Czech Names

Czech names are used in the Czech Republic in central Europe. See also about Czech and Slovak names.
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ADAM   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make".... [more]
ADÉLA   f   Czech
Czech form of ADELA.
ADOLF   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalwolf, which meant "noble wolf" from the Germanic elements adal "noble" and wulf. It was borne by several Swedish kings as a first or second name, most notably by Gustav II Adolf in the 17th century. Association with Adolf Hitler (1889-1945), the leader of the Nazi party in Germany during World War II, has lessened the use of this name.
AGÁTA   f   Czech
Czech form of AGATHA.
ALBÍNA   f   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of ALBINA.
ALENA   f   German, Czech, Slovak, Slovene
Short form of MAGDALENA or HELENA.
ALEŠ   m   Czech, Slovak, Slovene
Diminutive of ALEXEJ or ALEKSANDER.
ALEXANDR   m   Czech
Czech form of ALEXANDER.
ALEXANDRA   f   English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
ALEXEJ   m   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of ALEXIS.
ALOIS   m   German, Czech
German and Czech form of ALOYSIUS.
ALŽBĚTA   f   Czech
Czech form of ELIZABETH.
AMÁLIE   f   Czech
Czech form of AMALIA.
AMBROŽ   m   Slovene, Czech (Rare)
Slovene and Czech form of Ambrosius (see AMBROSE).
ANASTÁZIE   f   Czech
Czech form of ANASTASIA.
ANASTAZIE   f   Czech
Czech form of ANASTASIA.
ANDĚL   m   Czech
Czech form of ANGEL.
ANDĚLA   f   Czech
Czech form of ANGELA.
ANDREA (2)   f   English, German, Spanish, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Dutch, Croatian, Serbian
Feminine form of ANDREW. As an English name, it has been used since the 17th century, though it was not common until the 20th century.
ANETA   f   Czech
Czech diminutive of ANNA.
ANGELIKA   f   German, Polish, Slovak, Czech
Cognate of ANGELICA.
ANNA   f   English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary. In the English-speaking world, this form came into general use in the 18th century, joining Ann and Anne.... [more]
ANTONIE (1)   f   Czech
Czech form of ANTONIA.
ANTONÍN   m   Czech
Czech form of Antoninus (see ANTONINO). A famous bearer was the Czech composer Antonín Dvořák (1841-1904).
APOLENA   f   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of APOLLONIA.
AUGUSTÍN   m   Slovak, Czech
Slovak and Czech form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AUGUSTIN   m   French, Czech, Romanian, Croatian, German
Form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AUREL   m   German, Romanian, Czech, Slovak
German, Romanian, Czech and Slovak form of AURELIUS.
BÁRA   f   Czech
Czech diminutive of BARBORA.
BARBORA   f   Czech, Slovak, Lithuanian
Czech, Slovak and Lithuanian form of BARBARA.
BARTOLOMĚJ   m   Czech
Czech form of BARTHOLOMEW.
BEÁTA   f   Hungarian, Czech, Slovak
Hungarian, Czech and Slovak form of BEATA.
BEDŘICH   m   Czech
Czech form of FREDERICK.
BĚLA   f   Czech
Derived from the old Slavic word белъ (belu) meaning "white".
BENEDIKT   m   German, Russian, Icelandic, Czech
Form of Benedictus (see BENEDICT).
BENJAMÍN   m   Spanish, Czech, Slovak, Icelandic
Spanish, Czech, Slovak and Icelandic form of BENJAMIN.
BERNARD   m   English, French, Dutch, Polish, Croatian, Slovene, Czech, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element bern "bear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Beornheard. This was the name of several saints, including Saint Bernard of Menthon who built hospices in the Swiss Alps in the 10th century, and Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, a 12th-century theologian and Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include the Irish playwright and essayist George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) and the British World War II field marshal Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976).
BLAŽEJ   m   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of BLAISE.
BOHDAN   m   Czech, Ukrainian
Czech and Ukrainian form of BOGDAN.
BOHUMIL   m   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of BOGUMIŁ.
BOHUMILA   f   Czech
Czech feminine form of BOGUMIŁ.
BOHUMÍR   m   Czech, Slovak
Derived from the Slavic element bogu "god" combined with meru "great, famous" or miru "peace, world".
BOHUSLAV   m   Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian
Czech, Slovak and Ukrainian form of BOGUSŁAW.
BOHUSLAVA   f   Czech, Ukrainian
Feminine form of BOHUSLAV.
BOLESLAV   m   Czech, Russian, Medieval Slavic
Czech and Russian form of BOLESŁAW.
BOLESLAVA   f   Czech (Rare), Russian (Rare)
Czech and Russian feminine form of BOLESŁAW.
BONIFÁC   m   Czech (Rare), Hungarian (Rare)
Czech and Hungarian form of Bonifatius (see BONIFACE).
BOŘIVOJ   m   Czech
Derived from the Slavic elements borti "battle" and voji "soldier". This name was borne by a 9th-century duke of Bohemia.
BOŽENA   f   Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian
Derived from the Slavic element bozy meaning "divine".
BRANISLAVA   f   Serbian, Slovak, Czech, Slovene
Serbian, Slovak, Czech and Slovene feminine form of BRONISŁAW.
BRONISLAV   m   Czech, Slovak, Russian, Medieval Slavic
Czech and Russian form of BRONISŁAW.
BRONISLAVA   f   Czech, Slovak, Russian
Czech, Slovak and Russian feminine form of BRONISŁAW.
CECÍLIE   f   Czech
Czech form of CECILIA.
CECILIE   f   Norwegian, Danish, Czech
Norwegian, Danish and Czech form of CECILIA.
CENEK   m   Czech
Diminutive of VINCENC.
CTIBOR   m   Czech
Czech form of CZCIBOR.
CTIRAD   m   Czech, Slovak
Derived from the Slavic elements chisti "honour" and rad "happy, willing". In Czech legend this was the name of one of the men tricked by Šárka.
CYRIL   m   English, French, Czech, Slovak
From the Greek name Κυριλλος (Kyrillos) which was derived from Greek κυριος (kyrios) "lord", a word used frequently in the Greek Bible to refer to God or Jesus.... [more]
DAGMAR   f   Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic, German, Czech, Slovak
From the Old Norse name Dagmær, derived from the elements dagr "day" and mær "maid". This was the name adopted by the popular Bohemian wife of the Danish king Valdemar II when they married in 1205. Her birth name was Markéta.
DALIBOR   m   Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements dali meaning "distance" and borti meaning "to fight".
DALIMIL   m   Czech, Slovak
Derived from the Slavic elements dali meaning "distance" and milu meaning "gracious, dear".
DANA (1)   f   Romanian, Czech, Slovak, German, Hebrew
Feminine form of DANIEL or DAN (1).
DANICA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Slovak, Czech, Macedonian, English
From a Slavic word meaning "morning star, Venus". This name occurs in Slavic folklore as a personification of the morning star. It has sometimes been used in the English-speaking world since the 1970s.
DANIEL   m   English, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Armenian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.... [more]
DARINA (2)   f   Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian
Derived from the Slavic word dar meaning "gift". It can also be used as a diminutive of DARIA.
DARJA   f   Slovene, Czech
Slovene and Czech form of DARIA.
DAVID   m   English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was probably derived from Hebrew דוד (dwd) meaning "beloved". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.... [more]
DENIS   m   French, Russian, English, German, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Romanian, Croatian
From Denys or Denis, the medieval French forms of DIONYSIUS. Saint Denis was a 3rd-century missionary to Gaul and the first bishop of Paris. He was martyred by decapitation, after which legend says he picked up his own severed head and walked for a distance while preaching a sermon. He is credited with converting the Gauls to Christianity and is considered the patron saint of France.... [more]
DENISA   f   Czech, Slovak, Romanian
Feminine form of DENIS.
DOBROMIL   m   Czech (Rare), Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements dobru "good" and milu "gracious, dear".
DOBROSLAV   m   Croatian, Serbian, Czech, Bulgarian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements dobru "good" and slava "glory".
DOBROSLAVA   f   Czech
Feminine form of DOBROSLAV.
DOMINIKA   f   Slovak, Czech, Polish, Hungarian, Slovene, Russian
Feminine form of DOMINIC.
DOROTA   f   Polish, Czech, Slovak
Polish, Czech and Slovak form of DOROTHEA.
DOUBRAVKA   f   Czech
Czech feminine form of DUBRAVKO.
DRAHA   f   Czech, Slovak
Diminutive of DRAHOMÍRA.
DRAHOMÍR   m   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of DRAGOMIR.
DRAHOMÍRA   f   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak feminine form of DRAGOMIR.
DRAHOSLAV   m   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of DRAGOSLAV.
DRAHOSLAVA   f   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak feminine form of DRAGOSLAV.
DUŠAN   m   Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovak, Slovene, Macedonian
Derived from Slavic dusha meaning "soul, spirit".
DUŠANA   f   Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovak
Feminine form of DUŠAN.
ELIŠKA   f   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak diminutive of ELIZABETH.
EMIL   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Romanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Polish, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Hungarian, Icelandic, English
From the Roman family name Aemilius, which was derived from Latin aemulus meaning "rival".
EMÍLIE   f   Czech
Czech feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
ERIK   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, German, Dutch, English
Scandinavian form of ERIC. This was the name of kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway. King Erik IX of Sweden (12th century) is the patron saint of that country.
ERIKA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovene, Croatian, English, Italian
Feminine form of ERIK. It also coincides with the word for "heather" in some languages.
EUGEN   m   German, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Croatian
Form of Eugenius (see EUGENE).
EVA   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, English, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin
Latinate form of EVE. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. It is also a variant transcription of Russian YEVA. This name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.
EVŽEN   m   Czech
Czech form of EUGENE.
FERDINAND   m   German, French, Dutch, English, Czech, Slovene, Ancient Germanic
From Ferdinando, the old Spanish form of a Germanic name composed of the elements fardi "journey" and nand "daring, brave". The Visigoths brought the name to the Iberian Peninsula, where it entered into the royal families of Spain and Portugal. From there it became common among the Habsburg royal family of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria, starting with the Spanish-born Ferdinand I in the 16th century. A notable bearer was Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan (1480-1521), called Fernão de Magalhães in Portuguese, who was the leader of the first expedition to sail around the earth.
FRANTIŠEK   m   Czech
Czech form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRANTIŠKA   f   Czech
Czech feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
GABRIEL   m   French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "God is my strong man", derived from גֶּבֶר (gever) "strong man, hero" and אֶל ('El) "God". Gabriel was one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition, often appearing as a messenger of God. In the Old Testament he is sent to interpret the visions of the prophet Daniel, while in the New Testament he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Qur'an to Muhammad.... [more]
GERTRUDA   f   Polish, Czech
Polish and Czech form of GERTRUDE.
HANA (2)   f   Czech, Slovak, Croatian
Czech, Slovak and Croatian form of HANNAH.
HAVEL   m   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of GALLUS.
HEDVIKA   f   Czech, Slovene
Czech and Slovene form of HEDWIG.
HONZA   m   Czech
Czech form of HANS.
HYNEK   m   Czech
Diminutive of HEINRICH.
IGNÁC   m   Hungarian, Czech, Slovak
Hungarian, Czech and Slovak form of IGNATIUS.
ILONA   f   Hungarian, German, Finnish, Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Hungarian form of HELEN.
ILONKA   f   Hungarian, Czech
Hungarian and Czech diminutive of ILONA.
IRENKA   f   Polish, Czech
Polish and Czech diminutive of IRENA.
IVA (2)   f   Czech, Slovak, Slovene
Short form of IVANA.
IVA (3)   f   Czech
Feminine form of IVO (1).
IVAN   m   Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Macedonian, Slovene, English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Newer form of the old Slavic name Іѡаннъ (Ioannu), which was derived from Greek Ioannes (see JOHN). This was the name of six Russian rulers, including the 15th-century Ivan III the Great and 16th-century Ivan IV the Terrible, the first tsar of Russia. It was also borne by nine emperors of Bulgaria. Other notable bearers include the Russian author Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883), who wrote 'Fathers and Sons', and the Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), who is best known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex.
IVETA   f   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of YVETTE.
IVKA   f   Croatian, Bulgarian, Slovak, Czech
Diminutive of IVA (1), IVA (2) or IVA (3).
IVO (1)   m   German, Dutch, Italian, Portuguese, Czech, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element iv meaning "yew". Alternative theories suggest that it may in fact be derived from a cognate Celtic element. This was the name of several saints (who are also commonly known as Saint Yves or Ives).
JÁCHYM   m   Czech
Czech form of JOACHIM.
JAKUB   m   Polish, Czech, Slovak
Polish, Czech and Slovak form of JACOB (or JAMES).
JAN (1)   m   Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Polish, Slovene, German, Catalan
Form of JOHANNES. This name was borne by the 15th-century Flemish painter Jan van Eyck and the 17th-century Dutch painter Jan Vermeer.
JANA (1)   f   Czech, Slovak, Dutch, German, Slovene, Catalan
Feminine form of JAN (1).
JANEK   m   Polish, Czech
Polish and Czech diminutive of JAN (1).
JANIČKA   f   Czech
Diminutive of JANA (1).
JAREK   m   Polish, Czech
Diminutive of Slavic names beginning with the element yaru "fierce, strong", such as JAROSŁAW.
JARKA   f   Czech
Feminine form of JAREK.
JARMIL   m   Czech
Derived from the Slavic elements yaru "fierce, energetic" and milu "gracious, dear".
JARMILA   f   Czech, Slovak
Feminine form of JARMIL.
JAROMÍR   m   Czech
Derived from the Slavic elements yaru "fierce, energetic" and miru "peace, world".
JAROSLAV   m   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of JAROSŁAW.
JAROSLAVA   f   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak feminine form of JAROSŁAW.
JINDŘICH   m   Czech
Czech form of HENRY.
JIŘÍ   m   Czech
Czech form of GEORGE.
JIŘINA   f   Czech
Feminine form of JIŘÍ.
JITKA   f   Czech
Diminutive of JUDITA.
JOHANA   f   Czech
Czech form of Iohanna (see JOANNA).
JOLANA   f   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of YOLANDA.
JONÁŠ   m   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of JONAH.
JOSEF   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech
German, Scandinavian and Czech form of JOSEPH.
JOSEFA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Czech
Spanish, Portuguese and Czech feminine form of JOSEPH.
JUDITA   f   Lithuanian, Czech, Slovak
Lithuanian, Czech and Slovak form of JUDITH.
JULIE   f   French, Danish, Norwegian, Czech, English, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Danish, Norwegian and Czech form of JULIA. It has spread to many other regions as well. It has been common in the English-speaking world since the early 20th century.
JUSTINA   f   English, Slovene, Czech, Lithuanian, Late Roman
Feminine form of Iustinus (see JUSTIN).
JUSTÝNA   f   Czech
Czech feminine form of Iustinus (see JUSTIN).
KÁJA   f   Czech
Diminutive of KAROLÍNA.
KAJETÁN   m   Czech (Rare), Slovak (Rare), Hungarian (Rare)
Czech, Slovak and Hungarian form of Caietanus (see GAETANO).
KAMIL (2)   m   Czech, Slovak, Polish
Czech, Slovak and Polish form of CAMILLUS.
KAMILA   f   Czech, Slovak, Polish
Czech, Slovak and Polish form of CAMILLA.
KAREL   m   Dutch, Czech, Slovene
Dutch, Czech and Slovene form of CHARLES.
KAROLÍNA   f   Czech
Czech feminine form of CAROLUS.
KATEŘINA   f   Czech
Czech form of KATHERINE.
KATKA   f   Czech, Slovak
Diminutive of KATEŘINA or KATARÍNA.
KAZIMÍR   m   Czech (Rare), Slovak (Rare), Hungarian (Rare)
Czech, Slovak and Hungarian form of CASIMIR.
KLÁRA   f   Hungarian, Czech, Slovak
Hungarian, Czech and Slovak form of CLARA.
KLAUDIE   f   Czech
Czech feminine form of CLAUDIUS.
KLEMENT   m   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of Clemens (see CLEMENT).
KONRÁD   m   Hungarian, Czech, Slovak
Hungarian, Czech and Slovak form of CONRAD.
KORNEL   m   Polish, Czech, Slovak
Polish, Czech and Slovak form of CORNELIUS.
KORNÉLIE   f   Czech
Czech form of CORNELIA.
KRISTÝNA   f   Czech
Czech variant of KRISTINA.
KRYŠTOF   m   Czech
Czech form of CHRISTOPHER.
KVETA   f   Czech
Derived from Czech kvet meaning "flower, blossom".
LADISLAV   m   Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian
Czech, Slovak, Slovene and Croatian form of VLADISLAV.
LADISLAVA   f   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak feminine form of VLADISLAV.
LENKA   f   Czech, Slovak
Originally a diminutive of MAGDALÉNA or HELENA. It is now used as an independent name.
LEOŠ   m   Czech
Czech form of LEO.
LIBENA   f   Czech
Derived from the Czech element lib meaning "love".
LIBOR   m   Czech
Czech form of LIBERIUS.
LIBUŠE   f   Czech
Derived from the Czech element lib meaning "love". In Czech legend Lubuše was the founder of Prague.
LÍDA   f   Czech
Czech diminutive of LUDMILA.
LINDA   f   English, Dutch, German, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, French, Latvian, Finnish, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Ancient Germanic
Originally a medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element linde meaning "soft, tender". It also coincides with the Spanish and Portuguese word linda meaning "beautiful".
LIVIE   f   French, Czech
French and Czech feminine form of LIVIUS.
LJUBA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovene, Macedonian
From the Slavic element lyuby meaning "love".
LUBOMÍR   m   Czech
Derived from the Slavic elements lyuby "love" and miru "peace, world".
LUBOŠ   m   Czech
Short form of LUBOMÍR and other names beginning with the Slavic element lyuby meaning "love".
LUCIE   f   French, Czech
French and Czech form of LUCIA.
LUDĚK   m   Czech
Diminutive of LUDVÍK and other names beginning with Lud.
LUDMILA   f   Czech, Russian
Means "favour of the people" from the Slavic elements lyudu "people" and milu "gracious, dear". Saint Ludmila was a 10th-century duchess of Bohemia, the grandmother of Saint Václav. She was murdered on the orders of her daughter-in-law Drahomíra.... [more]
LUDVÍK   m   Czech
Czech form of LUDWIG.
LUKÁŠ   m   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of LUKE.
LÝDIE   f   Czech
Czech form of LYDIA.
MADLENKA   f   Czech
Czech diminutive of MARIE.
MAGDALÉNA   f   Czech, Slovak, Hungarian
Czech, Slovak and Hungarian form of MAGDALENE.
MAHULENA   f   Czech
Possibly inspired by MAGDALENA. The Czech author Julius Zeyer created it for a character in his play 'Radúz and Mahulena' (1898).
MALENA   f   Swedish, Spanish, Czech
Swedish and Spanish short form of MAGDALENA, and a Czech short form of MAHULENA.
MARCEL   m   French, Catalan, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, German
Form of MARCELLUS. A notable bearer was the French author Marcel Proust (1871-1922).
MAREK   m   Polish, Czech, Slovak
Polish, Czech and Slovak form of MARK.
MARIÁN   m   Slovak, Czech, Hungarian
Slovak, Czech and Hungarian form of MARIANUS.
MARIAN (2)   m   Polish, Czech, Romanian
Polish, Czech and Romanian form of MARIANUS. It is sometimes used as a masculine form of MARIA.
MARIANA   f   Portuguese, Spanish, Romanian, Czech, Ancient Roman
Roman feminine form of MARIANUS. After the classical era it was frequently interpreted as a combination of MARIA and ANA. In Portuguese it is further used as a form of MARIAMNE.
MARIE   f   French, Czech, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
French and Czech form of MARIA. A notable bearer of this name was Marie Antoinette, a queen of France who was executed by guillotine during the French Revolution. Another was Marie Curie (1867-1934), a physicist and chemist who studied radioactivity with her husband Pierre.
MARIKA   f   Czech, Slovak, Polish, Hungarian, Greek, Finnish, Estonian, Georgian
Diminutive of MARIA or other names beginning with Mari.
MARKÉTA   f   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of MARGARET.
MARTIN   m   English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish
From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god MARS. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.... [more]
MARTINA   f   German, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Slovene, Hungarian, English, Swedish, Dutch, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Martinus (see MARTIN). Saint Martina was a 3rd-century martyr who is one of the patron saints of Rome.
MÁŠA   f   Czech
Czech form of MASHA.
MATĚJ   m   Czech
Czech form of MATTHIAS, used to refer to the apostle chosen to replace Judas Iscariot.
MATOUŠ   m   Czech
Czech form of MATTHEW, used to refer to the evangelist and apostle also known as Levi.
MATYÁŠ   m   Czech
Czech form of MATTHIAS (via Hungarian Mátyás).
MATYLDA   f   Czech, Polish
Czech and Polish form of MATILDA.
MAXMILIÁN   m   Czech
Czech form of Maximilianus (see MAXIMILIAN).
MELÁNIE   f   Czech
Czech form of MELANIE.
METODĚJ   m   Czech
Czech form of METHODIUS.
MICHAEL   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name מִיכָאֵל (Mikha'el) meaning "who is like God?". This is a rhetorical question, implying no person is like God. Michael is one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament he is named as a protector of Israel. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies in the war against Satan, and is thus considered the patron saint of soldiers in Christianity.... [more]
MICHAELA   f   German, Swedish, English, Czech, Slovak
Feminine form of MICHAEL.
MICHAL (1)   m   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of MICHAEL.
MICHALA   f   Czech
Czech feminine form of MICHAL (1).
MIKOLÁŠ   m   Czech
Czech form of NICHOLAS.
MIKULA   m   Czech (Rare)
Czech form of NICHOLAS.
MIKULÁŠ   m   Slovak, Czech
Slovak and Czech form of NICHOLAS.
MILA   f   Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear".
MILADA   f   Czech
Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear". It has become associated with Czech mladý "young".
MILAN   m   Czech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Dutch, Hungarian
From the Slavic element milu meaning "gracious, dear", originally a short form of names that began with that element. A city in Italy bears this name, though it originates from a different source.
MILANA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Russian, Czech
Variant of MILENA.
MILENA   f   Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Polish, Russian, Italian
Feminine form of MILAN. It began to be used in Italy in honour of Milena Vukotić (1847-1923), mother of Helen of Montenegro, the wife of Italian king Victor Emmanuel III. In Italy it can also be considered a combination of MARIA and ELENA.
MILOŠ   m   Czech, Slovak, Serbian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian
Originally a diminutive of names beginning with the Slavic element milu "gracious, dear". This was the name of a 14th-century Serbian hero who apparently killed the Ottoman sultan Murad I at the Battle of Kosovo.
MILOSLAV   m   Czech, Slovak, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements milu "gracious, dear" and slava "glory".
MILOSLAVA   f   Czech, Medieval Slavic
Feminine form of MILOSLAV.
MIREK   m   Czech, Slovak, Polish
Diminutive of MIROSLAV and other names beginning with the Slavic element miru meaning "peace" or "world".
MIROSLAV   m   Czech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements miru "peace, world" and slava "glory". This was the name of a 10th-century king of Croatia who was deposed by one of his nobles after ruling for four years.
MÍŠA   f   Czech
Diminutive of MICHAELA.
MSTISLAV   m   Czech, Russian, Medieval Slavic
Means "vengeance and glory" from the Slavic elements misti "vengeance" and slava "glory".
NAĎA   f   Czech
Diminutive of NADĚŽDA.
NADĚŽDA   f   Czech
Czech form of NADEZHDA.
NATÁLIE   f   Czech
Czech form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NELA   f   Croatian, Slovak, Portuguese, Czech
Short form of names ending in nela, such as ANTONELA.
NICOL (2)   f   Dutch, German, Czech
Dutch, German and Czech variant of NICOLE.
NICOLA (2)   f   German, Czech, English
Latinate feminine form of NICHOLAS. In the English-speaking world this name is more common outside of America, where Nicole is more usual.
NIKOL   f   Czech, Bulgarian
Czech and Bulgarian form of NICOLE.
NIKOLA (2)   f   German, Polish, Czech, Slovak
German, Polish, Czech and Slovak feminine form of NICHOLAS.
NINA (1)   f   Russian, Italian, English, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, Polish, Slovene, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian
Short form of names that end in nina, such as ANTONINA or GIANNINA. It was imported to Western Europe from Russia and Italy in the 19th century. This name also coincides with the Spanish word niña meaning "little girl".
NOEMI   f   Italian, German, Czech, Biblical Latin
Italian, German and Czech form of NAOMI (1).
OLDŘICH   m   Czech
Czech form of ULRICH.
OLGA   f   Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian, Greek
Russian form of HELGA. The Varangians brought it from Scandinavia to Russia. The 10th-century Saint Olga was the wife of Igor I, Grand Prince of Kievan Rus (a state based around the city of Kiev). Following his death she ruled as regent for her son for 18 years. After she was baptized in Constantinople she attempted to convert her subjects to Christianity.
OLIVER   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.... [more]
OLIVIE   f   French (Rare), Czech (Rare)
French and Czech form of OLIVIA.
ONDŘEJ   m   Czech
Czech form of ANDREW.
OTAKAR   m   Czech
Czech form of ODOVACAR. This was the name of two kings of Bohemia.
OTOKAR   m   Czech
Czech form of ODOVACAR.
PATRICIE   f   Czech
Czech feminine form of Patricius (see PATRICK).
PATRIK   m   Swedish, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Hungarian
Form of Patricius (see PATRICK).
PAVEL   m   Russian, Czech, Bulgarian, Slovene, Macedonian
Russian, Czech, Bulgarian, Slovene and Macedonian form of PAUL.
PAVLA   f   Czech
Czech feminine form of PAUL.
PAVLÍNA   f   Czech
Czech form of PAULINA.
PETR   m   Czech
Czech form of PETER.
PETRA   f   German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Swedish, Finnish, English
Feminine form of PETER. This was also the name of an ancient city in the region that is now Jordan.
PŘEMEK   m   Czech
Diminutive of PŘEMYSL.
PŘEMYSL   m   Czech
From an old Slavic name which meant "trick, stratagem", from pre "over" and mysli "thought, idea". This was the name of the founder of the Přemyslid dynasty, which ruled Bohemia from the 9th to the 14th century.
RADANA   f   Czech, Slovene
Derived from the Slavic element rad meaning "happy, willing".
RADEK   m   Czech, Polish
Diminutive of Slavic names beginning with rad "happy, willing".
RADIM   m   Czech
Short form of RADOMIR.
RADKA   f   Czech, Bulgarian
Feminine form of RADKO.
RADKO   m   Bulgarian, Czech
Diminutive of Slavic names beginning with the element rad "happy, willing".
RADMILA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Czech
Serbian, Croatian and Czech feminine form of RADOMIL.
RADOMIL   m   Czech, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements rad "happy, willing" and milu "gracious, dear".
RADOMILA   f   Czech
Feminine form of RADOMIL.
RADOMÍR   m   Czech
Czech form of RADOMIR.
RADOMÍRA   f   Czech
Czech feminine form of RADOMIR.
RADOŠ   m   Czech
Short form of RADOSLAV, RADOMIR, and other names beginning with the Slavic element rad meaning "happy, willing".
RADOVAN   m   Slovak, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element rad "happy, willing" combined with another element of unknown meaning.
RADÚZ   m   Czech (Rare)
Derived from the Czech word rád "happy, glad". The Czech author Julius Zeyer probably created it for a character in his play 'Radúz and Mahulena' (1898).
REGINA   f   English, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Means "queen" in Latin (or Italian). It was in use as a Christian name from early times, and was borne by a 2nd-century saint. In England it was used during the Middle Ages in honour of the Virgin Mary, and it was later revived in the 19th century. A city in Canada bears this name, in honour of Queen Victoria.
ŘEHOŘ   m   Czech
Czech form of GREGORY.
RENÁTA   f   Hungarian, Czech, Slovak
Hungarian, Czech and Slovak feminine form of RENATUS.
RENÉ   m   French, German, Spanish, Slovak, Czech
French form of RENATUS. A famous bearer was the French mathematician and rationalist philosopher René Descartes (1596-1650).
RICHARD   m   English, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave power", derived from the Germanic elements ric "power, rule" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, and it has been very common there since that time. It was borne by three kings of England including Richard I the Lionheart, one of the leaders of the Third Crusade in the 12th century.... [more]
ROBERT   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been a very common English name since that time.... [more]
ROMAN   m   Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German
From the Late Latin name Romanus which meant "Roman".
ROMANA   f   Italian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Late Roman
Feminine form of Romanus (see ROMAN).
ROSTISLAV   m   Russian, Czech, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements rasti "growth" and slava "glory".
ROZÁLIE   f   Czech
Czech form of ROSALIA.
RUDOLF   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Russian, Armenian
From the Germanic name Hrodulf, which was derived from the elements hrod "fame" and wulf "wolf". It was borne by three kings of Burgundy, as well as several Habsburg rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria. Anthony Hope used this name for the hero in his popular novel 'The Prisoner of Zenda' (1894).
RŮŽENA   f   Czech
Derived from Czech růže meaning "rose".
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