American Names

American names are used in the United States. See also about American names.
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CASSIDY   f & m   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Caiside meaning "descendant of CAISIDE".
CASSIE   f   English
Diminutive of CASSANDRA and other names beginning with Cass.
CASSIUS   m   Ancient Roman, English
Roman family name which was possibly derived from Latin cassus "empty, vain". This name was borne by several early saints. In modern times, it was the original first name of boxer Muhammad Ali (1942-2016), who was named after his father Cassius Clay, who was himself named after the American abolitionist Cassius Clay (1810-1903).
CATE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of KATE. A famous bearer is Australian actress Cate Blanchett (1975-).
CATHARINE   f   English
Variant of KATHERINE.
CATHERIN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of KATHERINE.
CATHERINE   f   French, English
French form of KATHERINE, and also a common English variant.
CATHLEEN   f   Irish, English
Variant of KATHLEEN.
CATHRYN   f   English
Variant of KATHERINE.
CATHY   f   English
Diminutive of CATHERINE.
CAVAN   m   English
Either from the name of the Irish county, which is derived from Irish cabhán "hollow", or else from the Irish surname CAVAN.
CAYDEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CADEN.
CAYLEY   f   English (Rare)
Variant of KAYLEE.
CEARA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of CIARA (2).
CEARRA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of CIARA (2).
CECE   f   English
Diminutive of CECILIA or other names containing a similar sound.
CECELIA   f   English
Variant of CECILIA.
CECIL   m   English
From the Roman name Caecilius (see CECILIA). This was the name of a 3rd-century saint, a companion of Saint Cyprian. Though it was in use during the Middle Ages in England, it did not become common until the 19th century when it was given in honour of the noble Cecil family, who had been prominent since the 16th century. Their surname was derived from the Welsh given name Seisyll, which was derived from the Roman name Sextilius, a derivative of SEXTUS.
CECILIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish, Dutch, German
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.... [more]
CECILY   f   English
English form of CECILIA. This was the usual English form during the Middle Ages.
CEDAR   f & m   English (Rare)
From the English word for the coniferous tree, derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κεδρος (kedros).
CEDRIC   m   English
Invented by Sir Walter Scott for a character in his novel 'Ivanhoe' (1819). Apparently he based it on the actual name Cerdic, the name of the semi-legendary founder of the kingdom of Wessex in the 6th century. The meaning of Cerdic is uncertain, but it does not appear to be Old English in origin. It could be connected to the Brythonic name CARATACOS. The name was also used by Frances Hodgson Burnett for the main character in her novel 'Little Lord Fauntleroy' (1886).
CELANDINE   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which derives from Greek χελιδων (chelidon) "swallow (bird)".
CELESTE   f & m   Italian, English
Italian feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS. It is also the English feminine form.
CELESTINE   f & m   English
English form of CAELESTINUS. It is more commonly used as a feminine name, from the French feminine form Célestine.
CELIA   f   English, Spanish, Italian
Feminine form of the Roman family name CAELIUS. Shakespeare used it in his play 'As You Like It' (1599), which introduced the name to the English-speaking public at large. It is sometimes used as a short form of CECILIA.
CELINDA   f   English (Rare)
Probably a blend of CELIA and LINDA.
CHAD   m   English
From the Old English name Ceadda which is of unknown meaning, possibly based on Welsh cad "battle". This was the name of a 7th-century English saint. Borne primarily by Catholics, it was a rare name until the 1960s when it started to become more common amongst the general population. This is also the name of a country in Africa, though it originates from a different source.
CHADWICK   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the name of towns in England, meaning "settlement belonging to CHAD" in Old English.
CHALICE   f   English (Rare)
Means simply "chalice, goblet" from the English word, derived from Latin calix.
CHANCE   m   English
Originally a diminutive of CHAUNCEY. It is now usually given in reference to the English word chance meaning "luck, fortune" (ultimately derived from Latin cadens "falling").
CHANDLER   m   English
From an occupational surname which meant "candle seller" in Middle English, ultimately from Old French.
CHANEL   f   English
From a French surname which meant "pipe". It has been used as an American given name since 1970s, influenced by the Chanel brand name (a line of women's clothing and perfume), which was named for French fashion designer Coco Chanel (1883-1971).
CHANELLE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of CHANEL.
CHANNING   m & f   English (Modern)
From an English surname of uncertain origin.
CHANTAL   f   French, English, Dutch
From a French surname which was derived from a place name meaning "stony". It was originally given in honour of Saint Jeanne-Françoise de Chantal, the founder of the Visitation Order in the 17th century. It has become associated with French chant "song".
CHANTÉ   f   English (Modern)
Means "sung" in French.
CHANTEL   f   English
Variant of CHANTAL.
CHANTELLE   f   English
Variant of CHANTAL.
CHARIS   f   Ancient Greek, English (Rare)
Feminine form of CHARES. It came into use as an English given name in the 17th century.
CHARISMA   f   English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "personal magnetism", ultimately derived from Greek χαρις (charis) "grace, kindness".
CHARISSA   f   English
Elaborated form of CHARIS. Edmund Spencer used it in his epic poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590).
CHARISSE   f   English
From a French surname of unknown meaning. It was used as a given name in honour of American actress and dancer Cyd Charisse (1921-2008).
CHARITY   f   English
From the English word charity, ultimately derived from Late Latin caritas meaning "generous love", from Latin carus "dear, beloved". Caritas was in use as a Roman Christian name. The English name Charity came into use among the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation.
CHARLA   f   English
Feminine form of CHARLES.
CHARLEEN   f   English
Variant of CHARLENE.
CHARLENE   f   English
Feminine diminutive of CHARLES.
CHARLES   m   English, French
From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word meaning "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic name element hari meaning "army, warrior".... [more]
CHARLEY   m & f   English
Diminutive or feminine form of CHARLES.
CHARLIE   m & f   English
Diminutive or feminine form of CHARLES. A famous bearer is Charlie Brown, the main character in the comic strip 'Peanuts' by Charles Schulz.
CHARLOTTE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.
CHARLTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "settlement of free men" in Old English.
CHARMAINE   f   English
Meaning unknown, perhaps a combination of CHARMIAN or the English word charm with the aine suffix from LORRAINE. It was (first?) used for a character in the play 'What Price Glory' (1924), which was made into a popular movie in 1926.
CHARMIAN   f   English (Rare)
Form of CHARMION used by Shakespeare in his play 'Antony and Cleopatra' (1606).
CHARNETTE   f   English (Rare)
Probably an invented name.
CHAS   m   English
Diminutive of CHARLES.
CHASE   m   English
From a surname meaning "chase, hunt" in Middle English, originally a nickname for a huntsman.
CHASITY   f   English
Variant of CHASTITY.
CHASTITY   f   English
From the English word chastity, which is ultimately from Latin castus "pure". It was borne by the daughter of Sonny Bono and Cher, which probably led to the name's increase in popularity during the 1970s.
CHAUNCEY   m   English
From a Norman surname of unknown meaning. It was used as a given name in American in honour of Harvard president Charles Chauncey (1592-1672).
CHAZ   m   English
Diminutive of CHARLES.
CHELLE   f   English
Diminutive of MICHELLE.
CHELSEA   f   English
From the name of a district in London, originally derived from Old English and meaning "landing place for chalk or limestone". It has been in general use as an English given name since the 1970s.
CHELSEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of CHELSEA.
CHELSIE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of CHELSEA.
CHER   f   English
Short form of CHERYL. In the case of the American musician Cher (1946-), it is short for her real name CHERILYN.
CHERETTE   f   English (Rare)
Diminutive of CHERIE.
CHERI   f   English
Variant of CHERIE.
CHERICE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of CHARISSE.
CHERIE   f   English
Derived from French chérie meaning "darling". In America, Cherie came into use shortly after the variant Sherry, and has not been as common.
CHERILYN   f   English
Combination of CHERYL and the popular name suffix lyn.
CHERISE   f   English
Variant of CHARISSE.
CHERISH   f   English
From the English word meaning "to treasure".
CHEROKEE   f & m   English (Rare)
Probably derived from the Creek word tciloki meaning "people of a different speech". This is the name of a Native American people who live in the east of North America.
CHERRY   f   English
Simply means "cherry" from the name of the fruit. It can also be a diminutive of CHARITY. It has been in use since the late 19th century.
CHERRYL   f   English
Variant of CHERYL.
CHERYL   f   English
Elaboration of CHERIE, perhaps influenced by BERYL. This name was not used before the 20th century.
CHESLEY   m   English
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "camp meadow" in Old English.
CHESTER   m   English
From a surname which originally belonged to a person who came from Chester, an old Roman settlement in Britain. The name of the settlement came from Latin castrum "camp, fortress".
CHET   m   English
Short form of CHESTER.
CHEYANNE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of CHEYENNE probably influenced by the name ANNE (1).
CHEYENNE   f & m   English
Derived from the Dakota word shahiyena meaning "red speakers". This is the name of a Native American people of the Great Plains. The name was supposedly given to the Cheyenne by the Dakota because their language was unrelated to their own. As a given name, it has been in use since the 1950s.
CHILE   m   English (Rare)
Variant of KYLE.
CHINA   f   English (Modern)
From the name of the Asian country, ultimately derived from Qin, the name of a dynasty that ruled there in the 3rd century BC.
CHIP   m   English
Diminutive of CHARLES or CHRISTOPHER. It can also be from a nickname given in reference to the phrase a chip off the old block, used of a son who is similar to his father.
CHLOE   f   English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "green shoot" in Greek. This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Demeter. The name is also mentioned by Paul in one of his epistles in the New Testament. As an English name, Chloe has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.
CHRIS   m & f   English, Dutch
Short form of CHRISTOPHER, CHRISTIAN, CHRISTINE, and other names that begin with Chris.
CHRISSIE   f   English
Diminutive of CHRISTINE.
CHRISSY   f   English
Diminutive of CHRISTINE.
CHRISTA   f   German, Danish, English
Short form of CHRISTINA.
CHRISTABEL   f   English (Rare)
Combination of CHRISTINA and the name suffix bel. This name occurs in medieval literature, and was later used by Samuel Coleridge in his poem 'Christabel' (1800).
CHRISTABELLA   f   English (Rare)
Latinate form of CHRISTABEL.
CHRISTAL   f   English
Variant of CRYSTAL.
CHRISTEN (2)   f   English
Variant of KRISTIN.
CHRISTI   f   English
Diminutive of CHRISTINE.
CHRISTIAN   m   English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the medieval Latin name Christianus meaning "a Christian" (see CHRISTOS). In England it has been in use since the Middle Ages, during which time it was used by both males and females, but it did not become common until the 17th century. In Denmark the name has been borne by ten kings since the 15th century. A famous bearer was Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), the Danish author of such fairy tales as 'The Ugly Duckling' and 'The Emperor's New Clothes'.
CHRISTIANA   f   English, Late Roman
Latin feminine form of CHRISTIAN.
CHRISTIANNE   f   English (Rare)
Feminine form of CHRISTIAN.
CHRISTIE (1)   f   English
Diminutive of CHRISTINE.
CHRISTINA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
From Christiana, the Latin feminine form of CHRISTIAN. This was the name of an early, possibly legendary, saint who was tormented by her pagan father. It was also borne by a 17th-century Swedish queen and patron the arts who gave up her crown in order to become a Roman Catholic.
CHRISTINE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French form of CHRISTINA, as well as a variant in other languages.
CHRISTMAS   m & f   English (Rare)
From the name of the holiday, which means "Christ festival".
CHRISTOPHER   m   English
From the Late Greek name Χριστοφορος (Christophoros) meaning "bearing CHRIST", derived from Χριστος (Christos) combined with φερω (phero) "to bear, to carry". Early Christians used it as a metaphorical name, expressing that they carried Christ in their hearts. In the Middle Ages, literal interpretations of the name's etymology led to legends about a Saint Christopher who carried the young Jesus across a river. He has come to be regarded as the patron saint of travellers.... [more]
CHRISTY (1)   f   English
Diminutive of CHRISTINE.
CHRYSANTA   f   English (Rare)
Shortened form of the word chrysanthemum, the name of a flowering plant, which means "golden flower" in Greek.
CHRYSTAL   f   English
Variant of CRYSTAL.
CHUCK   m   English
Diminutive of CHARLES. It originated in America in the early 20th century. Two famous bearers of this name were pilot Chuck Yeager (1923-), the first man to travel faster than the speed of sound, and the musician Chuck Berry (1926-), one of the pioneers of rock music.
CHYNA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of CHINA.
CIARA (2)   f   English (Modern)
Variant of SIERRA. Use of the name has perhaps been influenced by the brand of perfume called Ciara, which was introduced by Revlon in 1973.
CICELY   f   English
Medieval variant of CECILY.
CIERA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of SIERRA.
CIERRA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of SIERRA.
CINDI   f   English
Diminutive of CYNTHIA.
CINDRA   f   English (Rare)
Combination of CINDY and SANDRA.
CINDY   f   English
Diminutive of CYNTHIA.
CISSY   f   English
Variant of SISSY.
CLAIR   m   French, English
French form of Clarus (see CLARA).
CLAIRE   f   French, English
French form of CLARA.
CLANCY   m   Irish, English (Rare)
From the Irish surname Mac Fhlannchaidh which means "son of Flannchadh". The Gaelic name Flannchadh means "red warrior".
CLARA   f   Italian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.
CLARE   f   English
Medieval English form of CLARA. This is also the name of an Irish county, which was originally named for the Norman invader Richard de Clare (known as Strongbow), whose surname was derived from the name of an English river.
CLARENCE   m   English
From the Latin title Clarensis which belonged to members of the British royal family. The title ultimately derives from the name of the town of Clare in Suffolk. As a given name it has been in use since the 19th century.
CLARETTE   f   English (Rare)
Diminutive of CLARA.
CLARIBEL   f   English
Combination of CLARA and the popular name suffix bel. This name was used by Edmund Spenser in his poem 'The Faerie Queene' (in the form Claribell) and by Shakespeare in his play 'The Tempest' (1611). Alfred Lord Tennyson also wrote a poem entitled 'Claribel' (1830).
CLARICE   f   English
Medieval vernacular form of the Late Latin name Claritia, which was a derivative of CLARA.
CLARINDA   f   English
Combination of CLARA and the popular name suffix inda. It was first used by Edmund Spenser in his epic poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590).
CLARISSA   f   English, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
Latinate form of CLARICE. This was the name of the title character in a 1748 novel by Samuel Richardson. In the novel Clarissa is a virtuous woman who is tragically exploited by her family and her lover.
CLARITY   f   English (Rare)
Simply means "clarity, lucidity" from the English word, ultimately from Latin clarus "clear".
CLARK   m   English
From an English surname meaning "cleric" or "scribe", from Old English clerec which originally meant "priest". A famous bearer of the surname was William Clark (1770-1838), an explorer of the west of North America. It was also borne by the American actor Clark Gable (1901-1960).
CLAUD   m   English
Variant of CLAUDE.
CLAUDE   m & f   French, English
French masculine and feminine form of CLAUDIUS. In France the masculine name has been common since the Middle Ages due to the 7th-century Saint Claude of Besançon. It was imported to Britain in the 16th century by the aristocratic Hamilton family, who had French connections. A famous bearer of this name was the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
CLAUDIA   f   English, German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Biblical, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CLAUDIUS. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament. As a Christian name it was very rare until the 16th century.
CLAY   m   English
From an English surname that originally referred to a person who lived near or worked with clay. This name can also be a short form of CLAYTON.
CLAYTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from various English place names, all meaning "clay settlement" in Old English.
CLEM   m   English
Short form of CLEMENT.
CLEMATIS   f   English (Rare)
From the English word for a type of flowering vine, ultimately derived from Greek κλημα (klema) "twig, branch".
CLEMENCE   f   English
Feminine form of Clementius (see CLEMENT). It has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it became rare after the 17th century.
CLEMENCY   f   English (Rare)
Medieval variant of CLEMENCE. It can also simply mean "clemency, mercy" from the English word, ultimately from Latin clemens "merciful".
CLEMENT   m   English
English form of the Late Latin name Clemens (or sometimes of its derivative Clementius) which meant "merciful, gentle". This was the name of 14 popes, including Saint Clement I, the third pope, one of the Apostolic Fathers. Another saint by this name was Clement of Alexandria, a 3rd-century theologian and church father who attempted to reconcile Christian and Platonic philosophies. It has been in general as a given name in Christian Europe (in various spellings) since early times. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, though it was revived in the 19th century.
CLEO   f   English
Short form of CLEOPATRA.
CLETIS   m   English (Rare)
Variant of CLETUS.
CLETUS   m   English
Short form of ANACLETUS. This name is sometimes used to refer to the third pope, Saint Anacletus. It can also function an an Anglicized form of KLEITOS.
CLEVE   m   English
Short form of CLEVELAND.
CLEVELAND   m   English
From a surname which was derived from an Old English place name meaning "hilly land". This was the surname of American president Grover Cleveland (1837-1908). It is also the name of an American city, which was founded by surveyor Moses Cleaveland (1754-1806).
CLIFF   m   English
Short form of CLIFFORD or CLIFTON.
CLIFFORD   m   English
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "ford by a cliff" in Old English.
CLIFTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "settlement by a cliff" in Old English.
CLINT   m   English
Short form of CLINTON. A notable bearer is American actor Clint Eastwood (1930-), who became famous early in his career for his western movies.
CLINTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally from an Old English place name meaning "settlement on the River Glyme". A famous bearer of the surname was American president Bill Clinton (1946-).
CLIVE   m   English
From a surname meaning "cliff" in Old English, originally belonging to a person who lived near a cliff.
CLOTILDA   f   English
English form of CLOTILDE.
CLOVER   f   English (Rare)
From the English word for the wild flower, ultimately deriving from Old English clafre.
CLYDE   m   English
From the name of the River Clyde in Scotland, which is of unknown origin. It became a common given name in America in the middle of the 19th century, perhaps in honour of Sir Colin Campbell (1792-1863) who was given the title Baron Clyde in 1858.
COBY   m & f   English
Masculine or feminine diminutive of JACOB.
CODIE   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CODY.
CODY   m   English, Irish
From the Gaelic surname Ó Cuidighthigh, which means "descendant of CUIDIGHTHEACH". A famous bearer of the surname was the American frontiersman and showman Buffalo Bill Cody (1846-1917).
COHEN   m   English
From a common Jewish surname which was derived from Hebrew כֹּהֵן (kohen) meaning "priest". This surname was traditionally associated with the hereditary priests who claimed descent from the biblical Aaron.
COLBERT   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a Norman form of the Germanic name COLOBERT.
COLBY   m   English
From a surname, originally from various English place names, derived from the Old Norse nickname Koli (meaning "coal, dark") and býr "town".
COLE   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from the Old English byname COLA.
COLEEN   f   English
Variant of COLLEEN.
COLEMAN   m   English, Irish
Variant of COLMÁN.
COLENE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of COLLEEN.
COLIN (1)   m   Scottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of CAILEAN or COILEAN.
COLIN (2)   m   English
Medieval diminutive of Col, a short form of NICHOLAS.
COLLEEN   f   English
Derived from the Irish word cailín meaning "girl". It is not commonly used in Ireland itself, but has been used in America since the early 20th century.
COLLIN   m   English
Variant of COLIN (2).
COLLYN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of COLLEEN.
COLTEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of COLTON.
COLTON   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname which was originally from a place name meaning "COLA's town".
COLUMBINE   f   English (Rare)
From the name of a variety of flower. It is also an English form of COLOMBINA, the pantomime character.
COMFORT   f   English (Rare)
From the English word comfort, ultimately from Latin confortare "to strengthen greatly", a derivative of fortis "strong". It was used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation.
CONNELL   m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Conaill meaning "descendant of CONALL".
CONNER   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CONOR.
CONNIE   f & m   English
Diminutive of CONSTANCE and other names beginning with Con. It is occasionally a masculine name, a diminutive of CORNELIUS or CONRAD.
CONNOR   m   Irish, English (Modern)
Variant of CONOR.
CONOR   m   Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Conchobhar which means "dog lover" or "wolf lover". It has been in use in Ireland for centuries and was the name of several Irish kings. It was also borne by the legendary Ulster king Conchobar mac Nessa, known for his tragic desire for Deirdre.
CONRAD   m   English, German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements kuoni "brave" and rad "counsel". This was the name of a 10th-century saint and bishop of Konstanz, in southern Germany. It was also borne by several medieval German kings and dukes. In England it was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has only been common since the 19th century when it was reintroduced from Germany.
CONSTANCE   f   English, French
Medieval form of CONSTANTIA. The Normans introduced this name to England (it was the name of a daughter of William the Conqueror).
CONSTANT   m   French, English (Rare)
From the Late Latin name CONSTANS. It was also used by the Puritans as a vocabulary name, from the English word constant.
CONWAY   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the name of the River Conwy, which possibly means "holy water" in Welsh.
COOPER   m   English
From a surname meaning "barrel maker" in Middle English.
CORA   f   English, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of KORE. It was not used as a given name in the English-speaking world until after it was employed by James Fenimore Cooper for a character in his novel 'The Last of the Mohicans' (1826). In some cases it may be a short form of CORDULA, CORINNA or other names beginning with a similar sound.
CORAL   f   English, Spanish
From the English and Spanish word coral for the underwater skeletal deposits which can form reefs. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κοραλλιον (korallion).
CORBIN   m   English
From a French surname which was derived from corbeau "raven", originally denoting a person who had dark hair. The name was probably popularized in America by actor Corbin Bernsen (1954-).
CORDELIA   f   English
From Cordeilla, possibly a Celtic name of unknown meaning. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Cordeilla was the youngest of the three daughters of King Lear and the only one to remain loyal to her father. When adapting the character for his play 'King Lear' (1606), Shakespeare altered the spelling to Cordelia.
CORDELL   m   English
From a surname meaning "maker of cord" or "seller of cord" in Middle English.
COREEN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of CORINNE.
CORETTA   f   English
Diminutive of CORA. It was borne by Coretta Scott King (1927-2006), the wife of Martin Luther King.
COREY   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the Old Norse given name Kóri, of unknown meaning. This name became popular in the 1960s due to the character Corey Baker on the television series 'Julia'.
CORI   f   English
Feminine form of COREY.
CORIANDER   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the spice, also called cilantro, which may ultimately be of Phoenician origin (via Latin and Greek).
CORIE   f   English
Variant of CORRIE.
CORINA   f   English, German, Romanian
Variant of CORINNA.
CORINE   f   English
Variant of CORINNE.
CORINNA   f   English, German, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Κοριννα (Korinna), which was derived from κορη (kore) "maiden". This was the name of a Greek lyric poet of the 5th century BC. The Roman poet Ovid used it for the main female character in his book 'Amores'. In the modern era it has been in use since the 17th century, when Robert Herrick used it in his poem 'Corinna's going a-Maying'.
CORINNE   f   French, English
French form of CORINNA. The French-Swiss author Madame de Staël used it for her novel 'Corinne' (1807).
CORNELIA   f   German, Romanian, Italian, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CORNELIUS. In the 2nd century BC it was borne by Cornelia Scipionis Africana (the daughter of the military hero Scipio Africanus), the mother of the two reformers known as the Gracchi. After her death she was regarded as an example of the ideal Roman woman. The name was revived in the 18th century.
CORNELIUS   m   Ancient Roman, English, Dutch, German, Biblical
Roman family name which possibly derives from the Latin element cornu "horn". In Acts in the New Testament Cornelius is a centurion who is directed by an angel to seek Peter. After speaking with Peter he converts to Christianity, and he is traditionally deemed the first gentile convert. The name was also borne by a few early saints, including a 3rd-century pope. In England it came into use in the 16th century, partly due to Dutch influence.
CORNELL   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name CORNELIUS.
CORRIE   f   English, Dutch
Diminutive of CORINNA, CORA, CORNELIA and other names starting with Cor. Since the 1970s it has also been used as a feminine form of COREY.
CORRINA   f   English
Variant of CORINNA.
CORRINE   f   English
Variant of CORINNE.
CORTNEY   f & m   English
Variant of COURTNEY.
CORWIN   m   English
From an English surname, derived from Old French cordoan "leather", ultimately from the name of the Spanish city of Cordova.
CORY   m   English
Variant of COREY.
CORYNN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of CORINNE.
COSMO   m   English
English form of COSMAS. It was introduced to Britain in the 18th century by the second Scottish Duke of Gordon, who named his son and successor after his friend Cosimo III de' Medici.
COTY   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CODY.
COURTNEY   f & m   English
From an aristocratic English surname which was derived either from the French place name Courtenay (originally a derivative of the personal name Curtenus, itself derived from Latin curtus "short") or else from a Norman nickname meaning "short nose". As a feminine name in America, it first became popular during the 1970s.
COY   m   English
From a surname which meant "quiet, shy, coy" from Middle English coi.
CRAIG   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from Gaelic creag meaning "crag" or "rocks", originally indicating a person who lived near a crag.
CRAWFORD   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "crow ford" in Old English.
CREE   m   English (Rare)
From the name of a Native American tribe of central Canada. Their name derives via French from the Cree word kiristino.
CREIGHTON   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name, originally from Gaelic crioch "border" combined with Old English tun "town".
CRISPIAN   m   English (Archaic)
Medieval variant of CRISPIN.
CRISPIN   m   English (Rare)
From the Roman cognomen Crispinus which was derived from the name CRISPUS. Saint Crispin was a 3rd-century Roman who was martyred with his twin brother Crispinian in Gaul. They are the patrons of shoemakers. They were popular saints in England during the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.
CRISTAL   f   English
Variant of CRYSTAL.
CRISTEN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of KRISTIN.
CROFTON   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "town with a small enclosed field" in Old English.
CRYSTAL   f   English
From the English word crystal for the clear, colourless glass, sometimes cut into the shape of a gemstone. The English word derives ultimately from Greek κρυσταλλος (krystallos) meaning "ice". It has been in use as a given name since the 19th century.
CULLEN   m   English
From a surname, either CULLEN (1) or CULLEN (2).
CURT   m   English
Either a variant of KURT or short form of CURTIS.
CURTIS   m   English
From an English surname which originally meant "courteous" in Old French.
CUTHBERT   m   English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements cuþ "famous" and beorht "bright". Saint Cuthbert was a 6th-century hermit who became the bishop of Lindisfarne, an island off the coast of England. He was known as performer of healing miracles. Because of the saint, this name remained in use in England even after the Norman conquest. It became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was (briefly) revived in the 19th century.
CY   m   English
Short form of CYRUS or CYRIL.
CYAN   f & m   English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "greenish blue", ultimately derived from Greek κυανος (kyanos).
CYBILL   f   English (Rare)
Variant of SIBYL. This name was borne by actress Cybill Shepherd (1950-), who was named after her grandfather Cy and her father Bill.
CYDNEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of SYDNEY.
CYMONE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of SIMONE (1).
CYNDI   f   English
Short form of CYNTHIA.
CYNTHIA   f   English, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κυνθια (Kynthia) which means "woman from Kynthos". This was an epithet of the Greek moon goddess Artemis, given because Kynthos was the mountain on Delos on which she and her twin brother Apollo were born. It was not used as a given name until the Renaissance, and it did not become common in the English-speaking world until the 19th century.
CYRIL   m   English, French, Czech, Slovak
From the Greek name Κυριλλος (Kyrillos) which was derived from Greek κυριος (kyrios) "lord", a word used frequently in the Greek Bible to refer to God or Jesus.... [more]
CYRILLA   f   English (Rare)
Feminine form of CYRIL.
CYRUS   m   English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From Κυρος (Kyros), the Greek form of the Persian name Kūrush, which may mean "far sighted" or "young". The name is sometimes associated with Greek κυριος (kyrios) "lord". It was borne by several kings of Persia, including Cyrus the Great, who conquered Babylon. He is famous in the Old Testament for freeing the captive Jews and allowing them to return to Israel. As an English name, it first came into use among the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation.
DACRE   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name in Cumbria, of Brythonic origin meaning "trickling stream".
DAFFODIL   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, ultimately derived from Dutch de affodil meaning "the asphodel".
DAHLIA   f   English (Modern)
From the name of the flower, which was named for the Swedish botanist Anders Dahl.
DAISY   f   English
Simply from the English word for the white flower, ultimately derived from Old English dægeseage meaning "day eye". It was first used as a given name in the 19th century, at the same time many other plant and flower names were coined.
DAKOTA   m & f   English (Modern)
Means "allies, friends" in the Dakota language. This is the name of a Native American people of the northern Mississippi valley.
DALE   m & f   English
From an English surname which originally belonged to a person who lived near a dale or valley.
DALEY   m   Irish, English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Dálaigh meaning "descendant of Dálach". The name Dálach means "assembly" in Gaelic.
DALIA (1)   f   Spanish (Latin American), American (Hispanic)
Spanish form of DAHLIA. The Dahlia is the national flower of Mexico.
DALLAS   m   English
From a surname which was originally taken from a Scottish place name meaning "meadow dwelling". A city in Texas bears this name, probably in honour of American Vice President George Mifflin Dallas.
DALTON   m   English
From an English surname which was originally from a place name meaning "valley town" in Old English. A notable bearer of the surname was John Dalton (1766-1844), the English chemist and physicist who theorized about the existence of atoms.
DALY   m   Irish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of DALEY.
DAMIAN   m   English, Polish, Dutch
From the Greek name Δαμιανος (Damianos) which was derived from Greek δαμαζω (damazo) "to tame". Saint Damian was martyred with his twin brother Cosmo in Syria early in the 4th century. They are the patron saints of physicians. Due his renown, the name came into general use in Christian Europe. Another saint by this name was Peter Damian, an 11th-century cardinal and theologian from Italy.
DAMION   m   English
Variant of DAMIAN.
DAMON   m   Greek Mythology, English
Derived from Greek δαμαζω (damazo) meaning "to tame". According to Greek legend, Damon and Pythias were friends who lived on Syracuse in the 4th century BC. When Pythias was sentenced to death, he was allowed to temporarily go free on the condition that Damon take his place in prison. Pythias returned just before Damon was to be executed in his place, and the king was so impressed with their loyalty to one another that he pardoned Pythias. As an English given name, it has only been regularly used since the 20th century.
DANA (2)   m & f   English
From a surname which originally belonged to a person who was Danish. It was originally given in honour of American lawyer Richard Henry Dana (1815-1882), the author of 'Two Years Before the Mast'.
DANE   m   English
From an English surname which was either a variant of the surname DEAN or else an ethnic name referring to a person from Denmark.
DANETTE   f   English
Feminine diminutive of DANIEL.
DANI (1)   f   English
Diminutive of DANIELLE.
DANICA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Slovak, Czech, Macedonian, English
From a Slavic word meaning "morning star, Venus". This name occurs in Slavic folklore as a personification of the morning star. It has sometimes been used in the English-speaking world since the 1970s.
DANIEL   m   English, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Armenian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.... [more]
DANIELLA   f   English
Feminine form of DANIEL.
DANIELLE   f   French, English
French feminine form of DANIEL. It has been commonly used in the English-speaking world only since the 20th century.
DANIKA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of DANICA.
DANITA   f   English
Feminine diminutive of DANIEL.
DANNA   f   English
Feminine form of DANIEL or DAN (1).
DANNI   f   English
Diminutive of DANIELLE.
DANNIE   m   English
Diminutive of DANIEL.
DANNY   m   English
Diminutive of DANIEL.
DAPHNE   f   Greek Mythology, English, Dutch
Means "laurel" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was a nymph turned into a laurel tree by her father in order that she might escape the pursuit of Apollo. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the end of the 19th century.
DAQUAN   m   African American (Modern)
Combination of the popular name elements Da and quan.
DARBY   m & f   English
From an English surname, which was derived from the name of the town of Derby, meaning "deer town" in Old Norse.
DARCEY   f   English (Rare)
Feminine form of DARCY.
DARCY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Norman French d'Arcy, originally denoting one who came from Arcy in France. This was the surname of a character in Jane Austen's novel 'Pride and Prejudice' (1813).
DARDEN   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname of unknown meaning, possibly from a place name.
DARELL   m   English
Variant of DARRELL.
DAREN   m   English
Variant of DARREN.
DARIA   f   Italian, Polish, Romanian, English, Croatian, Late Greek (Latinized)
Feminine form of DARIUS. Saint Daria was a 3rd-century Greek woman who was martyred with her husband Chrysanthus under the Roman emperor Numerian. It has never been a particularly common English given name.
DARIAN   m & f   English
Probably an elaborated form of DARREN.
DARIEN   m   English
Variant of DARIAN.
DARIN   m   English
Variant of DARREN. This was the adopted surname of the singer Bobby Darin (1936-1973), who was born Robert Cassotto and chose his stage name from a street sign.
DARION   m   English (Modern)
Variant of DARIAN.
DARIUS   m   English, Lithuanian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Roman form of Δαρειος (Dareios), which was the Greek form of the Persian name Dārayavahush, which was composed of the elements dâraya "to possess" and vahu "good". Three ancient kings of Persia bore this name, including Darius the Great who expanded the Achaemenid Empire to its greatest extent. His forces invaded Greece but were defeated in the Battle of Marathon.... [more]
DARLA   f   English
Short form of DARLENE.
DARLEEN   f   English
Variant of DARLENE.
DARLENE   f   English
From the English word darling combined with the popular name suffix lene. This name has been in use since the beginning of the 20th century.
DARNELL   m   English
From a surname, possibly derived from Old French darnel, a type of grass. Alternatively it may be derived from Old English derne "hidden" and halh "nook".
DARREL   m   English
Variant of DARRELL.
DARRELL   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Norman French d'Airelle, originally denoting one who came from Airelle in France.
DARREN   m   English
The meaning of this name is not known for certain. It could be from a rare Irish surname or it could be an altered form of DARRELL. It was first brought to public attention in the late 1950s by the American actor Darren McGavin (1922-2006). It was further popularized in the 1960s by the character Darrin Stephens from the television show 'Bewitched'.
DARRIN   m   English
Variant of DARREN.
DARRYL   m   English
Variant of DARRELL.
DARWIN   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given name Deorwine which meant "dear friend". The surname was borne by the English naturalist Charles Darwin (1809-1882), the man who first proposed the theory of natural selection and subsequently revolutionized biology.
DARYL   m   English
Variant of DARRELL.
DASHIELL   m   English (Rare)
In the case of American author Dashiell Hammett (1894-1961), it is an Anglicized form of his mother's surname De Chiel, which is of unknown meaning.
DAVE   m   English
Short form of DAVID.
DAVENA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of DAVINA.
DAVEY   m   English
Diminutive of DAVID.
DAVID   m   English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was probably derived from Hebrew דוד (dwd) meaning "beloved". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.... [more]
DAVIDA   f   English (Rare)
Feminine form of DAVID.
DAVIE   m   English, Scottish
Diminutive of DAVID.
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