Ancient Names

These names were used in various ancient regions.
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ORIGENES   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of ORIGEN.
ORTWIN   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ort "point" and win "friend".
OSBEORN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of OSBORN.
OSBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of OSBERT.
OSGAR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and gar "spear".
OSMUND   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of OSMOND.
OSWALD   m   English, German, Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and weald "power, ruler". Saint Oswald was a king of Northumbria who introduced Christianity to northeast England in the 7th century before being killed in battle. There was also an Old Norse cognate Ásvaldr in use in England, being borne by the 10th-century Saint Oswald of Worcester, who was of Danish ancestry. Though the name had died out by the end of the Middle Ages, it was revived in the 19th century.
OSWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of OSWIN.
OTHMAR   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Variant of OTMAR.
OTHO   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen of unknown meaning. This was the name of a short-lived 1st-century Roman emperor.
OTMAR   m   German, Czech (Rare), Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Audamar, which was derived from the elements aud "wealth, fortune" and meri "famous". This was the name of an 8th-century Swiss saint, an abbot of Saint Gall.
OTTO   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
Later German form of Audo or Odo, originally a short form of various names beginning with the Germanic element aud meaning "wealth, fortune". This was the name of four kings of Germany, starting in the 10th century with Otto I, the first Holy Roman Emperor, who was known as Otto the Great. This name was also borne by a 19th-century king of Greece who was originally from Bavaria. Another notable bearer was the German chancellor Otto von Bismarck (1815-1898).
OVIDIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Latin form of OVID.
PÆGA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name of unknown meaning.
PAMPHILOS   m   Ancient Greek
Means "friend of all" from Greek παν (pan) "all" and φιλος (philos) "friend".
PANCRATIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Πανκρατιος (Pankratios), derived from παν (pan) "all" and κρατος (kratos) "power". Early Byzantine Christians used this as a title of Christ. It was borne by two saints, a 1st-century Sicilian martyr and a semi-legendary 4th-century Roman martyr.
PANKRATIOS   m   Ancient Greek
Original Greek form of PANCRATIUS.
PANTALEON   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from the Greek elements παν (pan) meaning "all" (genitive παντος) and λεων (leon) meaning "lion". This was the name of a 2nd-century BC king of Bactria. It was also borne by Saint Pantaleon (also called Panteleimon), a doctor from Asia Minor who was martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian in the early 4th century. He is a patron saint of doctors and midwives.
PANTHER   m   Ancient Greek
Means "panther" in Greek.
PANTHERAS   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek πανθηρ (panther) meaning "panther", ultimately of Sanskrit origin, though folk etymology connects it to Greek παν (pan) "all" and θηραω (therao) "to hunt". According to some legends a Roman soldier named Panthera was the father of Jesus.
PAPAK   m   Ancient Persian
Variant of BABAK.
PARAMONOS   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek παραμονη (paramone) meaning "endurance, constancy".
PAULA   f   German, English, Finnish, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Hungarian, Polish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Paulus (see PAUL). This was the name of a 4th-century Roman saint who was a companion of Saint Jerome.
PAULINA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Swedish, Lithuanian, English, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Paulinus (see PAULINO).
PAULINUS   m   Ancient Roman
Original Latin form of PAULINO.
PAULUS   m   Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin
Latin form of PAUL.
PELAGIA   f   Ancient Greek, Greek, Polish
Feminine form of PELAGIUS. This was the name of a few early saints, including a young 4th-century martyr who threw herself from a rooftop in Antioch rather than lose her virginity.
PELAGIOS   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of PELAGIUS.
PELAGIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Πελαγιος (Pelagios), which was derived from πελαγος (pelagos) "the sea". This was the name of several saints and two popes.
PERICLES   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Περικλης (Perikles), which was derived from the Greek elements περι (peri) "around, exceedingly" and κλεος (kleos) "glory". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Athenian statesman and general.
PERIKLES   m   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of PERICLES.
PETRONIA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of PETRONIUS.
PETRONIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which is possibly derived from Latin petro, petronis "yokel".
PHAEDRUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Φαιδρος (Phaidros), which meant "bright". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Greek philosopher, and also of a 1st-century Roman fabulist who was originally a slave from Thrace.
PHAIDROS   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of PHAEDRUS.
PHERENIKE   f   Ancient Greek
Ancient Attic Greek form of BERENICE.
PHILANDROS   m   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of PHILANDER.
PHILE   f   Ancient Greek
Feminine form of Philon (see PHILO).
PHILO   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Φιλων (Philon), which was derived from φιλος (philos) meaning "lover, friend". This was the name of a 1st-century Hellenistic Jewish philosopher and theologian from Alexandria.
PHILOKRATES   m   Ancient Greek
Means "friend of power" from Greek φιλος (philos) "lover, friend" and κρατος (kratos) "power".
PHILON   m   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of PHILO.
PHILOTHEOS   m   Ancient Greek
Means "friend of god" from Greek φιλος (philos) "lover, friend" and θεος (theos) "god".
PHOCAS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Φωκας (Phokas), which meant "a seal" from Greek φωκη (phoke). This was the name of an early saint and martyr from Asia Minor. Sentenced to death for being a Christian, he is said to have given his killers lodging and then dug his own grave before he was executed.
PHOKAS   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of PHOCAS.
PHOTINA   f   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of PHOTINE.
PHOTINE   f   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek φως (phos) meaning "light" (genitive φωτος (photos)). This is the name traditionally given to the Samaritan woman Jesus met at the well (see John 4:7). She is venerated as a saint by the Eastern Church.
PHOTIOS   m   Greek, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek φως (phos) meaning "light" (genitive φωτος (photos)).
PIPIN   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of PÉPIN.
PIPPIN (1)   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of PÉPIN.
PLATO   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Πλατων (Platon) which was derived from Greek πλατυς (platys) meaning "broad-shouldered". Plato was one of the most important of the Greek philosophers. He was a pupil of Socrates and a teacher of Aristotle. He constructed the theory of Forms and wrote several works, including the 'Republic'.
PLATON   m   Ancient Greek, Greek, Russian
Greek form of PLATO.
PLINIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Original Latin form of PLINY.
PLOUTARCHOS   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of PLUTARCH.
POLYCARP   m   Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name Πολυκαρπος (Polykarpos) meaning "fruitful, rich in fruit", ultimately from Greek πολυς (polys) "much" and καρπος (karpos) "fruit". Saint Polycarp was a 2nd-century bishop of Smyrna who was martyred by being burned at the stake and then stabbed.
POLYKARPOS   m   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of POLYCARP.
POMPEIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Latin form of POMPEY.
POMPILIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Latin form of POMPILIU.
POMPONIA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of POMPONIUS.
POMPONIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which is of unknown meaning, possibly a derivative of Pompeius (see POMPEY).
PONTIUS   m   Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical
Roman family name. The family had Samnite roots so the name probably originated from the Oscan language, likely meaning "fifth" (a cognate of Latin Quintus). Alternatively, it could be derived from the name of the ancient province of Pontus in Asia Minor, itself probably from Greek ποντος (pontos) "sea". A notable bearer of this name was Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor of Judea who appears in the New Testament.
PORCIA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of PORCIUS.
PORCIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name meaning "pig", derived from Latin porcus. Famous members of the family include the Roman statesmen Cato the Elder (Marcus Porcius Cato) and his great-grandson Cato the Younger (Marcus Porcius Cato Uticencis).
PORPHYRIOS   m   Ancient Greek
Original Greek form of PORFIRIO.
PRAXITELES   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from the Greek elements πραξις (praxis) "action, exercise" and τελος (telos) "aim, goal". This was the name of a 4th-century BC sculptor from Athens.
PRISCA   f   Biblical, Dutch, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin
Feminine form of Priscus, a Roman family name which meant "ancient" in Latin. This name appears in the epistles in the New Testament, referring to Priscilla the wife of Aquila.
PRISCILLA   f   English, Italian, French, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical
Roman name, a diminutive of PRISCA. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lived with Priscilla (also known as Prisca) and her husband Aquila in Corinth for a while. It has been used as an English given name since the Protestant Reformation, being popular with the Puritans. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow used it in his poem 'The Courtship of Miles Standish' (1858).
PRISCUS   m   Ancient Roman
Masculine form of PRISCA.
PROKOPIOS   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek προκοπη (prokope) "progress, advance". Saint Prokopios was an early Christian martyr who was beheaded in Palestine during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian.
PTOLEMAIOS   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of PTOLEMY.
PTOLEMAIS   f   Ancient Greek
Feminine form of Ptolemaios (see PTOLEMY).
PUBLIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman praenomen, or given name, meaning "public" in Latin. This was among the more common of the Roman praenomina, being borne by (among others) the emperor Hadrian and the poet Virgil.
PYRRHUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Πυρρος (Pyrros) which meant "flame-coloured, red", related to πυρ (pyr) "fire". This was another name of Neoptolemus the son of Achilles. This was also the name of a 3rd-century BC king of Epirus.
PYTHAGORAS   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from PYTHIOS, a name of Apollo, combined with Greek αγορα (agora) meaning "assembly, marketplace". This was the name of a 6th-century BC Greek philosopher and mathematician from Samos. He was the founder of a school of philosophy whose members believed that numbers described the universe.
QUINTILIANUS   m   Ancient Roman
Original Latin form of QUINTILIAN.
QUINTILLUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen derived from the given name QUINTUS.
QUINTINA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of QUINTINUS.
QUINTINUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen which was originally derived from QUINTUS.
QUINTIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen derived from the given name QUINTUS.
QUINTUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman praenomen, or given name, meaning "fifth" in Latin. It was traditionally given to the fifth child, or possibly a child born in the fifth month. This was a common praenomen, being more popular than the other numeric Roman names. A notable bearer was the poet Horace (Quintus Horatius Flaccus).
RABAN   m   Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic byname derived from hraban meaning "raven".
RADOBOD   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of RADBOUD.
RADULF   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic cognate of RÁÐÚLFR.
RAGANHAR   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of RAYNER.
RAGANHILDIS   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of REINHILD.
RAGEMPRAND   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of REMBRANDT.
RAGINALD   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of REYNOLD.
RAGINHARD   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of REYNARD.
RAGINMAR   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of RAMIRO.
RAGINMUND   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of RAYMOND.
RAGNA   f   Icelandic, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Ancient Scandinavian
Short form of Old Norse names beginning with the element regin "advice, counsel".
RAGNARR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse cognate of RAGANHAR.
RAGNBJÖRG   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name derived from the elements regin "advice, counsel" and björg "help, save, rescue".
RAGNFRÍÐR   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of RANDI (2).
RAGNHEIÐR   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name meaning "bright advice", derived from the elements regin "advice, counsel" and heiðr "brightness".
RAGNHILDR   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of RAGNHILD.
RAGNVALDR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name composed of the elements regin "advice, counsel" and valdr "power, ruler" (making it a cognate of REYNOLD).
RAIMUND   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of RAYMOND.
RAINARD   m   Ancient Germanic
Variant of REYNARD.
RAINER   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of RAYNER.
RAMBERT   m   Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hramn "raven" and beraht "bright".
RAMESES   m   Ancient Egyptian (Hellenized)
From Egyptian Ra-msj-sw meaning "born of Ra", composed of the name of the supreme god RA combined with the Egyptian root mesu "be born". Rameses was the name of eleven Egyptian kings of the New Kingdom. The most important of these were Rameses II the Great who campaigned against the Hittites and also built several great monuments, and Rameses III who defended Egypt from the Libyans and Sea Peoples.
RAMESSU   m   Ancient Egyptian
Reconstructed Egyptian form of RAMESES.
RAMIRUS   m   Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of Raginmar (see RAMIRO).
RANDULF   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of RANDOLF.
RANDÚLFR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of RANDOLF.
RÁÐÚLFR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Norse elements ráð meaning "counsel" and úlfr meaning "wolf".
REGIN   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of REIN.
REGULUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "prince, little king", a diminutive of Latin rex "king". This was the cognomen of several 3rd-century BC consuls from the gens Atilia. It was also the name of several early saints. A star in the constellation Leo bears this name as well.
REINALD   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of REYNOLD.
REINER   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of RAYNER.
REINHARD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German cognate of REYNARD.
REINHOLD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German cognate of REYNOLD.
RICHARD   m   English, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave power", derived from the Germanic elements ric "power, rule" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, and it has been very common there since that time. It was borne by three kings of England including Richard I the Lionheart, one of the leaders of the Third Crusade in the 12th century.... [more]
RICOHARD   m   Ancient Germanic
Older form of RICHARD.
ROBERT   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been a very common English name since that time.... [more]
ROCCO   m   Italian, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the element hrok meaning "rest". This was the name of a 14th-century French saint who nursed victims of the plague but eventually contracted the disease himself. He is the patron saint of the sick.
ROCHUS   m   German (Rare), Dutch (Rare), Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of ROCCO, used in occasionally German and Dutch.
ROMILDA   f & m   Italian, Ancient Germanic
Means "famous battle" from the Germanic elements hrom "fame" and hild "battle".
ROSHANAK   f   Persian, Ancient Persian
Original Persian form of ROXANA.
ROSLINDIS   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ROSALIND.
ROSMUNDA   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ROSAMUND.
ROXANA   f   English, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latin form of Ρωξανη (Roxane), the Greek form of the Persian or Bactrian name روشنک (Roshanak) which meant "bright" or "dawn". This was the name of Alexander the Great's first wife, a daughter of the Bactrian nobleman Oxyartes. In the modern era it came into use during the 17th century. In the English-speaking world it was popularized by Daniel Defoe, who used it in his novel 'Roxana' (1724).
ROXANE   f   French, English, Ancient Greek
French and English form of ROXANA. This is the name of Cyrano's love interest in the play 'Cyrano de Bergerac' (1897).
ROZA (2)   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic short form of feminine names beginning with the element hrod meaning "fame".
RUDESIND   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ROSENDO.
RUFINA   f   Russian, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of RUFINUS.
RUFINUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from the cognomen RUFUS. It was borne by several early saints.
RUFUS   m   Ancient Roman, English, Biblical
Roman cognomen which meant "red-haired" in Latin. Several early saints had this name, including one mentioned in one of Paul's epistles in the New Testament. As a nickname it was used by William II Rufus, a king of England, because of his red hair. It came into general use in the English-speaking world after the Protestant Reformation.
RÚNA   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of RUNA.
RÚNI   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Faroese
Old Norse and Faroese form of RUNE.
SABINA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Swedish, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Sabinus, a Roman cognomen meaning "Sabine" in Latin. The Sabines were an ancient people who lived in central Italy, their lands eventually taken over by the Romans after several wars. According to legend, the Romans abducted several Sabine women during a raid, and when the men came to rescue them, the women were able to make peace between the two groups. This name was borne by several early saints.
SABINUS   m   Ancient Roman
Latin masculine form of SABINA.
SÆWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements "sea" and wine "friend".
SAPPHO   f   Ancient Greek
Possibly from Greek σαπφειρος (sappheiros) meaning "sapphire" or "lapis lazuli". This was the name of a 7th-century BC Greek poetess from Lesbos.
SATURNINA   f   Ancient Roman, Spanish
Feminine form of SATURNINUS. This was the name of a legendary saint who was supposedly martyred in northern France.
SATURNINUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen derived from the name of the Roman god Saturnus (see SATURN). This was the name of several early saints.
SAXA   f   Ancient Germanic
Germanic form of SASKIA.
SCAEVOLA   m   Ancient Roman
Latin form of SCEVOLA.
SECUNDINUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name derived from the praenomen SECUNDUS. Saint Secundinus, also known as Seachnall, was a 5th-century assistant to Saint Patrick who became the first bishop of Dunshaughlin.
SECUNDUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman praenomen, or given name, which meant "second" in Latin.
SEISYLL   m   Ancient Celtic
Old Welsh form of SEXTILIUS.
SELEUCUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Σελευκος (Seleukos), of unknown meaning. This was the name of one of Alexander the Great's generals, who established the Seleucid Empire in Western Asia after Alexander's death.
SELEUKOS   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of SELEUCUS.
SENECA   m   Ancient Roman
From a Roman cognomen which meant "old" from Latin senectus. This was the name of both a Roman orator (born in Spain) and also of his son, a philosopher and statesman. This name also coincides with that of the Seneca, a Native American tribe that lived near the Great Lakes, whose name meant "place of stones".
SEPTIMA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of SEPTIMUS.
SEPTIMIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which was derived from SEPTIMUS. Septimius Severus was an early 3rd-century Roman emperor. This was also the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr.
SEPTIMUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman praenomen, or given name, which meant "seventh" in Latin.
SERGIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name, possibly meaning "servant" in Latin but most likely of unknown Etruscan origin. Saint Sergius was a 4th-century Roman officer who was martyred in Syria with his companion Bacchus. They are the patron saints of Christian desert nomads. Another saint by this name (in the Russian form Sergey) was a 14th-century Russian spiritual leader. The name was also borne by four popes.
SERVIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman praenomen, or given name, meaning "to preserve" from Latin servo.
SETI   m   Ancient Egyptian
Means "of SETH (2)" in Egyptian. This was the name of two pharaohs of the 19th dynasty.
SEVERIANUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from SEVERUS.
SEVERINUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which was derived from SEVERUS. Severinus was the name of many early saints, including a 6th-century Roman philosopher martyred by the Ostrogothic king Theodoric. It was also borne by a pope.
SEVERUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name meaning "stern" in Latin. This name was borne by several early saints.
SEXTILIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen which was a derivative of SEXTUS.
SEXTUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman praenomen, or given name, which meant "sixth" in Latin. It was traditionally given to the sixth child.
SHARRU-KINU   m   Ancient Near Eastern
Akkadian form of SARGON.
SIDDHARTHA   m   Sanskrit, Bengali
Means "one who has accomplished a goal", derived from Sanskrit सिद्ध (siddha) meaning "accomplished" and अर्थ (artha) meaning "goal". Siddhartha Gautama was the real name of Buddha.
SIGDAG   m   Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and dag "day".
SIGEBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "bright victory", derived from Old English sige "victory" and beorht "bright". This was the name of a king of Wessex. The name fell out of use after the Norman conquest.
SIGEWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements sige "victory" and weard "guard, guardian".
SIGFRØÐR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse cognate of SIEGFRIED.
SIGIBERT   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of SIEGBERT.
SIGIFRID   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of SIEGFRIED.
SIGIHARD   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of SIEGHARD.
SIGIHERI   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of SIEGER.
SIGIHILD   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of SIEGHILD.
SIGILIND   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of SIEGLINDE.
SIGIMUND   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of SIGMUND.
SIGISMUND   m   German (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Form of SIGMUND in which the first element is sigis, an older form of sigu. Saint Sigismund was a 6th-century king of the Burgundians. This was also the name of kings of Poland and a ruler of the Holy Roman Empire.
SIGIVALD   m   Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and wald "rule".
SIGIWARD   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic cognate of SIGURD.
SIGMUNDR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of SIGMUND.
SIGNÝ   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse name which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and "new". In Norse legend she was the twin sister of Sigmund and the wife of Siggeir.
SIGRÍÐR   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of SIGRID.
SIGRÚN   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements sigr "victory" and rún "secret". This was the name of a Valkyrie in Norse legend.
SIGSTEINN   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of SIXTEN.
SILVANUS   m   Roman Mythology, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Roman name derived from Latin silva "wood, forest". Silvanus was the Roman god of forests. This name appears in the New Testament belonging to one of Saint Paul's companions, also called Silas.
SIMON (2)   m   Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek σιμος (simos) meaning "flat-nosed". In Greek mythology this was the name of one of the Telchines, demigods who were the original inhabitants of Rhodes.
SIMONIDES   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek σιμος (simos) "flat-nosed" and the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides). This name was borne by the 7th-century BC iambic poet Simonides of Amorgos and the 6th-century BC lyric poet Simonides of Ceos.
SINDRI   m   Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Possibly means either "small, trivial" or else "sparkling" in Old Norse. In Norse legend this was the name of a dwarf who, with his brother Brokk, made many magical items for the gods.
SIWARD   m   Ancient Germanic
Variant of SIGIWARD.
SLUAGHADHÁN   m   Ancient Irish
Derived from Irish sluaghadh "raid" and a diminutive suffix.
SNORRI   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Derived from Old Norse snerra "attack, onslaught". This name was borne by Snorri Sturluson, a 13th-century Icelandic historian and poet, the author of the Prose Edda.
SOCRATES   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Σωκρατης (Sokrates), which was derived from σως (sos) "whole, unwounded, safe" and κρατος (kratos) "power". This was the name of an important Greek philosopher. He left no writings of his own; virtually everything that we know of his beliefs comes from his pupil Plato. He was sentenced to death for impiety.
SOKRATES   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of SOCRATES.
SOLON   m   Ancient Greek
Possibly from Greek σολος (solos) meaning "lump of iron". This was the name of an Athenian statesman who reformed the laws and government of the city.
SÓLVEIG   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of SOLVEIG.
SOMARLIÐR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of SOMERLED.
SOPHIA   f   English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek
Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred during the reign of the emperor Hadrian. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which is the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.... [more]
SOPHOCLES   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Σοφοκλης (Sophokles), which was derived from Greek σοφος (sophos) "skilled, clever" and κλεος (kleos) "glory". Sophocles was a 5th-century BC Greek tragic poet.
SOPHOKLES   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of SOPHOCLES.
SOPHOS   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of SOPHUS.
SOPHUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Σοφος (Sophos) which meant "skilled, clever".
SOSIGENES   m   Ancient Greek
Means "born safely" from Greek σως (sos) "safe, whole, unwounded" and γενης (genes) "born". This was the name of an astronomer from Alexandria employed by Julius Caesar to correct the Roman calendar.
SOSTRATE   f   Ancient Greek
Means "safe army" from Greek σως (sos) "safe, whole, unwounded" and στρατος (stratos) "army".
SPURIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman praenomen, or given name, which is of uncertain meaning, probably of Etruscan origin. It may be related to the Late Latin word spurius "of illegitimate birth", which was derived from Etruscan srural "public".
STEINARR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of STEINAR.
STEINN   m   Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse and Icelandic form of STEN.
STEPHANOS   m   Ancient Greek, Biblical Greek, Greek
Ancient and modern Greek form of STEPHEN.
STÍGANDR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Means "wanderer" in Old Norse.
STIGR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Means "path" in Old Norse.
STRATON   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek στρατος (stratos) meaning "army". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek philosopher.
SUIBHNE   m   Irish, Scottish, Ancient Irish
Means "well-going" in Gaelic. This was the name of a 7th-century high king of Ireland.
SUNNGIFU   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of SUNNIVA.
SVANTEPOLK   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of SVYATOPOLK. It was borne by the prominent 13th-century Swedish nobleman Svantepolk Knutsson. He may have been named after a relative of his Pomeranian mother.
SVEINN   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of SVEN.
SVERRIR   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse form of SVERRE, as well as the modern Icelandic form.
SWANAHILDA   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of SWANHILD.
SWIÐHUN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of SWITHIN.
SYNTYCHE   f   Biblical, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek name meaning "common fate". This is the name of a woman mentioned in Paul's epistle to the Philippians in the New Testament.
TACITA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine form of TACITUS.
TACITUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen which meant "silent, mute" in Latin. This was the name of a 1st-century Roman historian.
TAHMASP   m   Ancient Persian
Persian form of the Avestan name Takhmaspa, which was derived from takhma "strong, brave, valiant" and aspa "horse". This name was borne by two Safavid shahs of Persia.
TAKHMASPA   m   Ancient Persian
Avestan form of TAHMASP.
TARQUINIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Latin form of TARQUIN.
TATA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name of unknown meaning.
TATIANA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, Polish, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Greek, Georgian, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of the Roman name Tatianus, a derivative of the Roman name TATIUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint who was martyred in Rome under the emperor Alexander Severus. She was especially venerated in Orthodox Christianity, and the name has been common in Russia (as Татьяна) and Eastern Europe. It was not regularly used in the English-speaking world until the 1980s.
TATIANUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from TATIUS.
TATIUS   m   Roman Mythology, Ancient Roman
Roman family name of unknown meaning, possibly of Sabine origin. According to Roman legend, Titus Tatius was an 8th-century BC king of the Sabines who came to jointly rule over the Romans and Sabines with the Roman king Romulus.
TELESPHOROS   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of TÉLESPHORE.
TELESPHORUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Telesphoros (see TÉLESPHORE).
TE'OMA   m   Ancient Aramaic
Old Aramaic form of THOMAS.
TERENTIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Original Latin form of TERENCE.
TERTIUS   m   Ancient Roman
This was both a Roman praenomen and a cognomen which meant "third" in Latin.
TEUTORIGOS   m   Ancient Celtic
Older form of TUDOR (1).
THAÏS   f   Ancient Greek
Possibly means "bandage" in Greek. This was the name of a companion of Alexander the Great. It was also borne by a 4th-century saint from Alexandria, a wealthy socialite who became a Christian convert. She has been a popular subject of art and literature, including an 1891 novel by Anatole France and an 1894 opera by Jules Massenet.
THAIS   f   Ancient Greek
Variant transcription of THAÏS.
THALES   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek θαλλω (thallo) meaning "to blossom". This was the name of a 6th-century BC Greek philosopher and mathematician.
THANCMAR   m   Ancient Germanic
Older form of TAMMARO.
THANKARAT   m   Ancient Germanic
Older Germanic form of TANCRED.
THEMISTOCLES   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Θεμιστοκλης (Themistokles) meaning "glory of the law", from θεμις (themis) "law of nature, divine law" (genitive θεμιστος) and κλεος (kleos) "glory". This was the name of an Athenian statesman and general who was victorious over the Persians in the Battle of Salamis.
THEMISTOKLES   m   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of THEMISTOCLES.
THEOBALD   m   English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements theud "people" and bald "bold". The Normans brought the name to England, where it joined an existing Old English cognate. The medieval forms Tibald and Tebald were commonly Latinized as Theobaldus. It was rare by the 20th century.
THEOCRITUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Θεοκριτος (Theokritos), a Greek name which meant "judge of god" from θεος (theos) "god" and κριτης (krites) "judge, critic". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek poet.
THEODOAR   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements theud "people" and war "vigilant, cautious".
THEODOARD   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements theud "people" and wart "watcher".
THEODORA   f   English, Greek, Ancient Greek
Feminine form of THEODORE. This name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by several empresses including the influential wife of Justinian in the 6th century.
THEODOROS   m   Greek, Ancient Greek
Original Greek form of THEODORE.
THEODORUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized), Dutch
Latinized form of the Greek name Theodoros (see THEODORE).
THEODOSIA   f   Ancient Greek, Greek
Feminine form of THEODOSIUS.
THEODOSIOS   m   Ancient Greek
Original Greek form of THEODOSIUS.
THEODOSIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Θεοδοσιος (Theodosios) which meant "giving to god", derived from θεος (theos) "god" and δοσις (dosis) "giving". Saint Theodosius of Palestine was a monk who founded a monastery near Bethlehem in the 5th century. This also was the name of emperors of the Eastern Roman and Byzantine Empires.
THEODOTOS   m   Ancient Greek
Original Greek form of THEODOTUS.
THEODOTUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Θεοδοτος (Theodotos) which meant "given to god" from θεος (theos) "god" and δοτος (dotos) "given". This name belonged to several early saints and martyrs.
THEODOULOS   m   Ancient Greek
Original Greek form of THEODULUS.
THEODULUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Θεοδουλος (Theodoulos) which meant "slave of god", derived from θεος (theos) "god" and δουλος (doulos) "slave". This name was borne by several early saints.
THEOKLEIA   f   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of THEKLA.
THEOKRITOS   m   Ancient Greek
Original Greek form of THEOCRITUS.
THEOPHANES   m   Ancient Greek
Means "manifestation of God" from Greek θεος (theos) "god" and φανης (phanes) "appearing". This name was borne by a few saints, including an 8th-century chronicler from Constantinople and a 19th-century Russian Orthodox saint, Theophanes the Recluse, who is Феофан (Feofan) in Russian. Another famous bearer was a 14th-century Byzantine icon painter active in Moscow.
THEOPHANIA   f   Ancient Greek
Feminine form of THEOPHANES.
THEOPHILA   f   Ancient Greek
Feminine form of THEOPHILUS.
THEOPHILOS   m   Ancient Greek
Original Greek form of THEOPHILUS.
THEOPHILUS   m   Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Θεοφιλος (Theophilos) which meant "friend of god", derived from θεος (theos) "god" and φιλος (philos) "friend". In the New Testament the evangelist Luke addresses his gospel and the Book of Acts to a man named Theophilus.
THEOPHYLAKTOS   m   Ancient Greek
Means "watched by god" from Greek θεος (theos) "god" and φυλακτεος (phylakteos) "to be watched". Saint Theophylaktos was a 9th-century bishop of Nicomedia who was banished to Caria.
THEOTHELM   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of DIETHELM.
THEOTIMOS   m   Ancient Greek
Original Greek form of THEOTIMUS.
THEOTIMUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Θεοτιμος (Theotimos), derived from the elemenets θεος (theos) "god" and τιμαω (timao) "to honour". Saint Theotimus was a 4th-century bishop of Tomi in Scythia.
THEOTLEIP   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of DETLEF.
THEOTMAN   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of TIEDEMANN.
THERON   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek θηραω (therao) meaning "to hunt".
THEUDELINDA   f   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of DIETLINDE.
THEUDEMAR   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic (Frankish) form of DIETMAR.
THEUDHAR   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of DIETER.
THEUDOBALD   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of THEOBALD.
THEUDOFRID   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of DIETFRIED.
THEUTRICH   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of THEODORIC.
ÞIUDREIKS   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic (Gothic) form of THEODORIC.
ÞÓRA   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Either a feminine form of Þórr (see THOR) or else a short form of the various Old Norse names beginning with the element Þór. In Norse myth Thora was the wife of the Danish king Ragnar Lodbrok.
ÞÓRARINN   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse name derived from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with arn "eagle".
ÞÓRBJÖRG   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name which meant "Thor's protection" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with björg "help, save, rescue".
ÞÓRBJÖRN   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of TORBJÖRN.
ÞÓRDÍS   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Means "Thor's goddess" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with Old Norse dís "goddess".
ÞÓRFASTR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements Þórr (see THOR) and fastr "firm".
ÞÓRFREÐR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements Þórr (see THOR) and friðr "peace".
ÞÓRFRÍÐR   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements Þórr (see THOR) and fríðr "beautiful".
ÞÓRGEIRR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of TORGEIR.
ÞÓRGÍSL   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name meaning "Thor's shaft" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with gísl "shaft, arrow".
ÞÓRGNÝR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of TORGNY.
ÞÓRHILDR   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of TORHILD.
ÞÓRIR   m   Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "Thor's warrior" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with Old Norse vér "warrior, fighter".
ÞÓRKETILL   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of TORKEL.
ÞÓRLEIFR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of TORLEIF.
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