Dutch Names

Dutch names are used in the Netherlands and Flanders. See also about Dutch names.
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AAFJE   f   Dutch
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element alf "elf".
AART   m   Dutch
Dutch short form of ARNOLD.
ABE (2)   m   Frisian, Dutch
Variant of ABBE.
ABRAHAM   m   English, Hebrew, Spanish, French, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
This name may be viewed either as meaning "father of many" in Hebrew or else as a contraction of ABRAM (1) and הָמוֹן (hamon) "many, multitude". The biblical patriarch Abraham was originally named Abram but God changed his name (see Genesis 17:5). With his father Terah, he led his wife Sarah, his nephew Lot and their other followers from Ur into Canaan. He is regarded by Jews as being the founder of the Hebrews through his son Isaac and by Muslims as being the founder of the Arabs through his son Ishmael.... [more]
AD   m   Dutch, Limburgish
Short form of ADRIAAN.
ADAM   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make".... [more]
ADELBERT   m   German, Dutch
German and Dutch variant of ADALBERT.
ADELHEID   f   German, Dutch
German and Dutch form of ADELAIDE.
ADOLF   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalwolf, which meant "noble wolf" from the Germanic elements adal "noble" and wulf. It was borne by several Swedish kings as a first or second name, most notably by Gustav II Adolf in the 17th century. Association with Adolf Hitler (1889-1945), the leader of the Nazi party in Germany during World War II, has lessened the use of this name.
ADRIAAN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of ADRIAN.
ADRIANUS   m   Dutch
Official Dutch form of ADRIAN, used on birth certificates but not commonly in daily life.
AGNES   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Αγνη (Hagne), derived from Greek ‘αγνος (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe, being especially popular in England in the Middle Ages.
ALBERT   m   English, French, Catalan, German, Polish, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Romanian, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalbert, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and beraht "bright". This name was common among medieval German royalty. The Normans introduced it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Æðelberht. Though it became rare in England by the 17th century, it was repopularized in the 19th century by the German-born Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.... [more]
ALBERTINA   f   Italian, Dutch, Portuguese
Feminine diminutive of ALBERT.
ALBERTUS   m   Ancient Germanic (Latinized), Dutch
Latinized form of Adalbert (see ALBERT).
ALDEGONDA   f   Dutch
Dutch form of ALDEGUND.
ALDERT   m   Frisian, Dutch
Frisian form of a Germanic name, either ALDHARD or ADALHARD.
ALEID   f   Dutch
Dutch short form of ADELAIDE.
ALEIDA   f   Dutch
Dutch short form of ADELAIDE.
ALEX   m & f   English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Russian
Short form of ALEXANDER, ALEXANDRA, and other names beginning with Alex.
ALEXANDER   m   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.... [more]
ALEXANDRA   f   English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
ALFONS   m   German, Dutch, Polish, Ancient Germanic
German, Dutch and Polish form of ALFONSO.
ALFRED   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Dutch
Derived from the Old English name Ælfræd, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and ræd "counsel". Alfred the Great was a 9th-century king of Wessex who fought unceasingly against the Danes living in northeast England. He was also a scholar, and he translated many Latin books into Old English. His fame helped to ensure the usage of this name even after the Norman conquest, when most Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. It became rare by the end of the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 18th century.... [more]
ALIDA   f   Dutch, German, Hungarian
Diminutive of ADELAIDE.
ALLARD   m   Dutch
Dutch form of ADALHARD.
ALMA (1)   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Dutch
This name became popular after the Battle of Alma (1854), which took place near the River Alma in Crimea and ended in a victory for Britain and France. However, the name was in rare use before the battle; it was probably inspired by Latin almus "nourishing". It also coincides with the Spanish word meaning "the soul".
ALWIN   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
From either of the two Germanic names ALFWIN or ADALWIN.
AMALIA   f   Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Germanic name Amala, a short form of names beginning with the element amal meaning "work".
AMANDA   f   English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Late Roman
In part this is a feminine form of AMANDUS. However, it was not used during the Middle Ages. In the 17th century it was recreated by authors and poets who based it directly on Latin amanda "lovable, worthy of love". Notably, the playwright Colley Cibber used it for a character in his play 'Love's Last Shift' (1696). It came into regular use during the 19th century.
AMBER   f   English, Dutch
From the English word amber that denotes either the gemstone, which is formed from fossil resin, or the orange-yellow colour. The word ultimately derives from Arabic عنبر ('anbar). It began to be used as a given name in the late 19th century, but it only became popular after the release of Kathleen Winsor's novel 'Forever Amber' (1944).
AMBROOS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of Ambrosius (see AMBROSE).
AMELIA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Variant of AMALIA, though it is sometimes confused with EMILIA, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of George II and George III. Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.
ANDRÉ   m   French, Portuguese, German, Dutch
French and Portuguese form of Andreas (see ANDREW).
ANDREA (2)   f   English, German, Spanish, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Dutch, Croatian, Serbian
Feminine form of ANDREW. As an English name, it has been used since the 17th century, though it was not common until the 20th century.
ANDREAS   m   German, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Welsh, Ancient Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Ancient Greek and Latin form of ANDREW. It is also the form used in modern Greek, German and Welsh.
ANDRIES   m   Dutch
Dutch form of ANDREW.
ANGELA   f   English, Italian, German, Dutch, Romanian, Slovene, Slovak, Russian, Macedonian, Late Roman
Feminine form of Angelus (see ANGEL). As an English name, it came into use in the 18th century.
ANGELIEN   f   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of ANGELA.
ANGELINA   f   Italian, English, Russian, German, Dutch, Polish, Spanish, Macedonian
Latinate diminutive of ANGELA. A famous bearer is American actress Angelina Jolie (1975-).
ANGELIQUE   f   Dutch
Dutch form of ANGÉLIQUE.
ANIKA (1)   f   German, Dutch, Danish, Slovene
German, Dutch, Danish and Slovene diminutive of ANNA or ANA.
ANITA (1)   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian, Slovene, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Latvian
Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian and Slovene diminutive of ANA.
ANKE   f   Low German, Dutch
Low German and Dutch diminutive of ANNA and other names beginning with An.
ANNA   f   English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary. In the English-speaking world, this form came into general use in the 18th century, joining Ann and Anne.... [more]
ANNABEL   f   English, Dutch
Variant of AMABEL influenced by the name ANNA. This name appears to have arisen in Scotland in the Middle Ages.
ANNE (1)   f   French, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Basque
French form of ANNA. In the 13th-century it was imported to England, where it was also commonly spelled Ann. The name was borne by a 17th-century English queen and also by the second wife of Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn (the mother of Queen Elizabeth I), who was eventually beheaded in the Tower of London. This is also the name of the heroine in 'Anne of Green Gables' (1908) by Canadian author L. M. Montgomery.
ANNEKE   f   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of ANNA.
ANNELIEN   f   Dutch
Combination of ANNA and lien (from names such as CAROLIEN).
ANNELIES   f   German, Dutch
Variant of ANNELIESE.
ANNELIESE   f   German, Dutch
Combination of ANNA and LIESE.
ANNEMARIE   f   Dutch, German
Combination of ANNA and MARIE.
ANNET   f   Dutch
Dutch variant of ANNETTE.
ANNETTE   f   French, English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch
French diminutive of ANNE (1). It has also been widely used in the English-speaking world, and it became popular in America in the late 1950s due to the fame of actress Annette Funicello (1942-).
ANNIE   f   English, French, Dutch
Diminutive of ANNE (1).
ANNIKA   f   Swedish, Dutch, Finnish, German, English (Modern)
Swedish diminutive of ANNA.
ANOUK   f   Dutch, French
Dutch and French diminutive of ANNA.
ANS   f   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of ANNA.
ANTJE   f   Frisian, Dutch, Low German
Frisian, Dutch and Low German diminutive of ANNA.
ANTONIE (2)   m   Dutch
Dutch form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ANTONIUS   m   Ancient Roman, Dutch
Ancient Roman form of ANTHONY. This is also the official Dutch form of the name, used on birth certificates but commonly rendered Anton or Antoon in daily life.
ANTOON   m   Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
AREND   m   Dutch, German
Dutch and German variant of ARNOLD. This is also the Dutch word for "eagle".
ARIANE   f   French, German, Dutch
French form of ARIADNE.
ARIE (1)   m   Dutch
Diminutive of ADRIAAN.
ARIS (2)   m   Dutch
Diminutive of ADRIAAN.
ARJAN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of ADRIAN.
ARNO   m   Dutch, German
Short form of ARNOUD or ARNOLD.
ARNOUD   m   Dutch
Dutch form of ARNOLD.
ARNOUT   m   Dutch
Dutch form of ARNOLD.
ARTHUR   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.... [more]
AUGUSTA   f   German, Italian, Portuguese, Polish, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of AUGUSTUS. It was introduced to Britain when king George III, a member of the German House of Hanover, gave this name to his second daughter in the 18th century.
AUGUSTIJN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AUGUSTUS   m   Ancient Roman, Dutch
Means "great" or "venerable", derived from Latin augere "to increase". Augustus was the title given to Octavian, the first Roman emperor. He was the adopted son of Julius Caesar who rose to power through a combination of military skill and political prowess. This was also the name of three kings of Poland.
BAREND   m   Dutch
Variant of BERNHARD.
BART   m   English, Dutch
Short form of BARTHOLOMEW. This name is borne by a cartoon boy on the television series 'The Simpsons'.
BARTEL   m   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of BARTHOLOMEW.
BARTHOLOMEUS   m   Dutch, Biblical Latin
Dutch and Latin form of BARTHOLOMEW.
BAS   m   Dutch
Short form of SEBASTIAAN.
BASTIAAN   m   Dutch
Short form of SEBASTIAAN.
BEATRIX   f   German, Hungarian, Dutch, English (Rare), Late Roman
Probably from Viatrix, a feminine form of the Late Latin name Viator which meant "voyager, traveller". It was a common name amongst early Christians, and the spelling was altered by association with Latin beatus "blessed". Viatrix or Beatrix was a 4th-century saint who was strangled to death during the persecutions of Diocletian.... [more]
BEN (1)   m   English, German, Dutch
Short form of BENJAMIN or BENEDICT. A notable bearer was Ben Jonson (1572-1637), an English poet and playwright.
BEN (2)   m   Dutch
Short form of BERNHARD and other Germanic names beginning with the element bern meaning "bear".
BENEDICTUS   m   Late Roman, Dutch
Original Latin form of BENEDICT, as well as the modern Dutch form.
BENJAMIN   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Biblical
From the Hebrew name בִּנְיָמִין (Binyamin) which means "son of the south" or "son of the right hand". Benjamin in the Old Testament is the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob and the founder of one of the southern tribes of the Hebrews. He was originally named בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oniy) meaning "son of my sorrow" by his mother Rachel, who died shortly after childbirth, but it was later changed by his father (see Genesis 35:18).... [more]
BENTE   f   Danish, Norwegian, Dutch
Danish feminine form of BENEDICT.
BERNARD   m   English, French, Dutch, Polish, Croatian, Slovene, Czech, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element bern "bear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Beornheard. This was the name of several saints, including Saint Bernard of Menthon who built hospices in the Swiss Alps in the 10th century, and Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, a 12th-century theologian and Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include the Irish playwright and essayist George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) and the British World War II field marshal Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976).
BERNHARD   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
German, Dutch and Scandinavian form of BERNARD.
BERT   m   English, German, Dutch
Short form of ALBERT and other names containing the element bert, often derived from the Germanic element beraht meaning "bright".
BETJE   f   Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish diminutive of ELISABETH.
BOB   m   English, Dutch
Short form of ROBERT. It arose later than Dob, Hob and Nob, which were medieval rhyming nicknames of Robert. It was borne by the character Bob Cratchit in Charles Dickens' novel 'A Christmas Carol' (1843). Other famous bearers include American folk musician Bob Dylan (1941-) and Jamaican reggae musician Bob Marley (1945-1981).
BOELE   m   Dutch
Possibly a Dutch form of BALDO.
BONIFAAS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of Bonifatius (see BONIFACE).
BOUDEWIJN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of BALDWIN.
BRAAM   m   Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish short form of ABRAHAM.
BRAM   m   English, Dutch
Short form of ABRAHAM. This name was borne by Bram Stoker (1847-1912), the Irish author who wrote 'Dracula'.
BRECHT   m   Dutch
Short form of names containing brecht, often derived from the Germanic element beraht meaning "bright".
BRECHTJE   f   Dutch
Feminine form of BRECHT.
BRIGITTA   f   German, Dutch, Hungarian
German, Dutch and Hungarian form of BRIDGET.
BROOS   m   Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish short form of AMBROOS.
CAROLA   f   Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish
Feminine form of CAROLUS.
CAROLIEN   f   Dutch
Dutch feminine form of CAROLUS.
CAROLINE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French feminine form of CAROLUS.
CAS   m   Dutch
Short form of CASPER.
CASPER   m   Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Dutch and Scandinavian form of JASPER. This is the name of a friendly ghost in a series of comic books.
CATHARINA   f   Dutch, Swedish
Dutch and Swedish form of KATHERINE.
CATO (2)   f   Dutch
Diminutive of CATHARINA.
CÉCILE   f   French, Dutch
French form of CECILIA.
CECILIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Romanian, Finnish, German
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.... [more]
CEEL   m   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of MARCELLUS.
CEES   m   Dutch
Variant of KEES.
CHANTAL   f   French, English, Dutch
From a French surname which was derived from a place name meaning "stony". It was originally given in honour of Saint Jeanne-Françoise de Chantal, the founder of the Visitation Order in the 17th century. It has become associated with French chant "song".
CHARLOTTE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.
CHRIS   m & f   English, Dutch
Short form of CHRISTOPHER, CHRISTIAN, CHRISTINE, and other names that begin with Chris.
CHRISTIAAN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of CHRISTIAN.
CHRISTINA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Greek
From Christiana, the Latin feminine form of CHRISTIAN. This was the name of an early, possibly legendary, saint who was tormented by her pagan father. It was also borne by a 17th-century Swedish queen and patron the arts who gave up her crown in order to become a Roman Catholic.
CHRISTINE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French form of CHRISTINA, as well as a variant in other languages.
CHRISTOFFEL   m   Dutch (Archaic)
Dutch form of KRISTOFFER.
CILLA   f   Swedish, Dutch
Diminutive of CECILIA.
CLAUDIA   f   English, German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Biblical, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CLAUDIUS. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament. As a Christian name it was very rare until the 16th century.
CLEMENS   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Original Latin form of CLEMENT, as well as the German, Dutch and Scandinavian form.
COBA   f   Dutch
Short form of JACOBA.
COBUS   m   Dutch
Short form of JACOBUS.
COEN   m   Dutch
Short form of COENRAAD.
COENRAAD   m   Dutch
Dutch form of CONRAD.
COKKIE   f   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of CORNELIA.
CONSTANTIJN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of Constantinus (see CONSTANTINE).
COOS   m   Dutch
Diminutive of JACOB.
CORNÉ   m   Dutch
Diminutive of CORNELIS.
CORNELIA   f   German, Romanian, Italian, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CORNELIUS. In the 2nd century BC it was borne by Cornelia Scipionis Africana (the daughter of the military hero Scipio Africanus), the mother of the two reformers known as the Gracchi. After her death she was regarded as an example of the ideal Roman woman. The name was revived in the 18th century.
CORNELIS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of CORNELIUS.
CORNELIUS   m   Ancient Roman, English, Dutch, German, Biblical
Roman family name which possibly derives from the Latin element cornu "horn". In Acts in the New Testament Cornelius is a centurion who is directed by an angel to seek Peter. After speaking with Peter he converts to Christianity, and he is traditionally deemed the first gentile convert. The name was also borne by a few early saints, including a 3rd-century pope. In England it came into use in the 16th century, partly due to Dutch influence.
CORRIE   f   English, Dutch
Diminutive of CORINNA, CORA, CORNELIA and other names starting with Cor. Since the 1970s it has also been used as a feminine form of COREY.
DAAN   m   Dutch
Short form of DANIËL.
DAMIAAN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of DAMIAN.
DAMIAN   m   English, Polish, Dutch
From the Greek name Δαμιανος (Damianos) which was derived from Greek δαμαζω (damazo) "to tame". Saint Damian was martyred with his twin brother Cosmo in Syria early in the 4th century. They are the patron saints of physicians. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in Christian Europe. Another saint by this name was Peter Damian, an 11th-century cardinal and theologian from Italy.
DANIËL   m   Dutch
Dutch form of DANIEL.
DANIËLLE   f   Dutch
Dutch feminine form of DANIEL.
DAPHNE   f   Greek Mythology, English, Dutch
Means "laurel" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was a nymph turned into a laurel tree by her father in order that she might escape the pursuit of Apollo. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the end of the 19th century.
DAVID   m   English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was probably derived from Hebrew דוד (dwd) meaning "beloved". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.... [more]
DEBORA   f   Italian, German, Dutch
Italian, German and Dutch form of DEBORAH.
DENISE   f   French, English, Dutch
French feminine form of DENIS.
DENNIS   m   English, German, Dutch
Usual English, German and Dutch form of DENIS.
DIANA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Polish, Roman Mythology
Probably derived from an old Indo-European root meaning "heavenly, divine", related to dyeus (see ZEUS). Diana was a Roman goddess of the moon, hunting, forests, and childbirth, often identified with the Greek goddess Artemis.... [more]
DIANTHA   f   Dutch, English (Rare)
From dianthus, the name of a type of flower (ultimately from Greek meaning "heavenly flower").
DICK (2)   m   Dutch
Short form of DIEDERIK.
DIEDE   m   Dutch
Short form of DIEDERIK and other names beginning with the same element, originally from Germanic theud meaning "people".
DIEDERICK   m   Dutch
Dutch variant of DIEDERIK.
DIEDERIK   m   Dutch
Dutch form of THEODORIC.
DIRK   m   Dutch, German, English
Short form of DIEDERIK. The name was popularized in the English-speaking world by actor Dirk Bogarde (1921-1999), who had some Dutch ancestry. This is also the Scots word for a type of dagger.
DOMINICUS   m   Late Roman, Dutch
Original Latin form of DOMINIC, as well as the modern Dutch form.
DOROTHEA   f   German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, English, Late Greek
Feminine form of the Late Greek name Δωροθεος (Dorotheos), which meant "gift of God" from Greek δωρον (doron) "gift" and θεος (theos) "god". The name Theodore is composed of the same elements in reverse order. Dorothea was the name of two early saints, notably the 4th-century martyr Dorothea of Caesarea. It was also borne by the 14th-century Saint Dorothea of Montau, who was the patron saint of Prussia.
DRIES   m   Dutch
Short form of ANDRIES.
DRIKA   f   Dutch
Short form of HENDRIKA.
ED   m   English, Dutch
Short form of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
EDITH   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
From the Old English name Eadgyð, derived from the elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gyð "war". It was popular among Anglo-Saxon royalty, being borne for example by Saint Eadgyeth;, the daughter of King Edgar the Peaceful. The name remained common after the Norman conquest. It became rare after the 15th century, but was revived in the 19th century.
EDWIN   m   English, Dutch
Means "rich friend" from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wine "friend". This was the name of a 7th-century Northumbrian king, regarded as a saint. After the Norman conquest the name was not popular, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century. A notable bearer was the astronaut Edwin Aldrin (1930-), also known as Buzz, the second man to walk on the moon.
EGBERT   m   English, Dutch
Means "bright edge" from the Old English elements ecg "edge of a sword" and beorht "bright". This was the name of kings of Kent and Wessex as well as two English saints. The name was rarely used after the Norman conquest but was revived in the 19th century.
ELBERT   m   Dutch
Dutch variant of ADELBERT.
ELIA   m   Italian, Dutch
Italian and Dutch form of ELIJAH.
ELIAN   m & f   Dutch
Dutch variant of names beginning with Eli, such as ELIJAH or ELISABETH.
ELISABETH   f   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
German and Dutch form of ELIZABETH. It is also a variant English form, reflecting the spelling used in the Authorized Version of the New Testament.
ELKE (1)   f   Dutch, German, Frisian
Frisian diminutive of ADELHEID.
ELLEN (2)   f   Dutch
Short form of ELEONORA.
ELLY   f   English, Dutch
Dutch diminutive of ELISABETH or an English variant of ELLIE.
ELMA   f   Dutch, German
Short form of WILHELMINE or names ending in elma, such as ANSELMA.
ELS   f   Dutch
Short form of ELISABETH.
ELSE   f   Danish, Norwegian, German, Dutch
Short form of ELISABETH.
ELSJE   f   Dutch
Diminutive of ELISABETH.
ELVIRA   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Russian
Spanish form of a Visigothic name, possibly composed of the Germanic elements ala "all" and wer "true". This is the name of a character in Mozart's opera 'Don Giovanni' (1787).
EMERENS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of EMERENTIUS.
EMMA   f   English, French, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of king Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of king Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.... [more]
EMMY   f   English, Dutch
Diminutive of EMMA or EMILY.
ERIK   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, German, Dutch, English
Scandinavian form of ERIC. This was the name of kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway. King Erik IX of Sweden (12th century) is the patron saint of that country.
ERNA (1)   f   German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Feminine form of ERNEST.
ERNST   m   German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
German, Dutch and Scandinavian form of ERNEST.
ERWIN   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic name Hariwini, composed of the elements hari "army" and win "friend". It may have merged somewhat with the Germanic name EBURWIN. A notable bearer was Erwin Schrodinger (1887-1961), an Austrian physicist who made contributions to quantum theory.
ESMÉ   m & f   English, Dutch
Means "esteemed" or "loved" in Old French. It was first recorded in Scotland, being borne by the first Duke of Lennox in the 16th century.
ESMÉE   f   English, Dutch
Feminine form of ESMÉ.
ESTHER   f   English, French, Spanish, Dutch, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Possibly means "star" in Persian. Alternatively it could be a derivative of the name of the Near Eastern goddess ISHTAR. The Book of Esther in the Old Testament tells the story of Queen Esther, the Jewish wife of the king of Persia. The king's advisor Haman persuaded the king to exterminate all the Jews in the realm. Warned of this plot by her cousin Mordecai, Esther revealed her Jewish ancestry and convinced the king to execute Haman instead. Her original Hebrew name was Hadassah.... [more]
EVA   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, English, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin
Latinate form of EVE. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. It is also a variant transcription of Russian YEVA. This name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.
EVELIEN   f   Dutch
Dutch form of EVELINA.
EVELINE   f   English, French, Dutch
Variant of EVELINA.
EVERT   m   Dutch
Dutch form of EVERARD.
EWALD   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name which was composed of the elements ewa "law, custom" and wald "rule".
EWOUD   m   Dutch
Dutch form of EWALD.
EWOUT   m   Dutch
Dutch form of EWALD.
FAAS   m   Dutch
Dutch short form of BONIFAAS or SERVAAS.
FABIAN   m   German, Dutch, Polish, History
From the Roman cognomen Fabianus, which was derived from FABIUS. Saint Fabian was a 3rd-century pope.
FEBE   f   Dutch, Spanish, Italian
Dutch, Spanish and Italian form of PHOEBE.
FELICIA   f   English, Spanish, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Latin name Felicius, a derivative of FELIX. In England, it has occasionally been used since the Middle Ages.
FELINE   f   Dutch
Dutch feminine form of FELINUS.
FELIX   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.... [more]
FEMKE   f   Dutch, Frisian
Diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element frid "peace". It also coincides with a Frisian word meaning "little girl".
FEMME   m   Dutch, Frisian
Diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element frid "peace".
FENNA   f   Dutch, Frisian
Feminine form of FEN (2).
FERDI   m   German, Dutch
Short form of FERDINAND.
FERDINAND   m   German, French, Dutch, English, Czech, Slovene, Ancient Germanic
From Ferdinando, the old Spanish form of a Germanic name composed of the elements fardi "journey" and nand "daring, brave". The Visigoths brought the name to the Iberian Peninsula, where it entered into the royal families of Spain and Portugal. From there it became common among the Habsburg royal family of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria, starting with the Spanish-born Ferdinand I in the 16th century. A notable bearer was Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan (1480-1521), called Fernão de Magalhães in Portuguese, who was the leader of the first expedition to sail around the earth.
FESTER   m   Dutch (Rare)
Possibly a short form of SILVESTER.
FILIPPUS   m   Dutch
Official Dutch form of PHILIP, used on birth certificates but not commonly in daily life.
FILOMENA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch
Italian, Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch form of PHILOMENA.
FLEUR   f   French, Dutch, English (Rare)
Means "flower" in French. This was the name of a character in John Galsworthy's novels 'The Forsyte Saga' (1922).
FLIP   m   Dutch
Diminutive of FILIP.
FLOOR   m & f   Dutch
Dutch form of Florentius (see FLORENCE) or FLORA.
FLOORTJE   f   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of FLOOR.
FLORINA   f   Romanian, Spanish, Dutch, Late Roman
Feminine form of FLORINUS.
FLORIS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of Florentius (see FLORENCE).
FONS   m   Dutch
Short form of ALFONS.
FRANCISCUS   m   Late Roman, Dutch
Original form of FRANCIS.
FRANK (1)   m   English, German, Dutch, French
From a Germanic name which referred to a member of the Germanic tribe, the Franks. The Franks settled in the regions now called France and the Netherlands in the 3rd and 4th century. They derived their tribal name from the name of a type of spear that they used. From medieval times, the various forms of this name have been commonly conflated with the various forms of Francis.... [more]
FRANKA (1)   f   German, Dutch
German and Dutch feminine form of FRANK (1).
FRANS   m   Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Dutch, Scandinavian and Finnish form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRED   m   English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese
Short form of FREDERICK or other names containing the same element. A famous bearer was the American actor and dancer Fred Astaire (1899-1987).
FREDERIK   m   Danish, Dutch
Danish and Dutch form of FREDERICK. This was the name of nine kings of Denmark over the past 500 years, alternating each generation with the name Christian.
FREEK   m   Dutch
Dutch short form of FREDERICK.
FRITS   m   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of FREDERIK.
FUNS   m   Dutch, Limburgish
Short form of ALFONS.
FUNSKE   m   Dutch, Limburgish
Diminutive of ALFONS.
GABRIËL   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GABRIEL.
GABRIËLLE   f   Dutch
Dutch feminine form of GABRIEL.
GEERT   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GERHARD.
GEERTJE   f   Dutch
Diminutive of GEERTRUIDA.
GEERTRUIDA   f   Dutch
Dutch form of GERTRUDE.
GEMMA   f   Italian, Catalan, English (British), Dutch
Medieval Italian nickname meaning "gem, precious stone". It was borne by the wife of the 13th-century Italian poet Dante Alighieri.
GEORGINA   f   English, Dutch, German, Spanish
Feminine form of GEORGE.
GERARD   m   English, Dutch, Catalan, Polish
Derived from the Germanic element ger "spear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain. It was initially much more common than the similar name Gerald, with which it was often confused, but it is now less common.
GERARDA   f   Italian, Dutch
Feminine form of GERARD.
GERBEN   m   Dutch
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and bern "bear".
GERD (1)   m   German, Dutch
Short form of GERHARD.
GERDA (1)   f   German, Dutch
Feminine form of GERD (1).
GERDINA   f   Dutch
Feminine form of GERD (1).
GERHARD   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Ancient Germanic
German, Dutch and Scandinavian form of GERARD.
GERLACH   m   Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element ger "spear" combined with laic "play". Saint Gerlach was a 12th-century Dutch soldier who became a hermit.
GERLINDE   f   German, Dutch
Derived from the Germanic element ger "spear" combined with linde "soft, tender".
GERLOF   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GERULF.
GEROLF   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GERULF.
GEROLT   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GERALD.
GERRIT   m   Dutch, Frisian
Dutch and Frisian form of GERARD.
GERRY   m & f   English, Dutch
Diminutive of GERALD, GERARD or GERALDINE.
GERT   m   German, Dutch
German and Dutch short form of GERHARD.
GERTIE   f   English, Dutch
Diminutive of GERTRUDE.
GERTRUDE   f   English, Dutch
Means "spear of strength", derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and thrud "strength". Saint Gertrude the Great was a 13th-century nun and mystic writer. It was probably introduced to England by settlers from the Low Countries in the 15th century. Shakespeare used the name in his play 'Hamlet' (1600) for the mother of the title character. A famous bearer was the American writer Gertrude Stein (1874-1946).
GERTRUIDA   f   Dutch
Dutch form of GERTRUDE.
GIJS   m   Dutch
Short form of GIJSBERT.
GIJSBERT   m   Dutch
Dutch variant of GISBERT.
GILBERT   m   English, French, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright pledge", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "pledge, hostage" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it was common during the Middle Ages. It was borne by a 12th-century British saint, the founder of the religious order known as the Gilbertines.
GILBERTA   f   Dutch, Italian (Rare)
Feminine form of GILBERT or GILBERTO.
GILLIS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GILES.
GISELA   f   German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
German, Dutch, Spanish and Portuguese form of GISELLE.
GODELIEVE   f   Dutch
Dutch (Flemish) form of GODELIVA.
GODFRIED   m   Dutch
Dutch cognate of Godafrid (see GODFREY).
GOSWIN   m   Dutch (Archaic)
Germanic name derived from the elements Gaut "Goth" and win "friend".
GREET   f   Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish short form of MARGARET.
GREETJE   f   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of MARGARET.
GRIET   f   Dutch
Short form of MARGRIET.
GUSTA   f   Dutch
Short form of AUGUSTA.
GUSTAAF   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GUSTAV.
GUUS   m   Dutch
Short form of AUGUSTUS or GUSTAAF.
HADEWYCH   f   Dutch
Dutch form of HEDWIG.
HANKE   m   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of JOHAN.
HANNAH   f   English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name חַנָּה (Channah) meaning "favour" or "grace". In the Old Testament this is the name of the wife of Elkanah. Her rival was Elkanah's other wife Peninnah, who had children while Hannah remained barren. After a blessing from Eli she finally became pregnant with Samuel.... [more]
HANNE (1)   f & m   Danish, Norwegian, German, Dutch
Danish and Norwegian short form of JOHANNE, or a German and Dutch short form of JOHANNA. This can also be a Dutch short form of JOHANNES (masculine).
HANNES   m   German, Swedish, Dutch, Finnish
Short form of JOHANNES.
HANNIE   f   Dutch
Diminutive of JOHANNA.
HANS   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German, Dutch and Scandinavian short form of JOHANNES. Two famous bearers were Hans Holbein (1497-1543), a Renaissance portrait painter from Germany, and Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), a Danish writer of fairy tales.
HARM   m   Dutch
Dutch short form of HERMAN.
HEDY   f   German, Dutch
Diminutive of HEDWIG and other Germanic names beginning with the element hadu meaning "battle, combat".
HEIKE   f & m   Low German, Frisian, Dutch
Low German diminutive of HENRIKE or HEINRICH.
HEIKO   m   Low German, Frisian, Dutch
Low German diminutive of HEINRICH.
HEIN   m   Dutch
Diminutive of HENDRIK.
HEINO   m   German, Dutch, Danish, Finnish, Estonian
German form of Haimo (see HAMO).
HEINTJE   f   Dutch
Feminine diminutive of HENDRIK.
HELEEN   f   Dutch
Dutch variant of HELEN.
HELEENTJE   f   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of HELEN.
HELMA   f   German, Dutch
Short form of WILHELMINA.
HENDRIK   m   Dutch, German, Estonian
Dutch and Estonian cognate of HENRY.
HENDRIKA   f   Dutch
Feminine form of HENDRIK.
HENDRIKJE   f   Dutch
Feminine form of HENDRIK.
HENDRINA   f   Dutch
Feminine form of HENDRIK.
HENK   m   Dutch
Dutch short form of HENDRIK.
HENNIE   m & f   Dutch
Dutch diminutive and feminine form of HENDRIK.
HENNY   m & f   Dutch
Dutch diminutive and feminine form of HENDRIK.
HENRIETTA   f   English, Hungarian, Finnish, Swedish, Dutch
Latinate form of HENRIETTE. It was introduced to England by Henriette Marie, the wife of the 17th-century English king Charles I. The name Henriette was also Anglicized as Harriet, a form which was initially more popular.
HENRIËTTE   f   Dutch
Dutch variant of HENRIETTE.
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