Names Categorized "unisex"

This is a list of names in which the categories include unisex.
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ALIX f French
Medieval French variant of ALICE.
ALYX f English (Rare)
Feminine variant of ALEX.
ANDI f English
Diminutive of ANDREA (2).
ANGE m French
French form of Angelus (see ANGEL).
ASHLEIGH f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of ASHLEY.
ASPEN f English (Modern)
From the English word for the tree, derived from Old English æspe. It is also the name of a ski resort in Colorado.
ASTER f English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which is derived via Latin from Greek ἀστήρ (aster) meaning "star".
AUDIE f English
Diminutive of AUDREY.
AZARIAH m Biblical
Means "YAHWEH has helped" in Hebrew, derived from עָזַר ('azar) meaning "help" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. This is the name of many Old Testament characters including of one of the three men the Babylonian king ordered cast into a fiery furnace. His Babylonian name was Abednego.
AZURE f English (Rare)
From the English word that means "sky blue". It is ultimately (via Old French, Latin and Arabic) from Persian لاجورد (lajvard) meaning "azure, lapis lazuli".
BEE f English
Short form of BEATRIX and other names beginning with B.
BELLAMY f English (Modern)
From a surname derived from Old French bel ami meaning "beautiful friend".
BENNIE m English
Diminutive of BENJAMIN or BENEDICT.
BETHEL f English
From an Old Testament place name meaning "house of God" in Hebrew. This was a town north of Jerusalem, where Jacob saw his vision of the stairway. It is occasionally used as a given name.
BLAISE m French
From the Roman name Blasius, which was derived from Latin blaesus meaning "lisping". A famous bearer was the French mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal (1623-1662).
BLAKE m English
From a surname that was derived from Old English blæc "black" or blac "pale". A famous bearer of the surname was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).
BLAKELY f English (Modern)
From a surname that was derived from Old English blæc "black" and leah "woodland clearing".
BLAZE m English (Modern)
Modern variant of BLAISE influenced by the English word blaze.
BRAELYN f English (Modern)
A recently created name, formed using the popular name suffix lyn.
BRINLEY f English (Modern)
From an English surname that was taken from the name of a town meaning "burned clearing" in Old English.
BRITTON m English
Derived from a Middle English surname meaning "a Briton" (a Celt of England) or "a Breton" (an inhabitant of Brittany).
BRYNLEE f English (Modern)
Combination of BRYN and the popular name suffix lee. It could also be considered a variant of BRINLEY.
BRYNN f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of BRYN.
CADENCE f English (Modern)
From an English word meaning "rhythm, flow". It has been in use only since the 20th century.
CARLIE f English
Feminine form of CARL.
CARMEL f English, Jewish
From the title of the Virgin Mary Our Lady of Carmel. כַּרְמֶל (Karmel) (meaning "garden" in Hebrew) is a mountain in Israel mentioned in the Old Testament. It was the site of several early Christian monasteries. As an English given name, it has mainly been used by Catholics.
CARMEN f Spanish, English, Italian, Romanian
Medieval Spanish form of CARMEL influenced by the Latin word carmen "song". This was the name of the main character in George Bizet's opera Carmen (1875).
CARROL m & f English
Variant of CARROLL (masculine) or CAROL (1) (feminine).
CARROLL m Irish
Anglicized form of CEARBHALL. A famous bearer of the surname was Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), whose real name was Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, the author of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
CASEY m & f English, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cathasaigh meaning "descendant of CATHASACH". This name can be given in honour of Casey Jones (1863-1900), a train engineer who sacrificed his life to save his passengers. In his case, Casey was a nickname acquired because he was raised in the town of Cayce, Kentucky.
CECIL m English
From the Roman name Caecilius (see CECILIA). This was the name of a 3rd-century saint, a companion of Saint Cyprian. Though it was in use during the Middle Ages in England, it did not become common until the 19th century when it was given in honour of the noble Cecil family, who had been prominent since the 16th century. Their surname was derived from the Welsh given name Seisyll, which was derived from the Roman name Sextilius, a derivative of SEXTUS.
CHARLEE f English (Modern)
Feminine form of CHARLES.
CHARLIE m & f English
Diminutive or feminine form of CHARLES. A famous bearer was the British comic actor Charlie Chaplin (1889-1977). It is also borne by Charlie Brown, the main character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles Schulz.
CHARLY m French
Diminutive of CHARLES.
CHE m Spanish
From an Argentine expression meaning "hey!". This nickname was acquired by the Argentine revolutionary Ernesto Guevara while he was in Cuba.
CLAIR m French, English
French form of Clarus (see CLARA).
CLAIRE f French, English
French form of CLARA.
CLARE f English
Medieval English form of CLARA. This is also the name of an Irish county, which was itself probably derived from Irish clár meaning "plank, level surface".
CLAUDIE f French
French feminine variant of CLAUDE.
CODIE m & f English (Modern)
Variant or feminine form of CODY.
CODY m English
From the Irish surname Ó Cuidighthigh, which means "descendant of CUIDIGHTHEACH". A famous bearer of the surname was the American frontiersman and showman Buffalo Bill Cody (1846-1917).
CORIANDER f English (Rare)
From the name of the spice, also called cilantro, which may ultimately be of Phoenician origin (via Latin and Greek).
COSMA m Italian
Italian form of COSMAS.
COURTNEY f & m English
From an aristocratic English surname that was derived either from the French place name Courtenay (originally a derivative of the personal name Curtenus, itself derived from Latin curtus "short") or else from a Norman nickname meaning "short nose". As a feminine name in America, it first became popular during the 1970s.
CREE m & f English (Rare)
From the name of a Native American tribe of central Canada. Their name derives via French from the Cree word kiristino.
DAKOTA m & f English (Modern)
Means "allies, friends" in the Dakota language. This is the name of a Native American people of the northern Mississippi valley.
DALEY m & f Irish, English (Rare)
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Dálaigh meaning "descendant of Dálach". The name Dálach means "assembly" in Gaelic.
DALLAS m & f English
From a surname that could either be of Old English origin meaning "valley house" or of Scottish Gaelic origin meaning "meadow dwelling". A city in Texas bears this name, probably in honour of American Vice President George M. Dallas (1792-1864).
DALY m & f Irish, English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of DALEY.
DANNIE m & f English
Diminutive of DANIEL or DANIELLE.
DELANEY f English (Modern)
From a surname: either the English surname DELANEY (1) or the Irish surname DELANEY (2).
DENE m & f English (Rare)
Possibly a variant of DEAN or DENA.
DENVER m English
From an English surname that was from a place name meaning "Dane ford" in Old English. This is the name of the capital city of Colorado, which was named for the politician James W. Denver (1817-1892).
DERBY m & f English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of DARBY.
DI f English
Short form of DIANA.
DIAMANTO f Greek
Derived from Greek διαμάντι (diamanti) meaning "diamond".
DIAMOND f English (Modern)
From the English word diamond for the clear colourless precious stone, the birthstone of April. It is derived from Late Latin diamas, from Latin adamas, which is of Greek origin meaning "invincible, untamed".
DONNIE m English
Diminutive of DONALD.
DORRIS f English
Variant of DORIS.
DORY f English
Diminutive of DOROTHY or DORIS. This is the name of a fish in the animated film Finding Nemo (2003).
DREW m English
Short form of ANDREW.
EDEN f & m Hebrew, English (Modern)
Possibly from Hebrew עֵדֶן ('eden) meaning "pleasure, delight", or perhaps derived from Sumerian 𒂔 (edin) meaning "plain". According to the Old Testament the Garden of Eden was the place where the first people, Adam and Eve, lived before they were expelled.
ELLIOTT m English
From an English surname that was derived from a diminutive of the medieval name ELIAS.
EMERSON m & f English
From an English surname meaning "son of EMERY". The surname was borne by Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American writer and philosopher who wrote about transcendentalism.
EMERY m & f English
Norman form of EMMERICH. The Normans introduced it to England, and though it was never popular, it survived until the end of the Middle Ages. As a modern given name, it is likely inspired by the surname Emery, which was itself derived from the medieval given name. It can also be given in reference to the hard black substance called emery.
ENGEL m German (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Originally this was a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element angil, referring to the Germanic tribe known in English as the Angles. Since the Middle Ages it has been firmly associated with the German word engel meaning "angel".
FALLON f English (Modern)
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Fallamhain meaning "descendant of Fallamhan". The given name Fallamhan meant "leader". It was popularized in the 1980s by a character on the soap opera Dynasty.
FAY f English
Derived from Middle English faie meaning "fairy", ultimately (via Old French) from Latin fata meaning "the Fates". It appears in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Arthurian legends in the name of Morgan le Fay. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century. In some cases it may be used as a short form of FAITH.
FLICK f & m English (Rare)
Diminutive of FELICITY. In some cases it can be a nickname from the English word flick.
FRANCIS m & f English, French
English form of the Late Latin name Franciscus meaning "Frenchman", ultimately from the Germanic tribe of the Franks, who were named for a type of spear that they used. This name was borne by the 13th-century Saint Francis of Assisi, who was originally named Giovanni but was given the nickname Francesco by his father, an admirer of the French. Francis went on to renounce his father's wealth and devote his life to the poor, founding the Franciscan order of friars. Later in his life he apparently received the stigmata.... [more]
FRANKIE m & f English
Diminutive of FRANK or FRANCES.
GAEL f English (Modern)
Variant of GAIL, also coinciding with the ethno-linguistic term Gael, which refers to speakers of Gaelic languages.
GAIL f English
Short form of ABIGAIL.
GAY f English
From the English word gay meaning "gay, happy". By the mid-20th century the word had acquired the additional meaning of "homosexual", and the name has subsequently dropped out of use.
GENE m English
Short form of EUGENE.
GENIE f English
Diminutive of EUGENIA.
GERMAINE f French
French feminine form of GERMAIN. Saint Germaine was a 16th-century peasant girl from France.
GWYN m Welsh
Means "white, fair, blessed" in Welsh.
GWYNN m Welsh
Variant of GWYN.
HALCYON f Various
From the name of a genus of kingfisher birds, derived from Greek ἀλκυών (from the same source as ALCYONE).
HARLEY m & f English
From a surname that was derived from a place name, itself from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing".
HAVEN f & m English
From the English word for a safe place, derived ultimately from Old English hæfen.
HAYDEN m & f English
From an English surname that was derived from place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
HAZE f English (Rare)
Short form of HAZEL.
HELGE m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Helgi, derived from heilagr meaning "holy, blessed".
HONOR f & m English (Rare)
Variant of HONOUR, using the American spelling.
HONOUR f English (Rare)
From the English word honour, which is of Latin origin. This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century. It can also be viewed as a form of HONORIA or HONORATA, which are ultimately derived from the same source.
IGGY m English
Diminutive of IGNATIUS.
INDIE f English (Modern)
Possibly a diminutive of INDIA or INDIANA, but also likely inspired by the term indie, short for independent, which is typically used to refer to media produced outside of the mainstream.
INDRA m Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Nepali
Means "possessing drops of rain" from Sanskrit इन्दु (indu) meaning "a drop" and (ra) meaning "acquiring, possessing". Indra is the name of the ancient Hindu warrior god of the sky and rain. He is the chief god in the Rigveda.
INNA f Russian, Ukrainian
Meaning unknown. This was the name of an early Scythian saint and martyr, a male, supposedly a disciple of Saint Andrew.
ISLAY m & f Scottish
From the name of the island of Islay, which lies off of the west coast of Scotland.
JAEL f Biblical
From the Hebrew name יָעֵל (Ya'el) meaning "ibex, mountain goat". This name appears in the Old Testament belonging to the wife of Heber the Kenite. After Sisera, the captain of the Canaanite army, was defeated in battle by Deborah and Barak he took refuge in Heber's tent. When he fell asleep Jael killed him by hammering a tent peg into his head.
JAIMIE f English
Variant of JAMIE.
JAMIE m & f Scottish, English
Originally a Lowland Scots diminutive of JAMES. Since the late 19th century it has also been used as a feminine form.
JAYE f & m English
Variant or feminine form of JAY (1).
JAYME f & m English
Variant of JAMIE.
JENSEN m English (Modern)
From a Danish surname meaning "son of JENS".
JET f Dutch
Short form of HENRIËTTE or MARIËTTE.
JEWEL f & m English
In part from the English word jewel, a precious stone, derived from Old French jouel, which was possibly related to jeu "game". It is also in part from the surname Jewel or Jewell (a derivative of the Breton name JUDICAËL), which was sometimes used in honour of the 16th-century bishop of Salisbury John Jewel. It has been in use as a given name since the 19th century.
JIMI m English
Diminutive of JAMES. A famous bearer was the rock musician Jimi Hendrix (1942-1970).
JODIE f English
Feminine variant of JODY.
JORDAN m & f English, French, Macedonian, Serbian
From the name of the river that flows between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". In the New Testament John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name in Europe after crusaders brought water back from the river to baptize their children. There may have been some influence from the Germanic name JORDANES, notably borne by a 6th-century Gothic historian.... [more]
JORDON m English
Variant of JORDAN.
JORDYN f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of JORDAN.
JOSIE f English
Short form of JOSEPHINE.
JOURNEY f English (Modern)
From the English word, derived via Old French from Latin diurnus "of the day".
JULY f English (Rare)
From the name of the month, which was originally named for Julius Caesar.
JUNÍPERO m Various
This was the name assumed by the 18th-century Spanish Franciscan monk Miguel José Serra, a missionary to California. He named himself after one of Saint Francis's companions, who was named from Latin iuniperus "juniper".
JUNO f Roman Mythology
Meaning unknown, possibly related to an Indo-European root meaning "youth", or possibly of Etruscan origin. In Roman mythology Juno was the wife of Jupiter and the queen of the heavens. She was the protectress of marriage and women, and was also the goddess of finance.
JUPITER m Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
From Latin Iuppiter, which was ultimately derived from the Indo-European *Dyeu-pater, composed of the elements Dyeus (see ZEUS) and pater "father". Jupiter was the supreme god in Roman mythology. He presided over the heavens and light, and was responsible for the protection and laws of the Roman state. This is also the name of the fifth and largest planet in the solar system.
JUSTICE m & f English
From an occupational surname meaning "judge, officer of justice" in Old French. This name can also be given in direct reference to the English word justice.
KAM m & f English (Modern)
Short form of KAMERON.
KESTREL f English (Rare)
From the name of the bird of prey, ultimately derived from Old French crecelle "rattle", which refers to the sound of its cry.
KILEY f English
Variant of KYLIE.
KIMBALL m English
From a surname that was derived from either the Welsh given name CYNBEL or the Old English given name CYNEBALD.
KIMBERLY f English
From the name of the city of Kimberley in South Africa, which was named after Lord KIMBERLEY (1826-1902). The city came to prominence in the late 19th century during the Boer War. Kimberly has been used as a given name since the mid-20th century, eventually becoming very popular as a feminine name.
KINGSLEY m English (Modern)
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "king's wood" in Old English.
KINSLEY f English (Modern)
From a surname that was derived from the given name CYNESIGE.
KIRBY m & f English
From an English surname that was originally from a place name meaning "church settlement" in Old Norse. This name briefly spiked in popularity for American girls in 1982 after the character Kirby Anders Colby was introduced to the soap opera Dynasty.
KRISHNA m Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Gujarati, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Malayalam, Nepali
Means "black, dark" in Sanskrit. This is the name of a Hindu god believed to be an incarnation of the god Vishnu. He was the youngest of King Vasudeva's eight children, six of whom were killed by King Kamsa because of a prophecy that a child of Vasudeva would kill Kamsa. Krishna however was saved and he eventually killed the king as well as performing many other great feats. In some Hindu traditions, Krishna is regarded as the supreme deity. He is usually depicted with blue skin.
KRISNA m Indonesian
Indonesian form of KRISHNA.
KRISTIAN m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Bulgarian
Scandinavian and Finnish form of CHRISTIAN, as well as a Bulgarian variant form.
LARK f English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of songbird.
LAUREL f English
From the name of the laurel tree, ultimately from Latin laurus.
LAWRIE m English
Diminutive of LAWRENCE.
LENNIE m & f English
Diminutive of LEONARD, sometimes a feminine form.
LÉONCE m French
French form of LEONTIOS.
LEVI m Hebrew, English, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Possibly means "joined, attached" in Hebrew. As told in the Old Testament, Levi was the third son of Jacob and Leah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of the Israelites, known as the Levites. This was the tribe that formed the priestly class of the Israelites. The brothers Moses and Aaron were members. This name also occurs in the New Testament, where it is another name for the apostle Matthew.... [more]
LEXIE f English
Diminutive of ALEXANDRA or ALEXIS.
LEXUS f English
Short form of ALEXUS. Its use has been influenced by the Lexus brand name (a line of luxury automobiles made by Toyota).
LEXY f English
Diminutive of ALEXANDRA or ALEXIS.
LOCKIE m Scottish
Diminutive of LACHLAN.
LONNIE m English
Short form of ALONZO and other names containing the same sound.
LORENZA f Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish feminine form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LORIN m & f English
Variant of LOREN.
LORIS m Italian
Diminutive of LORENZO.
LORRIN m & f English (Rare)
Variant of LOREN.
LOTUS f English (Rare)
From the name of the lotus flower (species Nelumbo nucifera) or the mythological lotus tree. They are ultimately derived from Greek λωτός (lotos). In Greek and Roman mythology the lotus tree was said to produce a fruit causing sleepiness and forgetfulness.
LOUIE m English
Diminutive of LOUIS.
LUCE f Italian, French
Italian and French variant of LUCIA. This also means "light" in Italian.
LYN f English
Variant of LYNN.
LYRIC f English (Modern)
Means simply "lyric, songlike" from the English word, ultimately derived from Greek λυρικός (lyrikos).
MARIS f English (Rare)
Means "of the sea", taken from the Latin title of the Virgin Mary, Stella Maris, meaning "star of the sea".
MARLEY f & m English (Modern)
From a surname that was taken from a place name meaning either "pleasant wood", "boundary wood" or "marten wood" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the Jamaican musician Bob Marley (1945-1981).
MARLOWE f English (Modern)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "remnants of a lake" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the English playwright Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593).
MARLYN f & m English
Variant of MARILYN (feminine) or MARLIN (masculine).
MERCURY m Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Latin Mercurius, probably derived from Latin mercari "to trade" or merces "wages". This was the name of the Roman god of trade, merchants, and travellers, later equated with the Greek god Hermes. This is also the name of the first planet in the solar system and a metallic chemical element, both named for the god.
MERRYN f Cornish
Meaning unknown. This was the name of an early Cornish (male) saint.
MICAH m Biblical, English
Contracted form of MICAIAH. Micah is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament. He authored the Book of Micah, which alternates between prophesies of doom and prophesies of restoration. This is also the name of a separate person in the Book of Judges, the keeper of an idol. It was occasionally used as an English given name by the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation, but it did not become common until the end of the 20th century.
MICKY m English
Diminutive of MICHAEL.
MILAN m Czech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
From the Slavic element milu meaning "gracious, dear", originally a short form of names that began with that element. A city in Italy bears this name, though it originates from a different source.
MILEY f English (Modern)
In the case of actress and singer Miley Cyrus (1992-), it is a shortened form of the nickname Smiley, given to her by her father because she often smiled. Although it was not at all common before she brought it to public attention, there are some examples of its use before her time, most likely as a diminutive of MILES.
MIRACLE f English (Modern)
From the English word miracle for an extraordinary event, ultimately deriving from Latin miraculum "wonder, marvel".
MISHA m Russian
Russian diminutive of MIKHAIL.
MOE (1) m English
Short form of MAURICE or MORRIS, or sometimes of other names beginning with a similar sound.
MONROE m & f Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname meaning "from the mouth of the Roe". The Roe is a river in Ireland. Two famous bearers of the surname were American president James Monroe (1758-1831) and American actress Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962).
MORLEY m English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally from an Old English place name meaning "marsh clearing".
NATIVIDAD f Spanish
Means "nativity" in Spanish.
NEPTUNE m Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Latin Neptunus, which is of unknown meaning, possibly related to the Indo-European root *nebh "wet, damp, clouds". Neptune was the god of the sea in Roman mythology, approximately equivalent to the Greek god Poseidon. This is also the name of the eighth planet in the solar system.
NESS (2) f English
Short form of VANESSA.
NEVADA f & m English
From the name of the American state, which means "snow-capped" in Spanish.
NIKE f Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Means "victory" in Greek. Nike was the Greek goddess of victory.
NORI m Japanese
From Japanese (nori) meaning "ceremony, rites" or other kanji that are pronounced the same way.
NOVA f English
Derived from Latin novus meaning "new". It was first used as a name in the 19th century.
OAKLYN f English (Modern)
Variant of OAKLEY using the popular name suffix lyn.
OLI m English
Short form of OLIVER.
OLLY m English
Diminutive of OLIVER.
ORAL m English
Meaning uncertain. This name was borne by the influential American evangelist Oral Roberts (1918-2009), who was apparently named by his cousin.
PACEY m & f English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from the French place name Pacy, itself derived from Gaulish given name of unknown meaning.
PADEN m English (Rare)
An invented name, using the popular den suffix sound found in such names as Braden, Hayden and Aidan. It is sometimes considered a derivative of the surname PADDON.
PAGE m & f English
From a surname that was a variant of PAIGE.
PAGET f & m English (Rare)
From a surname that meant "little page" (see PAIGE).
PEYTON m & f English
From an English surname, originally a place name meaning "PÆGA's town". A famous bearer was Peyton Randolph (1721-1775), the first president of the Continental Congress. It is also borne by American football quarterback Peyton Manning (1976-).
PHOENIX m & f English (Modern)
From the name of a beautiful immortal bird that appears in Egyptian and Greek mythology. After living for several centuries in the Arabian Desert, it would be consumed by fire and rise from its own ashes, with this cycle repeating every 500 years. The name of the bird was derived from Greek φοῖνιξ (phoinix) meaning "dark red".
PRAISE f English (Rare)
From the English word praise, which is ultimately derived (via Old French) from Late Latin preciare, a derivative of Latin pretium "price, worth".
QUINCY m English
From a surname that was derived (via the place name CUINCHY) from the personal name QUINTUS. A famous bearer was John Quincy Adams (1767-1848), sixth president of the United States, who was born in the town of Quincy, Massachusetts. Both the town and the president were named after his maternal great-grandfather John Quincy (1689-1767).
REESE m & f Welsh, English
Anglicized form of RHYS, also used as a feminine form.
REGAN f & m English
Meaning unknown, probably of Celtic origin. Shakespeare took the name from earlier British legends and used it in his tragedy King Lear (1606) for a treacherous daughter of the king. In the modern era it has appeared in the horror movie The Exorcist (1973) belonging to a girl possessed by the devil. This name can also be used as a variant of REAGAN.
REILLY m & f English (Modern)
From an Irish surname that was derived from the given name Raghailleach, meaning unknown.
REN m & f Japanese
From Japanese (ren) meaning "lotus", (ren) meaning "love", or other kanji that are pronounced the same way.
RIDLEY m & f English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally derived from various English place names meaning "reed clearing" or "channel clearing" in Old English.
RIO (1) m & f Various
Means "river" in Spanish or Portuguese. A city in Brazil bears this name. Its full name is Rio de Janeiro, which means "river of January", so named because the first explorers came to the harbour in January and mistakenly thought it was a river mouth.
RIPLEY f & m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from the name of various English towns, from Old English ripel "strip of land" and leah "clearing". A famous fictional bearer was the character Ellen Ripley (usually only called by her surname) from the Alien series of movies, beginning 1979.
RIVER m & f English (Modern)
From the English word that denotes a flowing body of water. The word is ultimately derived (via Old French) from Latin ripa "riverbank".
ROMEY f English (Rare)
Diminutive of ROSEMARY.
ROWAN m & f Irish, English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.
ROYAL m & f English
From the English word royal, derived (via Old French) from Latin regalis, a derivative of rex "king". It was first used as a given name in the 19th century.
ROYALE f & m English (Rare)
Variant of ROYAL.
ROYLE m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "rye hill" from Old English ryge "rye" and hyll "hill".
RUE f English
From the name of the bitter medicinal herb, ultimately deriving from Greek ῥυτή (rhyte). This is also sometimes used as a short form of RUTH (1).
RYAN m Irish, English
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Riain meaning "descendant of Rían". The given name Rían probably means "little king" (from Irish "king" combined with a diminutive suffix).
RYANN f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of RYAN.
RYLAN m English (Modern)
Possibly a variant of the English surname Ryland, which was originally derived from a place name meaning "rye land" in Old English.
RYLEE f & m English (Modern)
Variant of RILEY.
RYLEY m & f English (Modern)
Variant of RILEY.
RYLIE f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of RILEY.
SAM (1) m & f English
Short form of SAMUEL, SAMSON or SAMANTHA.
SATURN m Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Latin Saturnus, which is of unknown meaning. In Roman mythology he was the father of Jupiter, Juno and others, and was also the god of agriculture. This is also the name of the ringed sixth planet in the solar system.
SAYLOR f English (Modern)
From an English surname that was derived from Old French sailleor meaning "acrobat, dancer". As a modern English given name it could also come from the homophone vocabulary word sailor.
SCHUYLER m & f English
From a Dutch surname meaning "scholar". Dutch settlers brought the surname to America, where it was subsequently adopted as a given name in honour of the American general and senator Philip Schuyler (1733-1804).
SCOTTIE m English, Scottish
Diminutive of SCOTT.
SCOUT f English (Rare)
From the English word scout meaning "one who gathers information covertly", which is derived from Old French escouter "to listen". Harper Lee used this name in her novel To Kill a Mockingbird (1960).
SHAWN m English
Anglicized form of SEÁN.
SHAY (1) m Irish
Anglicized form of SÉAGHDHA.
SHEL m English
Short form of SHELDON.
SHELL f English
Short form of MICHELLE or SHELLEY. It can also be simply from the English word shell (ultimately from Old English sciell).
SID m English
Short form of SIDNEY.
SIDNEY m & f English
From the English surname SIDNEY. It was first used as a given name in honour of executed politician Algernon Sidney (1622-1683). Another notable bearer of the surname was the poet and statesman Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586).
SKY f & m English (Modern)
Simply from the English word sky, which was ultimately derived from Old Norse sky "cloud".
SKYE f English (Modern)
From the name of the Isle of Skye off the west coast of Scotland. It is sometimes considered a variant of SKY.
SLOANE f English (Modern)
From an Irish surname that was derived from an Anglicized form of the given name SLUAGHADHÁN.
SORA f & m Japanese
From Japanese (sora) or (sora) both meaning "sky". Other kanji with the same pronunciations can also form this name.
SORREL f English (Rare)
From the name of the sour tasting plant, which may ultimately derive from Germanic sur "sour".
STEVIE m & f English
Diminutive of STEPHEN or STEPHANIE. A famous bearer is the American musician Stevie Wonder (1950-).
SYD m & f English
Short form of SYDNEY.
TATUM f English (Modern)
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "Tata's homestead" in Old English.
TAYLOR m & f English
From an English surname that originally denoted someone who was a tailor, from Norman French tailleur, ultimately from Latin taliare "to cut". Its modern use as a feminine name may have been influenced by the British-American author Taylor Caldwell (1900-1985).
TEAL f English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of duck or the greenish-blue colour.
TEDDIE m & f English
Diminutive of EDWARD or THEODORE, sometimes a feminine form.
TEGAN f Welsh
Derived from Welsh teg meaning "fair".
TOBY m & f English
Medieval form of TOBIAS. It was sometimes used as a feminine name in the 1930s and 40s due to the influence of American actress Toby Wing (1915-2001).
TRINITY f English
From the English word Trinity, given in honour of the Christian belief that God has one essence, but three distinct expressions of being: Father, Son and Holy Spirit. It has only been in use as a given name since the 20th century.
TRISTAN m Welsh, English, French, Arthurian Romance
Old French form of the Pictish name Drustan, a diminutive of DRUST. The spelling was altered by association with Latin tristis "sad". Tristan is a character in medieval French tales, probably inspired by older Celtic legends, and ultimately merged into Arthurian legend. According to the story Tristan was sent to Ireland in order to fetch Isolde, who was to be the bride of King Mark of Cornwall. On the way back, Tristan and Isolde accidentally drink a potion that makes them fall in love. Their tragic story was very popular in the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.
TYLER m English
From an English surname meaning "tiler of roofs", derived from Old English tigele "tile". The surname was borne by American president John Tyler (1790-1862).
UNITY f English (Rare)
From the English word unity, which is ultimately derived from Latin unitas.
URANUS m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Οὐρανός (Ouranos), the name of the husband of Gaia and the father of the Titans in Greek mythology. His name is derived from οὐρανός (ouranos) meaning "the heavens". This is also the name of the seventh planet in the solar system.
WILLY m & f English, German, Dutch
Diminutive of WILLIAM, WILHELM or WILLEM. It is both masculine and feminine in Dutch.
WREN f English (Modern)
From the English word for the small songbird. It is ultimately derived from Old English wrenna.
WYN m Welsh
Derived from Welsh gwyn meaning "blessed, white, fair".
WYNN m Welsh
Variant of WYN.
XIU f Chinese
From Chinese (xiù) meaning "luxuriant, beautiful, elegant, outstanding" or other characters that are pronounced similarly.
YAEL f Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of JAEL.
ZAÏRE f Literature
Used by Voltaire for the heroine of his tragic play Zaïre (1732), about a Christian woman enslaved by Muslims. The heroine is named Zara in some English translations. Voltaire may have based the name on ZAHRAH.
ZEPHANIA m Southern African, Eastern African
Variant of ZEPHANIAH. This form of the name appears to be used in southern and eastern Africa.
ZEPHANIAH m Biblical
From the Hebrew name צְפַנְיָה (Tzefanyah) meaning "YAHWEH has hidden", derived from צָפַן (tzafan) meaning "to hide" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. This is the name of one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Zephaniah.
ZION m Jewish, Biblical
From the name of a citadel that was in the center of Jerusalem. Zion is also used to refer to a Jewish homeland and to heaven.