Names Categorized "victor hugo characters"

This is a list of names in which the categories include victor hugo characters.
AGNÈS f French, Catalan
French and Catalan form of AGNES.
ALBIN m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, French, English, Slovene
Form of ALBINUS in several languages.
AMY f English
English form of the Old French name Amée meaning "beloved" (modern French aimée), a vernacular form of the Latin Amata. As an English name, it was in use in the Middle Ages (though not common) and was revived in the 19th century.
ANGELO m Italian
Italian form of Angelus (see ANGEL).
ANTONIO m Spanish, Italian, Croatian
Spanish and Italian form of Antonius (see ANTHONY). A famous bearer was the Italian Renaissance painter Antonio Pisanello (c. 1395-1455). It is also the name of the main character in 'The Merchant of Venice' (1596) by William Shakespeare.
BLANCHE f French, English
From a medieval French nickname meaning "white, fair". This name and its cognates in other languages are ultimately derived from the Germanic word blanc. An early bearer was the 12th-century Blanca of Navarre, the wife of Sancho III of Castile. Her granddaughter of the same name married Louis VIII of France, with the result that the name became more common in France.
CARLOS m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of CHARLES.
CATARINA f Portuguese, Occitan, Galician
Portuguese, Occitan and Galician form of KATHERINE.
CÉSAR m French, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Spanish and Portuguese form of CAESAR. A famous bearer was the American labour organizer César Chávez (1927-1993).
CHARLES m English, French
From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word meaning "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic name element hari meaning "army, warrior".... [more]
CLAUDE m & f French, English
French masculine and feminine form of CLAUDIUS. In France the masculine name has been common since the Middle Ages due to the 7th-century Saint Claude of Besançon. It was imported to Britain in the 16th century by the aristocratic Hamilton family, who had French connections. A famous bearer of this name was the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
CLÉMENT m French
French form of Clemens (see CLEMENT).
COLOMBE f French
French feminine form of COLUMBA.
COSETTE f French, Literature
From French chosette meaning "little thing". This is the nickname of the illegitimate daughter of Fantine in Victor Hugo's novel 'Les Misérables' (1862). Her real name is Euphrasie, though it is seldom used. In the novel young Cosette is the ward of the cruel Thénardiers until she is retrieved by Jean Valjean.
DAHLIA f English (Modern)
From the name of the flower, which was named for the Swedish botanist Anders Dahl.
DAVID m English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was derived from Hebrew דּוֹד (dod) meaning "beloved" or "uncle". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.... [more]
EBENEZER m Biblical
Means "stone of help" in Hebrew. This was the name of a monument erected by Samuel in the Old Testament. Charles Dickens used it for the miserly character Ebenezer Scrooge in his novel 'A Christmas Carol' (1843).
EPONINE f Literature
Meaning unknown. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel 'Les Misérables' (1862) for a daughter of the Thénardiers. Her mother got her name from a romance novel.
ESMERALDA f Spanish, Portuguese, English, Literature
Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since that time.
EUPHRASIE f French
French form of EUPHRASIA.
FABIANO m Italian, Portuguese
Italian and Portuguese form of Fabianus (see FABIAN).
FANTINE f Literature
This name was used by Victor Hugo for the mother of Cosette in his novel 'Les Misérables' (1862). The name was given to her by a passerby who found the young orphan on the street. Hugo may have intended it to be a derivative of the French word enfant "child".
FÉLIX m French, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Spanish and Portuguese form of FELIX.
FLORIAN m German, Polish, French
From the Roman cognomen Florianus, a derivative of FLORUS. This was the name of a short-lived Roman emperor of the 3rd century. It was also borne by Saint Florian, a martyr of the 3rd century, the patron saint of Poland and Upper Austria.
FRANÇOIS m French
French form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS). François Villon was a French lyric poet of the 15th century. This was also the name of two kings of France.
GAUVAIN m French
French form of GAWAIN.
GENNARO m Italian
Italian form of JANUARIUS.
GEORGES m French
French form of GEORGE. This name was borne by the French artists Georges Seurat (1859-1891) and Georges Braque (1882-1963).
GEORGETTE f French
French feminine form of GEORGE.
GERVAIS m French
French form of GERVASIUS.
INEZ f English
English form of INÉS.
JACQUES m French
French form of JACOB (or JAMES).
JEAN (1) m French
French form of Jehan, the Old French form of Iohannes (see JOHN). The French philosophers Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) and Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980) were two well-known bearers of this name. It was also borne by the German-French Dadaist artist Jean Arp (1886-1966).
JEHAN m Medieval French
Old French form of Iohannes (see JOHN).
JOANNES m Late Roman
Latin variant of JOHANNES.
JOSIANE f French
Diminutive of JOSÉPHINE.
LÉOPOLD m French
French form of LEOPOLD.
LOUIS m French, English, Dutch
French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of 18 kings of France, starting with Louis I the son of Charlemagne. Others include Louis IX (Saint Louis) who led two crusades and Louis XIV (called the Sun King) who was the ruler of France during the height of its power, the builder of the Palace of Versailles, and the longest reigning monarch in the history of Europe. It was also borne by kings of Germany (as Ludwig), Hungary (as Lajos), and other places.... [more]
LUCRÈCE f & m French
French form of both LUCRETIA and its masculine form Lucretius.
MANUEL m Spanish, Portuguese, German, English, Italian, French, Romanian, Late Greek (Latinized)
Spanish and Portuguese form of EMMANUEL. In the spelling Μανουηλ (Manouel) it was also used in the Byzantine Empire, notably by two emperors. It is possible this form of the name was transmitted to Spain and Portugal from Byzantium, since there were connections between the royal families (king Ferdinand III of Castile married Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen, who had Byzantine roots, and had a son named Manuel). The name has been used in Iberia since at least the 13th century and was borne by two kings of Portugal.
MARC m French, Catalan, Welsh
French, Catalan and Welsh form of MARK.
MARGUERITE f French
French form of MARGARET. This is also the French word for the daisy flower (species Leucanthemum vulgare).
MARÍA f & m Spanish, Galician, Icelandic
Spanish, Galician and Icelandic form of MARIA. It is occasionally used as a masculine middle name (or the second part of a double name) in Spanish-speaking regions.
MARIE f & m French, Czech, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
French and Czech form of MARIA. A notable bearer of this name was Marie Antoinette, a queen of France who was executed by guillotine during the French Revolution. Another was Marie Curie (1867-1934), a physicist and chemist who studied radioactivity with her husband Pierre.... [more]
MARION (1) f French, English
Medieval French diminutive of MARIE.
MARIUS m Ancient Roman, Romanian, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, French
Roman family name that was derived either from MARS, the name of the Roman god of War, or else from the Latin root mas, maris meaning "male". Gaius Marius was a famous Roman consul of the 2nd century BC. Since the start of the Christian era, it has occasionally been used as a masculine form of MARIA.
MICHELLE f French, English, Dutch
French feminine form of MICHEL. It has been common in the English-speaking world since the middle of the 20th century.
OLIVER m English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Catalan, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.... [more]
OLIVIER m French, Dutch
French and Dutch form of OLIVER.
PHOEBUS m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβος (Phoibos), which meant "bright, pure". This was an epithet of the Greek god Apollo.
PIERRE m French, Swedish
French form of PETER. This name was borne by Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919), a French impressionist painter, and by Pierre Curie (1859-1906), a physicist who discovered radioactivity with his wife Marie.
ROBERT m English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been a very common English name since that time.... [more]
ROBIN m & f English, Dutch, Swedish
Medieval diminutive of ROBERT. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor. In modern times it has also been used as a feminine name, and it may sometimes be given in reference to the red-breasted bird.
RODOLFO m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of RUDOLF. This is the name of the hero in Puccini's opera 'La Bohème' (1896).
RUY m Portuguese, Spanish
Medieval Portuguese and Spanish short form of RODRIGO. It is another name of the 11th-century Spanish military commander Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar, also known as El Cid.
SATAN m Theology, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Derived from Hebrew שָׂטָן (satan) meaning "adversary". This is the Hebrew name of the enemy of the Judeo-Christian god. In the New Testament he is also known by the title Devil (Diabolos in Greek).
SIMON (1) m English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From Σιμων (Simon), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name שִׁמְעוֹן (Shim'on) meaning "he has heard". This name is spelled Simeon, based on Greek Συμεων, in many translations of the Old Testament, where it is borne by the second son of Jacob. The New Testament spelling may show influence from the otherwise unrelated Greek name SIMON (2).... [more]
SOL (1) f Spanish, Portuguese
Means "sun" in Spanish or Portuguese.
TOMÁS m Spanish, Portuguese, Irish
Spanish, Portuguese and Irish form of THOMAS.
TRISTAN m Welsh, English, French, Arthurian Romance
Old French form of the Pictish name Drustan, a diminutive of DRUST. The spelling was altered by association with Latin tristis "sad". Tristan is a character in medieval French tales, probably inspired by older Celtic legends, and ultimately merged into Arthurian legend. According to the story Tristan was sent to Ireland in order to fetch Isolde, who was to be the bride of King Mark of Cornwall. On the way back, Tristan and Isolde accidentally drink a potion that makes them fall in love. Their tragic story was very popular in the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.
URBAIN m French
French form of Urbanus (see URBAN).
URSULA f English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, Late Roman
Means "little bear", derived from a diminutive form of the Latin word ursa "she-bear". Saint Ursula was a legendary virgin princess of the 4th century who was martyred by the Huns while returning from a pilgrimage. In England the saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and the name came into general use at that time.
URSUS m Late Roman
Latin form of URS.