Names Categorized "wisdom"

This is a list of names in which the categories include wisdom.
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ALFRED   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Dutch
Derived from the Old English name Ælfræd, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and ræd "counsel". Alfred the Great was a 9th-century king of Wessex who fought unceasingly against the Danes living in northeast England. He was also a scholar, and he translated many Latin books into Old English. His fame helped to ensure the usage of this name even after the Norman conquest, when most Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. It became rare by the end of the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 18th century.... [more]
ALIM   m   Arabic, Uyghur
Means "learned, expert, scholar" in Arabic.
ATHENA   f   Greek Mythology, English
Meaning unknown, perhaps derived from Greek αθηρ (ather) "sharp" and αινη (aine) "praise". Athena was the Greek goddess of wisdom and warfare, the daughter of Zeus and the patron goddess of the city of Athens in Greece. She is associated with the olive tree and the owl.
BASIR   m   Arabic
Means "wise" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition البصير (al-Basir) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
BRIDGET   f   Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Irish name Brighid which means "exalted one". In Irish mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire, poetry and wisdom, the daughter of the god Dagda. In the 5th century it was borne by Saint Brigid, the founder of a monastery at Kildare and a patron saint of Ireland. Because of the saint, the name was considered sacred in Ireland, and it did not come into general use there until the 17th century. In the form Birgitta this name has been common in Scandinavia, made popular by the 14th-century Saint Birgitta of Sweden, patron saint of Europe.
CADOC   m   Welsh
Derived from Welsh cad "battle". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who was martyred by the Saxons.
CHIKA (2)   f   Japanese
From Japanese (chi) meaning "thousand", (chi) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (chi) meaning "scatter" combined with (ka) meaning "good, beautiful" or (ka) meaning "flower". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
CONRAD   m   English, German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements kuoni "brave" and rad "counsel". This was the name of a 10th-century saint and bishop of Konstanz, in southern Germany. It was also borne by several medieval German kings and dukes. In England it was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has only been common since the 19th century when it was reintroduced from Germany.
DAGRUN   f   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Dagrún, which was derived from the Old Norse elements dagr "day" and rún "secret lore".
DANA (4)   m & f   Persian, Arabic
Means "wise" in Persian.
EMER   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly from Gaelic eimh "swift". In Irish legend she was the wife of Cúchulainn. She was said to possess the six gifts of womanhood: beauty, voice, speech, needlework, wisdom and chastity.
ENKI   m   Near Eastern Mythology
Derived from Sumerian en-ki "lord of the earth" (though maybe originally from en-kur "lord of the underworld"). Enki, called Ea by the Babylonians, was the Sumerian god of water and wisdom and the keeper of the Me, the divine laws.
EUDOXIA   f   Ancient Greek
Means "good repute, good judgement" from Greek ευδοξος (eudoxos), itself derived from ευ (eu) "good" and δοξα (doxa) "notion, reputation, honour, glory".
EUN-JI   f   Korean
From Sino-Korean (eun) meaning "kindness, mercy, charity" combined with (ji) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (ji) meaning "earth, soil, ground". Other hanja character combinations are possible.
FIONN   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
From Irish fionn (older Irish finn) meaning "fair" or "white". Fionn mac Cumhail was a legendary Irish hero who became all-wise by eating an enchanted salmon. He fought against the giant Fomors with his son Oisín and grandson Oscar.
GALADRIEL   f   Literature
Means "maiden crowned with a radiant garland" in Sindarin. Galadriel was a Noldorin elf princess renowned for her beauty and wisdom in J. R. R. Tolkien's novels. The elements are galad "radiant" and riel "garlanded maiden". Alatáriel is the Quenya form of her name.
GANESHA   m   Hinduism
Means "lord of hordes" from Sanskrit गण (gana) meaning "horde, multitude" and ईश (isha) meaning "lord, ruler". This is the name of the Hindu god of wisdom and good luck, the son of Shiva and Parvati. He is often depicted as a stout man with the head of an elephant.
GUISCARD   m   Medieval French
Norman French form of the Norman name Wischard, formed of the Old Norse elements viskr "wise" and hórðr "brave, hardy".
HAKIM   m   Arabic
Means "wise" in Arabic.
ISMENE   f   Greek Mythology
Possibly from Greek ισμη (isme) "knowledge". This was the name of the daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta in Greek legend.
JI-MIN   f & m   Korean
From Sino-Korean (ji) meaning "will, purpose, ambition" or (ji) meaning "wisdom, intellect" combined with (min) meaning "gentle, affable", (min) meaning "quick, clever, sharp" or (min) meaning "jade, stone resembling jade". Other hanja character combinations are possible.
JI-YEONG   f & m   Korean
From Sino-Korean (ji) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (ji) meaning "know, perceive, comprehend" combined with (yeong) meaning "flower, petal, brave, hero" or (yeong) meaning "glory, honour, flourish, prosper". Many other hanja character combinations are possible.
JI-YOUNG   f & m   Korean
Variant transcription of JI-YEONG.
JI-YU   f   Korean
From Sino-Korean (ji) meaning "wisdom, intellect" and (yu) meaning "abundant, rich, plentiful". Other combinations of hanja characters can form this name as well.
KAVI   m   Indian, Hindi
From a title for a a poet, meaning "wise man, sage, poet" in Sanskrit.
MAIARA   f   Native American, Tupi
Means "great grandmother, wise" in Tupi.
MANOJA   m   Hinduism
Means "born of the mind", from Sanskrit मनस् (manas) meaning "mind, intellect, spirit" and (ja) meaning "born". This is another name of the Hindu god Kama.
MICHIKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful", (chi) meaning "wisdom, intellect" and (ko) meaning "child". This name can also be comprised of other combinations of kanji.
MINERVA   f   Roman Mythology, English
Possibly derived from Latin mens meaning "intellect", but more likely of Etruscan origin. Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom and war, approximately equivalent to the Greek goddess Athena. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since after the Renaissance.
MIN-JI   f   Korean
From Sino-Korean (min) meaning "quick, clever, sharp" combined with (ji) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (ji) meaning "know, perceive, comprehend". Other hanja combinations are possible.
MONICA   f   English, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Late Roman
Meaning unknown, most likely of North African or Phoenician origin. In the 4th century this name was borne by the North African saint Monica of Hippo, the mother of Saint Augustine, whom she converted to Christianity. Since the Middle Ages it has been associated with Latin moneo "advisor" and Greek monos "one". As an English name, Monica has been in general use since the 18th century.
NABU   m   Near Eastern Mythology
Possibly from a Semitic root meaning "to announce". This was the name of an Assyrian and Babylonian god of wisdom, letters and writing.
NESTOR   m   Greek Mythology, Russian
Means "homecoming" in Greek. In Homer's 'Iliad' this was the name of the king of Pylos, famous for his great wisdom and longevity, who acted as a counselor to the Greek allies.
NIKOMEDES   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and μηδομαι (medomai) "to think, to plan". This was the name of a 1st-century saint, a priest beaten to death for refusing to worship the Roman gods.
ODIN   m   Norse Mythology, English (Modern)
Anglicized form of Old Norse Óðinn, which was derived from óðr "inspiration, rage, frenzy". It ultimately developed from the early Germanic *Woðanaz. The name appears as Woden in Anglo-Saxon sources (for example, as the founder of several royal lineages in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle) and in forms such as Wotan, Wuotan or Wodan in continental Europe. However Odin is most known from Norse mythology, as the highest of the gods, presiding over art, war, wisdom and death. He resided in Valhalla, where warriors went after they were slain.
PRANAY   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "leader, guidance, love" in Sanskrit.
PRUDENTIUS   m   Late Roman
Late Latin name derived from prudens "prudence, good judgement". This was the name of a 9th-century bishop of Troyes. He is considered a local saint there.
QUETZALCOATL   m   Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "feathered snake" in Nahuatl, derived from quetzalli "feather" and coatl "snake". In Aztec and other Mesoamerican mythology he was the god of the sky, wind, and knowledge, also associated with the morning star. According to one legend he created the humans of this age using the bones of humans from the previous age and adding his own blood.
RAGNBJÖRG   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name derived from the elements regin "advice, counsel" and björg "help, save, rescue".
RAGNVALDR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name composed of the elements regin "advice, counsel" and valdr "power, ruler" (making it a cognate of REYNOLD).
RAIN (2)   m   Estonian
Estonian short form of RAYNER and other Germanic names beginning with the element ragin "advice, counsel".
RAMIRO   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Ramirus, a Latinized form of a Visigothic name derived from the Germanic elements ragin "advice" and meri "famous". Saint Ramirus was a 6th-century prior of the Saint Claudius Monastery in Leon. He and several others were executed by the Arian Visigoths, who opposed orthodox Christianity. This name was subsequently borne by kings of León, Asturias and Aragon.
RASHID   m   Arabic
Means "rightly guided" in Arabic. This transcription represents two different ways of spelling the name in Arabic. In Islamic tradition الرشيد (al-Rashid) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
RAYMOND   m   English, French
From the Germanic name Raginmund, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and mund "protector". The Normans introduced this name to England in the form Reimund. It was borne by several medieval (mostly Spanish) saints, including Saint Raymond Nonnatus, the patron of midwives and expectant mothers, and Saint Raymond of Peñafort, the patron of canonists.
REYNARD   m   English (Rare)
From the Germanic name Raginhard, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England in the form Reinard, though it never became very common there. In medieval fables the name was borne by the sly hero Reynard the Fox (with the result that renard has become a French word meaning "fox").
REYNOLD   m   English
From the Germanic name Raginald, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and wald "rule". The Normans (who used forms like Reinald or Reinold) brought the name to Britain, where it reinforced rare Old English and Norse cognates already in existence. It was common during the Middle Ages, but became more rare after the 15th century.
RHETT   m   English
From a surname, an Anglicized form of the Dutch de Raedt, derived from raet "advice, counsel". Margaret Mitchell used this name for the character Rhett Butler in her novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936).
SAGE   f & m   English (Modern)
From the English word sage, which denotes either a type of spice or else a wise person.
SARASWATI   f   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "possessing water" from Sanskrit सरस् (saras) meaning "fluid, water, lake" and वती (vati) meaning "having". This is the name of a Hindu river goddess, also associated with learning and the arts, who is the wife of Brahma.
SATOMI   f   Japanese
From Japanese (sato) meaning "village" or (sato) meaning "intelligent, clever, bright" combined with (mi) meaning "beautiful". Other kanji combinations are possible.
SCHUYLER   m   English
From a Dutch surname meaning "scholar". Dutch settlers brought the surname to America, where it was subsequently adopted as a given name in honour of the American general and senator Philip Schuyler (1733-1804).
SOPHIA   f   English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek
Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred during the reign of the emperor Hadrian. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which is the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.... [more]
TANCRED   m   Old Norman
Norman form of a Germanic name meaning "thought and counsel", derived from the elements thank "thought" and rad "counsel". This was the name of a leader of the First Crusade, described by Torquato Tasso in his epic poem 'Jerusalem Delivered' (1580).
TOMOMI   f & m   Japanese
From Japanese (tomo) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (tomo) meaning "friend" combined with (mi) meaning "beautiful" or (mi) meaning "fruit, good result, truth". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
VEDA   f   Indian, Telugu, Kannada
Means "knowledge" in Sanskrit.
VIDYA   f   Hinduism, Indian, Marathi, Hindi, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil
Means "knowledge, science, learning" in Sanskrit. This is another name of the Hindu goddess Saraswati.
VIVEK   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Tamil, Kannada, Telugu, Malayalam, Bengali
Means "wisdom, distinction, discrimination" in Sanskrit.
VIVI   f   Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Scandinavian diminutive of names beginning with Vi, as well as OLIVIA and SOFIA.
WASI   m   Arabic
Means "broad-minded, liberal, learned" in Arabic.
ZHIHAO   m & f   Chinese
From Chinese (zhì) meaning "will, purpose, ambition" or (zhì) meaning "wisdom, intellect" combined with (háo) meaning "brave, heroic, chivalrous". Many other character combinations are possible.
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