American Names

American names are used in the United States. See also about American names.
There are 3,912 names matching your criteria. This is page 2.

BAILEE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of BAILEY.
BAILEY   m & f   English
From a surname derived from Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", originally denoting one who was a bailiff.
BALDRIC   m   English (Archaic)
Derived from the Germanic elements bald "bold, brave" and ric "power, rule"... [more]
BALDWIN   m   English, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements bald "bold, brave" and win "friend"... [more]
BALFOUR   m   English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname, originally from various place names, which meant "village pasture" in Gaelic.
BAMBI   f   English
Derived from Italian bambina meaning "young girl". The American novelist Marjorie Benton Cooke used it in her novel 'Bambi' (1914). This was also the name of a male deer in a cartoon by Walt Disney, which was based on a 1923 novel by Swiss author Felix Salten.
BARB   f   English
Short form of BARBARA.
BARBARA   f   English, Italian, French, German, Polish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Late Roman
Derived from Greek βαρβαρος (barbaros) meaning "foreign"... [more]
BARBIE   f   English
Diminutive of BARBARA.
BARBRA   f   English
Variant of BARBARA.
BARCLAY   m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname which was likely derived from the English place name Berkeley, meaning "birch wood" in Old English.
BARNABAS   m   German, English (Rare), Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Greek form of an Aramaic name. In Acts in the New Testament the byname Barnabas was given to a man named Joseph, a Jew from Cyprus who was a companion of Paul on his missionary journeys... [more]
BARNABY   m   English (Archaic)
Medieval English form of BARNABAS.
BARNEY   m   English
Diminutive of BARNABAS, BERNARD or BARNABY.
BARRET   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of BARRETT.
BARRETT   m   English
From a surname probably meaning "strife" in Middle English, originally given to a quarrelsome person.
BARRIE   m   Irish, English
Variant of BARRY.
BARRY   m   Irish, English
Anglicized form of BAIRRE. It is also sometimes used as an Anglicized form of BERACH.
BART   m   English, Dutch
Short form of BARTHOLOMEW. This name is borne by a cartoon boy on the television series 'The Simpsons'.
BARTHOLOMEW   m   English, Biblical
From Βαρθολομαιος (Bartholomaios), which was the Greek form of an Aramaic name meaning "son of TALMAI"... [more]
BASIL (1)   m   English
From the Greek name Βασιλειος (Basileios) which was derived from βασιλευς (basileus) meaning "king"... [more]
BAXTER   m   English
From an occupational surname which meant "(female) baker" in Old English.
BAYLEE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of BAILEY.
BEA   f   English
Short form of BEATRIX.
BEATRICE   f   Italian, English, Swedish
Italian form of BEATRIX. Beatrice Portinari (1266-1290) was the woman who was loved by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri... [more]
BEATRIX   f   German, Hungarian, Dutch, English (Rare), Late Roman
Probably from Viatrix, a feminine form of the Late Latin name Viator which meant "voyager, traveller". It was a common name amongst early Christians, and the spelling was altered by association with Latin beatus "blessed"... [more]
BEAU   m   English
Means "beautiful" in French. It has been occasionally used as an American given name since the late 19th century. It appears in Margaret Mitchell's novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936) as the name of Ashley and Melanie's son.
BEAUMONT   m   English (Rare)
From a French surname meaning "beautiful mountain".
BEAUREGARD   m   English (Rare)
From a French surname meaning "beautiful outlook".
BECCA   f   English
Short form of REBECCA.
BECCI   f   English (Modern)
Diminutive of REBECCA.
BECKA   f   English
Short form of REBECCA.
BECKAH   f   English
Short form of REBECCA.
BECKETT   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname which could be derived from various sources, including from Middle English beke meaning "beak" or bekke meaning "stream, brook".
BECKY   f   English
Diminutive of REBECCA.
BEE   f   English
Short form of BEATRIX and other names beginning with B.
BEKKI   f   English (Modern)
Diminutive of REBECCA.
BELINDA   f   English
The meaning of this name is not known for certain. The first element could be related Italian bella "beautiful"... [more]
BELLA   f   English
Short form of ISABELLA and other names ending in bella. It is also associated with the Italian word bella meaning "beautiful".
BELLE   f   English
Short form of ISABELLA or names ending in belle. It is also associated with the French word belle meaning "beautiful"... [more]
BEN (1)   m   English, German, Dutch
Short form of BENJAMIN or BENEDICT. A notable bearer was Ben Jonson (1572-1637), an English poet and playwright.
BENEDICT   m   English
From the Late Latin name Benedictus which meant "blessed". Saint Benedict was an Italian monk who founded the Benedictines in the 6th century. After his time the name was common among Christians, being used by 16 popes... [more]
BENJ   m   English
Short form of BENJAMIN.
BENJAMIN   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Biblical
From the Hebrew name בִּנְיָמִין (Binyamin) which means "son of the south" or "son of the right hand"... [more]
BENJI   m   English
Diminutive of BENJAMIN.
BENJY   m   English
Diminutive of BENJAMIN.
BENNETT   m   English
Medieval form of BENEDICT. This was the more common spelling in England until the 18th century. Modern use of the name is probably also influenced by the common surname Bennett, itself a derivative of the medieval name.
BENNIE   m   English
Diminutive of BENJAMIN or BENEDICT.
BENNY   m   English
Diminutive of BENJAMIN or BENEDICT.
BENSON   m   English
From a surname which originally meant "son of BENEDICT".
BENTLEY   m   English
From a surname which was from a place name, itself derived from Old English beonet "bent grass" and leah "woodland, clearing"... [more]
BENTON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name, composed of Old English beonet "bent grass" and tun "enclosure".
BERENICE   f   English, Italian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Βερενικη (Berenike), the Macedonian form of the Greek name Φερενικη (Pherenike), which meant "bringing victory" from φερω (phero) "to bring" and νικη (nike) "victory"... [more]
BERNADETTE   f   French, English
French feminine form of BERNARD. Saint Bernadette was a young woman from Lourdes in France who claimed to have seen visions of the Virgin Mary.
BERNADINE   f   English
Feminine form of BERNARD.
BERNARD   m   English, French, Dutch, Polish, Croatian, Slovene, Czech, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element bern "bear" combined with hard "brave, hardy"... [more]
BERNETTA   f   English
Diminutive of BERENICE.
BERNICE   f   English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Contracted form of BERENICE. It occurs briefly in Acts in the New Testament belonging to a sister of King Herod Agrippa II.
BERNIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of BERNARD, BERNADETTE, BERNICE, and other names beginning with Bern.
BERNIECE   f   English
Variant of BERNICE.
BERNY   m & f   English
Variant of BERNIE.
BERRY (1)   m   English
Variant of BARRY.
BERRY (2)   f   English (Rare)
From the English word referring to the small fruit. It is ultimately derived from Old English berie. This name has only been in use since the 20th century.
BERT   m   English, German, Dutch
Short form of ALBERT and other names containing the element bert, often derived from the Germanic element beraht meaning "bright".
BERTHA   f   German, English, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element beraht meaning "bright, famous". It was borne by the mother of Charlemagne in the 8th century, and it was popularized in England by the Normans... [more]
BERTIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of ALBERT, HERBERT, and other names containing bert (often derived from the Germanic element beraht meaning "bright").
BERTINA   f   English
Feminine form of BERT.
BERTRAM   m   English, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright raven", derived from the Germanic element beraht "bright" combined with hramn "raven"... [more]
BERTRAND   m   French, English, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements beraht meaning "bright" and rand meaning "rim (of a shield)"... [more]
BERYL   f   English
From the English word for the clear or pale green precious stone, ultimately deriving from Sanskrit. As a given name, it first came into use in the 19th century.
BESS   f   English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH.
BESSIE   f   English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH.
BETH   f   English
Short form of ELIZABETH, or sometimes BETHANY.
BETHANIE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of BETHANY.
BETHANY   f   English, Biblical
From the name of a biblical town, possibly derived from Hebrew בֵּית־תְּאֵנָה (beit-te'enah) meaning "house of figs"... [more]
BETHNEY   f   English (Rare)
Variant of BETHANY.
BETONY   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the minty medicinal herb.
BETSY   f   English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH.
BETTE   f   English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH. A famous bearer was American actress Bette Davis (1908-1989).
BETTIE   f   English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH.
BETTY   f   English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH.
BETTYE   f   English
Variant of BETTY.
BEULAH   f   Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Means "married" in Hebrew. The name is used in the Old Testament to refer to the land of Israel (Isaiah 62:4). As an English given name, Beulah has been used since the Protestant Reformation.
BEV   f   English
Short form of BEVERLY.
BEVERLEY   f   English
Variant of BEVERLY.
BEVERLY   f & m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English city, itself meaning "beaver stream" in Old English. It came into use as a masculine given name in the 19th century, and it became common as an American feminine name after the publication of George Barr McCutcheon's novel 'Beverly of Graustark' (1904).
BEVIS   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which is possibly derived from the name of the French town Beauvais.
BIDDY   f   Irish, English
Diminutive of BRIDGET.
BIFF   m   English (Rare)
From a nickname which was based on the English word biff, which means "punch, hit, strike".
BILL   m   English
Short form of WILLIAM. This spelling was first used in the 19th century. The change in the initial consonant may have been influenced by an earlier Irish pronunciation of the name... [more]
BILLIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of BILL. It is also used as a feminine form of WILLIAM.
BILLY   m   English
Diminutive of BILL. A notable bearer was the American outlaw Billy the Kid (1859-1881), whose real name was William H. Bonney.
BINDY   f   English
Diminutive of BELINDA.
BISHOP   m   English
Either from the English occupational surname, or else directly from the English word. It is ultimately derived from Greek επισκοπος (episkopos) "overseer".
BLAINE   m   English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from the given name Bláán, which meant "yellow" in Gaelic. Saint Bláán was a 6th-century missionary to the Picts.
BLAIR   m & f   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname which is derived from Gaelic blár meaning "plain, field, battlefield".
BLAKE   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English blæc "black" or blac "pale". A famous bearer of the surname was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).
BLANCH   f   English
Variant of BLANCHE.
BLANCHE   f   French, English
From a medieval French nickname meaning "white, fair". This name and its cognates in other languages are ultimately derived from the Germanic word blanc... [more]
BLAZE   m   English (Modern)
Modern variant of BLAISE influenced by the English word blaze.
BLONDIE   f   English (Rare)
From a nickname for a person with blond hair. This is the name of the title character in a comic strip by Chic Young.
BLOSSOM   f   English
From the English word blossom, ultimately from Old English blóstm. It came into use as a rare given name in the 19th century.
BLYTHE   f & m   English (Rare)
From a surname which meant "cheerful" in Old English.
BOB   m   English, Dutch
Short form of ROBERT. It arose later than Dob, Hob and Nob, which were medieval rhyming nicknames of Robert... [more]
BOBBI   f   English
Diminutive of ROBERTA or BARBARA.
BOBBIE   f & m   English
Variant of BOBBY. As a feminine name it can be a diminutive of ROBERTA or BARBARA.
BOBBY   m   English
Diminutive of BOB. Hockey greats Bobby Hull (1939-) and Bobby Orr (1948-) have borne this name.
BONIFACE   m   French, English (Rare)
From the Late Latin name Bonifatius, which meant "good fate" from bonum "good" and fatum "fate". This was the name of nine popes and also several saints, including an 8th-century Anglo-Saxon missionary to Germany (originally named Winfrid) who is now regarded as the patron saint of that country... [more]
BONITA   f   English
Means "pretty" in Spanish. It has been used as a name in the English-speaking world since the beginning of the 20th century.
BONNIE   f   English
Means "pretty" from the Scottish word bonnie, which was itself derived from Middle French bon "good". It has been in use as an American given name since the 19th century, and it became especially popular after the movie 'Gone with the Wind' (1939), in which it was the nickname of Scarlett's daughter.
BOOKER   m   English
From an English occupational surname meaning "maker of books". A famous bearer was Booker T. Washington (1856-1915), an African-American leader.
BOYCE   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Old French bois "wood".
BOYD   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname which was possibly derived from the name of the island of Bute.
BRAD   m   English
Short form of BRADLEY, BRADFORD, and other names beginning with Brad. A famous bearer is American actor Brad Pitt (1963-).
BRADEN   m   English, Irish
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Bradáin meaning "descendant of BRADÁN".
BRADFORD   m   English
From a surname which originally came from a place name that meant "broad ford" in Old English.
BRADLEY   m   English
From a surname which originally came from a place name meaning "broad clearing" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the World War II American general Omar Bradley (1893-1981).
BRADY   m   English, Irish
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Brádaigh meaning "descendant of BRÁDACH".
BRAEDEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of BRADEN.
BRAELYN   f   English (Modern)
A recently created name, formed using the popular name suffix lyn.
BRAIDEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of BRADEN.
BRAIDY   m & f   English (Rare)
Variant of BRADY.
BRAM   m   English, Dutch
Short form of ABRAHAM. This name was borne by Bram Stoker (1847-1912), the Irish author who wrote 'Dracula'.
BRAND   m   English (Rare)
From a surname, a variant of BRANT.
BRANDA   f   English (Rare)
Perhaps a variant of BRANDY or a feminine form of BRAND.
BRANDE   f   English
Variant of BRANDY.
BRANDEE   f   English
Variant of BRANDY.
BRANDEN   m   English
Variant of BRANDON.
BRANDI   f   English
Variant of BRANDY.
BRANDIE   f   English
Variant of BRANDY.
BRANDON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "hill covered with broom" in Old English. It is sometimes also used as a variant of BRENDAN.
BRANDT   m   English
From a surname, a variant of BRANT.
BRANDY   f   English
From the English word brandy for the alcoholic drink. It is ultimately from Dutch brandewijn "burnt wine". It has been in use as a given name since the 1960s.
BRANNON   m   English
From an Irish surname derived from Mac Branain, which means "descendant of BRAN (1)".
BRANSON   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname which meant "son of BRANDR".
BRANT   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the Old Norse name BRANDR.
BRAXTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from an Old English place name meaning "Bracca's town".
BRAYDEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of BRADEN.
BRAYLON   m   African American (Modern)
An invented name, using the same sounds found in names such as Braden and Jalen.
BREANA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of BRIANA.
BREANN   f   English (Modern)
Feminine form of BRIAN.
BREANNA   f   English
Variant of BRIANA.
BREANNE   f   English (Modern)
Feminine form of BRIAN.
BRENDA   f   English
Possibly a feminine form of the Old Norse name Brandr, meaning "sword", which was brought to Britain in the Middle Ages. This name is sometimes used as a feminine form of BRENDAN.
BRENDAN   m   Irish, English
From Brendanus, the Latinized form of the Irish name Bréanainn which was derived from a Welsh word meaning "prince". Saint Brendan was a 6th-century Irish abbot who, according to legend, crossed the Atlantic and reached North America with 17 other monks.
BRENDEN   m   English
Variant of BRENDAN.
BRENDON   m   English
Variant of BRENDAN.
BRENNA   f   English
Possibly a variant of BRENDA or a feminine form of BRENNAN.
BRENNAN   m   Irish, English
From an Irish surname derived from Ó Braonáin meaning "descendant of Braonán". Braonán is a byname meaning "rain, moisture, drop" (with a diminutive suffix).
BRENT   m   English
From an English surname, originally taken from various place names, perhaps derived from a Celtic word meaning "hill".
BRENTON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from an English place name which meant "Bryni's town". Bryni was Old English name meaning "fire".
BRET   m   English
Variant of BRETT.
BRETT   m & f   English
From a Middle English surname meaning "a Breton", referring to an inhabitant of Brittany. A famous bearer is the American football quarterback Brett Favre (1969-).
BRIAN   m   Irish, English, Ancient Irish
The meaning of this name is not known for certain but it is possibly related to the old Celtic element bre meaning "hill", or by extension "high, noble"... [more]
BRIANA   f   English
Feminine form of BRIAN. This name was used by Edmund Spenser in 'The Faerie Queene' (1590). The name was not commonly used until the 1970s, when it rapidly became popular in the United States.
BRIANNA   f   English
Variant of BRIANA.
BRIANNE   f   English (Modern)
Feminine form of BRIAN.
BRIAR   m & f   English (Rare)
From the English word for the thorny plant.
BRICE   m   French, English
From the name Bricius, which was probably a Latinized form of a Gaulish name meaning "speckled". This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a disciple of Saint Martin of Tours.
BRIDGER   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname which originally indicated a person who lived near or worked on a bridge.
BRIDGET   f   Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Irish name Brighid which means "exalted one". In Irish mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire, poetry and wisdom, the daughter of the god Dagda... [more]
BRIDGETTE   f   English
Variant of BRIDGET.
BRIELLA   f   English (Modern)
Short form of GABRIELLA.
BRIELLE   f   English (Modern)
Short form of GABRIELLE. This is also the name of towns in the Netherlands and New Jersey, though their names derive from a different source.
BRIGHAM   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from place names meaning "bridge settlement" in Old English.
BRION   m   English
Variant of BRIAN.
BRIONY   f   English (Rare)
Variant of BRYONY.
BRISCOE   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "birch wood" in Old Norse.
BRISTOL   m   English (Rare)
From the name of the city in southwest England which means "the site of the bridge".
BRITANNIA   f   English (Rare)
From the Latin name of the island of Britain, in occasional use as an English given name since the 18th century. This is also the name of the Roman female personification of Britain pictured on some British coins.
BRITNEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of BRITTANY.
BRITTANY   f   English
From the name of the region in the northwest of France, called in French Bretagne. It was named for the Britons who settled there after the fall of the Western Roman Empire and the invasions of the Anglo-Saxons... [more]
BRITTNY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of BRITTANY.
BRITTON   m   English
Derived from a Middle English surname meaning "a Briton" (a Celt of England) or "a Breton" (an inhabitant of Brittany).
BROCK   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English brocc meaning "badger".
BRODIE   m   English (Modern)
Variant of BRODY.
BRODY   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place in Moray, Scotland. It probably means "ditch, mire" in Gaelic.
BRONTE   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname, an Anglicized form of Irish Ó Proinntigh meaning "descendant of Proinnteach". The given name Proinnteach meant "bestower" in Gaelic... [more]
BROOK   m & f   English
From an English surname which denoted one who lived near a brook.
BROOKE   f   English
Variant of BROOK. The name came into use in the 1950s, probably influenced by American socialite Brooke Astor (1902-2007)... [more]
BROOKLYN   f   English (Modern)
From the name of the borough of New York City, originally derived from Dutch Breukelen meaning "broken land". It can also be viewed as a combination of BROOK and the popular name suffix lyn.
BROOKS   m   English
From an English surname, a variant of BROOK.
BRUCE   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname, of Norman origin, which probably originally referred to the town of Brix in France. The surname was borne by Robert the Bruce, a Scottish hero of the 14th century who achieved independence from England and became the king of Scotland... [more]
BRYAN   m   English
Variant of BRIAN.
BRYANA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of BRIANA.
BRYANNA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of BRIANA.
BRYANNE   f   English (Rare)
Feminine form of BRIAN.
BRYANT   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name BRIAN.
BRYCE   m   English
Variant of BRICE.
BRYN   m & f   Welsh, English
Means "hill, mound" in Welsh. It is now used as a feminine name as well.
BRYNN   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of BRYN.
BRYNNE   f   English (Rare)
Feminine variant of BRYN.
BRYON   m   English
Variant of BRIAN.
BRYONY   f   English (Rare)
From the name of a type of Eurasian vine, formerly used as medicine. It ultimately derives from Greek βρυω (bryo) "to swell".
BRYSON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of BRICE".
BUCK   m   English
From an English nickname meaning simply "buck, male deer", ultimately from Old English bucc.
BUD   m   English
Short form of BUDDY.
BUDDY   m   English
From the English word meaning "friend". It probably originated as a nursery form of the word brother.
BUFFY   f   English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH, from a child's pronunciation of the final syllable. It is now associated with the main character from the television series 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer' (1997-2003).
BUNNY   f   English
Diminutive of BERENICE.
BURGUNDY   f   English (Rare)
This name can refer either to the region in France, the wine (which derives from the name of the region), or the colour (which derives from the name of the wine).
BURKE   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Old English burg meaning "fortress".
BURT   m   English
Short form of BURTON.
BURTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally taken from an Old English place name meaning "fortified town". A famous bearer of the surname was Sir Richard Burton (1821-1890), an explorer of Africa and Asia.
BUSTER   m   English
Originally a nickname denoting a person who broke things, from the word bust. A famous bearer was the silent movie star Buster Keaton (1895-1966).
BYRNE   m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Broin meaning "descendant of BRAN (1)".
BYRON   m   English
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "place of the cow sheds" in Old English. This was the surname of the romantic poet Lord Byron (1788-1824), the writer of 'Don Juan' and many other works.
BYSSHE   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname, a variant of the surname Bush, which originally indicated a person who lived near a bush. This was the middle name of the romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822).
CADE   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a nickname meaning "round" in Old English.
CADEN   m   English (Modern)
Sometimes explained as a derivative of the Irish surname Caden, which is a reduced form of the Gaelic surname Mac Cadáin meaning "son of Cadán"... [more]
CADENCE   f   English (Modern)
From an English word meaning "rhythm, flow". It has been in use only since the 20th century.
CAELAN   m & f   English (Rare)
Anglicized form of CAOLÁN or CAOILFHIONN.
CAELIE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of KAYLEE.
CAETLIN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of CAITLIN.
CAIDEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CADEN.
CAILEIGH   f   English (Rare)
Variant of KAYLEIGH.
CAILIN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of KAYLYN. It also coincides with the Irish word cailín meaning "girl".
CAILYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of KAYLYN.
CAIRO   m   English (Rare)
From the name of the city in Egypt, called القاهرة (al-Qahirah) in Arabic, meaning "the victorious".
CAITLIN   f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of CAITLÍN.
CAITLYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of CAITLIN.
CAL   m   English
Short form of CALVIN.
CALANTHE   f   English (Rare)
From the name of a type of orchid, ultimately meaning "beautiful flower", derived from Greek καλος (kalos) "beautiful" and ανθος (anthos) "flower".
CALANTHIA   f   English (Rare)
Elaborated form of CALANTHE.
CALE   m   English
Short form of CALEB.
CALEB   m   English, Biblical
Most likely related to Hebrew כֶּלֶב (kelev) meaning "dog"... [more]
CALEIGH   f   English (Modern)
Variant of KAYLEIGH.
CALISTA   f   English, Portuguese, Spanish
Feminine form of CALLISTUS. As an English name it might also be a variant of KALLISTO.
CALLA   f   English
From the name of a type of lily. Use of the name may also be inspired by Greek καλλος (kallos) meaning "beauty".
CALLAHAN   m   English
From a surname, the Anglicized form of the Irish Ó Ceallacháin, which means "descendant of CEALLACHÁN".
CALLEIGH   f   English (Rare)
Variant of CALLIE.
CALLIE   f   English
Diminutive of CAROLINE, or sometimes of names beginning with Cal.
CALLISTA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of CALISTA.
CALVIN   m   English
Derived from the French surname Chauvin, which was derived from chauve "bald". The surname was borne by Jean Chauvin (1509-1564), a theologian from France who was one of the leaders of the Protestant Reformation... [more]
CAM (2)   m & f   English
Short form of CAMERON.
CAMDEN   m   English (Modern)
From a surname which was from a place name perhaps meaning "enclosed valley" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the English historian William Camden (1551-1623).
CAMELLIA   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the flowering shrub, which was named for the botanist and missionary Georg Josef Kamel.
CAMERON   m & f   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked nose" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and sròn "nose".
CAMILLA   f   English, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of CAMILLUS. This was the name of a legendary warrior maiden of the Volsci, as told by Virgil in the 'Aeneid'... [more]
CAMILLE   f & m   French, English
French feminine and masculine form of CAMILLA. It is also used in the English-speaking world, where it is generally only feminine.
CAMMIE   f   English
Diminutive of CAMILLA.
CAMRON   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CAMERON.
CAMRYN   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of CAMERON.
CANDACE   f   English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the hereditary title of the queens of Ethiopia, as mentioned in Acts in the New Testament. It is apparently derived from Cushitic kdke meaning "queen mother"... [more]
CANDI   f   English
Variant of CANDY.
CANDICE   f   English
Variant of CANDACE.
CANDIDA   f   Late Roman, English
Late Latin name derived from candidus meaning "white". This was the name of several early saints, including a woman supposedly healed by Saint Peter... [more]
CANDIS   f   English
Variant of CANDACE.
CANDY   f   English
Diminutive of CANDACE. It is also influenced by the English word candy.
CANDYCE   f   English
Variant of CANDACE.
CAPRICE   f   English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "impulse", ultimately (via French) from Italian capriccio.
CAPRICIA   f   English (Rare)
Elaborated form of CAPRICE.
CARA   f   English
From an Italian word meaning "beloved". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century, though it did not become popular until after the 1950s.
CAREEN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of CARREEN.
CAREN   f   English
Variant of KAREN (1).
CAREY   m & f   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Ciardha meaning "descendant of CIARDHA".
CARI   f   English
Variant of CARRIE.
CARINA (1)   f   English, Portuguese, Spanish, German, Late Roman
Late Latin name derived from cara meaning "dear, beloved". This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr. It is also the name of a constellation in the southern sky, though in this case it means "keel" in Latin, referring to a part of Jason's ship the Argo.
CARIS   f   English (Rare)
Variant of CHARIS.
CARISSA   f   English
Variant of CHARISSA.
CARL   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
German form of CHARLES. Two noteworthy bearers of the name were the German mathematician Carl Gauss (1777-1855), who made contributions to number theory and algebra as well as physics and astronomy, and the Swiss psychologist Carl Jung (1875-1961), who founded analytical psychology... [more]
CARLENE   f   English
Feminine diminutive of CARL.
CARLETON   m   English
Variant of CHARLTON.
CARLEY   f   English (Modern)
Feminine form of CARL.
CARLIE   f   English
Feminine form of CARL.
CARLISA   f   English (Rare)
Combination of CARLA and LISA.
CARLISLE   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the name of a city in northern England. The city was originally called by the Romans Luguvalium meaning "stronghold of LUGUS"... [more]
CARLTON   m   English
Variant of CHARLTON.
CARLY   f   English
Feminine form of CARL.
CARLYLE   m   English
Variant of CARLISLE.
CARLYN   f   English
Contracted variant of CAROLINE.
CARMEL   f   English, Jewish
From the title of the Virgin Mary Our Lady of Carmel. כַּרְמֶל (Karmel) (meaning "garden" in Hebrew) is a mountain in Israel mentioned in the Old Testament... [more]
CARMELLA   f   English
Latinized form of CARMEL.
CARMEN   f   Spanish, English, Italian, Romanian
Medieval Spanish form of CARMEL influenced by the Latin word carmen "song". This was the name of the main character in George Bizet's opera 'Carmen' (1875).
CAROL (1)   f & m   English
Short form of CAROLINE. It was formerly a masculine name, derived from CAROLUS... [more]
CAROLINA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Swedish
Latinate feminine form of CAROLUS. This is the name of two American states: North and South Carolina. They were named for Charles I, king of England.
CAROLINE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French feminine form of CAROLUS.
CAROLYN   f   English
Variant of CAROLINE.
CARRAN   m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Ó Corraidhín meaning "descendant of CORRAIDHÍN".
CARREEN   f   English (Rare)
Used by Margaret Mitchell in her novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936), where it is a combination of CAROLINE and IRENE.
CARRIE   f   English
Diminutive of CAROLINE.
CARRY   f   English
Diminutive of CAROLINE.
CARSON   m & f   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname of unknown meaning. A famous bearer of the surname was the American scout Kit Carson (1809-1868).
CARTER   m   English
From an English surname which meant "one who uses a cart".
CARVER   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which meant "wood carver".
CARY   m & f   English
Variant of CAREY.
CARYL   f   English
Variant of CAROL (1).
CARYN   f   English
Variant of KAREN (1).
CASEY   m & f   English, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cathasaigh meaning "descendant of CATHASACH". This name can be given in honour of Casey Jones (1863-1900), a train engineer who sacrificed his life to save his passengers... [more]
CASH   m   English
From an English occupational surname for a box maker, derived from Norman French casse meaning "case". A famous bearer of the surname was American musician Johnny Cash (1932-2003).
CASIMIR   m   English, French
English form of the Polish name Kazimierz, derived from the Slavic element kaziti "to destroy" combined with miru "peace, world"... [more]
CASS   f & m   English
Short form of CASSANDRA, CASSIDY, and other names beginning with Cass.
CASSANDRA   f   English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κασσανδρα (Kassandra), derived from possibly κεκασμαι (kekasmai) "to excel, to shine" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος)... [more]
CASSARAH   f   English (Rare)
Recently created name intended to mean "what will be, will be". It is from the title of the 1956 song 'Que Sera, Sera', which was taken from the Italian phrase che sarà sarà... [more]
CASSIDY   f & m   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Caiside meaning "descendant of CAISIDE".


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