Ancient Names

These names were used in various ancient regions.
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BÁRÐR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of BÅRD.
BASILEIOS   m   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of BASIL (1).
BASILIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of BASILEIOS.
BAUGULF   m   Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements bauga meaning "bend, flex" or "ring" and wulf meaning "wolf".
BELSHAZZAR   m   Ancient Near Eastern, Biblical
From בֵּלְשַׁאצַּר (Belshatzzar), the Hebrew form of the Akkadian name Bel-sarra-usur meaning "BA'AL protect the king". This was the name of the son of Nabonidus, the last king of the Babylonian Empire before it was conquered by the Persians in the 6th century BC. In the Old Testament Book of Daniel Belshazzar is the last king of Babylon who sees the mystical handwriting on the wall, which is interpreted by Daniel to portend the end of the empire.
BEORHTRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements beorht "bright" and ric "power, rule".
BEORHTSIGE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements beorht "bright" and sige "victory".
BEORNRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements beorn "warrior, man" and ræd "counsel".
BERAHTHRABAN   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of BERTRAM, using an extended form of the second element.
BERAHTHRAM   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of BERTRAM.
BERARD   m   Ancient Germanic
Variant of BERNARD using the related root bera "bear" as the first element. This was the name of a 13th-century saint who was martyred in Morocco.
BERENGAR   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements bern "bear" and ger "spear". This was the name of two medieval kings of Italy and a Holy Roman Emperor.
BERENGARIA   f   Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized feminine form of BERENGAR. This name was borne by a 13th-century queen of Castile.
BERENICE   f   English, Italian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Βερενικη (Berenike), the Macedonian form of the Greek name Φερενικη (Pherenike), which meant "bringing victory" from φερω (phero) "to bring" and νικη (nike) "victory". This name was common among the Ptolemy ruling family of Egypt, a dynasty which was originally from Macedon. It occurs briefly in Acts in the New Testament (in most English Bibles it is spelled Bernice) belonging to a sister of King Herod Agrippa II. As an English name, Berenice came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
BERENIKE   f   Ancient Greek
Ancient Macedonian form of BERENICE.
BERGLJÓT   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of BERGLJOT.
BERHTA   f   Ancient Germanic
Older form of BERTHA.
BERHTOALD   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of BERTHOLD.
BERINHARD   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of BERNARD.
BERNARD   m   English, French, Dutch, Polish, Croatian, Slovene, Czech, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element bern "bear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Beornheard. This was the name of several saints, including Saint Bernard of Menthon who built hospices in the Swiss Alps in the 10th century, and Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, a 12th-century theologian and Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include the Irish playwright and essayist George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) and the British World War II field marshal Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976).
BERNHARD   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
German, Dutch and Scandinavian form of BERNARD.
BERTHA   f   German, English, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element beraht meaning "bright, famous". It was borne by the mother of Charlemagne in the 8th century, and it was popularized in England by the Normans. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. The name also appears in southern Germanic legends (often spelled Perchta or Berchta) belonging to a goddess of animals and weaving.
BERTILO   m   Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element beraht meaning "bright, famous".
BERTRAM   m   English, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright raven", derived from the Germanic element beraht "bright" combined with hramn "raven". The Normans introduced this name to England. Shakespeare used it in his play 'All's Well That Ends Well' (1603).
BERTRAND   m   French, English, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements beraht meaning "bright" and rand meaning "rim (of a shield)". From an early date it has been confused with BERTRAM and the two names have merged to some degree. A famous bearer was English philosopher Bertrand Russell (1872-1970).
BION   m   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek name derived from βιος (bios) meaning "life".
BIRGIR   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of BIRGER.
BJARNI   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse diminutive of BJÖRN and other names containing the element björn meaning "bear".
BJARTR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of BJARTE.
BJÖRG   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of BJØRG.
BJÖRN   m   Swedish, Icelandic, German, Ancient Scandinavian
From an Old Norse byname meaning "bear".
BLANCHARD   m   Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements blanc meaning "white" and hard meaning "brave, hardy".
BLANDINA   f   Ancient Roman
Latin form of BLANDINE.
BLANDINUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen which was a derivative of BLANDUS.
BLANDUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen which meant "charming" in Latin.
BLASIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Original Latin form of BLAISE.
BOADICEA   f   Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Latinized form of BOUDICCA.
BÓTHILDR   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of BODIL.
BOUDICCA   f   Ancient Celtic
Derived from Brythonic boud meaning "victory". This was the name of a 1st-century queen of the Iceni who led the Britons in revolt against the Romans. Eventually her forces were defeated and she committed suicide.
BRADÁN   m   Ancient Irish
Derived from Irish Gaelic meaning "salmon".
BRANDO   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the element brand meaning "sword".
BRANDR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse byname meaning "sword" or "fire".
BRÉANAINN   m   Ancient Irish
Old Irish form of BRENDAN.
BRENNUS   m   Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Latinized form of a Celtic name (or title) that possibly meant either "king, prince" or "raven". Brennus was a Gallic leader of the 4th century BC who attacked and sacked Rome.
BRIAN   m   Irish, English, Ancient Irish
The meaning of this name is not known for certain but it is possibly related to the old Celtic element bre meaning "hill", or by extension "high, noble". It was borne by the semi-legendary Irish king Brian Boru, who thwarted Viking attempts to conquer Ireland in the 11th century. He was slain in the Battle of Clontarf, though his forces were decisively victorious. The name was common in Ireland before his time, and even more so afterwards. It came into use in England in the Middle Ages, introduced by Breton settlers. It subsequently became rare, but was revived in the 20th century.
BRICIUS   m   Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Latin form of BRICE, probably ultimately of Gaulish origin.
BRUNIHILD   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of BRÜNHILD.
BRUNO   m   German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Croatian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element brun "armour, protection" or brun "brown". Saint Bruno of Cologne was a German monk of the 11th century who founded the Carthusian Order. The surname has belonged Giordano Bruno, a philosopher burned at the stake by the Inquisition.
BRUTUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "heavy" in Latin. Famous bearers include Lucius Junius Brutus, the traditional founder of the Roman Republic, and Marcus Junius Brutus, the statesman who conspired to assassinated Julius Caesar.
BRYNHILDR   f   Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse cognate of BRÜNHILD. In the Norse legend the 'Volsungasaga' Brynhildr was rescued by the hero Sigurd in the guise of Gunnar. Brynhildr and Gunnar were married, but when Sigurd's wife Gudrun let slip that it was in fact Sigurd who had rescued her, Brynhildr plotted against him. She accused Sigurd of taking her virginity, spurring Gunnar to arrange Sigurd's murder.
BRYNJA   f   Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "armour" in Old Norse.
BRYNJARR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of BRYNJAR.
BÚI   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of BO (1).
BURKHARD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements burg meaning "protection" and hard "brave, hardy". Saint Burkhard was a bishop who founded several monasteries in Germany in the 8th century.
CADEYRN   m   Ancient Celtic
Means "battle king" from Welsh cad "battle" and teyrn "king, monarch". Cadeyrn (also known as Catigern) was a 5th-century king of Powys in Wales, the son of Vortigern.
CAECILIA   f   German, Ancient Roman
German form of CECILIA, as well as the original Latin form.
CAECILIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Original masculine form of CECILIA.
CAELIA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CAELIUS.
CAELINA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CAELINUS.
CAELINUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which was itself derived from the Roman family name CAELIUS.
CAELIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which was derived from Latin caelum meaning "heaven".
CAESAR   m   Ancient Roman
From a Roman cognomen which possibly meant "hairy", from Latin caesaries "hair". Julius Caesar and his adopted son Julius Caesar Octavianus (commonly known as Augustus) were both rulers of the Roman Empire in the 1st century BC. Caesar was used as a title by the emperors that came after them.
CAISIDE   m   Ancient Irish
Old Irish byname meaning "curly haired", from Irish Gaelic cas.
CAIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman variant of GAIUS.
CALLIAS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of KALLIAS.
CALVUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "bald" in Latin.
CAMILLA   f   English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, German, Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of CAMILLUS. This was the name of a legendary warrior maiden of the Volsci, as told by Virgil in the 'Aeneid'. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Fanny Burney's novel 'Camilla' (1796).
CAMILLUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen, which is probably of Etruscan origin and unknown meaning. It is probably not related to Latin camillus "a youth employed in religious services". This name was borne by the 16th-century Italian monk Saint Camillus de Lellis.
CAOMH   m   Ancient Irish
Masculine form of CAOIMHE.
CAOMHÁN   m   Ancient Irish
Diminutive of CAOMH. This was the name of a 6th-century Irish saint.
CARATACOS   m   Ancient Celtic
Derived from the Celtic element car meaning "love". This was the name of a 1st-century British chieftain who rebelled against Roman rule.
CARLMAN   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic form of CARLOMAN.
CARLOMAN   m   History, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name derived from karl (see CHARLES) and man "man". This was the name of several Frankish rulers, including the 8th-century Carloman I who ruled jointly with his brother Charlemagne for a time.
CASSANDER   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κασσανδρος (Kassandros), the masculine form of CASSANDRA. This was the name of a 3rd-century BC king of Macedon.
CASSIA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CASSIUS.
CASSIAN   m   Ancient Roman (Anglicized)
From the Roman family name Cassianus, which was derived from CASSIUS. This was the name of several saints, including a 3rd-century martyr from Tangier who is the patron saint of stenographers and a 5th-century mystic who founded a monastery in Marseille.
CASSIANUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which was a derivative of CASSIUS.
CASSIUS   m   Ancient Roman, English
Roman family name which was possibly derived from Latin cassus "empty, vain". This name was borne by several early saints. In modern times, it was the original first name of boxer Muhammad Ali (1942-2016), who was named after his father Cassius Clay, who was himself named after the American abolitionist Cassius Clay (1810-1903).
CATHASACH   m   Ancient Irish
Means "vigilant" in Irish.
CATO (1)   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "wise" in Latin. This name was bestowed upon Cato the Elder (Marcus Porcius Cato), a 2nd-century BC Roman statesman, author and censor, and was subsequently inherited by his descendants, including his great-grandson Cato the Younger (Marcus Porcius Cato Uticencis), a politician and philosopher who opposed Julius Caesar.
CEADDA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of CHAD.
CELSUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which meant "tall" in Latin. This was the name of a 2nd-century philosopher who wrote against Christianity. It was also borne by an early saint martyred with Nazarius in Milan.
CENHELM   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of KENELM.
CENRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cene "bold" and ric "power".
CEOLMUND   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ceol "keel" and mund "protection".
CERDIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Earlier form of CEDRIC, possibly of Brythonic origin.
CHARES   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek χαρις (charis) meaning "grace, kindness". This was the name of a 4th-century BC Athenian general. It was also borne by the sculptor who crafted the Colossus of Rhodes.
CHARIOVALDA   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HAROLD.
CHARIS   f   Ancient Greek, English (Rare)
Feminine form of CHARES. It came into use as an English given name in the 17th century.
CHARITON   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek χαρις (charis) meaning "grace, kindness". This was the name of a 1st-century Greek novelist.
CHARMION   f   Ancient Greek
Greek name derived from χαρμα (charma) meaning "delight". This was the name of one of Cleopatra's servants, as recorded by Plutarch.
CHLODOCHAR   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of LOTHAR.
CHLODOVECH   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of LUDWIG.
CHLODULF   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of LUDOLF.
CHLOE   f   English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "green shoot" in Greek. This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Demeter. The name is also mentioned by Paul in one of his epistles in the New Testament. As an English name, Chloe has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.
CHLOTHAR   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic form of LOTHAR.
CHLOTICHILDA   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of CLOTILDE.
CHRYSANTHE   f   Ancient Greek
Feminine form of CHRYSANTHOS.
CHRYSANTHOS   m   Greek, Ancient Greek
Means "golden flower" from Greek χρυσεος (chryseos) "golden" combined with ανθος (anthos) "flower". This name was borne by a semi-legendary 3rd-century Egyptian saint.
CICERO   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen which meant "chickpea" from Latin cicer. Marcus Tullius Cicero (known simply as Cicero) was a statesman, orator and author of the 1st century BC.
CLAUDIA   f   English, German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Biblical, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CLAUDIUS. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament. As a Christian name it was very rare until the 16th century.
CLAUDIUS   m   Ancient Roman
From a Roman family name which was possibly derived from Latin claudus meaning "lame, crippled". This was the name of a patrician family prominent in Roman politics. The ancestor of the family was said to have been a 6th-century BC Sabine leader named Attius Clausus, who adopted the name Appius Claudius upon becoming a Roman citizen. The family produced several Roman emperors of the 1st century, including the emperor known simply as Claudius. He was poisoned by his wife Agrippina in order to bring her son Nero (Claudius's stepson) to power. The name was later borne by several early saints, including a 7th-century bishop of Besançon.
CLEISTHENES   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Κλεισθενης (Kleisthenes), derived from κλεος (kleos) "glory" and σθενος (sthenos) "strength". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Athenian statesman and reformer. He helped establish democracy in Athens.
CLEITUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of KLEITOS.
CLEON   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Κλεων (Kleon), a Greek name derived from κλεος (kleos) "glory".
CLEOPATRA   f   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κλεοπατρα (Kleopatra) which meant "glory of the father", derived from κλεος (kleos) "glory" combined with πατηρ (pater) "father" (genitive πατρος), This was the name of queens of Egypt from the Ptolemaic royal family, including Cleopatra VII, the mistress of both Julius Caesar and Mark Antony. After being defeated by Augustus she committed suicide by allowing herself to be bitten by an asp. Shakespeare's tragedy 'Antony and Cleopatra' (1606) is based on her.
CLITUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of KLEITOS.
CLODOVICUS   m   Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of Chlodovech (see LUDWIG).
CLOELIA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CLOELIUS. In Roman legend Cloelia was a maiden who was given to an Etruscan invader as a hostage. She managed to escape by swimming across the Tiber, at the same time helping some of the other captives to safety.
CLOELIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name of unknown meaning.
CLOTHILDIS   f   Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Old Germanic form of CLOTILDE.
CLOVIS   m   Ancient Germanic (Latinized), French
Shortened form of Clodovicus, a Latinized form of Chlodovech (see LUDWIG). Clovis was a Frankish king who united France under his rule in the 5th century.
CNAEUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman variant of GNAEUS.
COLA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English byname meaning "charcoal", originally given to a person with dark features.
COLOBERT   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements col, possibly meaning "helmet", and beraht meaning "bright".
CONRAD   m   English, German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements kuoni "brave" and rad "counsel". This was the name of a 10th-century saint and bishop of Konstanz, in southern Germany. It was also borne by several medieval German kings and dukes. In England it was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has only been common since the 19th century when it was reintroduced from Germany.
CORINNA   f   English, German, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Κοριννα (Korinna), which was derived from κορη (kore) "maiden". This was the name of a Greek lyric poet of the 5th century BC. The Roman poet Ovid used it for the main female character in his book 'Amores'. In the modern era it has been in use since the 17th century, when Robert Herrick used it in his poem 'Corinna's going a-Maying'.
CORNELIA   f   German, Romanian, Italian, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CORNELIUS. In the 2nd century BC it was borne by Cornelia Scipionis Africana (the daughter of the military hero Scipio Africanus), the mother of the two reformers known as the Gracchi. After her death she was regarded as an example of the ideal Roman woman. The name was revived in the 18th century.
CORNELIUS   m   Ancient Roman, English, Dutch, German, Biblical
Roman family name which possibly derives from the Latin element cornu "horn". In Acts in the New Testament Cornelius is a centurion who is directed by an angel to seek Peter. After speaking with Peter he converts to Christianity, and he is traditionally deemed the first gentile convert. The name was also borne by a few early saints, including a 3rd-century pope. In England it came into use in the 16th century, partly due to Dutch influence.
CORRAIDHÍN   m   Ancient Irish
Means "little spear", derived from Irish corradh "spear" and a diminutive suffix.
COSMAS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κοσμας (Kosmas), which was derived from κοσμος (kosmos) meaning "order, decency". Saint Cosmas was martyred with his twin brother Damian in the 4th century. They are the patron saints of physicians.
CRISPINUS   m   Ancient Roman
Latin form of CRISPIN.
CRISPUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen which meant "curly-haired" in Latin.
CUIDIGHTHEACH   m   Ancient Irish
Old Irish byname meaning "helpful".
CUNIGUND   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of KUNIGUNDE.
CUNOBELINUS   m   Ancient Celtic
Possibly means "hound of Belenus" from the old Celtic element koun "hound" combined with the name of the god BELENUS. This was the name of a 1st-century king of southeast Britain.
CUTHBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of CUTHBERT.
CYNBEL   m   Ancient Celtic
Derived from Welsh cyn "chief" and bel "war".
CYNEBALD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and beald "bold".
CYNEBURG   f   Anglo-Saxon
Means "royal fortress" from Old English cyne "royal" and burg "fortress". Saint Cyneburga, a daughter of a king of Mercia, was the founder of an abbey at Gloucester in the 7th century.
CYNEFRIÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "royal peace" from Old English cyne "royal" and friþ "peace".
CYNEHEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and heard "brave, hardy".
CYNEMÆR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and mær "famous".
CYNERIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and ric "power".
CYNESIGE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and sige "victory".
CYNEWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and weard "guard".
CYNWRIG   m   Ancient Celtic
Derived from Welsh cyn meaning "chief" and gwr meaning "hero, man", plus the suffix -ig indicating "has the quality of".
CYPRIANUS   m   Ancient Roman
Original Roman form of CYPRIAN.
CYRILLUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of KYRILLOS.
CYRUS   m   English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From Κυρος (Kyros), the Greek form of the Persian name Kūrush, which may mean "far sighted" or "young". The name is sometimes associated with Greek κυριος (kyrios) "lord". It was borne by several kings of Persia, including Cyrus the Great, who conquered Babylon. He is famous in the Old Testament for freeing the captive Jews and allowing them to return to Israel. As an English name, it first came into use among the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation.
DAGFINNR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of DAGFINN.
DAGMÆR   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of DAGMAR.
DAGNÝ   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of DAGNY.
DAGR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of DAG.
DAGRÚN   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of DAGRUN.
DAMIANOS   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of DAMIAN.
DAMIANUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of DAMIANOS.
DANR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of DAN (3).
DARAYAVAHUSH   m   Ancient Persian
Old Persian form of DARIUS.
DECIMA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of DECIMUS.
DECIMUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman praenomen, or given name, meaning "tenth" in Latin.
DEMETRIA   f   Ancient Greek, English
Feminine form of DEMETRIUS.
DEMETRIOS   m   Greek, Ancient Greek
Original Greek form of DEMETRIUS.
DEMETRIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Δημητριος (Demetrios), which was derived from the name of the Greek goddess DEMETER (1). Kings of Macedon and the Seleucid kingdom have had this name. This was also the name of several early saints including a Saint Demetrius who was martyred in the 4th century.
DEMOCRITUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Δημοκριτος (Demokritos), a Greek name meaning "judge of the people" from the elements δημος (demos) "the people" and κριτης (krites) "judge, critic". This was the name of a Greek philosopher, the creator of the atomic theory.
DEMOKRITOS   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of DEMOCRITUS.
DEMON   m   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek name derived from δημος (demos) "the people".
DEMOSTHENES   m   Ancient Greek
Means "vigour of the people" from Greek δημος (demos) "the people" and σθενος (sthenos) "vigour, strength". This was the name of both an Athenian general of the 5th century and an Athenian orator of the 4th century.
DEMOSTRATE   f   Ancient Greek
Means "army of the people", derived from the Greek elements δημος (demos) "the people" and στρατος (stratos) "army".
DEORWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements deor "dear" and wine "friend".
DIOCLES   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of DIOKLES.
DIOCLETIANUS   m   Ancient Roman
Latin form of DIOCLETIAN.
DIODOROS   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of DIODORUS.
DIODORUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Διοδωρος (Diodoros) which meant "gift of Zeus", derived from the elements Διος (Dios) meaning "of ZEUS" and δωρον (doron) meaning "gift". This was the name of a 1st-century BC Greek historian.
DIODOTOS   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of DIODOTUS.
DIODOTUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Διοδοτος (Diodotos), a Greek name which meant "given by Zeus" from Διος (Dios) meaning "of ZEUS" and δοτος (dotos) meaning "given".
DIOGENES   m   Ancient Greek
Means "born of Zeus" from Greek Διος (Dios) meaning "of ZEUS" and γενης (genes) meaning "born". This was the name of a Greek Cynic philosopher.
DIOKLES   m   Ancient Greek
Means "glory of Zeus" from Greek Διος (Dios) meaning "of ZEUS" and κλεος (kleos) meaning "glory".
DION   m   Ancient Greek, English
Short form of DIONYSIOS and other Greek names beginning with the Greek element Διος (Dios) meaning "of ZEUS". This was the name of a 4th-century BC tyrant of Syracuse. It has been used as an American given name since the middle of the 20th century.
DIONYSIOS   m   Greek, Ancient Greek
Greek personal name derived from the name of the Greek god DIONYSOS. Famous bearers include two early tyrants of Syracuse and a 1st-century BC Greek rhetorician.
DIONYSIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized), Biblical
Latin form of DIONYSIOS. Dionysius the Areopagite, who is mentioned in the New Testament, was a judge converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. This was also the name of many other early saints, including a 3rd-century pope.
DIONYSODOROS   m   Ancient Greek
Means "gift of Dionysos" from the name of the god DIONYSOS combined with Greek δωρον (doron) "gift".
DJEHUTIMESU   m   Ancient Egyptian
Reconstructed Egyptian form of THUTMOSE.
DOMITIA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of DOMITIUS.
DOMITIANUS   m   Ancient Roman
Latin form of DOMITIAN.
DOMITILLA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Feminine diminutive of the Roman family name DOMITIUS. This was the name of the wife of the Roman emperor Vespasian and the mother of emperors Titus and Domitian.
DOMITIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which was probably derived from Latin domitus meaning "having been tamed".
DONNDUBHÁN   m   Ancient Irish
Composed of the Gaelic element donn "brown" combined with dubh "dark" and a diminutive suffix.
DORIS   f   English, German, Croatian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
From the ancient Greek name Δωρις (Doris) which meant "Dorian woman". The Dorians were a Greek tribe who occupied the Peloponnese starting in the 12th century BC. In Greek mythology Doris was a sea nymph, one of the many children of Oceanus and Tethys. It began to be used as an English name in the 19th century. A famous bearer is the American actress Doris Day (1924-).
DRACO   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Δρακων (Drakon) which meant "dragon, serpent". This was the name of a 7th-century BC Athenian legislator. This is also the name of a constellation in the northern sky.
DRAKON   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of DRACO.
DREST   m   Ancient Celtic
Variant of DRUST.
DRUSA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of DRUSUS.
DRUSILLA   f   Biblical, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin
Feminine diminutive of the Roman family name DRUSUS. In Acts in the New Testament Drusilla is the wife of Felix.
DRUST   m   Ancient Celtic
Pictish name probably derived from Celtic drest meaning "riot" or "tumult". This name was borne by several kings of the Picts, including their last king Drust X, who ruled in the 9th century.
DRUSTAN   m   Ancient Celtic
Older form of TRISTAN. This name was borne by a 7th-century Scottish saint.
DRUSUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name, also sometimes used as a praenomen, or given name, by the Claudia family. Apparently the name was first assumed by a Roman warrior who killed a Gallic chieftain named Drausus in single combat. Drausus possibly derives from a Celtic element meaning "strong".
DUBHSHLÁINE   m   Ancient Irish
Old Irish name derived from dubh "dark, black" and either slán "defiance" or Sláine, the Gaelic name of the River Slaney.
DUBHTHACH   m   Ancient Irish
Old Irish name derived from dubh "dark, black" in combination with a second element of unknown meaning.
DUDDA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English byname possibly meaning "round".
DUILIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Latin form of DUILIO.
DUNSTAN   m   English (Rare), Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements dun "dark" and stan "stone". This name was borne by a 10th-century saint, the archbishop of Canterbury. It was occasionally used in the Middle Ages, though it died out after the 16th century. It was revived by the Tractarian movement in the 19th century.
EADBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and beorht "bright". This was the name of an 8th-century king of Northumbria and three kings of Kent.
EADBURG   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and burg "fortress".
EADGAR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDGAR.
EADGYÐ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDITH.
EADMUND   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDMUND.
EADRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDRIC.
EADWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDWARD.
EADWIG   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wig "war". This was the name of a Saxon king of England in the 10th century. The name fell out of use after the Norman conquest.
EADWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDWIN.
EADWULF   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wulf "wolf". This name fell out of use after the Norman conquest.
EALDGYÐ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eald "old" and gyð "battle".
EALDRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements eald "old" and ræd "counsel". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
EALDWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements eald "old" and wine "friend". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
EALHHERE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ealh "temple" and here "army".
EALHSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element ealh "temple" combined with stan "stone".
EARDWULF   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element eard "land" combined with wulf "wolf".
EASTMUND   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ESMOND.
EBERHARD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of EVERARD. This name was borne by a 9th-century Duke of Friuli.
EBURWIN   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic cognate of EOFORWINE.
ECGBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EGBERT.
EDDA (2)   f   Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Possibly from Old Norse meaning "great-grandmother". This was the name of two literary works by the 13th-century Icelandic author Snorri Sturluson: the Poetic Edda and the Prose Edda. This is also the name of a character in the Poetic Edda, though it is unclear if her name is connected to the name of the collection.
EGILHARD   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements agil "edge of a sword" and hard "brave, hardy".
EGILL   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of EGIL.
EGINO   m   Ancient Germanic
Older form of EGON.
EGNATIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Earlier form of IGNATIUS.
EILEIFR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of ELOF.
EINARR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of EINAR.
EINDRIÐI   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of EINDRIDE.
EIRENAIOS   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of IRENAEUS.
EIRENE   f   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Original Greek form of IRENE.
EIRÍKR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of ERIC.
EKKEBERT   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ECKBERT.
EKKEHARD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ag "edge" and hard "brave, hardy".
ELISEDD   m   Ancient Celtic
Derived from Welsh elus meaning "kind". This was the name of two kings of Powys in Wales.
ELLANHER   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements aljan "strength, power" and hari "army, warrior".
ELPIS   f   Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "hope" in Greek. In Greek mythology Elpis was the personification of hope. She was the last spirit to remain in the jar after Pandora unleashed the evils that were in it.
EMELRICH   m   Ancient Germanic
Variant of AMALRIC.
EMMA   f   English, French, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of king Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of king Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.... [more]
EMMERICH   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, in which the second element is ric meaning "power". The first element may be ermen "whole, universal" (making it a relative of Ermenrich), amal "work, labour" (making it a relative of Amalric) or heim "home" (making it a relative of Henry). It is likely that several forms merged into a single name.
ENGEL   m   German (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Originally this was a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element Angil, the name of a Germanic tribe (known in English as the Angles). Since the Middle Ages it has been firmly associated with the German word engel meaning "angel".
ENGELBERT   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements Angil, the name of a Germanic tribe known in English as the Angles, and beraht "bright". Saint Engelbert was a 13th-century archbishop of Cologne murdered by assassins.
ENGILRAM   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic form of ENGUERRAND.
ENNIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Original Latin form of ENNIO.
EOFORHILD   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eofor "boar" and hild "battle". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
EOFORWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eofor "boar" and wine "friend". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
EÓGAN   m   Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology
Older Irish form of EOGHAN.
EPAPHRAS   m   Biblical, Ancient Greek, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin
Derived from Greek επαφρος (epaphros) meaning "foamy". In the New Testament this is the name of one of Paul's co-workers.
EPAPHRODITOS   m   Ancient Greek
Means "lovely, charming", derived from Greek επι (epi) "on" combined with the name of the Greek love goddess APHRODITE.
EPIKTETOS   m   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek name meaning "newly acquired". This was the name of a 1st-century Greek stoic philosopher.
EPIPHANES   m   Ancient Greek
Means "appearing, manifesting" in Greek. This was an epithet of two 2nd-century BC Hellenistic rulers: the Seleucid king Antiochus IV and the Ptolemaic king Ptolemy V.
EPIPHANIOS   m   Ancient Greek
Original Greek form of EPIFANIO.
EPIPHANIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Epiphanios (see EPIFANIO).
ERASMOS   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of ERASMUS.
ERCANBALD   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ARCHIBALD.
ERHARD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element era "honour, respect" or hari "army" combined with hard "brave, hardy". In some cases it may be a variant of EBERHARD.
ERLENDR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of ERLAND.
ERLINGR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of ERLING.
ERMENDRUD   f   Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ermen "whole, universal" and thrud "strength".
ERMENRICH   m   Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic elements ermen "whole, universal" and ric "power". Ermenrich (also often called Ermanaric) was a 4th-century Gothic king.
ERMINGARD   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of IRMINGARD.
ERMINHILT   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of IRMHILD.
ERMINIGILD   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HERMENEGILDO.
ERMINLINDA   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ERMELINDA.
ERNUST   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ERNEST.
ERWIN   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic name Hariwini, composed of the elements hari "army" and win "friend". It may have merged somewhat with the Germanic name EBURWIN. A notable bearer was Erwin Schrodinger (1887-1961), an Austrian physicist who made contributions to quantum theory.
EUANTHE   f   Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ευανθης (euanthes) meaning "blooming, flowery", a derivative of ευ (eu) "good" and ανθος (anthos) "flower". According to some sources, this was the name of the mother of the three Graces or Χαριτες (Charites) in Greek mythology.
EUARISTOS   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of EVARISTUS.
EUCLID   m   Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name Ευκλειδης (Eukleides), derived from Greek ευ (eu) "good" and κλεος (kleos) "glory" with the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides). This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek mathematician from Alexandria who made numerous contributions to geometry.
EUDOCIA   f   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ευδοκια (Eudokia), derived from the word ευδοκεω (eudokeo) meaning "to be well pleased, to be satisfied", itself derived from ευ (eu) "good" and δοκεω (dokeo) "to think, to imagine, to suppose".
EUDOKIA   f   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of EUDOCIA.
EUDOXIA   f   Ancient Greek
Means "good repute, good judgement" from Greek ευδοξος (eudoxos), itself derived from ευ (eu) "good" and δοξα (doxa) "notion, reputation, honour, glory".
EUGENEIA   f   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek feminine form of EUGENE.
EUGENIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Polish, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Feminine form of Eugenius (see EUGENE). It was borne by a semi-legendary 3rd-century saint who escaped persecution by disguising herself as a man. The name was occasionally found in England during the Middle Ages, but it was not regularly used until the 19th century.
EUGENIOS   m   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of EUGENE.
EUGENIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Eugenios (see EUGENE).
EUKLEIDES   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of EUCLID.
EULALIA   f   Spanish, Italian, English, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ευλαλος (eulalos) meaning "sweetly-speaking", itself from ευ (eu) "good" and λαλεω (laleo) "to talk". This was the name of an early 4th-century saint and martyr from Merida in Spain. She is a patron saint of Barcelona.
EUMELIA   f   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ευμελεια (eumeleia) meaning "melody".
EUNIKE   f   Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek
Greek form of EUNICE.
EUPHEMIA   f   Ancient Greek, English (Archaic)
Means "to use words of good omen" from Greek () "good" and φημι (phemi) "to speak, to declare". Saint Euphemia was an early martyr from Chalcedon.
EUPHEMIOS   m   Ancient Greek
Masculine form of EUPHEMIA.
EUPHRANOR   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ευφραινω (euphraino) meaning "to delight". This was the name of a 4th-century BC Athenian artist.
EUPHRASIA   f   Ancient Greek
Means "good cheer" in Greek.
EUPRAXIA   f   Ancient Greek
From a Greek word meaning "good conduct", derived from ευ (eu) "good" and πραξις (praxis) "action, exercise".
EURIPIDES   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek Ευριπος (Euripos), referring to the strait between Euboea and Boeotia, combined with the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides). This was the name of a 5th-century BC Greek tragic poet.
EUSEBIOS   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ευσεβης (eusebes) meaning "pious", itself derived from ευ (eu) "good" and σεβω (sebo) "to worship, to honour". This was the name of several saints.
EUSEBIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of EUSEBIOS. This was the name of a 4th-century historian of the Christian church.
EUSTACHYS   m   Ancient Greek
Means "fruitful" in Greek. It is ultimately from ευ (eu) "good" and σταχυς (stachus) "ear of corn".
EUSTATHIOS   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of EUSTATHIUS.
EUSTATHIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ευσταθιος (Eustathios), derived from the Greek word ευσταθης (eustathes) meaning "well-built, stable". It is ultimately from ευ (eu) "good" and ‘ιστημι (histemi) "to stand, to set up". This was the name of a few early saints, including the 2nd-century martyr also known as Eustachius (see Eustace).
EUSTORGIOS   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of EUSTORGIO.
EUSTORGIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Eustorgios (see EUSTORGIO).
EUTHALIA   f   Ancient Greek
Means "flower, bloom" from the Greek word ευθαλεια (euthaleia), itself derived from ευ (eu) "good" and θαλλω (thallo) "to blossom".
EUTHYMIA   f   Ancient Greek
Feminine form of EUTHYMIUS.
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