Names Categorized "unisex"

This is a list of names in which the categories include unisex.
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AYODELEm & fWestern African, Yoruba
Means "joy has come home" in Yoruba.
BENNIEmEnglish
Diminutive of BENJAMIN or BENEDICT.
BERLINfVarious
From the name of the city in Germany, which is of uncertain meaning.
BROOKLYNfEnglish (Modern)
From the name of the borough of New York City, originally derived from Dutch Breukelen meaning "broken land". It can also be viewed as a combination of BROOK and the popular name suffix lyn.
CAMPBELLmEnglish
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked mouth" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and béul "mouth".
CARROLmIrish
Variant of CARROLL.
CARROLLmIrish
Anglicized form of CEARBHALL. A famous bearer of the surname was Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), whose real name was Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, the author of 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'.
CHANDLERmEnglish
From an occupational surname which meant "candle seller" in Middle English, ultimately from Old French.
CLAIRmFrench, English
French form of Clarus (see CLARA).
CLAREfEnglish
Medieval English form of CLARA. This is also the name of an Irish county, which was originally named for the Norman invader Richard de Clare (known as Strongbow), whose surname was derived from the name of an English river.
CLAUDIEfFrench
French feminine variant of CLAUDE.
CREEmEnglish (Rare)
From the name of a Native American tribe of central Canada. Their name derives via French from the Cree word kiristino.
DALEYmIrish, English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Dálaigh meaning "descendant of Dálach". The name Dálach means "assembly" in Gaelic.
DANNIEmEnglish
Diminutive of DANIEL.
DELANEYfEnglish (Modern)
From a surname: either the English surname DELANEY (1) or the Irish surname DELANEY (2).
DIAMONDfEnglish (Modern)
From the English word diamond for the clear colourless precious stone, the birthstone of April. It is derived from Late Latin diamas, from Latin adamas, which is of Greek origin meaning "invincible, untamed".
DONNIEmEnglish
Diminutive of DONALD.
DORRISfEnglish
Variant of DORIS.
EKUNDAYOf & mWestern African, Yoruba
Means "sorrow becomes joy" in Yoruba.
ERNIEmEnglish
Diminutive of ERNEST.
GEMINImRoman Mythology
Means "twins" in Latin. This is the name of the third sign of the zodiac. The two brightest stars in the constellation, Castor and Pollux, are named for the mythological twin sons of Leda.
GWYNmWelsh
Means "white, fair, blessed" in Welsh.
INDYmPopular Culture
Diminutive of INDIANA. This is the nickname of the hero of the 'Indiana Jones' movies, starring Harrison Ford.
JAIMIEfEnglish
Variant of JAMIE.
JAMIEm & fScottish, English
Originally a Lowland Scots diminutive of JAMES. Since the late 19th century it has also been used as a feminine form.
JOURNEYfEnglish (Modern)
From the English word, derived via Old French from Latin diurnus "of the day".
KYRIEm & fEnglish (Modern)
From the name of a Christian prayer, also called the Kyrie eleison meaning "Lord, have mercy". It is ultimately from Greek κυριος (kyrios) meaning "lord". In America it was popularized as a masculine name by basketball player Kyrie Irving (1992-), whose name is pronounced differently than the prayer.
LARKfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for the type of songbird.
LASHAYmAfrican American (Rare)
Combination of the popular name prefix La and SHAY (1).
LAURELfEnglish
From the name of the laurel tree, ultimately from Latin laurus.
LELANDmEnglish
From a surname, originally from an English place name, which meant "fallow land" in Old English. A famous bearer was the politician, businessman and Stanford University founder Leland Stanford (1824-1893).
LEXIEfEnglish
Diminutive of ALEXANDRA.
LONNIEmEnglish
Short form of ALONZO and other names containing the same sound.
LORENZAfItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish feminine form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LORINmEnglish
Variant of LOREN.
LORISmItalian
Diminutive of LORENZO.
LYRICfEnglish (Modern)
Means simply "lyric, songlike" from the English word, ultimately derived from Greek λυρικος (lyrikos).
MARLEYfEnglish (Modern)
From a surname which was taken from a place name meaning either "pleasant wood", "boundary wood" or "marten wood" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the Jamaican musician Bob Marley (1945-1981).
MARLINmEnglish
Possibly a variant of MERLIN.
MARLOWEfEnglish (Modern)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "remnants of a lake" in Old English.
MILDREDfEnglish
From the Old English name Mildþryð meaning "gentle strength", derived from the elements milde "gentle" and þryð "strength". Saint Mildred was a 7th-century abbess, the daughter of the Kentish princess Saint Ermenburga. After the Norman conquest this name became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
MONROEmScottish, English
From a Scottish surname meaning "from the mouth of the Roe". The Roe is a river in Ireland. Two famous bearers of the surname were American president James Monroe (1758-1831) and American actress Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962).
NOVAfEnglish
Derived from Latin novus meaning "new". It was first used as a name in the 19th century.
ORALmEnglish
Meaning uncertain. This name was borne by the influential American evangelist Oral Roberts (1918-2009), who was apparently named by his cousin.
PEARLfEnglish
From the English word pearl for the concretions formed in the shells of some mollusks, ultimately from Late Latin perla. Like other gemstone names, it has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. The pearl is the birthstone for June, and it supposedly imparts health and wealth.
REECEmWelsh
Anglicized form of RHYS.
REESEmWelsh
Anglicized form of RHYS.
REGANfEnglish
Meaning unknown, probably of Celtic origin. Shakespeare took the name from earlier British legends and used it in his tragedy 'King Lear' (1606) for a treacherous daughter of the king. In the modern era it has appeared in the horror movie 'The Exorcist' (1973) belonging to a girl possessed by the devil. This name can also be used as a variant of REAGAN.
RENEm & fEnglish
English form of RENÉ or RENÉE.
SAWYERmEnglish (Modern)
From a surname meaning "sawer of wood" in Middle English. Mark Twain used it for the hero in his novel 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer' (1876).
SIDmEnglish
Short form of SIDNEY.
SKYfEnglish (Modern)
Simply from the English word sky, which was ultimately derived from Old Norse sky "cloud".
SKYEfEnglish (Modern)
From the name of the Isle of Skye off the west coast of Scotland. It is sometimes considered a variant of SKY.
SYDmEnglish
Short form of SYDNEY.
TEDDYmEnglish
Diminutive of EDWARD or THEODORE.
XIUfChinese
From Chinese (xiù) meaning "luxuriant, beautiful, elegant, outstanding" or other characters which are pronounced similarly.