Names Categorized "yellow"

This is a list of names in which the categories include yellow.
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AELIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which was possibly derived from the Greek word ‘ηλιος (helios) meaning "sun". This was the family name of the Roman emperor Hadrian.
ÁMBAR   f   Spanish
Spanish cognate of AMBER.
AMBER   f   English, Dutch
From the English word amber that denotes either the gemstone, which is formed from fossil resin, or the orange-yellow colour. The word ultimately derives from Arabic عنبر ('anbar). It began to be used as a given name in the late 19th century, but it only became popular after the release of Kathleen Winsor's novel 'Forever Amber' (1944).
AMBRA   f   Italian
Italian cognate of AMBER.
AMBRE   f   French
French cognate of AMBER.
AURELIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which was derived from Latin aureus "golden, gilded". Marcus Aurelius was a 2nd-century Roman emperor and philosophical writer. This was also the name of several early saints.
AUREOLE   f   English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "radiant halo", ultimately derived from Latin aureolus "golden".
BLAINE   m   English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from the given name Bláán, which meant "yellow" in Gaelic. Saint Bláán was a 6th-century missionary to the Picts.
BLONDIE   f   English (Rare)
From a nickname for a person with blond hair. This is the name of the title character in a comic strip by Chic Young.
BOGLÁRKA   f   Hungarian
Means "buttercup" in Hungarian, derived from the archaic word boglár meaning "ornament".
CAPUCINE   f   French
Means "nasturtium" in French. This was the stage name of the French actress and model Capucine (1928-1990).
CHRYSES   m   Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek χρυσεος (chryseos) meaning "golden". In Greek mythology Chryses was the father of Chryseis, a woman captured by Agamemnon during the Trojan War.
CRESSIDA   f   Literature
Medieval form of CHRYSEIS. Various medieval tales describe her as a woman of Troy, daughter of Calchus, who leaves her Trojan lover Troilus for the Greek hero Diomedes. Shakespeare's play 'Troilus and Cressida' (1602) was based on these tales.
DAFFODIL   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, ultimately derived from Dutch de affodil meaning "the asphodel".
DARDAN   m   Albanian
From the name of the Dardani, an Illyrian tribe who lived on the Balkan Peninsula. Their name may derive from an Illyrian word meaning "pear". They were unrelated to the ancient people who were also called the Dardans who lived near Troy.
DARDANA   f   Albanian
Feminine form of DARDAN.
ELECTRA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ηλεκτρα (Elektra), derived from ηλεκτρον (elektron) meaning "amber". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra and the sister of Orestes. She helped her brother kill their mother and her lover Aegisthus in vengeance for Agamemnon's murder. Also in Greek mythology, this name was borne by one of the Pleiades, who were the daughters of Atlas and Pleione.
ELEKTRA   f   Greek Mythology
Greek form of ELECTRA.
ELETTRA   f   Italian
Italian form of ELECTRA.
FLAVIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of FLAVIUS.
FLÁVIO   m   Portuguese
Portuguese form of FLAVIUS.
FLAVIO   m   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of FLAVIUS.
FLAVIU   m   Romanian
Romanian form of FLAVIUS.
FLAVIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which meant "golden" or "yellow-haired" from Latin flavus "yellow, golden". Flavius was the family name of the 1st-century Roman emperors Vespasian, Titus and Domitian. It was used as a personal name by several later emperors, notably by Constantine.
FULVIA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Fulvius (see FULVIO).
FÚLVIO   m   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese form of Fulvius (see FULVIO).
FULVIO   m   Italian
Italian form of the Roman family name Fulvius, which was derived from Latin fulvus "yellow, tawny".
FULVIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Latin form of FULVIO.
GARDENIA   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the tropical flower, which was named for the Scottish naturalist Alexander Garden (1730-1791).
GINTARAS   m   Lithuanian
Means "amber" in Lithuanian.
GINTARĖ   f   Lithuanian
Feminine form of GINTARAS.
GOLDA   f   Yiddish
Means "gold" in Yiddish.
GOLDIE (1)   f   English
From a nickname for a person with blond hair, from the English word gold.
GWENLLIAN   f   Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and llian meaning "flaxen". This name was popular among medieval Welsh royalty. It was borne by the 14th-century daughter of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd.
HARI   m   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Nepali
Means "brown, yellow, tawny" in Sanskrit, and by extension "monkey, horse, lion". This is another name of the Hindu god Vishnu, and sometimes of Krishna. It is also borne by the son of the Garuda, the bird-like mount of Vishnu.
HELIOS   m   Greek Mythology
Means "sun" in Greek. This was the name of the young Greek sun god, who rode across the sky each day in a chariot pulled by four horses.
INBAR   f   Hebrew
Means "amber" in Hebrew.
JONQUIL   f   English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of flower, derived ultimately from Latin iuncus "reed".
KETUT   m & f   Indonesian, Balinese
Possibly from a Balinese word meaning "small banana". This name is traditionally given to the fourth child.
KETZI'AH   f   Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of KEZIAH.
KEZIA   f   Biblical
Variant of KEZIAH.
KEZIAH   f   Biblical
From the Hebrew name קְצִיעָה (Qetzi'ah) meaning "cassia, cinnamon", from the name of the spice tree. In the Old Testament she is a daughter of Job.
KIM (3)   f   Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (kim) meaning "gold, metal".
KIZZIE   f   English
Diminutive of KEZIAH.
KIZZY   f   English
Diminutive of KEZIAH. This particular spelling was repopularized in the late 1970s by a character in the book and miniseries 'Roots'.
KOHAKU   f & m   Japanese
From Japanese 琥珀 (kohaku) meaning "amber".
MARIGOLD   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which comes from a combination of MARY and the English word gold.
NARCÍS   m   Catalan
Catalan form of NARCISSUS. This is also the Catalan word for the narcissus flower.
NARCISA   f   Portuguese, Spanish, Italian, Romanian
Feminine form of NARCISSUS.
NARCISO   m   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of NARCISSUS. This is also the word for the narcissus flower in those languages.
NARCISSA   f   Late Roman
Feminine form of NARCISSUS.
NARCISSE   m & f   French
French masculine and feminine form of NARCISSUS. This is also the French word for the narcissus flower.
NARCISSUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Late Roman, Biblical
Latinized form of Greek Ναρκισσος (Narkissos), possibly derived from ναρκη (narke) meaning "sleep, numbness". Narkissos was a beautiful youth in Greek mythology who stared at his own reflection for so long that he eventually died and was turned into the narcissus flower.... [more]
NARCYZ   m   Polish
Polish form of NARCISSUS. This is also the Polish word for the narcissus flower.
NARGES   f   Persian
Means "daffodil, narcissus flower" in Persian, ultimately derived from Greek (see NARCISSUS).
NARKISSOS   m   Greek Mythology
Greek form of NARCISSUS.
NERGİS   f   Turkish
Means "daffodil, narcissus flower" in Turkish, ultimately derived from Greek (see NARCISSUS).
NEVEN   m   Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Masculine form of NEVENA.
NEVENA   f   Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian
Derived from South Slavic neven meaning "marigold".
NEVENKA   f   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Variant of NEVENA.
NGAIRE   f   Maori
Possibly means "flaxen" in Maori.
NUBIA   f   Various
From the name of the ancient region and kingdom in Africa, south of Egypt. It possibly derives from the Egyptian word nbw meaning "gold".
NURIT   f   Hebrew
Means "buttercup flower" in Hebrew (genus Ranunculus).
ORIA   f   Italian
Italian form of the Late Latin name Aurea which was derived from Latin aureus "golden". This was the name of a 3rd-century saint from Ostia (near Rome), as well as an 11th-century Spanish saint.
ORIANA   f   Italian, Spanish
Possibly derived from Latin aurum "gold" or from its derivatives, Spanish oro or French or. In medieval legend Oriana was the daughter of a king of England who married the knight Amadis.
PAZ (2)   f & m   Hebrew
Means "gold" in Hebrew.
PITAMBAR   m   Indian, Hindi
Modern form of PITAMBARA.
PITAMBARA   m   Hinduism
Derived from Sanskrit पीत (pita) meaning "yellow" and अम्बर (ambara) meaning "garment". This is another name of the Hindu gods Vishnu or Krishna, given to them because yellow clothing is traditionally worn at religious events.
SAFFRON   f   English (Rare)
From the English word which refers either to a spice, the crocus flower from which it is harvested, or the yellow-orange colour of the spice. It is derived via Old French from Arabic زعفران (za'faran), itself probably from Persian meaning "gold leaves".
SOL (1)   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Means "the sun" in Spanish or Portuguese.
SONAL   f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati
From Hindi सोना (sona), Marathi सोन (son) or Gujarati સોનું (sonum) meaning "gold", all derived from Sanskrit सुवर्ण (suvarna) meaning literally "good colour".
SUMMER   f   English
From the name of the season, ultimately from Old English sumor. It has been in use as a given name since the 1970s.
SUNNY   f & m   English
From the English word meaning "sunny, cheerful".
TAHNEE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of TAWNY.
TANSY   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which is derived via Old French from Late Latin tanacita.
TANZI   f   English (Rare)
Variant of TANSY.
TAWNEE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of TAWNY.
TAWNIE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of TAWNY.
TAWNY   f   English (Modern)
From the English word, ultimately deriving from Old French tané, which means "light brown".
TOPAZ   f   English (Rare)
From the English word for the yellow precious stone, the birthstone of November, ultimately derived from Greek τοπαζος (topazos).
XANTHE   f   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ξανθος (xanthos) meaning "yellow" or "fair hair". This was the name of a few minor figures in Greek mythology.
XANTHIA   f   English (Rare)
Modern elaborated form of XANTHE.
XANTHIPPE   f   Ancient Greek
Feminine form of XANTHIPPOS. This was the name of the wife of Socrates. Because of her supposedly argumentative nature, the name has been adopted (in the modern era) as a word for a scolding, ill-tempered woman.
XANTHIPPOS   m   Ancient Greek
From the Greek elements ξανθος (xanthos) "yellow" and ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Athenian general.
XANTHOS   m   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
From Greek ξανθος (xanthos) meaning "yellow". This is the name of several figures, mostly minor, in Greek mythology.
ZARATHUSTRA   m   History
Possibly means "golden camel" in Old Iranian, derived from zarat meaning "golden" combined with ushtra meaning "camel". Zarathustra was the Persian prophet who founded the ancient religion of Zoroastrianism about the 10th century BC.
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