American Names

American names are used in the United States. See also about American names.
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AALIYAH   f   Arabic, English (Modern)
Feminine form of AALI. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by the singer Aaliyah Haughton (1979-2001), who was known simply as Aaliyah.
AAREN   m & f   English (Rare)
Variant or feminine form of AARON.
AARON   m   English, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name אַהֲרֹן ('Aharon) which is most likely of unknown Egyptian origin. Other theories claim a Hebrew derivation, and suggest meanings such as "high mountain" or "exalted". In the Old Testament this name is borne by the older brother of Moses. He acted as a spokesman for his brother when they appealed to the pharaoh to release the Israelites from slavery. Aaron's rod produced miracles and plagues to intimidate the pharaoh. After the departure from Egypt and arrival at Mount Sinai, God installed Aaron as the first high priest of the Israelites and promised that his descendants would form the priesthood.... [more]
ABBEY   f   English
Diminutive of ABIGAIL.
ABBI   f   English
Diminutive of ABIGAIL.
ABBIE   f   English
Diminutive of ABIGAIL.
ABBY   f   English
Diminutive of ABIGAIL.
ABE (1)   m   English
Short form of ABRAHAM.
ABEGAIL   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ABIGAIL.
ABEL   m   English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name הֶבֶל (Hevel) or הָבֶל (Havel) which meant "breath". In the Old Testament he is the second son of Adam and Eve, murdered out of envy by his brother Cain. In England, this name came into use during the Middle Ages, and it was common during the Puritan era.
ABIGAIL   f   English, German, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name אֲבִיגָיִל ('Avigayil) meaning "my father is joy". In the Old Testament this is the name of Nabal's wife. After Nabal's death she became the third wife of King David.... [more]
ABIGAYLE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ABIGAIL.
ABNER   m   English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Means "my father is a light" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, Abner was a cousin of Saul and the commander of his army. After he killed Asahel he was himself slain by Asahel's brother Joab. It has been used as an English Christian given name since the Protestant Reformation. It was popular with the Puritans, who brought it to America in the 17th century.
ABRAHAM   m   English, Hebrew, Spanish, French, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
This name may be viewed either as meaning "father of many" in Hebrew or else as a contraction of ABRAM (1) and הָמוֹן (hamon) "many, multitude". The biblical patriarch Abraham was originally named Abram but God changed his name (see Genesis 17:5). With his father Terah, he led his wife Sarah, his nephew Lot and their other followers from Ur into Canaan. He is regarded by Jews as being the founder of the Hebrews through his son Isaac and by Muslims as being the founder of the Arabs through his son Ishmael.... [more]
ABRAM (1)   m   English, Biblical
Means "high father" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament God changed Abram's name to Abraham (see Genesis 17:5).
ACACIA   f   English (Rare)
From the name of a type of tree, ultimately deriving from Greek ακη (ake) "thorn, point".
ACE (1)   m   English
From the English word meaning "highest rank". More commonly a nickname, it is occasionally used as a given name.
ADA   f   English, German, Polish, Hungarian, Italian, Finnish
Short form of ADELAIDE and other names beginning with the same sound. This name was borne by Augusta Ada King (1815-1852), the Countess of Lovelace (known as Ada Lovelace), a daughter of Lord Byron. She was an assistant to Charles Babbage, the inventor of an early mechanical computer.
ADAIR   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the given name EDGAR.
ADALYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ADELINE using the popular name suffix lyn.
ADALYNN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ADELINE using the popular name suffix lyn.
ADAM   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make".... [more]
ADAMINA   f   English (Rare)
Feminine form of ADAM.
ADDIE   f   English
Diminutive of ADELAIDE.
ADDISON   f & m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of ADAM". Its recent popularity as a feminine name stems from its similarity in sound to Madison.
ADDY (1)   f   English
Diminutive of ADELAIDE.
ADDYSON   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of ADDISON.
ADELA   f   English, Spanish, Romanian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element adal meaning "noble". Saint Adela was a 7th-century Frankish princess who founded a monastery at Pfazel in France. This name was also borne by a daughter of William the Conqueror.
ADELAIDE   f   English, Italian, Portuguese
From the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman Emperor Otto the Great. The name became common in Britain in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.
ADELIA   f   English, Spanish
Elaborated form of ADELA.
ADELINE   f   French, English
Diminutive of ADÈLE.
ADELLA   f   English
Variant of ADELA.
ADELLE   f   English
Variant of ADELE.
ADELYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ADELINE using the popular name suffix lyn.
ADEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of AIDAN.
ADOLPH   m   English
English form of ADOLF, rarely used since World War II.
ADRIA   f   English
Short form of ADRIANA.
ADRIAN   m   English, Romanian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian
Form of Hadrianus (see HADRIAN). Several saints and six popes have borne this name, including the only English pope, Adrian IV, and the only Dutch pope, Adrian VI. As an English name, it has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it was not popular until modern times.
ADRIANNA   f   English, Polish
Feminine form of ADRIAN.
ADRIANNE   f   English
Feminine form of ADRIAN.
AFRICA (1)   f   African American (Rare)
From the name of the continent, which is of Latin origin, possibly from the Afri people who lived near Carthage in North Africa. This rare name is used most often by African-American parents.
AGATHA   f   English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αγαθη (Agathe), derived from Greek αγαθος (agathos) meaning "good". Saint Agatha was a 3rd-century martyr from Sicily who was tortured and killed after spurning the advances of a Roman official. The saint was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). The mystery writer Agatha Christie (1890-1976) was a famous modern bearer of this name.
AGGIE   f   English
Diminutive of AGNES or AGATHA.
AGNES   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Αγνη (Hagne), derived from Greek ‘αγνος (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe, being especially popular in England in the Middle Ages.
AIDAN   m   Irish, Scottish, English (Modern)
Anglicized form of AODHÁN. In the latter part of the 20th century it became popular in America due to its sound, since it uses the same fashionable aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden and Hayden.
AIDEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of AIDAN.
AILEEN   f   Scottish, Irish, English
Variant of EILEEN.
AINSLEE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of AINSLEY.
AINSLEY   f & m   Scottish, English (Modern)
From a surname which was from a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".
AINSLIE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of AINSLEY.
AISHA   f   Arabic, Urdu, American
Means "alive" in Arabic. This was the name of Muhammad's third wife, the daughter of Abu Bakr. Some time after Muhammad's death she went to war against Ali, the fourth caliph, but was defeated. This name is used more by Sunni Muslims and less by Shias.... [more]
AKEEM   m   African American
Perhaps a variant of HAKIM.
AL   m   English
Short form of ALBERT and other names beginning with Al. A notable bearer is American actor Al Pacino (1940-).
ALAINA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ALANA, probably influenced by ELAINE.
ALAN   m   English, Scottish, Breton, French
The meaning of this name is not known for certain. It was used in Brittany at least as early as the 6th century, and it possibly means either "little rock" or "handsome" in Breton. Alternatively, it may derive from the tribal name of the Alans, an Iranian people who migrated into Europe in the 4th and 5th centuries.... [more]
ALANA   f   English
Feminine form of ALAN.
ALANIS   f   English (Rare)
Feminine form of ALAN. Canadian musician Alanis Morissette (1974-) was named after her father Alan. Her parents apparently decided to use this particular spelling after seeing this word in a Greek newspaper.
ALANNA   f   English
Feminine form of ALAN.
ALANNAH   f   English (Modern), Irish
Variant of ALANA. It has been influenced by the affectionate Anglo-Irish word alannah, from the Irish Gaelic phrase a leanbh meaning "O child".
ALANNIS   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ALANIS.
ALAYNA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ALAINA.
ALBAN   m   German, French, Albanian, English (Rare)
From the Roman cognomen Albanus which meant "from Alba". Alba (from Latin albus "white") was the name of various places within the Roman Empire, including the city Alba Longa. This name was borne by Saint Alban, the first British martyr (4th century). According to tradition, he sheltered a fugitive priest in his house. When his house was searched, he disguised himself as the priest, was arrested in his stead, and was beheaded. As an English name, Alban was occasionally used in the Middle Ages and was revived in the 18th century, though it is now uncommon.
ALBERT   m   English, French, Catalan, German, Polish, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Romanian, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalbert, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and beraht "bright". This name was common among medieval German royalty. The Normans introduced it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Æðelberht. Though it became rare in England by the 17th century, it was repopularized in the 19th century by the German-born Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.... [more]
ALBERTA   f   English, Italian, Portuguese
Feminine form of ALBERT. This is the name of a Canadian province, which was named in honour of a daughter of Queen Victoria.
ALDEN   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given name EALDWINE.
ALDOUS   m   English (Rare)
Probably a diminutive of names beginning with the Old English element eald "old". It has been in use as an English given name since the Middle Ages, mainly in East Anglia. The British author Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) was a famous bearer of this name.
ALEA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of AALIYAH.
ALEAH   f   English (Modern)
Variant of AALIYAH.
ALEASE   f   English
Possibly a variant of ALICIA.
ALEC   m   English
Short form of ALEXANDER.
ALECIA   f   English
Variant of ALICIA.
ALEESHA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ALICIA.
ALENE   f   English
Variant of ALINE.
ALESHA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ALICIA.
ALESIA   f   English
Possibly a variant of ALICIA, or maybe from the ancient Gaulish city of Alesia.
ALETA   f   English
Possibly a variant of ALETHEA. This was the name of the wife of the title character in the comic strip 'Prince Valiant' which first appeared in 1937.
ALETHA   f   English
Variant of ALETHEA.
ALETHEA   f   English
Derived from Greek αληθεια (aletheia) meaning "truth". This name was coined in the 17th century.
ALEX   m & f   English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Russian
Short form of ALEXANDER, ALEXANDRA, and other names beginning with Alex.
ALEXA   f   English, German, Hungarian
Short form of ALEXANDRA.
ALEXANDER   m   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.... [more]
ALEXANDRA   f   English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
ALEXANDRIA   f   English
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. Alexander the Great founded several cities by this name (or renamed them) as he extended his empire eastward. The most notable of these is Alexandria in Egypt, founded by Alexander in 331 BC.
ALEXANDRINA   f   Portuguese, English (Rare)
Elaborated form of ALEXANDRA. This was the first name of Queen Victoria; her middle name was Victoria.
ALEXIA   f   French, English (Modern)
Feminine form of ALEXIS.
ALEXINA   f   English
Feminine form of ALEX, or a diminutive of ALEXIS.
ALEXIS   m & f   German, French, English, Greek, Ancient Greek
From the Greek name Αλεξις (Alexis), which meant "helper" or "defender", derived from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, to help". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek comic poet, and also of several saints. It is used somewhat interchangeably with the related name Αλεξιος or Alexius, borne by five Byzantine emperors. In the English-speaking world it is more commonly used as a feminine name.
ALEXUS   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ALEXIS.
ALF (2)   m   English
Short form of ALFRED.
ALFIE   m   English
Diminutive of ALFRED.
ALFRED   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Dutch
Derived from the Old English name Ælfræd, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and ræd "counsel". Alfred the Great was a 9th-century king of Wessex who fought unceasingly against the Danes living in northeast England. He was also a scholar, and he translated many Latin books into Old English. His fame helped to ensure the usage of this name even after the Norman conquest, when most Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. It became rare by the end of the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 18th century.... [more]
ALGAR   m   English (Rare)
Means "elf spear" from Old English ælf "elf" and gar "spear". This Old English name was rarely used after the Norman conquest, being absorbed by similar-sounding names and Norman and Scandinavian cognates. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
ALGER   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name ALGAR.
ALGERNON   m   English
Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from aux gernons "having a moustache", which was applied to William de Percy, a companion of William the Conqueror. It was first used a given name in the 15th century (for a descendant of William de Percy).
ALI (2)   f   English
Diminutive of ALISON, ALEXANDRA or other names beginning with the same sound.
ALIAH   f   English (Rare)
Variant of AALIYAH.
ALICE   f   English, French, Portuguese, Italian
From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).
ALICIA   f   Spanish, English
Latinized form of ALICE.
ALINE   f   French, Portuguese (Brazilian), English
Medieval short form of ADELINE. As an English name, in modern times it has sometimes been regarded as a variant of EILEEN. This was the name of a popular 1965 song by the French singer Christophe.
ALISE (2)   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ALICE.
ALISHA   f   English
Variant of ALICIA.
ALISHIA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ALICIA.
ALISIA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ALICIA.
ALISON   f   English, French
Norman French diminutive of Aalis (see ALICE). It was common in England and France in the Middle Ages, and was later revived in the 20th century. Unlike most other English names ending in son, it is not derived from a surname.
ALISSA   f   English
Variant of ALYSSA.
ALISYA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ALICIA.
ALITA   f   English (Rare)
Possibly a variant of ALETHEA.
ALIVIA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of OLIVIA.
ALLAN   m   English, Scottish, Danish
Variant of ALAN. The American author Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) got his middle name from the surname of the parents who adopted him.
ALLANA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ALANA.
ALLANNAH   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ALANNAH.
ALLEGRA   f   English (Rare), Italian (Rare)
Means "cheerful, lively" in Italian. It is not a traditional Italian name. It was borne by a short-lived illegitimate daughter of Lord Byron.
ALLEGRIA   f   English (Rare)
Elaborated form of ALLEGRA.
ALLEN   m   English, Scottish
Variant of ALAN. A famous bearer of this name was Allen Ginsberg (1926-1997), an American beat poet. Another is the American film director and actor Woody Allen (1935-), who took the stage name Allen from his real first name.
ALLIE   f   English
Diminutive of ALISON, ALEXANDRA or other names beginning with the same sound.
ALLISON   f   English
Variant of ALISON.
ALLISSA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ALYSSA.
ALLY (1)   f   English
Diminutive of ALISON, ALEXANDRA or other names beginning with the same sound.
ALLYCIA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ALICIA.
ALLYN   m   English
Variant of ALAN.
ALLYSON   f   English
Variant of ALISON.
ALMA (1)   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Dutch
This name became popular after the Battle of Alma (1854), which took place near the River Alma in Crimea and ended in a victory for Britain and France. However, the name was in rare use before the battle; it was probably inspired by Latin almus "nourishing". It also coincides with the Spanish word meaning "the soul".
ALOYSIUS   m   English
Latinized form of Aloys, an old Occitan form of LOUIS. This was the name of a 16th-century Italian saint, Aloysius Gonzaga. The name has been in occasional use among Catholics since his time.
ALPHA   f & m   English
From the name of the first letter in the Greek alphabet, Α.
ALPHONSO   m   English
Variant of ALFONSO.
ALPHONZO   m   English (Rare)
Uncommon variant of ALFONSO.
ALTON   m   English
From an Old English surname which was derived from a place name meaning "town at the source of the river".
ALVA (2)   m   English
Variant of ALVAH. A famous bearer of this name was the inventor Thomas Alva Edison (1847-1931).
ALVENA   f   English
Feminine form of ALVIN.
ALVIN   m   English
From a medieval form of any of the Old English names ÆLFWINE, ÆÐELWINE or EALDWINE. It was revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname which was derived from the Old English names.
ALVINA   f   English
Feminine form of ALVIN.
ALYCE   f   English
Variant of ALICE.
ALYCIA   f   English
Variant of ALICIA.
ALYS   f   English
Variant of ALICE.
ALYSA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ALICIA.
ALYSE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ALICE.
ALYSHA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ALICIA.
ALYSIA   f   English
Variant of ALICIA.
ALYSON   f   English
Variant of ALISON.
ALYSSA   f   English
Variant of ALICIA. The spelling has probably been influenced by that of the alyssum flower, the name of which is derived from Greek α (a), a negative prefix, combined with λυσσα (lyssa) "madness, rabies", since it was believed to cure madness.
ALYSSIA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ALICIA.
ALYX   f   English (Rare)
Feminine variant of ALEX.
AMABEL   f   English (Rare)
Medieval feminine form of AMABILIS.
AMANDA   f   English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Late Roman
In part this is a feminine form of AMANDUS. However, it was not used during the Middle Ages. In the 17th century it was recreated by authors and poets who based it directly on Latin amanda "lovable, worthy of love". Notably, the playwright Colley Cibber used it for a character in his play 'Love's Last Shift' (1696). It came into regular use during the 19th century.
AMBER   f   English, Dutch
From the English word amber that denotes either the gemstone, which is formed from fossil resin, or the orange-yellow colour. The word ultimately derives from Arabic عنبر ('anbar). It began to be used as a given name in the late 19th century, but it only became popular after the release of Kathleen Winsor's novel 'Forever Amber' (1944).
AMBERLY   f   English (Modern)
Elaboration of AMBER, influenced by the spelling of the name KIMBERLY.
AMBROSE   m   English
From the Late Latin name Ambrosius, which was derived from the Greek name Αμβροσιος (Ambrosios) meaning "immortal". Saint Ambrose was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Milan, who is considered a Doctor of the Church. Due to the saint, the name came into general use in Christian Europe, though it was never particularly common in England.
AMBROSINE   f   English (Rare)
Feminine form of AMBROSE.
AMELIA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Variant of AMALIA, though it is sometimes confused with EMILIA, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of George II and George III. Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.
AMERICA   f   English
In the English-speaking world, this name is usually given in reference to the United States of America (see AMERIGO). It came into use as an American name in the 19th century.
AMERY   m   English (Rare)
Variant of EMERY.
AMETHYST   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the purple semi-precious stone, which is derived from the Greek negative prefix α (a) and μεθυστος (methystos) meaning "intoxicated, drunk", as it was believed to be a remedy against drunkenness.
AMI (2)   f   English
Variant of AMY.
AMIAS   m   English (Rare)
Variant of AMYAS.
AMIE   f   English
Variant of AMY.
AMILIA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of either AMALIA or EMILIA.
AMITY   f   English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "friendship", ultimately deriving from Latin amicitia.
AMOS   m   English, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
Means "carried" in Hebrew. Amos is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Amos, which speaks against greed, corruption and oppression of the poor. Written about the 8th century BC, it is among the oldest of the prophetic books. As an English name, Amos has been used since the Protestant Reformation, and was popular among the Puritans.
AMY   f   English
English form of the Old French name Amée meaning "beloved" (modern French aimée), a vernacular form of the Latin Amata. As an English name, it was in use in the Middle Ages (though not common) and was revived in the 19th century.
AMYAS   m   English (Rare)
Meaning unknown, perhaps a derivative of AMIS. Alternatively, it may come from a surname which originally indicated that the bearer was from the city of Amiens in France. Edmund Spenser used this name for a minor character in his epic poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590).
ANABELLA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ANNABEL.
ANABELLE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ANNABEL.
ANASTACIA   f   English
Variant of ANASTASIA.
ANASTASIA   f   Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, English, Spanish, Italian, Ancient Greek
Feminine form of ANASTASIUS. This was the name of a 4th-century Dalmatian saint who was martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. Due to her, the name has been common in Eastern Orthodox Christianity (in various spellings). As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the youngest daughter of the last Russian tsar Nicholas II, who was rumoured to have escaped the execution of her family in 1918.
ANDERSON   m   English
From a surname meaning "son of ANDREW".
ANDI   f   English
Diminutive of ANDREA (2).
ANDIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of ANDREW or ANDREA (2).
ANDRA   f   Romanian, English
Feminine form of ANDREI or ANDREW. As an English name it has only been used since the 20th century.
ANDRE   m   English, African American
English form of ANDRÉ.
ANDREA (2)   f   English, German, Spanish, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Dutch, Croatian, Serbian
Feminine form of ANDREW. As an English name, it has been used since the 17th century, though it was not common until the 20th century.
ANDREW   m   English, Biblical
English form of the Greek name Ανδρεας (Andreas), which was derived from ανδρειος (andreios) "manly, masculine", a derivative of ανηρ (aner) "man". In the New Testament the apostle Andrew, the first disciple to join Jesus, is the brother of Simon Peter. According to tradition, he later preached in the Black Sea region, with some legends saying he was crucified on an X-shaped cross. Andrew, being a Greek name, was probably only a nickname or a translation of his real Hebrew name, which is not known.... [more]
ANDRINA   f   English (Rare)
Feminine form of ANDREW.
ANDY   m & f   English
Diminutive of ANDREW or sometimes ANDREA (2). American pop artist and filmmaker Andy Warhol (1928-1987) was a famous bearer of this name.
ANEMONE   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the anemone flower, which derives from Greek ανεμος (anemos) "wind".
ANGEL   m & f   English, Bulgarian, Macedonian
From the medieval Latin masculine name Angelus which was derived from the name of the heavenly creature (itself derived from the Greek word αγγελος (angelos) meaning "messenger"). It has never been very common in the English-speaking world, where it is sometimes used as a feminine name in modern times.
ANGELA   f   English, Italian, German, Dutch, Romanian, Slovene, Slovak, Russian, Macedonian, Late Roman
Feminine form of Angelus (see ANGEL). As an English name, it came into use in the 18th century.
ANGELIA   f   English
Elaborated form of ANGELA.
ANGELICA   f   English, Italian, Romanian, Literature
Derived from Latin angelicus meaning "angelic", ultimately related to Greek αγγελος (angelos) "messenger". The poets Boiardo and Ariosto used this name in their 'Orlando' poems (1495 and 1532), where it belongs to Orlando's love interest. It has been used as a given name since the 18th century.
ANGELINA   f   Italian, English, Russian, German, Dutch, Polish, Spanish, Macedonian
Latinate diminutive of ANGELA. A famous bearer is American actress Angelina Jolie (1975-).
ANGELLE   f   English (Rare)
Feminine variant of ANGEL.
ANGIE   f   English
Diminutive of ANGELA.
ANGUS   m   Scottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of AONGHUS.
ANIMA (2)   f   English (Rare)
Means "soul, spirit" in Latin. In Jungian psychology the anima is an individual's true inner self, or soul.
ANISE   f   English (Rare)
From the English word for the herb, also called aniseed.
ANISSA   f   English
Combination of ANNA and the popular name suffix issa. This name was first brought to public attention by the child actress Anissa Jones (1958-1976).
ANITA (1)   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian, Slovene, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Latvian
Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian and Slovene diminutive of ANA.
ANIYA   f   English (Modern)
Modern name, possibly based on ANYA or AALIYAH.
ANIYAH   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ANIYA.
ANN   f   English
English form of ANNE (1). In the English-speaking world, both this spelling and Anne have been used since the Middle Ages, though Ann became much more popular during the 19th century.
ANNA   f   English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary. In the English-speaking world, this form came into general use in the 18th century, joining Ann and Anne.... [more]
ANNABEL   f   English, Dutch
Variant of AMABEL influenced by the name ANNA. This name appears to have arisen in Scotland in the Middle Ages.
ANNABELLA   f   Italian, English (Modern)
Latinate form of ANNABEL. It can also be taken as a combination of ANNA and BELLA.
ANNABELLE   f   English, French
Variant of ANNABEL. It can also be taken as a combination of ANNA and BELLE.
ANNABETH   f   English (Rare)
Combination of ANNA and BETH.
ANNALEE   f   English (Rare)
Combination of ANNA and LEE.
ANNALISE   f   English (Modern)
Combination of ANNA and LISE.
ANNE (1)   f   French, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Basque
French form of ANNA. In the 13th-century it was imported to England, where it was also commonly spelled Ann. The name was borne by a 17th-century English queen and also by the second wife of Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn (the mother of Queen Elizabeth I), who was eventually beheaded in the Tower of London. This is also the name of the heroine in 'Anne of Green Gables' (1908) by Canadian author L. M. Montgomery.
ANNEKA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ANNIKA.
ANNETTE   f   French, English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch
French diminutive of ANNE (1). It has also been widely used in the English-speaking world, and it became popular in America in the late 1950s due to the fame of actress Annette Funicello (1942-).
ANNICE   f   English
Variant of ANNIS.
ANNIE   f   English, French, Dutch
Diminutive of ANNE (1).
ANNIKA   f   Swedish, Dutch, Finnish, German, English (Modern)
Swedish diminutive of ANNA.
ANNIS   f   English
Medieval English form of AGNES.
ANNMARIE   f   English
Combination of ANN and MARIE.
ANNORA   f   English (Rare)
Medieval English variant of HONORA.
ANONA   f   English
Meaning unknown. It was possibly inspired by a 1903 song by this name recorded by American musician Vess Ossman.
ANSEL   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name ANSELM. A famous bearer was American photographer Ansel Adams (1902-1984).
ANSELM   m   German, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ans "god" and helm "helmet, protection". This name was brought to England in the late 11th century by Saint Anselm, who was born in northern Italy. He was archbishop of Canterbury and a Doctor of the Church.
ANSLEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of AINSLEY.
ANSON   m   English
From a surname meaning "son of AGNES".
ANTHONY   m   English
English form of the Roman family name Antonius, which is of unknown Etruscan origin. The most notable member of the Roman family was the general Marcus Antonius (called Mark Antony in English), who for a period in the 1st century BC ruled the Roman Empire jointly with Augustus. When their relationship turned sour, he and his mistress Cleopatra were attacked and forced to commit suicide, as related in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Antony and Cleopatra' (1606).... [more]
ANTOINE   m   French, African American
French form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ANTONETTE   f   English
Diminutive of ANTONIA.
ANTONY   m   English
Variant of ANTHONY. This was formerly the usual English spelling of the name, but during the 17th century the h began to be added.
ANTWAN   m   African American
Variant of ANTOINE, in use since the 1960s.
APRIL   f   English
From the name of the month, probably originally derived from Latin aperire "to open", referring to the opening of flowers. It has only been commonly used as a given name since the 1940s.
ARABELLA   f   English
Medieval Scottish name, probably a variant of ANNABEL. It has long been associated with Latin orabilis meaning "invokable".
ARAMINTA   f   English (Rare)
Meaning unknown. This name was (first?) used by William Congreve in his comedy 'The Old Bachelor' (1693) and later by Sir John Vanbrugh in his comedy 'The Confederacy' (1705). This was the real name of abolitionist Harriet Tubman (1820-1913), who was born Araminta Ross.
ARCHER   m   English
From an English surname meaning "bowman, archer", of Old French origin.
ARCHIBALD   m   Scottish, English
Derived from the Germanic elements ercan "genuine" and bald "bold". The first element was altered due to the influence of Greek names beginning with the element αρχος (archos) meaning "master". The Normans brought this name to England. It first became common in Scotland in the Middle Ages.
ARCHIE   m   Scottish, English
Diminutive of ARCHIBALD. This name is borne by Archie Andrews, an American comic-book character created in 1941.
ARDEN   m & f   English
From an English surname, originally taken from various place names, which were derived from a Celtic word meaning "high".
ARETHA   f   English
Possibly derived from Greek αρετη (arete) meaning "virtue". This name was popularized in the 1960s by American singer Aretha Franklin (1942-).
ARIA   f   English
Means "song" or "melody" in Italian (literally means "air"). An aria is an elaborate vocal solo, the type usually performed in operas. As an English name, it has only been in use since the 20th century. It is not common in Italy.
ARIANA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ARIANNA.
ARIC   m   English
Variant of ERIC.
ARIEL   m & f   Hebrew, English, French, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Means "lion of God" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament it is used as another name for the city of Jerusalem. Shakespeare used it as the name of a spirit in his play 'The Tempest' (1611), and one of the moons of Uranus bears this name in his honour. As an English name, it became more common for females in the 1980s, especially after it was used for the title character in the Walt Disney film 'The Little Mermaid' (1989).
ARIELLA   f   English (Rare)
Strictly feminine form of ARIEL.
ARIENNE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ARIANE.
ARIN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ERIN.
ARLEEN   f   English
Variant of ARLINE.
ARLEN   m   English
Meaning unknown, possibly from a surname.
ARLENE   f   English
Variant of ARLINE.
ARLIE   f & m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "eagle wood" in Old English. This name can also be a diminutive of ARLENE.
ARLINE   f   English
Meaning unknown, possibly invented by Michael William Balfe for the main character in his opera 'The Bohemian Girl' (1843).
ARLO   m   English
Meaning uncertain. It was perhaps inspired by the fictional place name Arlo Hill from the poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590) by Edmund Spenser. Spenser probably got Arlo by altering the real Irish place name Aherlow, which is Gaelic meaning "between two highlands".
ARN   m   English
Short form of ARNOLD.
ARNIE   m   English
Diminutive of ARNOLD.
ARNOLD   m   English, German, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "eagle power", derived from the elements arn "eagle" and wald "power". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Earnweald. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century.... [more]
ARRON   m   English
Variant of AARON.
ART   m   English
Short form of ARTHUR.
ARTHUR   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.... [more]
ARVEL   m   English
Meaning unknown, possibly a variant of ARWEL.
ARYANA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ARIANA.
ASH   m & f   English
Short form of ASHLEY. It can also come directly from the English word denoting either the tree or the residue of fire.
ASHER   m   Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "happy, blessed" in Hebrew. Asher in the Old Testament is a son of Jacob by Leah's handmaid Zilpah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. The meaning of his name is explained in Genesis 30:13.
ASHLEA   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of ASHLEY.
ASHLEE   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of ASHLEY.
ASHLEIGH   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of ASHLEY.
ASHLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from a combination of Old English æsc and leah. Until the 1960s it was more commonly given to boys in the United States, but it is now most often used on girls.
ASHLIE   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of ASHLEY.
ASHLYN   f   English (Modern)
Combination of ASHLEY and the popular name suffix lyn.
ASHLYNN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ASHLYN.
ASHTON   m & f   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name which meant "ash tree town" in Old English.
ASIA (1)   f   English (Modern), Italian (Modern)
From the name of the continent, which is perhaps derived from Akkadian asu, meaning "east".
ASPEN   f   English (Modern)
From the English word for the tree, derived from Old English æspe. It is also the name of a ski resort in Colorado.
ASTON   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from either a place name meaning "east town" in Old English or from the given name ÆÐELSTAN.
ASTOR   m   English (Rare)
From a surname derived from Occitan astur meaning "hawk".
ASTRA   f   English (Rare)
Means "star", ultimately from Greek αστηρ (aster). This name has only been (rarely) used since the 20th century.
ATHENA   f   Greek Mythology, English
Meaning unknown, perhaps derived from Greek αθηρ (ather) "sharp" and αινη (aine) "praise". Athena was the Greek goddess of wisdom and warfare, the daughter of Zeus and the patron goddess of the city of Athens in Greece. She is associated with the olive tree and the owl.
AUBERON   m   English (Rare)
Norman French derivative of a Germanic name, probably ALBERICH.
AUBREE   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of AUBREY.
AUBREY   m & f   English
Norman French form of the Germanic name ALBERICH. As an English masculine name it was common in the Middle Ages, and was revived in the 19th century. Since the mid-1970s it has more frequently been given to girls, due to Bread's 1972 song 'Aubrey' along with its similarity to the established feminine name Audrey.
AUBRIE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of AUBREY.
AUDIE   f   English
Diminutive of AUDREY.
AUDLEY   m   English
From a surname which was taken from a place name meaning "EALDGYÐ's clearing" in Old English.
AUDRA (2)   f   English
Variant of AUDREY, used since the 19th century.
AUDREA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of AUDREY.
AUDREY   f   English
Medieval diminutive of ÆÐELÞRYÐ. This was the name of a 7th-century saint, a princess of East Anglia who founded a monastery at Ely. It was also borne by a character in Shakespeare's comedy 'As You Like It' (1599). At the end of the Middle Ages the name became rare due to association with the word tawdry (which was derived from St. Audrey, the name of a fair where cheap lace was sold), but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was British actress Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).
AUGUST   m   German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Catalan, English
German, Polish, Scandinavian and Catalan form of AUGUSTUS.
AUGUSTA   f   German, Italian, Portuguese, Polish, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of AUGUSTUS. It was introduced to Britain when king George III, a member of the German House of Hanover, gave this name to his second daughter in the 18th century.
AUGUSTINE (1)   m   English
From the Roman name Augustinus, itself derived from the Roman name AUGUSTUS. Saint Augustine of Hippo was a 5th-century Christian theologian and author from North Africa. For his contributions to Christian philosophy he is known as a Doctor of the Church. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world. It became popular in England in the Middle Ages partly because of a second saint by this name, Augustine of Canterbury, a 6th-century Italian monk sent to England to convert the Anglo-Saxons.
AURA   f   English
From the English word aura (derived from Greek via Latin meaning "breeze") for a distinctive atmosphere or illumination.
AUREOLE   f   English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "radiant halo", ultimately derived from Latin aureolus "golden".
AURORA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Romanian, Finnish, Roman Mythology
Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.
AUSTEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of AUSTIN.
AUSTIN   m   English
Medieval contracted form of AUGUSTINE (1). Modern use of the name is probably also partly inspired by the common surname Austin, which is of the same origin. This is also the name of a city in Texas.
AUSTYN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of AUSTIN.
AUTUMN   f   English
From the name of the season, ultimately from Latin autumnus. This name has been in general use since the 1960s.
AVA (1)   f   English
Variant of EVE. A famous bearer was the American actress Ava Gardner (1922-1990).
AVALINE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of AVELINE.
AVALON   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the island paradise to which King Arthur was brought after his death. The name of this island is perhaps related to Welsh afal meaning "apple", a fruit which was often linked with paradise.
AVELINE   f   English (Rare)
From the Norman French form of the Germanic name Avelina, a diminutive of AVILA. The Normans introduced this name to Britain. After the Middle Ages it became rare as an English name, though it persisted in America until the 19th century.
AVERILL   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from the feminine given name EOFORHILD.
AVERY   m & f   English
From a surname which was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.
AVICE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of AVIS.
AVIS   f   English
Probably a Latinized form of the Germanic name Aveza, which was derived from the element avi, of unknown meaning, possibly "desired". The Normans introduced this name to England and it became moderately common during the Middle Ages, at which time it was associated with Latin avis "bird".
AVRIL   f   French (Rare), English (Rare)
French form of APRIL.
AYDAN (2)   m   English (Modern)
Variant of AIDAN.
AYDEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of AIDAN.
AYLMER   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of ELMER.
AZALEA   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, ultimately derived from Greek αζαλεος (azaleos) "dry".
AZURA   f   English (Rare)
Elaboration of AZURE.
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