French Names

French names are used in France and other French-speaking regions. See also about French names.
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ABELmEnglish, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name הֶבֶל (Hevel) meaning "breath". In the Old Testament he is the second son of Adam and Eve, murdered out of envy by his brother Cain. In England, this name came into use during the Middle Ages, and it was common during the Puritan era.
ABRAHAMmEnglish, Hebrew, Spanish, French, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
This name may be viewed either as meaning "father of many" in Hebrew or else as a contraction of ABRAM (1) and הָמוֹן (hamon) meaning "many, multitude". The biblical patriarch Abraham was originally named Abram but God changed his name (see Genesis 17:5). With his father Terah, he led his wife Sarah, his nephew Lot and their other followers from Ur into Canaan. He is regarded by Jews as being the founder of the Hebrews through his son Isaac and by Muslims as being the founder of the Arabs through his son Ishmael.... [more]
ACHILLEmFrench, Italian
French and Italian form of ACHILLES.
ADAMmEnglish, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Catalan, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make".... [more]
ADÉLAÏDEfFrench
French form of ADELAIDE.
ADÈLEfFrench
French form of ADELA.
ADELINEfFrench, English
French and English form of ADELINA.
ADOLPHEmFrench
French form of ADOLF.
ADRIENmFrench
French form of ADRIAN.
ADRIENNEfFrench
French feminine form of ADRIAN.
AGLAÉfFrench
French form of AGLAIA.
AGNÈSfFrench, Catalan
French and Catalan form of AGNES.
AIMÉmFrench
From Old French Amé, the masculine form of Amée (see AMY).
AIMÉEfFrench
French form of AMY.
ALAINmFrench
French form of ALAN.
ALANmEnglish, Scottish, Breton, French
The meaning of this name is not known for certain. It was used in Brittany at least as early as the 6th century, and it possibly means either "little rock" or "handsome" in Breton. Alternatively, it may derive from the tribal name of the Alans, an Iranian people who migrated into Europe in the 4th and 5th centuries.... [more]
ALBANmGerman, French, Albanian, English (Rare)
From the Roman cognomen Albanus which meant "from Alba". Alba (from Latin albus "white") was the name of various places within the Roman Empire, including the city Alba Longa. This name was borne by Saint Alban, the first British martyr (4th century). According to tradition, he sheltered a fugitive priest in his house. When his house was searched, he disguised himself as the priest, was arrested in his stead, and was beheaded. As an English name, Alban was occasionally used in the Middle Ages and was revived in the 18th century, though it is now uncommon.
ALBERTmEnglish, French, Catalan, German, Polish, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Romanian, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalbert, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and beraht "bright". This name was common among medieval German royalty. The Normans introduced it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Æðelberht. Though it became rare in England by the 17th century, it was repopularized in the 19th century by the German-born Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.... [more]
ALBERTE (2)fFrench, Danish
French and Danish feminine form of ALBERT.
ALBERTINEfFrench
French feminine form of ALBERT.
ALBINEfFrench
French form of ALBINA.
ALCIDEmItalian, French (Rare)
Italian and French form of ALCIDES.
ALDRICmFrench, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name, derived from the elements ald "old" and ric "ruler, power". Saint Aldric was a 9th-century bishop of Le Mans.
ALEXm & fEnglish, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Russian
Short form of ALEXANDER, ALEXANDRA, and other names beginning with Alex.
ALEXANDRAfEnglish, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Catalan, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
ALEXANDREmFrench, Portuguese, Galician, Catalan
Form of ALEXANDER. This name was borne by the 19th-century French author Alexandre Dumas (1802-1870), who wrote 'The Three Musketeers'.
ALEXANDRINEfFrench
French elaborated form of ALEXANDRA. This was the name of a Danish queen, the wife of King Christian X.
ALEXISm & fGerman, French, English, Greek, Ancient Greek
From the Greek name Αλεξις (Alexis), which meant "helper" or "defender", derived from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, to help". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek comic poet, and also of several saints. It is used somewhat interchangeably with the related name Αλεξιος or Alexius, borne by five Byzantine emperors. In the English-speaking world it is more commonly used as a feminine name.
ALFREDmEnglish, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Dutch
Derived from the Old English name Ælfræd, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and ræd "counsel". Alfred the Great was a 9th-century king of Wessex who fought unceasingly against the Danes living in northeast England. He was also a scholar, and he translated many Latin books into Old English. His fame helped to ensure the usage of this name even after the Norman conquest, when most Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. It became rare by the end of the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 18th century.... [more]
ALICEfEnglish, French, Portuguese, Italian
From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).
ALINEfFrench, Portuguese (Brazilian), English
Medieval short form of ADELINE. As an English name, in modern times it has sometimes been regarded as a variant of EILEEN. This was the name of a popular 1965 song by the French singer Christophe.
ALISONfEnglish, French
Norman French diminutive of Aalis (see ALICE). It was common in England, Scotland and France in the Middle Ages, and was later revived in England in the 20th century via Scotland. Unlike most other English names ending in son, it is not derived from a surname.
ALIXfFrench
Medieval French variant of ALICE.
ALPHONSEmFrench
French form of ALFONSO.
ALPHONSINEfFrench
French feminine diminutive of ALFONSO.
AMANDmFrench
French form of AMANDUS.
AMANDINEfFrench
French diminutive of AMANDA.
AMAURYmFrench
French form of AMALRIC.
AMBREfFrench
French cognate of AMBER.
AMBROISEmFrench
French form of Ambrosius (see AMBROSE).
AMÉDÉEmFrench
French form of AMADEUS.
AMÉLIEfFrench
French form of AMELIA.
AMOURm & fFrench
French form of AMOR.
ANAÏSfOccitan, Catalan, French
Occitan and Catalan form of ANNA.
ANASTASIEfFrench
French form of ANASTASIA.
ANATOLEmFrench
French form of ANATOLIUS.
ANDRÉmFrench, Portuguese, German, Dutch
French and Portuguese form of Andreas (see ANDREW).
ANDRÉEfFrench
French feminine form of ANDREW.
ANGÈLEfFrench
French feminine form of Angelus (see ANGEL).
ANGELINEfFrench
French diminutive of ANGELA.
ANGÉLIQUEfFrench
French form of ANGELICA.
ANNAfEnglish, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary. In the English-speaking world, this form came into general use in the 18th century, joining Ann and Anne.... [more]
ANNABELLEfEnglish, French
Variant of ANNABEL. It can also be taken as a combination of ANNA and BELLE.
ANNE (1)fFrench, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Basque
French form of ANNA. In the 13th-century it was imported to England, where it was also commonly spelled Ann. The name was borne by a 17th-century English queen and also by the second wife of Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn (the mother of Queen Elizabeth I), who was eventually beheaded in the Tower of London. This is also the name of the heroine in 'Anne of Green Gables' (1908) by Canadian author L. M. Montgomery.
ANNETTEfFrench, English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch
French diminutive of ANNE (1). It has also been widely used in the English-speaking world, and it became popular in America in the late 1950s due to the fame of actress Annette Funicello (1942-).
ANNICKfBreton
Breton diminutive of ANNA.
ANOUKfDutch, French
Dutch and French diminutive of ANNA.
ANSELMEmFrench
French form of ANSELM.
ANTOINEmFrench, African American
French form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ANTOINETTEfFrench
Feminine diminutive of ANTOINE. This name was borne by Marie Antoinette, the queen of France during the French Revolution. She was executed by guillotine.
ANTONINmFrench
French form of Antoninus (see ANTONINO). This name was borne by the French playwright Antonin Artaud (1896-1948).
APOLLINAIREmFrench (Rare)
French form of APOLLINARIS. It was adopted as a surname by the Polish-French poet Guillaume Apollinaire (1880-1918), who based it on his Polish middle name Apolinary.
APOLLINEfFrench
French form of APOLLONIA.
ARIANEfFrench, German, Dutch
French form of ARIADNE.
ARIANNEfFrench
Variant of ARIANE.
ARIELm & fHebrew, English, French, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Means "lion of God" in Hebrew, from אֲרִי ('ari) meaning "lion" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". In the Old Testament it is used as another name for the city of Jerusalem. Shakespeare used it as the name of a spirit in his play 'The Tempest' (1611), and one of the moons of Uranus bears this name in his honour. As an English name, it became more common for females in the 1980s, especially after it was used for the title character in the Walt Disney film 'The Little Mermaid' (1989).
ARIELLEfFrench
French feminine form of ARIEL.
ARISTIDEmFrench, Italian
French and Italian form of ARISTIDES.
ARLETTEfFrench
French form of HERLEVA.
ARMANDmFrench
French form of HERMAN.
ARMELmFrench
From the old Welsh name Arthfael, which was composed of the elements arth "bear" and mael "prince". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who founded abbeys in Brittany.
ARMELLEfFrench
Feminine form of ARMEL.
ARNAUDmFrench
French form of ARNOLD.
ARNAUDEfFrench (Rare)
French feminine form of ARNOLD.
ARSÈNEmFrench
French form of ARSENIOS.
ARTHURmEnglish, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.... [more]
ASTRIDfSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French
Modern form of ÁSTRÍÐR. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of 'Pippi Longstocking'.
ASTRIDEfFrench
French variant of ASTRID.
ATHÉNAÏSfFrench
French form of ATHENAIS.
AUBERTmFrench
French variant of ALBERT.
AUBINmFrench
French form of ALBINUS.
AUDEfFrench
French feminine form of ALDO.
AUGUSTE (1)mFrench
French form of AUGUSTUS.
AUGUSTINE (2)fFrench, German
French feminine form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AURÈLEmFrench
French form of AURELIUS.
AURÉLIEfFrench
French feminine form of AURELIUS.
AURÉLIENmFrench
French form of AURELIANUS.
AUROREfFrench
French form of AURORA.
AXELLEfFrench
Feminine form of AXEL.
BABETTEfFrench
French diminutive of ELIZABETH.
BABYLASmLate Greek, French (Rare)
Derived from the name of the ancient Mesopotamian city of Babylon. Saint Babylas was a 3rd-century patriarch of Antioch who was martyred during the reign of the Roman emperor Decius.
BAPTISTEmFrench
Means "baptist" in French, originally deriving from Greek βαπτω (bapto) "to dip". This name is usually given in honour of Saint John the Baptist, and as such it is often paired with the name Jean.
BARBARAfEnglish, Italian, French, German, Polish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Late Roman
Derived from Greek βαρβαρος (barbaros) meaning "foreign". According to legend, Saint Barbara was a young woman killed by her father Dioscorus, who was then killed by a bolt of lightning. She is the patron of architects, geologists, stonemasons and artillerymen. Because of her renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was revived in the 19th century.
BARNABÉmFrench
French form of BARNABAS.
BASILEmFrench
French form of BASIL (1).
BASTIENmFrench
Short form of SÉBASTIEN.
BAUDOUINmFrench
French form of BALDWIN.
BÉATRICEfFrench
French form of BEATRIX.
BÉNÉDICTEfFrench
French feminine form of BENEDICT.
BENJAMINmEnglish, French, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Biblical
From the Hebrew name בִּנְיָמִין (Binyamin) which means "son of the south" or "son of the right hand", from the roots בֵּן (ben) meaning "son" and יָמִין (yamin) meaning "right hand, south". Benjamin in the Old Testament is the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob and the founder of one of the southern tribes of the Hebrews. He was originally named בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oni) meaning "son of my sorrow" by his mother Rachel, who died shortly after childbirth, but it was later changed by his father (see Genesis 35:18).... [more]
BENJAMINEfFrench
French feminine form of BENJAMIN.
BENOÎTmFrench
French form of BENEDICT.
BENOÎTEfFrench
French feminine form of BENEDICT.
BÉRENGERmFrench
French form of BERENGAR.
BÉRÉNICEfFrench
French form of BERENICE.
BERNADETTEfFrench, English
French feminine form of BERNARD. Saint Bernadette was a young woman from Lourdes in France who claimed to have seen visions of the Virgin Mary.
BERNARDmEnglish, French, Dutch, Polish, Croatian, Slovene, Czech, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element bern "bear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Beornheard. This was the name of several saints, including Saint Bernard of Menthon who built hospices in the Swiss Alps in the 10th century, and Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, a 12th-century theologian and Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include the Irish playwright and essayist George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) and the British World War II field marshal Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976).
BERNARDINEfFrench (Rare)
French feminine form of BERNARD.
BERTHEfFrench
French form of BERTHA.
BERTILLEfFrench
French diminutive of BERTHA.
BERTRANDmFrench, English, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements beraht meaning "bright" and rand meaning "rim (of a shield)". From an early date it has been confused with BERTRAM and the two names have merged to some degree. A famous bearer was English philosopher Bertrand Russell (1872-1970).
BLAISEmFrench
From the Roman name Blasius which meant "lisping" from Latin blaesus. A famous bearer was the French mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal (1623-1662).
BLANCHEfFrench, English
From a medieval French nickname meaning "white, fair". This name and its cognates in other languages are ultimately derived from the Germanic word blanc. An early bearer was the 12th-century Blanca of Navarre, the wife of Sancho III of Castile. Her granddaughter of the same name married Louis VIII of France, with the result that the name became more common in France.
BLANDINEfFrench
French form of the Roman name Blandina, which was the feminine form of Blandinus, which was itself a derivative of the cognomen BLANDUS. Saint Blandina was a 2nd-century slave from Lyons who was martyred by being thrown to wild beasts.
BONIFACEmFrench, English (Rare)
From the Late Latin name Bonifatius, which meant "good fate" from bonum "good" and fatum "fate". This was the name of nine popes and also several saints, including an 8th-century Anglo-Saxon missionary to Germany (originally named Winfrid) who is now regarded as the patron saint of that country. It came into use in England during the Middle Ages, but became rare after the Protestant Reformation.
BRICEmFrench, English
From the name Bricius, which was probably a Latinized form of a Gaulish name meaning "speckled". This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a disciple of Saint Martin of Tours.
BRIGITTEfGerman, French
German and French form of BRIDGET.
BRUNOmGerman, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Croatian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element brun "armour, protection" or brun "brown". Saint Bruno of Cologne was a German monk of the 11th century who founded the Carthusian Order. The surname has belonged Giordano Bruno, a philosopher burned at the stake by the Inquisition.
CALIXTEmFrench
French form of CALIXTUS.
CAMÉLIAfFrench
French form of CAMELLIA.
CAMILLEf & mFrench, English
French feminine and masculine form of CAMILLA. It is also used in the English-speaking world, where it is generally only feminine.
CANDIDEm & fFrench
French form of CANDIDUS or CANDIDA.
CAPUCINEfFrench
Means "nasturtium" in French. This was the stage name of the French actress and model Capucine (1928-1990).
CARINEfFrench
French form of CARINA (1). It can also function as a short form of CATHERINE, via Swedish Karin.
CAROLEfFrench
French feminine form of CAROLUS.
CASIMIRmEnglish, French
English form of the Polish name Kazimierz, derived from the Slavic element kaziti "to destroy" combined with miru "peace, world". Four kings of Poland have borne this name, including Casimir III the Great, who greatly strengthened the Polish state in the 14th century. It was also borne Saint Casimir, a 15th-century Polish prince and a patron saint of Poland and Lithuania. The name was imported into Western Europe via Germany, where it was borne by some royalty.
CASSANDRAfEnglish, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κασσανδρα (Kassandra), derived from possibly κεκασμαι (kekasmai) "to excel, to shine" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek myth Cassandra was a Trojan princess, the daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but when she spurned his advances he cursed her so nobody would believe her prophecies.... [more]
CATHERINEfFrench, English
French form of KATHERINE, and also a common English variant.
CÉCILEfFrench, Dutch
French form of CECILIA.
CÉDRICmFrench
French form of CEDRIC.
CÉLESTEf & mFrench
French feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS.
CÉLESTINEfFrench
French feminine form of CAELESTINUS.
CÉLINEfFrench
French feminine form of CAELINUS. This name can also function as a short form of MARCELINE.
CERISEfFrench
Means "cherry" in French.
CÉSAIREmFrench
French form of CAESARIUS.
CÉSARmFrench, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Spanish and Portuguese form of CAESAR. A famous bearer was the American labour organizer César Chávez (1927-1993).
CHANTALfFrench, English, Dutch
From a French surname which was derived from a place name meaning "stony". It was originally given in honour of Saint Jeanne-Françoise de Chantal, the founder of the Visitation Order in the 17th century. It has become associated with French chant "song".
CHARLESmEnglish, French
From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word meaning "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic name element hari meaning "army, warrior".... [more]
CHARLINEfFrench
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES.
CHARLOTmFrench
French diminutive of CHARLES.
CHARLOTTEfFrench, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.
CHLOÉfFrench
French form of CHLOE.
CHRISTELLEfFrench
French diminutive of CHRISTINE.
CHRISTIANmEnglish, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the medieval Latin name Christianus meaning "a Christian" (see CHRISTOS). In England it has been in use since the Middle Ages, during which time it was used by both males and females, but it did not become common until the 17th century. In Denmark the name has been borne by ten kings since the 15th century. A famous bearer was Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), the Danish author of such fairy tales as 'The Ugly Duckling' and 'The Emperor's New Clothes'.
CHRISTIANEfGerman, French
German and French feminine form of CHRISTIAN.
CHRISTINEfFrench, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French form of CHRISTINA, as well as a variant in other languages.
CLAIRmFrench, English
French form of Clarus (see CLARA).
CLAIREfFrench, English
French form of CLARA.
CLARISSEfFrench
French form of CLARICE.
CLAUDEm & fFrench, English
French masculine and feminine form of CLAUDIUS. In France the masculine name has been common since the Middle Ages due to the 7th-century Saint Claude of Besançon. It was imported to Britain in the 16th century by the aristocratic Hamilton family, who had French connections. A famous bearer of this name was the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
CLAUDETTEfFrench
French feminine form of CLAUDIUS.
CLAUDIEfFrench
French feminine variant of CLAUDE.
CLAUDINEfFrench
Feminine form of CLAUDIUS.
CLÉMENCEfFrench
French feminine form of Clementius (see CLEMENT).
CLÉMENTmFrench
French form of Clemens (see CLEMENT).
CLÉMENTINEfFrench
French feminine form of CLEMENT.
CLÉOfFrench
Short form of CLÉOPÂTRE.
CLOÉfPortuguese, French
Portuguese form and French variant of CHLOE.
CLOTILDEfFrench, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
French form of the Germanic name Chlotichilda which was composed of the elements hlud "fame" and hild "battle". Saint Clotilde was the wife of the Frankish king Clovis, whom she converted to Christianity.
CLOVISmAncient Germanic (Latinized), French
Shortened form of Clodovicus, a Latinized form of Chlodovech (see LUDWIG). Clovis was a Frankish king who united France under his rule in the 5th century.
COLETTEfFrench
Short form of NICOLETTE. Saint Colette was a 15th-century French nun who gave her money to the poor. This was also the pen name of the French author Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (1873-1954).
COLINEfFrench
Diminutive of NICOLE.
COLOMBEfFrench
French feminine form of COLUMBA.
CÔMEmFrench
French form of COSMAS.
CONSTANCEfEnglish, French
Medieval form of CONSTANTIA. The Normans introduced this name to England (it was the name of a daughter of William the Conqueror).
CONSTANTmFrench, English (Rare)
From the Late Latin name CONSTANS. It was also used by the Puritans as a vocabulary name, from the English word constant.
CONSTANTINmRomanian, French
Romanian and French form of Constantinus (see CONSTANTINE).
CORALIEfFrench
Either a French form of KORALIA, or a derivative of Latin corallium "coral" (see CORAL).
CORENTINmBreton, French
Possibly means "hurricane" in Breton. This was the name of a 5th-century bishop of Quimper in Brittany.
CORINNEfFrench, English
French form of CORINNA. The French-Swiss author Madame de Staël used it for her novel 'Corinne' (1807).
CORNÉLIEfFrench
French form of CORNELIA.
COSETTEfFrench, Literature
From French chosette meaning "little thing". This is the nickname of the illegitimate daughter of Fantine in Victor Hugo's novel 'Les Misérables' (1862). Her real name is Euphrasie, though it is seldom used. In the novel young Cosette is the ward of the cruel Thénardiers until she is retrieved by Jean Valjean.
CUNÉGONDEfFrench
French form of KUNIGUNDE. Voltaire used this name in his novel 'Candide' (1759).
CYPRIENmFrench
French form of Cyprianus (see CYPRIAN).
CYRIELLEfFrench
French feminine form of CYRIL.
CYRILmEnglish, French, Czech, Slovak
From the Greek name Κυριλλος (Kyrillos) which was derived from Greek κυριος (kyrios) meaning "lord", a word used frequently in the Greek Bible to refer to God or Jesus.... [more]
CYRILLEm & fFrench
French form of CYRIL, sometimes used as a feminine form.
DAMIENmFrench
French form of DAMIAN.
DANIELmEnglish, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Armenian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge", from the roots דִּין (din) meaning "to judge" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.... [more]
DANIÈLEfFrench
French feminine form of DANIEL.
DANIELLEfFrench, English
French feminine form of DANIEL. It has been commonly used in the English-speaking world only since the 20th century.
DAPHNÉfFrench
French form of DAPHNE.
DAPHNÉEfFrench
French variant form of DAPHNE.
DAVIDmEnglish, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was derived from Hebrew דּוֹד (dod) meaning "beloved" or "uncle". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.... [more]
DÉBORAfSpanish, Portuguese, French
Spanish, Portuguese and French form of DEBORAH.
DÉLIAfPortuguese, French, Hungarian
Portuguese, French and Hungarian form of DELIA (1).
DELPHINEfFrench
French form of DELPHINA.
DENIELmBreton
Breton form of DANIEL.
DENISmFrench, Russian, English, German, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Romanian, Croatian
From Denys or Denis, the medieval French forms of DIONYSIUS. Saint Denis was a 3rd-century missionary to Gaul and the first bishop of Paris. He was martyred by decapitation, after which legend says he picked up his own severed head and walked for a distance while preaching a sermon. He is credited with converting the Gauls to Christianity and is considered the patron saint of France.... [more]
DENISEfFrench, English, Dutch
French feminine form of DENIS.
DÉODATmFrench
French form of DEODATUS.
DÉSIRÉmFrench
Masculine form of DÉSIRÉE.
DÉSIRÉEfFrench
French form of DESIDERATA. In part it is directly from the French word meaning "desired, wished".
DIANEfFrench, English
French form of DIANA, also regularly used in the English-speaking world.
DIDIERmFrench
French form of DESIDERIO.
DIEUDONNÉmFrench
Means "given by God" in French, used as a French form of DEUSDEDIT.
DIEUDONNÉEfFrench
Feminine form of DIEUDONNÉ.
DIMITRImRussian, French
Variant of DMITRIY, using the Church Slavic spelling.
DOMINIQUEf & mFrench
French feminine and masculine form of DOMINIC.
DOMITILLEfFrench
French form of DOMITILLA.
DONATmFrench (Rare), Occitan (Rare), Catalan (Rare), Polish (Rare)
French, Occitan, Catalan and Polish form of Donatus (see DONATO).
DONATIENmFrench
French form of DONATIANUS.
DONATIENNEfFrench
French feminine form of DONATIANUS.
DORIANmEnglish, French
The name was first used by Oscar Wilde in his novel 'The Picture of Dorian Gray' (1891), which tells the story of a man whose portrait ages while he stays young. Wilde may have taken it from the name of the ancient Greek tribe the Dorians, or from the surname DORAN.
DORIANEfFrench
French feminine form of DORIAN.
DOROTHÉEfFrench
French form of DOROTHEA.
EDGARmEnglish, French
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gar "spear". This was the name of a 10th-century English king, Edgar the Peaceful. The name did not survive long after the Norman conquest, but it was revived in the 18th century, in part due to a character by this name in Sir Walter Scott's novel 'The Bride of Lammermoor' (1819), which tells of the tragic love between Edgar Ravenswood and Lucy Ashton. Famous bearers include author and poet Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), French impressionist painter Edgar Degas (1834-1917), and author Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950).
EDGARDmFrench
French variant of EDGAR.
ÉDITHfFrench
French form of EDITH.
EDMÉEfFrench (Rare)
Feminine form of EDMÉ.
EDMONDmFrench
French form of EDMUND. A notable bearer was the English astronomer Edmond Halley (1656-1742), for whom Halley's comet is named.
EDMONDEfFrench
French feminine form of EDMUND.
ÉDOUARDmFrench
French form of EDWARD.
EDWIGEfFrench
French form of HEDWIG.
ELÉONOREfFrench
French form of ELEANOR.
ÉLIANEfFrench
Probably from Aeliana, the feminine form of the Roman name Aelianus, which was derived from the Roman family name AELIUS. This was the name of an early saint and martyr.
ÉLIEmFrench
French form of ELIJAH.
ÉLISABETHfFrench
French form of ELIZABETH.
ÉLISEfFrench
French short form of ÉLISABETH.
ÉLODIEfFrench
French form of ALODIA.
ÉLOImFrench
French form of ELIGIUS.
ÉLOÏSEfFrench
French form of ELOISE.
ELOUANmBreton, French
Possibly from a Breton word meaning "light". This name was borne by an obscure 6th-century saint who is now venerated mainly in Brittany and Cornwall.
ELVIREfFrench
French form of ELVIRA.
ÉMELINEfFrench
French form of Amelina (see EMMELINE).
ÉMERICmFrench
French form of EMMERICH.
ÉMILEmFrench
French form of Aemilius (see EMIL). This name was borne by French author Émile Zola (1840-1902).
ÉMILIEfFrench
French feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
ÉMILIENmFrench
French form of Aemilianus (see EMILIANO).
ÉMILIENNEfFrench
French feminine form of Aemilianus (see EMILIANO).
EMMAfEnglish, French, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of King Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of King Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.... [more]
EMMANUELmBiblical, French, English
From the Hebrew name עִמָּנוּאֵל ('Immanu'el) meaning "God is with us", from the roots עִם ('im) meaning "with" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". This was the foretold name of the Messiah in the Old Testament. It has been used in England since the 16th century in the spellings Emmanuel and Immanuel, though it has not been widespread. The name has been more common in continental Europe, especially in Spain and Portugal (in the spellings Manuel and Manoel).
EMMANUELLEfFrench
French feminine form of EMMANUEL.
ÉRICmFrench
French form of ERIC.
ERNESTmEnglish, French, Slovene, Polish
Derived from Germanic eornost meaning "serious". It was introduced to England by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century, though it did not become common until the following century. The American author and adventurer Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961) was a famous bearer of the name. It was also used by Oscar Wilde for a character in his comedy 'The Importance of Being Earnest' (1895).
ERNESTINEfFrench, German, English
Feminine form of ERNEST.
ERWANmBreton
Breton form of IVO (1) or YVES.
ERWANNmBreton
Variant of ERWAN.
ESTELLEfEnglish, French
From an Old French name which was derived from Latin stella, meaning "star". It was rare in the English-speaking world in the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due to the character Estella Havisham in Charles Dickens' novel 'Great Expectations' (1860).
ESTHERfEnglish, French, Spanish, Dutch, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Possibly means "star" in Persian. Alternatively it could be a derivative of the name of the Near Eastern goddess ISHTAR. The Book of Esther in the Old Testament tells the story of Queen Esther, the Jewish wife of the king of Persia. The king's advisor Haman persuaded the king to exterminate all the Jews in the realm. Warned of this plot by her cousin Mordecai, Esther revealed her Jewish ancestry and convinced the king to execute Haman instead. Her original Hebrew name was Hadassah.... [more]
ETHANmEnglish, French, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name אֵיתָן ('Eitan) meaning "solid, enduring, firm". In the Old Testament this name is borne by a few minor characters, including the wise man Ethan the Ezrahite, supposedly the author of Psalm 89.... [more]
ÉTIENNEmFrench
French form of STEPHEN.
ÉTIENNETTEfFrench (Rare)
French feminine form of STEPHEN.
EUGÈNEmFrench
French form of Eugenius (see EUGENE).
EUGÉNIEfFrench
French form of EUGENIA. This was the name of the wife of Napoleon III.
EULALIEfFrench
French form of EULALIA.
EUPHRASIEfFrench
French form of EUPHRASIA.
EUSTACHEmFrench
French form of Eustachius or Eustathius (see EUSTACE).
ÉVARISTEmFrench
French form of EVARISTUS.
ÈVEfFrench
French form of EVE.
ÉVELYNEfFrench
French form of EVELINA.
ÉVRARDmFrench
French form of EVERARD.
FABIENmFrench
French form of Fabianus (see FABIAN).
FABIENNEfFrench
French feminine form of Fabianus (see FABIAN).
FABRICEmFrench
French form of the Roman family name Fabricius, which was derived from Latin faber "craftsman". Gaius Fabricius Luscinus was a 3rd-century BC Roman general and statesman.
FANNYfEnglish, French, Spanish
Diminutive of FRANCES, FRANÇOISE or STÉPHANIE. In the English-speaking world this has been a vulgar slang word since the late 19th century, and the name has subsequently dropped out of common use.
FAUSTINEfFrench
French feminine form of Faustinus (see FAUSTINO).
FÉLICIEfFrench
French form of FELICIA.
FÉLICIENmFrench
French form of Felicianus (see FELICIANO).
FÉLICIENNEfFrench
French feminine form of Felicianus (see FELICIANO).
FÉLICITÉfFrench
French form of FELICITAS.
FÉLIXmFrench, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Spanish and Portuguese form of FELIX.
FERDINANDmGerman, French, Dutch, English, Czech, Slovene, Ancient Germanic
From Ferdinando, the old Spanish form of a Germanic name composed of the elements fardi "journey" and nand "daring, brave". The Visigoths brought the name to the Iberian Peninsula, where it entered into the royal families of Spain and Portugal. From there it became common among the Habsburg royal family of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria, starting with the Spanish-born Ferdinand I in the 16th century. A notable bearer was Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan (1480-1521), called Fernão de Magalhães in Portuguese, who was the leader of the first expedition to sail around the earth.
FERNANDmFrench
French form of FERDINAND.
FERNANDEfFrench
French feminine form of FERDINAND.
FIFIfFrench
Diminutive of JOSÉPHINE.
FIRMINmFrench, Medieval English
From the Late Latin name Firminus which meant "firm". This was the name of several early saints, notably the 3rd-century bishop Saint Firmin (or Fermin) of Amiens who is especially venerated in Navarre, Spain.
FLAVIEfFrench
French feminine form of FLAVIUS.
FLAVIENmFrench
French form of FLAVIAN.
FLAVIENNEfFrench
French feminine form of FLAVIAN.
FLEURfFrench, Dutch, English (Rare)
Means "flower" in French. This was the name of a character in John Galsworthy's novels 'The Forsyte Saga' (1922).
FLOREfFrench
French form of FLORA.
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