German Names

German names are used in Germany and other German-speaking areas such as Austria and Switzerland. See also about German names.
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MAGDALENE   f   German, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From a title which meant "of Magdala". Mary Magdalene, a character in the New Testament, was named thus because she was from Magdala - a village on the Sea of Galilee whose name meant "tower" in Hebrew. She was cleaned of evil spirits by Jesus and then remained with him during his ministry, witnessing the crucifixion and the resurrection. She was a popular saint in the Middle Ages, and the name became common then. In England it is traditionally rendered Madeline, while Magdalene or Magdalen is the learned form.
MAIKE   f   Frisian, German
Frisian diminutive of MARIA.
MALTE   m   Danish, Swedish, German
Short form of the Germanic name HELMOLD.
MALTHE   m   Danish, German
Variant of MALTE.
MANFRED   m   German, Dutch, Polish
Derived from the Germanic elements magan "strength" and frid "peace". This is the name of the main character in Byron's drama 'Manfred' (1817). This name was also borne by Manfred von Richthofen (1892-1918), the German pilot in World War I who was known as the Red Baron.
MANFRIED   m   German
German form of MANFRED.
MANU (2)   m & f   French, Spanish, German, Finnish
Short form of MANUEL or EMMANUEL (or MANUELA in Germany).
MANUEL   m   Spanish, Portuguese, German, English, Italian, French, Romanian, Late Greek (Latinized)
Spanish and Portuguese form of EMMANUEL. In the spelling Μανουηλ (Manouel) it was also used in the Byzantine Empire, notably by two emperors. It is possible this form of the name was transmitted to Spain and Portugal from Byzantium, since there were connections between the royal families (king Ferdinand III of Castile married Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen, who had Byzantine roots, and had a son named Manuel). The name has been used in Iberia since at least the 13th century and was borne by two kings of Portugal.
MANUELA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, German, Italian
Feminine form of MANUEL.
MARCELL   m   Hungarian, German
Hungarian and German form of MARCELLUS.
MARCELLA   f   Italian, German, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of MARCELLUS.
MARCELLUS   m   Ancient Roman, German, Dutch
Roman family name which was originally a diminutive of MARCUS. This was the name of two popes.
MARCO   m   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Italian form of MARK. During the Middle Ages this name was common in Venice, where Saint Mark was supposedly buried. A famous bearer was the Venetian explorer Marco Polo, who travelled across Asia to China in the 13th century.
MAREIKE   f   Frisian, German
Frisian and German diminutive of MARIA.
MARGARETE   f   German
German form of MARGARET.
MARGARETHA   f   Dutch, German
Dutch and German form of MARGARET.
MARGARETHE   f   German, Danish
German and Danish form of MARGARET.
MARGRIT   f   German
German variant form of MARGARET.
MARIA   f & m   Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.... [more]
MARIANNE   f   French, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Originally a French diminutive of MARIE. It is also considered a combination of MARIE and ANNE (1). Shortly after the formation of the French Republic in 1792, a female figure by this name was adopted as the symbol of the state.
MARIE   f   French, Czech, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
French and Czech form of MARIA. A notable bearer of this name was Marie Antoinette, a queen of France who was executed by guillotine during the French Revolution. Another was Marie Curie (1867-1934), a physicist and chemist who studied radioactivity with her husband Pierre.
MARIELE   f   German
German diminutive of MARIA.
MARITA (1)   f   German, Spanish, Dutch, Finnish
Diminutive of MARIA.
MARIUS   m   Ancient Roman, Romanian, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, French
Roman family name which was derived either from MARS, the name of the Roman god of War, or else from the Latin root mas, maris meaning "male". Gaius Marius was a famous Roman consul of the 2nd century BC. Since the start of the Christian era, it has occasionally been used as a masculine form of MARIA.
MARKUS   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
German, Scandinavian and Finnish form of MARK.
MARLEN (2)   f   German
Variant of MARLENE.
MARLENE   f   German, English
Blend of MARIA and MAGDALENE. It refers, therefore, to Mary Magdalene, a character in the New Testament. The name was popularized by the German actress and singer Marlene Dietrich (1901-1992), whose real name was Maria Magdalene von Losch.
MARLIES   f   German, Dutch
Combination of MARIA and LIES.
MARLIS   f   German
Combination of MARIA and LIESE.
MARTHA   f   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, Greek, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From Aramaic מַרְתָּא (marta') meaning "the lady, the mistress", feminine form of מַר (mar) "master". In the New Testament this is the name of the sister of Lazarus and Mary of Bethany (who is sometimes identified with Mary Magdalene). She was a witness to Jesus restoring her dead brother to life.... [more]
MARTIN   m   English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish
From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god MARS. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.... [more]
MARTINA   f   German, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Slovene, English, Swedish, Dutch, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Martinus (see MARTIN). Saint Martina was a 3rd-century martyr who is one of the patron saints of Rome.
MARVIN   m   English, German
Probably from an English surname which was derived from the given name MERVYN. A famous bearer was the American musician Marvin Gaye (1939-1984).
MARWIN   m   German
German variant of MARVIN.
MARZELL   m   German
German variant of MARCELLUS.
MATHIS   m   German, French
German and French form of MATTHIAS.
MATTHÄUS   m   German
German form of MATTHEW, used to refer to the evangelist and apostle also known as Levi.
MATTHIAS   m   Greek, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, French, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Variant of Matthaios (see MATTHEW) which appears in the New Testament as the name of the apostle chosen to replace the traitor Judas Iscariot. This was also the name of kings of Hungary, including Matthias I who made important reforms to the kingdom in the 15th century.
MATTIAS   m   German, Swedish
Variant of MATTHIAS.
MAX   m   German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Short form of MAXIMILIAN (or sometimes of MAXWELL in English).
MAXIMILIAN   m   German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Roman name Maximilianus, which was derived from MAXIMUS. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint and martyr. In the 15th century the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick III gave this name to his son and eventual heir. In this case it was a blend of the names of the Roman generals Fabius Maximus and Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus (see EMILIANO), who Frederick admired. It was subsequently borne by a second Holy Roman Emperor, two kings of Bavaria, and a short-lived Habsburg emperor of Mexico.
MAXIMILIANE   f   German
German feminine form of MAXIMILIAN.
MECHTHILD   f   German
German variant of MATHILDE.
MECHTILDE   f   German
German variant of MATHILDE.
MEIKE   f   German, Dutch
German and Dutch diminutive of MARIA.
MEINARD   m   German
Variant of MEINHARD.
MEINE   m   Frisian, Dutch, German
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element magan meaning "strength".
MEINHARD   m   German
German form of MEGINHARD.
MEINO   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Variant of MEINE.
MEINRAD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements magan "mighty, strong" and rad "counsel". Saint Meinrad was a 9th-century hermit who founded the Benedictine abbey at Einsiedeln in Switzerland.
MELANIE   f   English, German, Dutch
From Mélanie, the French form of the Latin name Melania, derived from Greek μελαινα (melaina) meaning "black, dark". This was the name of a Roman saint who gave all her wealth to charity in the 5th century. Her grandmother was also a saint with the same name.... [more]
MELITTA   f   Ancient Greek, German
Ancient Attic Greek variant of MELISSA.
MENNO   m   Dutch, German
Diminutive of MEINE.
MERTEN   m   German
German variant of MARTIN.
META   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German and Scandinavian short form of MARGARET.
MIA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Scandinavian, Dutch and German diminutive of MARIA. It coincides with the Italian word mia meaning "mine".
MICHAEL   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name מִיכָאֵל (Mikha'el) meaning "who is like God?". This is a rhetorical question, implying no person is like God. Michael is one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament he is named as a protector of Israel. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies in the war against Satan, and is thus considered the patron saint of soldiers in Christianity.... [more]
MICHAELA   f   German, Swedish, English, Czech, Slovak
Feminine form of MICHAEL.
MICHEL   m   French, German, Dutch
French form of MICHAEL. Michel de Notredame, also known as Nostradamus, was the 16th-century French astrologer who made predictions about future world events. This is also the German diminutive form of MICHAEL.
MICHI (2)   m & f   German
German diminutive of MICHAEL or MICHAELA.
MIRIAM   f   Hebrew, English, German, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Original Hebrew form of MARY. It is used in the Old Testament, where it belongs to the elder sister of Moses and Aaron. She watched over the infant Moses as the pharaoh's daughter drew him from the Nile. The name has long been popular among Jews, and it has been used as an English Christian name since the Protestant Reformation.
MITZI   f   German
German diminutive of MARIA.
MORITZ   m   German
German form of MAURICE.
MOSE   m   German
German variant of MOSES.
NADINE   f   French, German, English
French elaborated form of NADIA (1).
NADJA   f   German, Slovene
German and Slovene form of NADYA (1).
NATALIE   f   French, English, German
From the Late Latin name Natalia, which meant "Christmas Day" from Latin natale domini. This was the name of the wife of the 4th-century martyr Saint Adrian of Nicomedia. She is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church, and the name has traditionally been more common among Eastern Christians than those in the West. It was popularized in America by actress Natalie Wood (1938-1981), who was born to Russian immigrants.
NATHALIE   f   French, German
French and German variant of NATALIE.
NELE   f   German
Diminutive of CORNELIA.
NICKOLAUS   m   German
Variant of NIKOLAUS.
NICO   m   Italian, Dutch, German, Spanish, Portuguese
Short form of NICHOLAS (or sometimes NICODEMUS).
NICOL (2)   f   Dutch, German, Czech
Dutch, German and Czech variant of NICOLE.
NICOLA (2)   f   German, Czech, English
Latinate feminine form of NICHOLAS. In the English-speaking world this name is more common outside of America, where Nicole is more usual.
NICOLAUS   m   German, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Nikolaos (see NICHOLAS). This form is also used in Germany.
NICOLE   f   French, English, Dutch, German
French feminine form of NICHOLAS, commonly used in the English-speaking world since the middle of the 20th century. A famous bearer is American-Australian actress Nicole Kidman (1967-).
NIKLAS   m   Swedish, Finnish, Danish, Norwegian, German
Swedish form of NICHOLAS.
NIKLAUS   m   German (Swiss)
Swiss German form of NICHOLAS.
NIKOLA (2)   f   German, Polish, Czech, Slovak
German, Polish, Czech and Slovak feminine form of NICHOLAS.
NIKOLAUS   m   German
German form of NICHOLAS.
NINA (1)   f   Russian, Italian, English, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, Polish, Slovene, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian
Short form of names that end in nina, such as ANTONINA or GIANNINA. It was imported to Western Europe from Russia and Italy in the 19th century. This name also coincides with the Spanish word niña meaning "little girl".
NOEMI   f   Italian, German, Czech, Biblical Latin
Italian, German and Czech form of NAOMI (1).
NORA   f   Irish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Italian
Short form of HONORA or ELEANOR. Henrik Ibsen used it for a character in his play 'A Doll's House' (1879).
NORBERT   m   German, English, Dutch, French, Hungarian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements nord "north" and beraht "bright". This was the name of an 11th-century German saint who made many reforms within the church.
ODA   f   German, Ancient Germanic
Feminine form of Odo (see OTTO).
ODILIE   f   German (Archaic)
Variant of ODILIA.
OLAF   m   Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Polish
From the Old Norse name Áleifr meaning "ancestor's descendant", derived from the elements anu "ancestor" and leifr "descendant". This was the name of five kings of Norway, including Saint Olaf (Olaf II).
OLGA   f   Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian
Russian form of HELGA. The Varangians brought it from Scandinavia to Russia. The 10th-century Saint Olga was the wife of Igor I, Grand Prince of Kievan Rus (a state based around the city of Kiev). Following his death she ruled as regent for her son for 18 years. After she was baptized in Constantinople she attempted to convert her subjects to Christianity.
OLIVER   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.... [more]
OLIVIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
This name was first used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy 'Twelfth Night' (1602). Shakespeare may have based it on OLIVER or OLIVA, or perhaps directly on the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.... [more]
ORTRUN   f   German
Derived from the Germanic elements ort "point" and run "secret".
ORTWIN   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ort "point" and win "friend".
OSKAR   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish
Scandinavian, German, Polish and Slovene form of OSCAR. A famous bearer was Oskar Schindler (1908-1974), who saved over a thousand Polish Jews during World War II.
OSWALD   m   English, German, Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and weald "power, ruler". Saint Oswald was a king of Northumbria who introduced Christianity to northeast England in the 7th century before being killed in battle. There was also an Old Norse cognate Ásvaldr in use in England, being borne by the 10th-century Saint Oswald of Worcester, who was of Danish ancestry. Though the name had died out by the end of the Middle Ages, it was revived in the 19th century.
OTMAR   m   German, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Audamar, which was derived from the elements aud "wealth, fortune" and meri "famous". This was the name of an 8th-century Swiss saint, an abbot of Saint Gall.
OTTILIE   f   German
German form of ODILIA.
OTTMAR   m   German
Variant of OTMAR.
OTTO   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
Later German form of Audo or Odo, originally a short form of various names beginning with the Germanic element aud meaning "wealth, fortune". This was the name of four kings of Germany, starting in the 10th century with Otto I, the first Holy Roman Emperor, who was known as Otto the Great. This name was also borne by a 19th-century king of Greece who was originally from Bavaria. Another notable bearer was the German chancellor Otto von Bismarck (1815-1898).
OTTOKAR   m   German
German form of ODOVACAR.
OTTOMAR   m   German
Variant of OTMAR.
PANKRAZ   m   German
German form of PANCRATIUS.
PARSIFAL   m   German
German form of PERCIVAL.
PASCAL   m   French, German, Dutch
From the Late Latin name Paschalis, which meant "relating to Easter" from Latin Pascha "Easter", which was in turn from Hebrew פֶּסַח (pesach) "Passover". Passover is the ancient Hebrew holiday celebrating the liberation from Egypt. Because it coincided closely with the later Christian holiday of Easter, the same Latin word was used for both. The name Pascal can also function as a surname, as in the case of Blaise Pascal, the French philosopher, mathematician and inventor.
PATRICIA   f   English, Spanish, German, Late Roman
Feminine form of Patricius (see PATRICK). In medieval England this spelling appears in Latin documents, but this form was probably not used as the actual name until the 18th century, in Scotland.
PATRICK   m   Irish, English, French, German
From the Latin name Patricius, which meant "nobleman". This name was adopted in the 5th-century by Saint Patrick, whose birth name was Sucat. He was a Romanized Briton who was captured and enslaved in his youth by Irish raiders. After six years of servitude he escaped home, but he eventually became a bishop and went back to Ireland as a missionary. He is traditionally credited with Christianizing the island, and is regarded as Ireland's patron saint.... [more]
PAUL   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Biblical
From the Roman family name Paulus, which meant "small" or "humble" in Latin. Paul was an important leader of the early Christian church. According to Acts in the New Testament, he was a Jewish Roman citizen who converted to Christianity after the resurrected Jesus appeared to him. After this he travelled the eastern Mediterranean as a missionary. His original Hebrew name was Saul. Many of the epistles in the New Testament were authored by him.... [more]
PAULA   f   German, English, Finnish, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Hungarian, Polish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Paulus (see PAUL). This was the name of a 4th-century Roman saint who was a companion of Saint Jerome.
PAULINE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
French feminine form of Paulinus (see PAULINO).
PETER   m   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Slovak, Biblical
Derived from the Greek Πετρος (Petros) meaning "stone". This is a translation used in most versions of the New Testament of the name Cephas, meaning "stone" in Aramaic, which was given to the apostle Simon by Jesus (compare Matthew 16:18 and John 1:42). Simon Peter was the most prominent of the apostles during Jesus' ministry and is often considered the first pope.... [more]
PETRA   f   German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Swedish, Finnish, English
Feminine form of PETER. This was also the name of an ancient city in the region that is now Jordan.
PETRONELLA   f   Dutch, German, Swedish
Dutch, German and Swedish form of PETRONILLA.
PETRUS   m   Dutch, German, Biblical Latin
Latin form of PETER used in Dutch and German.
PHILIPP   m   German
German form of PHILIP.
PHILIPPA   f   English (British), German
Latinate feminine form of PHILIP.
PHILIPPINA   f   German (Rare)
Elaborated form of PHILIPPA.
PHILOMENA   f   English, German, Late Greek
From Greek φιλος (philos) "friend, lover" and μενος (menos) "mind, purpose, strength, courage". This was the name of an obscure early saint and martyr. The name came to public attention in the 19th century after a tomb seemingly marked with the name Filumena was found in Rome, supposedly belonging to another martyr named Philomena. This may have in fact been a representation of the Greek word φιλομηνη (philomene) meaning "loved".
PHYLLIS   f   Greek Mythology, English, German
Means "foliage" in Greek. In Greek mythology this was the name of a woman who killed herself out of love for Demophon and was subsequently transformed into an almond tree. It began to be used as a given name in England in the 16th century, though it was often confused with Felicia.
POLDI   m   German
German diminutive of LEOPOLD.
PRISKA   f   German, Biblical Greek
German form of PRISCA, as well as the form used in the Greek New Testament.
QUIRIN   m   German
German form of QUIRINUS.
RACHEL   f   English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
From the Hebrew name רָחֵל (Rachel) meaning "ewe". In the Old Testament this is the name of the favourite wife of Jacob and the mother of Joseph and Benjamin. She was the younger sister of Jacob's first wife Leah.... [more]
RAFFAEL   m   German
German variant of RAPHAEL.
RAFFAELA   f   German
German feminine form of RAPHAEL.
RAIMUND   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of RAYMOND.
RAIMUNDE   f   German
German feminine form of RAYMOND.
RAINER   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of RAYNER.
RALPH   m   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Contracted form of the Old Norse name RÁÐÚLFR (or its Norman form Radulf). Scandinavian settlers introduced it to England before the Norman conquest, though afterwards it was bolstered by Norman influence. In the Middle Ages it was usually spelled Ralf, but by the 17th century it was most commonly Rafe, reflecting the normal pronunciation. The Ralph spelling appeared in the 18th century. A famous bearer of the name was Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American poet and author who wrote on transcendentalism.
RAPHAEL   m   German, French, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name רָפָאֵל (Rafa'el) which meant "God has healed". In Hebrew tradition Raphael was the name of one of the seven archangels. He appears in the Book of Tobit, in which he disguises himself as a man named Azarias and accompanies Tobias on his journey to Media, aiding him along the way. In the end he cures Tobias's father Tobit of his blindness. He is not mentioned in the New Testament, though tradition identifies him with the angel troubling the water in John 5:4.... [more]
RAPHAELA   f   German
Feminine form of RAPHAEL.
REBEKKA   f   German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, Icelandic, Faroese, Finnish, Biblical Greek
Cognate of REBECCA. It is also the form used in the Greek Old Testament.
REGINA   f   English, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Means "queen" in Latin (or Italian). It was in use as a Christian name from early times, and was borne by a 2nd-century saint. In England it was used during the Middle Ages in honour of the Virgin Mary, and it was later revived in the 19th century. A city in Canada bears this name, in honour of Queen Victoria.
REGINE   f   German, Norwegian
German and Norwegian form of REGINA.
REGULA   f   German (Swiss), Late Roman
Means "rule" in Latin. This was the name of a 3rd-century Swiss martyr, the patron saint of Zurich.
REIMUND   m   German
German form of RAYMOND.
REIN   m   German, Frisian, Dutch
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element ragin "advice, counsel".
REINER   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of RAYNER.
REINHARD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German cognate of REYNARD.
REINHILD   f   German
From a Germanic name which was composed of the elements ragin "advice" and hild "battle".
REINHILDE   f   German
Variant of REINHILD.
REINHOLD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German cognate of REYNOLD.
RENATE   f   German, Dutch, Norwegian
German, Dutch and Norwegian feminine form of RENATUS.
RENÉ   m   French, German, Spanish, Slovak, Czech
French form of RENATUS. A famous bearer was the French mathematician and rationalist philosopher René Descartes (1596-1650).
RETO   m   German (Swiss)
Means "of Rhaetia". Rhaetia is a region in eastern Switzerland that got its name from the Rhaeti, a Celtic tribe who originally inhabited the area.
RIA   f   German, Dutch
Short form of MARIA.
RICARDA   f   Spanish, German
Spanish and German feminine form of RICHARD.
RICHARD   m   English, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave power", derived from the Germanic elements ric "power, rule" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, and it has been very common there since that time. It was borne by three kings of England including Richard I the Lionheart, one of the leaders of the Third Crusade in the 12th century.... [more]
RIKE   f   German
German short form of FRIEDERIKE, HENRIKE, and other names ending in rike.
RITA   f   Italian, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Spanish, Portuguese
Short form of MARGHERITA and other names ending in rita. A famous bearer was American actress Rita Hayworth (1918-1987).
ROBERT   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been a very common English name since that time.... [more]
ROCHUS   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of ROCCO, used in German and Dutch.
RODOLF   m   German (Rare), Dutch (Rare)
German form of RUDOLF.
ROGER   m   English, French, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
Means "famous spear" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ger "spear". The Normans brought this name to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hroðgar (the name of the Danish king in the Anglo-Saxon epic 'Beowulf'). It was a common name in England during the Middle Ages. By the 18th century it was rare, but it was revived in following years. The name was borne by the Norman lords Roger I, who conquered Sicily in the 11th century, and his son Roger II, who ruled Sicily as a king.
ROLAND   m   English, French, German, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian, Medieval French
From the Germanic elements hrod meaning "fame" and land meaning "land", though some theories hold that the second element was originally nand meaning "brave". Roland was a semi-legendary French hero whose story is told in the medieval epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which he is a nephew of Charlemagne killed in battle with the Saracens. The Normans introduced this name to England.
ROLF   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
From the Germanic name Hrolf (or its Old Norse cognate Hrólfr), a contracted form of Hrodulf (see RUDOLF). The Normans introduced this name to England but it soon became rare. In the modern era it has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world as a German import.
ROMAN   m   Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German
From the Late Latin name Romanus which meant "Roman".
ROMY   f   German, English
Diminutive of ROSEMARIE or ROSEMARY.
ROSA (1)   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Generally this can be considered a Latin form of ROSE, though originally it may have come from the Germanic name ROZA (2). This was the name of a 13th-century saint from Viterbo in Italy. In the English-speaking world it was first used in the 19th century. A famous bearer was civil rights activist Rosa Parks (1913-2005).
ROSALIE   f   French, German, Dutch, English
French, German and Dutch form of ROSALIA. In the English-speaking this name received a boost after the release of the movie 'Rosalie' (1938), which was based on an earlier musical.
ROSEMARIE   f   English, German
Variant of ROSEMARY.
ROSWITHA   f   German
Derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and swinth "strength". This was the name of a 10th-century nun from Saxony who wrote several notable poems.
RUDI   m   German, Hungarian
Diminutive of RUDOLF.
RÜDIGER   m   German
German form of ROGER.
RUDOLF   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Russian, Armenian
From the Germanic name Hrodulf, which was derived from the elements hrod "fame" and wulf "wolf". It was borne by three kings of Burgundy, as well as several Habsburg rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria. Anthony Hope used this name for the hero in his popular novel 'The Prisoner of Zenda' (1894).
RUEDI   m   German (Swiss)
Swiss diminutive of RUDOLF.
RUPERT   m   German, Dutch, English, Polish
German variant form of ROBERT. The military commander Prince Rupert of the Rhine, a nephew of Charles I, introduced this name to England in the 17th century.
RUPRECHT   m   German (Archaic)
Variant of RUPERT.
RUTH (1)   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From a Hebrew name which was derived from the Hebrew word רְעוּת (re'ut) meaning "friend". This is the name of the central character in the Book of Ruth in the Old Testament. She was a Moabite woman who accompanied her mother-in-law Naomi back to Bethlehem after Ruth's husband died. There she met and married Boaz. She was an ancestor of King David.... [more]
SABINE   f   French, German
French and German form of SABINA.
SABRINA   f   English, Italian, German
Latinized form of Habren, the original Welsh name of the River Severn. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Sabrina was the name of a princess who was drowned in the Severn. Supposedly the river was named for her, but it is more likely that her name was actually derived from that of the river, which is of unknown meaning. She appears as a water nymph in John Milton's masque 'Comus' (1634). It was popularized as a given name by Samuel A. Taylor's play 'Sabrina Fair' (1953) and the movie adaptation that followed it the next year.
SALOME   f   English, German, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From an Aramaic name which was related to the Hebrew word שָׁלוֹם (shalom) meaning "peace". According to the historian Josephus this was the name of the daughter of Herodias (the consort of Herod Antipas, the tetrarch of Galilee). In the New Testament, though a specific name is not given, it was a daughter of Herodias who danced for Herod and was rewarded with the head of John the Baptist, and thus Salome and the dancer have traditionally been equated.... [more]
SAMUEL   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Jewish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name שְׁמוּאֵל (Shemu'el) which could mean either "name of God" or "God has heard". As told in the Books of Samuel in the Old Testament, Samuel was the last of the ruling judges. He led the Israelites during a period of domination by the Philistines, who were ultimately defeated in battle at Mizpah. Later he anointed Saul to be the first king of Israel, and even later anointed his successor David.... [more]
SANDRA   f   Italian, English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Latvian, Lithuanian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian
Short form of ALESSANDRA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by author George Meredith, who used it for the heroine in his novel 'Emilia in England' (1864) and the reissued version 'Sandra Belloni' (1887). A famous bearer is American actress Sandra Bullock (1964-).
SARAH   f   English, French, German, Hebrew, Arabic, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "lady, princess, noblewoman" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of Abraham's wife, considered the matriarch of the Jewish people. She was barren until she unexpectedly became the pregnant with Isaac at the age of 90. Her name was originally Sarai, but God changed it at the same time Abraham's name was changed (see Genesis 17:15).... [more]
SASCHA   m & f   German
German form of SASHA.
SASKIA   f   Dutch, German
From the Germanic element Sahs "Saxon". The Saxons were a Germanic tribe, their name ultimately deriving from the Germanic word sahs meaning "knife".
SCHWANHILD   f   German
Variant of SWANHILD.
SEBASTIAN   m   German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Finnish, Romanian
From the Latin name Sebastianus which meant "from Sebaste". Sebaste was the name a town in Asia Minor, its name deriving from Greek σεβαστος (sebastos) "venerable" (a translation of Latin Augustus, the title of the Roman emperors). According to Christian tradition, Saint Sebastian was a 3rd-century Roman soldier martyred during the persecutions of the emperor Diocletian. After he was discovered to be a Christian, he was tied to a stake and shot with arrows. This however did not kill him. Saint Irene of Rome healed him and he returned to personally admonish Diocletian, whereupon the emperor had him beaten to death.... [more]
SELMA   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic
Meaning unknown, possibly a short form of ANSELMA. It could also have been inspired by James Macpherson's 18th-century poems, in which it is the name of Ossian's castle.
SENTA   f   German
Diminutive of KRESZENTIA.
SEPP   m   German
German diminutive of JOSEPH.
SEPPEL   m   German
German diminutive of JOSEPH.
SERAPHINA   f   English (Rare), German (Rare), Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Seraphinus, derived from the biblical word seraphim which was Hebrew in origin and meant "fiery ones". The seraphim were an order of angels, described by Isaiah in the Bible as having six wings each. This was the name of a 13th-century Italian saint who made clothes for the poor. As an English name, it has never been common.
SEVERIN   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German and Scandinavian form of SEVERINUS.
SIBYLLA   f   Greek, German, Swedish, Late Roman, Late Greek
Greek and Latinate form of SIBYL.
SIBYLLE   f   German, French
German and French form of SIBYL.
SIDONIA   f   Late Roman, German
Feminine form of SIDONIUS.
SIEGBERT   m   German
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and beraht "bright". This was the name of several Frankish kings, including the 7th-century Sigebert III of Austrasia who is regarded as a saint.
SIEGER   m   Dutch, German
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and hari "army".
SIEGFRIED   m   German, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and frid "peace". Siegfried was a hero from Germanic legend, chief character in the 'Nibelungenlied'. He secretly helped the Burgundian king Günther overcome the challenges set out by the Icelandic queen Brünhild so that Günther might win her hand. In exchange, Günther consented to the marriage of Siegfried and his sister Kriemhild. Years later, after a dispute between Brünhild and Kriemhild, Siegfried was murdered by Hagen with Günther's consent. He was stabbed in his one vulnerable spot on the small of his back, which had been covered by a leaf while he bathed in dragon's blood. His adventures were largely based on those of the Norse hero Sigurd. The story was later adapted by Richard Wagner to form part of his opera 'The Ring of the Nibelung' (1876).
SIEGHARD   m   German
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and hard "brave, hardy".
SIEGHILD   f   German
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and hild "battle".
SIEGLINDE   f   German, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and linde "gentle, soft". Sieglinde was the mother of Siegfried in the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied'.
SIEGMUND   m   German
German variant of SIGMUND.
SIEGWARD   m   German
German form of SIGURD.
SIGI   m & f   German
Diminutive of SIEGFRIED, SIEGLINDE, and other Germanic names beginning with the element sigu which means "victory".
SIGISMUND   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Form of SIGMUND in which the first element is sigis, an older form of sigu. Saint Sigismund was a 6th-century king of the Burgundians. This was also the name of kings of Poland and a ruler of the Holy Roman Empire.
SIGMUND   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and mund "protector" (or in the case of the Scandinavian cognate, from the Old Norse elements sigr "victory" and mundr "protector"). In Norse mythology this was the name of the hero Sigurd's father, the bearer of the powerful sword Gram. A notable bearer was the Austrian psychologist Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), the creator of the revolutionary theory of psychoanalysis.
SILKE   f   German, Dutch
German and Dutch diminutive of CELIA or CECILIA.
SILVESTER   m   Dutch, English, Slovene, Slovak, German, Late Roman
From a Roman name meaning "of the forest" from Latin silva "wood, forest". This was the name of three popes, including Saint Silvester I who supposedly baptized the first Christian Roman emperor, Constantine the Great. As an English name, Silvester (or Sylvester) has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it became less common after the Protestant Reformation.
SILVIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, English, German, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of SILVIUS. Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome. This was also the name of a 6th-century saint, the mother of the pope Gregory the Great. It has been a common name in Italy since the Middle Ages. It was introduced to England by Shakespeare, who used it for a character in his play 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594).
SIMON   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From Σιμων (Simon), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name שִׁמְעוֹן (Shim'on) which meant "he has heard". This name is spelled Simeon, based on Greek Συμεων, in many translations of the Old Testament, where it is borne by the second son of Jacob. In the New Testament Simon is the name of several characters, including the man who carried the cross for Jesus. Most importantly however it was borne by the leading apostle Simon, also known as Peter (a name given to him by Jesus).... [more]
SOFIE   f   German, Danish, Dutch, Czech
Form of SOPHIE.
SONJE   f   German
German variant of SONJA.
SOPHIA   f   English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek
Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred during the reign of the emperor Hadrian. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which is the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.... [more]
SOPHIE   f   French, English, German, Dutch
French form of SOPHIA.
SÖREN   m   Swedish, German
Swedish and German form of SØREN.
STEFANIE   f   German, Dutch, Danish
Variant of STEPHANIE.
STEFFEN   m   Low German, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch
Low German and Danish form of STEPHEN.
STEFFI   f   German
Diminutive of STEPHANIE.
STEFFIE   f   German (Rare)
Diminutive of STEPHANIE.
STELLA (1)   f   English, Italian, Dutch, German
Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets 'Astrophel and Stella'. It was a nickname of a lover of Jonathan Swift, real name Esther Johnson (1681-1728), though it was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play 'A Streetcar Named Desire' (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.
STEPHAN   m   German, Dutch
German and Dutch form of STEPHEN.
STEPHANIE   f   English, German
Feminine form of STEPHEN.
SUSANN   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German and Scandinavian short form of SUSANNE.
SUSANNE   f   German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
German and Scandinavian form of SUSANNA.
SUSE   f   German
German diminutive of SUSANNE.
SUSI   f   German
German diminutive of SUSANNE.
SVEN   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
From the Old Norse byname Sveinn which meant "boy". This was the name of kings of Denmark, Norway and Sweden.
SVENJA   f   German
German feminine form of SVEN.
SWANHILD   f   German
Derived from the Germanic elements swan "swan" and hild "battle".
SWANHILDA   f   German
Variant of SWANHILD.
SWANHILDE   f   German
Variant of SWANHILD.
SYBILLE   f   German, French
German and French form of SIBYL.
SYLVESTER   m   English, Dutch, Danish, German
Medieval variant of SILVESTER. This is currently the usual English spelling of the name. The actor Sylvester Stallone (1946-) is a famous bearer.
SYLVIA   f   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German
Variant of SILVIA. This has been the most common English spelling since the 19th century.
TABEA   f   German
German short form of TABITHA. This form was used in earlier editions of the Luther Bible.
TATIANA   f   Russian, Slovak, Bulgarian, Romanian, Polish, Greek, Georgian, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of the Roman name Tatianus, a derivative of the Roman name TATIUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint who was martyred in Rome under the emperor Alexander Severus. She was especially venerated in Orthodox Christianity, and the name has been common in Russia and Eastern Europe. It was not regularly used in the English-speaking world until the 1980s.
TERESA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Finnish, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Cognate of THERESA. Saint Teresa of Ávila was a 16th-century Spanish nun who reformed the Carmelite monasteries and wrote several spiritual books. It was also borne by the beatified Albanian missionary Mother Teresa (1910-1997), who worked with the poor in Calcutta. She adopted the name in honour of the French saint Thérèse de Lisieux, who is the patron of missionaries.
THEDA   f   German
Short form of THEODORA. A famous bearer was actress Theda Bara (1885-1955), who was born Theodosia Goodman.
THEKLA   f   German (Rare), Greek (Rare), Late Greek
From the ancient Greek name Θεοκλεια (Theokleia), which meant "glory of God" from the Greek elements θεος (theos) meaning "god" and κλεος (kleos) meaning "glory". This was the name of a 1st-century saint, appearing (as Θεκλα) in the apocryphal 'Acts of Paul and Thecla'. The story tells how Thecla listens to Paul speak about the virtues of chastity and decides to remain a virgin, angering both her mother and her suitor.
THEODOR   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Romanian
German form of THEODORE, as well as a Scandinavian, Czech and Romanian variant of TEODOR. A famous bearer was American children's book creator Theodor Seuss Geisel (1904-1991), better known as Dr. Seuss.
THEOPHIL   m   German
German form of THEOPHILUS.
THERESA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Spanish and Portuguese name Teresa. It was first recorded as Therasia, being borne by the Spanish wife of Saint Paulinus of Nola in the 4th century. The meaning is uncertain, but it could be derived from Greek θερος (theros) "summer", from Greek θεριζω (therizo) "to harvest", or from the name of the Greek island of Therasia (the western island of Santorini).... [more]
THERESE   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
German and Scandinavian variant of THERESA.
THERESIA   f   German, Dutch, Swedish
German, Dutch and Swedish form of THERESA.
THILO   m   German
Variant of TILO.
THOMAS   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Greek form of the Aramaic name תָּאוֹמָא (Ta'oma') which meant "twin". In the New Testament this is the name of an apostle. When he heard that Jesus had risen from the dead he initially doubted the story, until Jesus appeared before him and he examined his wounds himself. According to tradition he was martyred in India. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world.... [more]
THORA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Modern form of ÞÓRA.
THORBEN   m   Danish, German
Variant of TORBEN.
THORSTEN   m   Swedish, Danish, German
Variant of TORSTEN.
TIEDEMANN   m   German (Archaic)
Germanic name derived from the elements theud "people" and man "man".
TILL   m   German
From Tielo, a Medieval Low German diminutive of names that began with Diet (for example DIETRICH), originally from Germanic theud meaning "people".
TILLO   m   German (Rare)
Variant of TILO.
TILO   m   German
From Tielo, a Low German diminutive of names that began with Diet (for example DIETRICH), from the Germanic element theud meaning "people". Saint Tillo was a 7th-century man of Saxony who was kidnapped and brought to the Low Countries by raiders. After his release he became a Benedictine monk and did missionary work in France.
TIM   m   English, German, Dutch, Slovene, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of TIMOTHY. It was borne by the fictional character Tiny Tim, the ill son of Bob Cratchit in Charles Dickens' novel 'A Christmas Carol' (1843).
TIMO (1)   m   Finnish, German, Dutch
Finnish, German and Dutch short form of Timotheus (see TIMOTHY).
TIMO (2)   m   German, Dutch
From Thiemo, an old short form of Thietmar (see DIETMAR).
TIMOTHEUS   m   Biblical Latin, German, Dutch
Latinized form of Timotheos (see TIMOTHY).
TOBIAS   m   Biblical, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Greek form of TOBIAH. This is the name of the hero of the apocryphal Book of Tobit, which appears in many English versions of the Old Testament. It relates how Tobit's son Tobias, with the help of the angel Raphael, is able to drive away a demon who has plagued Sarah, who subsequently becomes his wife. This story was popular in the Middle Ages, and the name came into occasional use in parts of Europe at that time. In England it became common after the Protestant Reformation.
TORBEN   m   Danish, German
Danish form of TORBJÖRN.
TORSTEN   m   Swedish, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Þórsteinn, which meant "Thor's stone" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with steinn "stone".
TRAUDL   f   German
Diminutive of GERTRAUD or WALTRAUD.
TRAUGOTT   m   German
Derived from German trau "trust" and Gott "God". This name was created in the 17th century.
TRUDI   f   German, English
Diminutive of GERTRUDE and other Germanic names ending with the element thrud "strength".
UDO (1)   m   German
Newer form of Odo (see OTTO).
UELI   m   German (Swiss)
Swiss diminutive of ULRICH.
ULLA   f   Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish, German
Scandinavian diminutive of ULRIKA or HULDA (1), or a German diminutive of URSULA.
ULLI   m & f   German
Diminutive of ULRICH or ULRIKE.
ULRICH   m   German, French, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Odalric meaning "prosperity and power", from the element odal "heritage" combined with ric "power". It has long been confused with the Germanic name Hulderic. This was the name of two German saints. Another famous bearer was Ulrich Zwingli (1484-1531), also known as Huldrych, the leader of the Protestant Reformation in Switzerland.
ULRIKE   f   German
German feminine form of ULRICH.
URBAN   m   Danish, Swedish, German, Polish, Slovene, Biblical, History
From the Latin name Urbanus which meant "city dweller". This name is mentioned briefly in one of Paul's epistles in the New Testament. It was subsequently borne by eight popes.
URS   m   German
German form of the Latin name Ursus, which meant "bear". Saint Ursus was a 3rd-century soldier in the Theban Legion who was martyred with Saint Victor. He is the patron saint of Solothurn in Switzerland.
URSEL   f   German
German diminutive of URSULA.
URSULA   f   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, Late Roman
Means "little bear", derived from a diminutive form of the Latin word ursa "she-bear". Saint Ursula was a legendary virgin princess of the 4th century who was martyred by the Huns while returning from a pilgrimage. In England the saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and the name came into general use at that time.
USCHI   f   German
Diminutive of URSULA.
UTE   f   German
Feminine form of UDO (1).
UTZ   m   German
Diminutive of ULRICH.
UWE   m   German
German form of OVE.
VALERIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Romanian, German, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of VALERIUS. This was the name of a 2nd-century Roman saint and martyr.
VALERIE   f   English, German, Czech
English and German form of VALERIA and Czech variant of VALÉRIE.
VALESKA   f   German
Diminutive of VALERIA.
VANESSA   f   English, Italian, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Invented by author Jonathan Swift for his poem 'Cadenus and Vanessa' (1726). He arrived at it by rearranging the initial syllables of the first name and surname of Esther Vanhomrigh, his close friend. Vanessa was later used as the name of a genus of butterfly. It was a rare given name until the mid-20th century, at which point it became fairly popular.
VEIT   m   German
German form of VITUS or WIDO.
VERA (1)   f   Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.
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