River and was named from the initials of the states Kentucky, Illinois and Mississippi. The name was popularized in America by the actresses Kim Hunter (1922-2002) and Kim Novak (1933-), both of whom assumed it as a stage name.
KIMMIE   f   English
Diminutive of KIMBERLY or KIM (1).
KIMMY   f   English
Diminutive of KIMBERLY or KIM (1).
KINSLEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was derived from the given name CYNESIGE.
KIRABO   m & f   Eastern African, Ganda
Means "gift" in Luganda.
KIRBY   m   English
From an English surname which was originally from a place name meaning "church settlement" in Old Norse.
KISEMBO   m & f   Eastern African, Tooro
Means "gift" in Rutooro.
KORI   f   English
Feminine form of COREY.
KRISHNA   m   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Gujarati, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Malayalam, Nepali
Means "black, dark" in Sanskrit. This is the name of a Hindu god believed to be an incarnation of the god Vishnu. He was the youngest of King Vasudeva's eight children, six of whom were killed by King Kamsa because of a prophecy that a child of Vasudeva would kill Kamsa. Krishna however was saved and he eventually killed the king as well as performing many other great feats. In some Hindu traditions, Krishna is regarded as the supreme deity. He is usually depicted with blue skin.
LAKE   m & f   English (Rare)
From the English word lake, for the inland body of water. It is ultimately derived from Latin lacus.
LARK   f   English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of songbird.
LAUREN   f & m   English
Variant or feminine form of LAURENCE (1). Originally a masculine name, it was first popularized as a feminine name by actress Betty Jean Perske (1924-), who used Lauren Bacall as her stage name.
LAURIE   f & m   English, Dutch
Diminutive of LAURA or LAURENCE (1).
LEE   m & f   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English leah meaning "clearing". The surname belonged to Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), commander of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. In his honour, it has been commonly used as a given name in the American South.
LESLIE   f & m   English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from a Scottish place name, probably derived from Gaelic leas celyn meaning "garden of holly". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century. In America it was more common as a feminine name after the 1940s.
LIN   m & f   Chinese
From Chinese (lín) meaning "forest" or (lín) meaning "fine jade, gem". Other characters can also form this name.
LINDSEY   f & m   English, Scottish
Variant of LINDSAY.
LOGAN   m & f   Scottish, English
From a surname which was originally derived from a Scottish place name meaning "little hollow" in Scottish Gaelic.
LONDON   f & m   English (Modern)
From the name of the capital city of the United Kingdom, the meaning of which is uncertain. As a surname it was borne by the American author Jack London (1876-1916).
LOREN   m & f   English
Either a short form of LAURENCE (1) (masculine) or a variant of LAUREN (feminine).
LOU   f & m   English, French
Short form of LOUISE or LOUIS. Famous bearers include the baseball player Lou Gehrig (1903-1941) and the musician Lou Reed (1942-2013).
LOUIE   m   English
Diminutive of LOUIS.
LUCE   f   Italian, French
Italian and French variant of LUCIA. This also means "light" in Italian.
LYRIC   f   English (Modern)
Means simply "lyric, songlike" from the English word, ultimately derived from Greek λυρικος (lyrikos).
MACKENZIE   f & m   English
From the Gaelic surname Mac Coinnich, which means "son of COINNEACH". A famous bearer of the surname was William Lyon MacKenzie (1795-1861), a Canadian journalist and political rebel. As a feminine given name, it was popularized by the American actress Mackenzie Phillips (1959-).
MAHLAH   f & m   Biblical
From the Hebrew name מַחְלָה (Machlah), possibly from חָלָה (chalah) meaning "weak" or "sick". This name is used in the Old Testament as both a feminine and masculine name. In some versions of the Bible the masculine name is spelled Mahalah.
MAKANA   m & f   Hawaiian
Means "gift" in Hawaiian.
MARAM   f & m   Arabic
Means "wish, desire" in Arabic.
MARIA   f & m   Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.... [more]
MARLEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was taken from a place name meaning either "pleasant wood", "boundary wood" or "marten wood" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the Jamaican musician Bob Marley (1945-1981).
MERLE   f & m   English
Variant of MERRILL or MURIEL. The spelling has been influenced by the word merle meaning "blackbird" (via French, from Latin merula).
MICAH   m   Biblical, English
Contracted form of MICAIAH. Micah is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament. He authored the Book of Micah, which alternates between prophesies of doom and prophesies of restoration. It was occasionally used as an English given name by the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation, but it did not become common until the end of the 20th century.
MICKEY   m & f   English
Diminutive or feminine form of MICHAEL. This was the name that Walt Disney gave to Ub Iwerks' cartoon character Mickey Mouse, who was originally named Mortimer Mouse. Another famous bearer was the American baseball player Mickey Mantle (1931-1995).
MITRA (1)   m & f   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi
Means "friend" in Sanskrit, a cognate of MITHRA. This is a transcription of both the feminine form मित्रा and the masculine form मित्र, which is the name of a Hindu god of friendship and contracts who appears in the Rigveda.
MONET   f & m   Various
From a French surname which was derived from either HAMON or EDMOND. This was the surname of the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
MORGAN (1)   m & f   Welsh, English, French
From the Old Welsh masculine name Morcant, which was possibly derived from Welsh mor "sea" and cant "circle". Since the 1980s in America Morgan has been more common for girls than boys, perhaps due to stories of Morgan le Fay or the fame of actress Morgan Fairchild (1950-).
MPHATSO   m & f   Southern African, Chewa
Means "gift" in Chewa.
MPHO   m & f   Southern African, Tswana, Sotho
Means "gift" in Tswana and Sotho, a derivative of fa "to offer".
MU   m & f   Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "admire, desire", () meaning "tree, wood", or other characters with similar pronunciations.
MURPHY   m & f   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Murchadha meaning "descendant of MURCHADH".
MYEONG   m & f   Korean
From Sino-Korean (myeong) meaning "bright, light, clear" or other hanja characters with the same pronunciation. Although it does appear rarely as a single-character name, it is more often used in combination with another character.
NALANI   f & m   Hawaiian
Means "the heavens" or "the chiefs" from Hawaiian , a definite article, and lani "heaven, sky, chief".
NEO (1)   f & m   Southern African, Tswana
Means "gift" in Tswana, a derivative of naya "to give".
NERGÜI   m & f   Mongolian
Means "no name" in Mongolian. This name was traditionally given in order to mislead bad spirits.
NICKY   m & f   English
Diminutive of NICHOLAS or NICOLE.
NUR   f & m   Arabic, Turkish, Urdu, Uyghur, Indonesian, Malay
Means "light" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition النور (al-Nur) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
OCEAN   m & f   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word ocean for a large body of water. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ωκεανος (Okeanos), the name of the body of water thought to surround the Earth.
OLI   m   English
Short form of OLIVER.
OMEGA   m & f   Various
From the name of the last letter in the Greek alphabet, Ω. It is often seen as a symbol of completion.
ORAL   m   English (Rare)
Meaning uncertain. This name was borne by the influential American evangelist Oral Roberts (1918-2009), who was apparently named by his cousin.
PACEY   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the French place name Pacy, itself derived from Gaulish given name of unknown meaning.
PADEN   m   English (Rare)
An invented name, using the popular aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden, Hayden and Aidan. It is sometimes considered a derivative of the surname PADDON.
PAGE   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of PAIGE.
PARIS (2)   f   Various
From the name of the capital city of France, which got its name from the ancient Celtic tribe known as the Parisii.
PARVEEN   f & m   Indian, Hindi
Hindi form of PARVIN, also used as a masculine name.
PAULIE   m   English
Diminutive of PAUL.
PAX   f   Roman Mythology
Means "peace" in Latin. In Roman mythology this was the name of the goddess of peace.
PAZ (2)   f & m   Hebrew
Means "gold" in Hebrew.
PHOENIX   m & f   English (Modern)
From the name of a beautiful immortal bird which appears in Egyptian and Greek mythology. After living for several centuries in the Arabian Desert, it would be consumed by fire and rise from its own ashes, with this cycle repeating every 500 years. The name of the bird was derived from Greek φοινιξ (phoinix) meaning "dark red".
PRESLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "priest clearing" (Old English preost and leah). This surname was borne by musician Elvis Presley (1935-1977).
PRUDENCE   f & m   English, French
Medieval English form of Prudentia, the feminine form of PRUDENTIUS. In France it is both the feminine form and a rare masculine form. In England it was used during the Middle Ages and was revived in the 17th century by the Puritans, in part from the English word prudence, ultimately of the same source.
QUINN   m & f   Irish, English
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cuinn meaning "descendant of CONN".
RADHA   f & m   Hinduism, Indian, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Hindi, Marathi
Means "success" in Sanskrit. This is the name of the favourite consort of the Hindu god Krishna.
RAIN (1)   f & m   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word rain, derived from Old English regn.
REAGAN   f & m   English, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ríagáin meaning "descendant of RIAGÁN". This surname was borne by American president Ronald Reagan (1911-2004).
REECE   m   Welsh
Anglicized form of RHYS.
REES   m   Welsh
Anglicized form of RHYS.
REESE   m   Welsh
Anglicized form of RHYS.
REGAN   f   English
Meaning unknown, probably of Celtic origin. Shakespeare took the name from earlier British legends and used it in his tragedy 'King Lear' (1606) for a treacherous daughter of the king. In the modern era it has appeared in the horror movie 'The Exorcist' (1973) belonging to a girl possessed by the devil. This name can also be used as a variant of REAGAN.
REGGIE   m   English
Diminutive of REGINALD.
REILLY   m & f   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname which was derived from the given name Raghailleach, meaning unknown.
RENÉ   m   French, German, Spanish, Slovak, Czech
French form of RENATUS. A famous bearer was the French mathematician and rationalist philosopher René Descartes (1596-1650).
REYES   f & m   Spanish
Means "kings" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, La Virgen de los Reyes, meaning "The Virgin of the Kings". According to legend, the Virgin Mary appeared to King Ferdinand III of Castile and told him his armies would defeat those of the Moors in Seville.
RHYS   m   Welsh
Means "enthusiasm" in Welsh. Several Welsh rulers have borne this name.
RILEY   m & f   English
From a surname which comes from two distinct sources. As an Irish surname it is a variant of REILLY. As an English surname it is derived from a place name meaning "rye clearing" in Old English.
RIVER   m & f   English (Modern)
From the English word that denotes a flowing body of water. The word is ultimately derived (via Old French) from Latin ripa "riverbank".
ROBIN   m & f   English, Dutch, Swedish
Medieval diminutive of ROBERT. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor. In modern times it has also been used as a feminine name, and it may sometimes be given in reference to the red-breasted bird.
ROWAN   m & f   Irish, English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.
ROYAL   m   English
From the English word royal, derived (via Old French) from Latin regalis, a derivative of rex "king". It was first used as a given name in the 19th century.
ROYALE   m   English (Rare)
Variant of ROYAL.
RYLEE   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of RILEY.
RYLEY   m   English (Modern)
Variant of RILEY.
RYLIE   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of RILEY.
SACHA   m & f   French
French form of SASHA.
SAGE   f & m   English (Modern)
From the English word sage, which denotes either a type of spice or else a wise person.
SAL   f & m   English
Short form of SALLY, SALVADOR, and other names beginning with Sal.
SAM (1)   m & f   English
Short form of SAMUEL, SAMSON or SAMANTHA.
SASCHA   m & f   German
German form of SASHA.
SASHA   m & f   Russian, Ukrainian, English, French
Russian and Ukrainian diminutive of ALEKSANDR or ALEKSANDRA.
SATOMI   f   Japanese
From Japanese (sato) meaning "village" or (sato) meaning "intelligent, clever, bright" combined with (mi) meaning "beautiful". Other kanji combinations are possible.
SCHUYLER   m   English
From a Dutch surname meaning "scholar". Dutch settlers brought the surname to America, where it was subsequently adopted as a given name in honour of the American general and senator Philip Schuyler (1733-1804).
SCOUT   f   English (Rare)
From the English word scout meaning "one who gathers information covertly", which is derived from Old French escouter "to listen". Harper Lee used this name in her novel 'To Kill a Mockingbird' (1960).
SELBY   m & f   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was from a place name meaning "willow farm" in Old Norse.
SEVAN   f & m   Armenian
From the name of the largest lake in Armenia, which may be from the Urartian word suinia simply meaning "lake".
SHACHAR   f & m   Hebrew
Means "dawn" in Hebrew.
SHAHAR   f & m   Hebrew
Variant transcription of SHACHAR.
SHAY (2)   m & f   Hebrew
Variant transcription of SHAI.
SHELBY   m & f   English
From a surname, which was possibly a variant of SELBY. Though previously in use as a rare masculine name, it was popularized as a feminine name by the main character in the movie 'The Woman in Red' (1935). It was later reinforced by the movie 'Steel Magnolias' (1989) in which Julia Roberts played a character by this name.
SHELL   f   English
Short form of MICHELLE or SHELLEY. It can also be simply from the English word shell (ultimately from Old English sciell).
SHILOH   m & f   Biblical
From an Old Testament place name possibly meaning "tranquil" in Hebrew. It is also used prophetically in the Old Testament to refer to a person, often understood to be the Messiah (see Genesis 49:10). This may in fact be a mistranslation. This name was brought to public attention after Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie gave it to their daughter in 2006.
SIMCHA   f & m   Hebrew
Means "happiness, joy" in Hebrew.
SKY   f   English (Modern)
Simply from the English word sky, which was ultimately derived from Old Norse sky "cloud".
SKYE   f   English (Modern)
From the name of the Isle of Skye off the west coast of Scotland. It is sometimes considered a variant of SKY.
SKYLAR   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of SKYLER.
SKYLER   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of SCHUYLER. The spelling was modified due to association with the name Tyler and the English word sky.
SLOAN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of SLOANE.
SLOANE   f   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from an Anglicized form of the given name SLUAGHADHÁN.
SULTAN   m & f   Arabic, Turkish, Urdu, Bengali, Avar
Means "ruler, king, sultan" in Arabic. In the Arab world this name is typically masculine, but Turkey it is given to both boys and girls.
SUNNY   f & m   English
From the English word meaning "sunny, cheerful".
TAM (2)   m & f   Hebrew
Means "honest, innocent" in Hebrew.
TATUM   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "Tata's homestead" in Old English.
TAYLOR   m & f   English
From an English surname which originally denoted someone who was a tailor, from Norman French tailleur, ultimately from Latin taliare "to cut". Its modern use as a feminine name may have been influenced by British author Taylor Caldwell (1900-1985).
TEDDY   m   English
Diminutive of EDWARD or THEODORE.
TERRY (1)   m & f   English
From an English surname which was derived from the medieval name Thierry, a Norman French form of THEODORIC.
TERRY (2)   m & f   English
Diminutive of TERENCE or THERESA. A famous bearer was Terry Fox (1958-1981), a young man with an artificial leg who attempted to run across Canada to raise money for cancer research. He died of the disease before crossing the country.
TIERNEY   m & f   Irish, English (Rare)
Anglicized form of TIGHEARNACH. In part, it is from a surname derived from the given name.
TRINIDAD   f & m   Spanish
Means "trinity" in Spanish, referring to the Holy Trinity. An island in the West Indies bears this name.
UDUAK   m & f   Western African, Ibibio
Means "will, desire" in Ibibio.
VAL   m & f   English
Short form of VALENTINE (1), VALERIE, and other names beginning with Val.
VINNIE   m   English
Diminutive of VINCENT.
VIVIAN   m & f   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Latin name Vivianus which was derived from Latin vivus "alive". Saint Vivian was a French bishop who provided protection during the Visigoth invasion of the 5th century. It has been occasionally used as an English (masculine) name since the Middle Ages. In modern times it is also used as a feminine name, in which case it is either an Anglicized form of BÉBINN or a variant of VIVIEN (2).
WALLIS   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of WALLACE. Wallis Simpson (1895-1986) was the divorced woman whom Edward VIII married, which forced him to abdicate the British throne.
WREN   f   English (Rare)
From the English word for the small songbird. It is ultimately derived from Old English wrenna.
YAEL   f   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of JAEL.
YAĞMUR   f & m   Turkish
Means "rain" in Turkish.
YAN (2)   f & m   Chinese
From Chinese (yàn) meaning "beautiful, gorgeous" (which is usually only feminine) or (yán) meaning "cliff, rocks", as well as other Chinese characters pronounced in a similar fashion.
YU   f & m   Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "jade, precious stone, gem", () meaning "pleasant, delightful" or () meaning "rain". Other characters can form this name as well.
ZIV   m & f   Hebrew
Means "bright, radiant" in Hebrew. This was the ancient name of the second month of the Jewish calendar.
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