Literature Names

These names occur primarily in literature. They are not commonly given to real people.
There are 144 names matching your criteria.

AIDA   f   Arabic, Literature
Variant of AYDA. This name was used in Verdi's opera 'Aida' (1871), where it belongs to an Ethiopian princess held captive in Egypt.
ALADDIN   m   Literature
Anglicized form of ALA AL-DIN. This is the name of a mischievous boy in one of the tales of 'The 1001 Nights'. He is trapped in a cave by a magician but escapes with the help of a genie.
ALMIRA (1)   f   Literature
Variant of ELMIRA. Handel used it for the title character in his opera 'Almira' (1705).
AMARYLLIS   f   Literature
Derived from Greek αμαρυσσω (amarysso) "to sparkle"... [more]
AMINTA   m   Literature
Form of AMYNTAS used by the Italian poet Torquato Tasso for his play 'Aminta' (1573). In the play Aminta is a shepherd who falls in love with a nymph.
AMIRAN   m   Georgian, Literature
Variant of AMIRANI. This is the name of the central character in the medieval Georgian romance 'Amiran-Darejaniani' by Moses of Khoni... [more]
ANGELICA   f   English, Italian, Romanian, Literature
Derived from Latin angelicus meaning "angelic", ultimately related to Greek αγγελος (angelos) "messenger"... [more]
ARAGORN   m   Literature
Meaning unknown, though the first element is presumably Sindarin ara "noble, kingly". This is the name of a character in 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien... [more]
ARAMIS   m   Literature
The surname of one of the musketeers in 'The Three Musketeers' (1844) by Alexandre Dumas. Dumas based the character on Henri d'Aramitz, whose surname was derived from the French village of Aramits.
ARMIDE   f   Literature
French form of ARMIDA. This is the name of operas by Jean-Baptiste Lully (in 1686) and Christoph Willibald Gluck (in 1777), both of which were based on 'Jerusalem Delivered' by Torquato Tasso.
ARTHUR   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king"... [more]
ARWEN   f   Literature
Means "noble maiden" in Sindarin. In 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Arwen was the daughter of Elrond and the lover of Aragorn.
ASTAROTH   m   Literature
From Ashtaroth, the plural form of ASHTORETH used in the bible to refer to Phoenician idols. This spelling was used in late medieval demonology texts to refer to a type of (masculine) demon.
ASTROPHEL   m   Literature
Probably intended to mean "star lover", from Greek αστηρ (aster) "star" and φιλος (philos) "lover, friend"... [more]
ATTICUS   m   Literature
From a Roman name meaning "from Attica" in Latin. Attica is the region surrounding Athens in Greece. The author Harper Lee used this name in her novel 'To Kill a Mockingbird' (1960).
AVTANDIL   m   Georgian, Literature
Created by the Georgian poet Shota Rustaveli for his 12th-century epic 'The Knight in the Panther's Skin'. Rustaveli based it on Persian آفتاب (aftab) "sunshine" and دل (dil) "heart"... [more]
AYLA (3)   f   Literature
Created for the novel 'Clan of the Cave Bear' (1980) by author Jean M. Auel. In the novel Ayla is an orphaned Cro-Magnon girl adopted by Neanderthals. Ayla is the Neanderthal pronunciation of her real name, which is not given.
BAYARD   m   Literature
Derived from Old French baiart meaning "bay coloured". In medieval French poetry Bayard was a bay horse owned by Renaud de Montauban and his brothers. The horse could magically adjust its size to carry multiple riders.
BEDIVERE   m   Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
From the Welsh name Bedwyr, which is of unknown meaning. In Arthurian legends Bedivere was one of the original companions of King Arthur... [more]
BELPHOEBE   f   Literature
Combination of belle "beautiful" and the name PHOEBE. This name was first used by Edmund Spenser in his poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590).
BILBO   m   Literature
This was the name of the hero of 'The Hobbit' (1937) by J. R. R. Tolkien. His real hobbit name was Bilba, which is of unknown meaning, but this was altered by Tolkien in order to use the more masculine o ending... [more]
BRISEIDA   f   Literature
Form of BRISEIS used in medieval tales about the Trojan War.
CASPIAN   m   Literature
Used by author C. S. Lewis for a character in his 'Chronicles of Narnia' series, first appearing in 1950. Prince Caspian first appears in the fourth book, where he is the rightful king of Narnia driven into exile by his evil uncle Miraz... [more]
CINDERELLA   f   Literature
From the French name Cendrillon which means "little ashes". This is best known as the main character in the fairy tale 'Cinderella'.
COSETTE   f   French, Literature
From French chosette meaning "little thing". This is the nickname of the illegitimate daughter of Fantine in Victor Hugo's novel 'Les Misérables' (1862)... [more]
CRESSIDA   f   Literature
Medieval form of CHRYSEIS. Various medieval tales describe her as a woman of Troy, daughter of Calchus, who leaves her Trojan lover Troilus for the Greek hero Diomedes... [more]
CYMBELINE   m   Literature
Form of CUNOBELINUS used by Shakespeare in his play 'Cymbeline' (1609).
CYRANO   m   Literature
Possibly derived from the name of the ancient Greek city of Cyrene, which was located in North Africa. Edmond Rostand used this name in his play 'Cyrano de Bergerac' (1897)... [more]
D'ARTAGNAN   m   Literature
Means "from Artagnan" in French, Artagnan being a town in southwest France. This was the name of a character in the novel 'The Three Musketeers' (1884) by Alexandre Dumas... [more]
DESDEMONA   f   Literature
Derived from Greek δυσδαιμων (dysdaimon) meaning "ill-fated"... [more]
DULCINEA   f   Literature
Derived from Spanish dulce meaning "sweet". This name was (first?) used by Miguel de Cervantes in his novel 'Don Quixote' (1605), where it belongs to the love interest of the main character, though she never actually appears in the story.
ELAINE   f   English, Arthurian Romance
From an Old French form of HELEN. It appears in Arthurian legend; in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation 'Le Morte d'Arthur' Elaine was the daughter of Pelleas, the lover of Lancelot, and the mother of Galahad... [more]
ELANOR   f   Literature
Means "star sun" in Sindarin. In 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien this is Sam's eldest daughter, named after a type of flower.
ELMIRA   f   Literature
Shortened form of EDELMIRA. It appears in the play 'Tartuffe' (1664) by the French playwright Molière (often spelled in the French style Elmire).
ELROND   m   Literature
Means "star dome" in Sindarin. In 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Elrond was the elven ruler of Rivendell.
ENID   f   Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Derived from Welsh enaid meaning "soul" or "life". She is the wife of Geraint in Welsh legend and Arthurian romance.
ENOBARBUS   m   Literature
Form of AHENOBARBUS used by Shakespeare in his play 'Antony and Cleopatra' (1606).
ÉOWYN   f   Literature
Means "horse joy" in Old English. This name was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien who used Old English to represent the Rohirric language. In his novel 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) Eowyn is the niece of King Theoden of Rohan... [more]
EPONINE   f   Literature
Meaning unknown. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel 'Les Misérables' (1862) for a daughter of the Thénardiers. Her mother got her name from a romance novel.
ESMERALDA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, English, Literature
Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo... [more]
FANTINE   f   Literature
This name was used by Victor Hugo for the mother of Cosette in his novel 'Les Misérables' (1862). The name was given to her by a passerby who found the young orphan on the street... [more]
FAUST   m   Literature
From a German surname which was derived from the Latin name FAUSTUS. This is the name of a character in German legends about a man who makes a deal with the devil... [more]
FIGARO   m   Literature
Created by playwright Pierre-Augustin Caron de Beaumarchais for the central character in his plays 'The Barber of Seville' (1775), 'The Marriage of Figaro' (1784) and 'The Guilty Mother' (1792)... [more]
FRODO   m   Literature
Derived from the Germanic element frod "wise". This was the name of the hobbit hero in 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien, who used Old English to translate some hobbit names (Frodo's real name was Maura)... [more]
GAHARIET   m   Arthurian Romance
Medieval French form of GARETH.
GALADRIEL   f   Literature
Means "maiden crowned with a radiant garland" in Sindarin. Galadriel was a Noldorin elf princess renowned for her beauty and wisdom in J. R. R. Tolkien's novels... [more]
GALAHAD   m   Arthurian Romance
Meaning unknown. In Arthurian legend Sir Galahad was the son of Lancelot and Elaine... [more]
GANDALF   m   Norse Mythology, Literature
Means "wand elf" in Old Norse, from the elements gandr "wand, staff, cane" and álfr "elf". This name belongs to a dwarf in the 'Völuspá', a 13th-century Scandinavian manuscript which forms part of the Poetic Edda... [more]
GARETH   m   Welsh, English (British), Arthurian Romance
Meaning unknown. It first appears in this form in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation of Arthurian legends 'Le Morte d'Arthur', in which Gareth was a Knight of the Round Table, the brother of Sir Gawain... [more]
GAWAIN   m   Welsh, Arthurian Romance
Meaning uncertain, from the Latin form Walganus used by the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth. This was the name of a nephew of King Arthur and one of the Knights of the Round Table in Arthurian legend... [more]
GERAINT   m   Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Meaning unknown, possibly a Welsh form of GERONTIUS. This was the name of a figure various Welsh legends. He was also incorporated into later Arthurian tales as one of the Knights of the Round Table and the husband of Enid.
GRISELDA   f   English, Scottish, Spanish, Literature
Possibly derived from the Germanic elements gris "grey" and hild "battle"... [more]
GUINEVERE   f   Arthurian Romance
From the Norman French form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar, derived from the elements gwen meaning "fair, white" and sebara meaning "phantom, magical being"... [more]
GUIOMAR   f & m   Portuguese, Spanish, Arthurian Romance
Possibly derived from the Germanic name Wigmar, which is formed of the elements wig "war, battle" and meri "famous"... [more]
GYNETH   f   Literature
Perhaps a variant of GWYNETH. Sir Walter Scott used this name for the daughter of King Arthur in his work 'The Bridal of Triermain' (1813).
HAIDEE   f   Literature
Perhaps intended to derive from Greek αιδοιος (aidoios) "modest, reverent"... [more]
HAMLET   m   Literature, Armenian
Anglicized form of the Danish name Amleth. Shakespeare used this name for the Prince of Denmark in his play 'Hamlet' (1600), which he based upon earlier Danish tales.
HECTOR   m   English, French, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Arthurian Romance
Latinized form of Greek ‘Εκτωρ (Hektor), which was derived from ‘εκτωρ (hektor) "holding fast", ultimately from εχω (echo) meaning "to hold, to possess"... [more]
HERMIA   f   Literature
Feminine form of HERMES. Shakespeare used this name in his comedy 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' (1595).
IDRIL   f   Literature
Means "sparkle brilliance" in Sindarin. In the 'Silmarillion' (1977) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Idril was the daughter of Turgon, the king of Gondolin. She escaped the destruction of that place with her husband Tuor and sailed with him into the west.
IGERNA   f   Arthurian Romance
Latin form of IGRAINE.
IGRAINE   f   Arthurian Romance
Meaning unknown, from Igerna, the Latinized form of Welsh Eigyr. In Arthurian legend she is the mother of King Arthur by Uther Pendragon and the mother of Morgan le Fay by Gorlois... [more]
ISEULT   f   Arthurian Romance
Medieval variant of ISOLDE.
ISOLDA   f   Arthurian Romance
Latinate form of ISOLDE.
ISOLDE   f   English (Rare), German, Arthurian Romance
The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, perhaps from a hypothetic name like Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice, iron" and hild "battle"... [more]
KAY (2)   m   Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
From the Welsh name Cai or Cei, possibly a form of the Roman name GAIUS. Sir Kay was one of the Knights of the Round Table in Arthurian legend... [more]
LALAGE   f   Literature
Derived from Greek λαλαγεω (lalageo) meaning "to babble, to prattle"... [more]
LALLA   f   Literature
Derived from Persian لاله (laleh) meaning "tulip"... [more]
LANCELOT   m   Arthurian Romance
Meaning unknown, possibly an Old French diminutive of Lanzo (see LANCE). In Arthurian legend Lancelot was the bravest of the Knights of the Round Table... [more]
LAUNCE   m   Literature
Short form of Launcelot, a variant of LANCELOT. This was the name of a clownish character in Shakespeare's play 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594).
LEGOLAS   m   Literature
Means "green leaves" in Sindarin, from laeg "green" combined with go-lass "collection of leaves". In 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Legolas is the son of the elf lord Thranduil and a member of the Fellowship of the Ring.
LESTAT   m   Literature
Name used by author Anne Rice for a character in her 'Vampire Chronicles' series of novels, first released in 1976, where it belongs to the French vampire Lestat de Lioncourt... [more]
LOT (2)   m   Arthurian Romance
From the name of the region of Lothian in southern Scotland, of unknown meaning. A king of Lothian by this name appears in early Latin and Welsh texts (as Leudonus and Lewdwn respectively)... [more]
LUCASTA   f   Literature
This name was first used by the poet Richard Lovelace for a collection of poems called 'Lucasta' (1649). The poems were dedicated to Lucasta, a nickname for the woman he loved Lucy Sacheverel, who he called lux casta "pure light".
LUCINDA   f   English, Portuguese, Literature
An elaboration of LUCIA created by Cervantes for his novel 'Don Quixote' (1605). It was subsequently used by Molière in his play 'The Doctor in Spite of Himself' (1666).
LUNED   f   Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Variant of ELUNED. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is a servant of the Lady of the Fountain who rescues the knight Owain.
MALVINA   f   Scottish, English, Literature
Created by the poet James MacPherson in the 18th century for a character in his Ossian poems. He probably intended it to mean "smooth brow" in Gaelic.
MALVOLIO   m   Literature
Means "ill will" in Italian. This name was invented by Shakespeare for a character in his play 'Twelfth Night' (1602).
MEHRAB   m   Persian, Literature
From مهر (Mehr), the Persian word for MITHRA, combined with Persian آب (ab) "water"... [more]
MERLIN   m   Arthurian Romance, English
Form of the Welsh name Myrddin (meaning "sea fortress") used by Geoffrey of Monmouth in his 12th-century Arthurian tales. Writing in Latin, he likely chose the form Merlinus over Merdinus in order to prevent associations with French merde "excrement"... [more]
MERRY (2)   m   Literature
The name of a hobbit in J. R. R. Tolkien's novel 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954). His full given name was Meriadoc, a semi-translation into English of his true hobbit name Kalimac meaning "jolly, merry".
MIGNON   f   Literature
Means "cute, darling" in French. This is the name of a character in Ambroise Thomas's opera 'Mignon' (1866), which was based on a novel by Goethe.
MORDRED   m   Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
From Welsh Medraut, meaning uncertain. In Arthurian legend Mordred was the illegitimate son (in some versions nephew) of King Arthur... [more]
MORGAINE   f   Arthurian Romance
Variant of MORGAN (2), from a French form.
MORGAN (2)   f   Arthurian Romance
Modern form of Morgen, which was used by Geoffrey of Monmouth in the 12th century for the Arthurian sorceress Morgan le Fay, who was unnamed in earlier stories... [more]
MORGEN   f   Arthurian Romance
Earlier form of MORGAN (2).
NÉLIDA   f   Literature, Spanish
Created by French author Marie d'Agoult for her semi-autobiographical novel 'Nélida' (1846), written under the name Daniel Stern. It was probably an anagram of her pen name DANIEL.
NEMO   m   Literature
Means "nobody" in Latin. This was the name used by author Jules Verne for the captain of the Nautilus in his novel '20,000 Leagues Under the Sea' (1870).
NERISSA   f   Literature
Created by Shakespeare for a character in his play 'The Merchant of Venice' (1596). He possibly took it from Greek Νηρεις (Nereis) meaning "nymph, sea sprite", ultimately derived from the name of the Greek sea god NEREUS, who supposedly fathered them.
NESTAN-DAREJAN   f   Literature
Created by the Georgian poet Shota Rustaveli for a character in his 12th-century epic 'The Knight in the Panther's Skin'. Rustaveli derived it from the Middle Persian phrase نیست اندر جهان (nist andar jahan) meaning "unlike any other in the world" or "unique"... [more]
NIMUE   f   Arthurian Romance
Meaning unknown. In Arthurian legends this is the name of a sorceress, also known as the Lady of the Lake, Vivien, or Niniane. Various versions of the tales have Merlin falling in love with her and becoming imprisoned by her magic... [more]
NORMA   f   English, Italian, Literature
Created by Felice Romani for the main character in the opera 'Norma' (1831). He may have based it on Latin norma "rule". This name is also frequently used as a feminine form of NORMAN.
NYDIA   f   English (Rare), Spanish, Literature
Used by British author Edward Bulwer-Lytton for a blind flower-seller in his novel 'The Last Days of Pompeii' (1834). He perhaps based it on Latin nidus "nest".
OBERON   m   Literature
Variant of AUBERON. Oberon was the king of the fairies in Shakespeare's comedy 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' (1595). A moon of Uranus bears this name in his honour.
OLIVETTE   f   Literature
Feminine form of OLIVER. This was the name of the title character in the French opera 'Les noces d'Olivette' (1879) by Edmond Audran.
OPHELIA   f   English, Literature
Derived from Greek οφελος (ophelos) meaning "help"... [more]
ORINTHIA   f   Literature
Possibly related to Greek ορινω (orino) meaning "to excite, to agitate"... [more]
OSSIAN   m   Literature
Variant of OISÍN used by James Macpherson in his epic poems, which he claimed to have based on early Irish legends.
OTHELLO   m   Literature
Perhaps an Italian diminutive of OTHO. Shakespeare used this name in his tragedy 'Othello' (1603), where it belongs to a Moor who is manipulated by Iago into killing his wife Desdemona.
OWAIN   m   Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Probably a Welsh form of EUGENE, though it might be derived from Welsh eoghunn meaning "youth". This was the name of several figures from Welsh history and mythology... [more]
PERCIVAL   m   Arthurian Romance, English
Created by the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes for his poem 'Perceval, the Story of the Grail'. In the poem Perceval was one of King Arthur's Knights of the Round Table who was given a glimpse of the Holy Grail... [more]
PERDITA   f   Literature
Derived from Latin perditus meaning "lost". Shakespeare created this name for the daughter of Hermione in his play 'The Winter's Tale' (1610).
PEREDUR   m   Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Possibly means "hard spears" in Welsh. This was the name of several figures from Welsh mythology. It was later used by the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth in his Arthurian tales... [more]
PHARAMOND   m   Literature, French (Rare)
French form of FARAMUND used by Shakespeare in 'Henry V' (1599).
PHILOMEL   f   Literature
From an English word meaning "nightingale" (ultimately from PHILOMELA). It has been used frequently in poetry to denote the bird.
PIPPIN (2)   m   Literature
The name of a hobbit in 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien. His full given name was Peregrin, a semi-translation into English of his true hobbit name Razanur meaning "traveller".
POLLYANNA   f   Literature
Combination of POLLY and ANNA. This was the name of the main character in Eleanor H. Porter's novel 'Pollyanna' (1913).
ROHAN (2)   f   Literature
From the novel 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien, where it is a place name meaning "horse country" in Sindarin.
SAM (3)   m   Literature
The name of a hobbit in J. R. R. Tolkien's novel 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954). His full given name was Samwise meaning "half wise" in Old English (the language used by Tolkien to represent the old hobbit speech).
SCHEHERAZADE   f   Literature
Anglicized form of SHAHRAZAD.
SHEHERAZADE   f   Literature
Anglicized form of SHAHRAZAD.
SHERLOCK   m   Literature
Used by Scottish author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle for his character Sherlock Holmes, who was a detective in Doyle's mystery stories beginning in 1887. The character's name was from an English surname meaning "shear lock", originally referring to a person with closely cut hair.
SOPHRONIA   f   Literature, Late Greek
Feminine form of SOPHRONIUS. Torquato Tasso used it in his epic poem 'Jerusalem Delivered' (1580), in which it is borne by the lover of Olindo.
TALIESIN   m   Welsh, Arthurian Romance
Means "shining brow", derived from Welsh tal "brow" and iesin "shining". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh poet and bard. In later Welsh legends he is portrayed as a wizard and prophet, or as a companion of King Arthur.
TINATIN   f   Georgian, Literature
Possibly related to Georgian სინათლე (sinatle) "light"... [more]
TINUVIEL   f   Literature
Means "nightingale" in Sindarin. In the 'Silmarillion' (1977) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Tinuviel was the daughter of Thingol the elf king and the beloved of Beren, who with her help retrieved one of the Silmarils from the iron crown of Morgoth.
TITANIA   f   Literature
Perhaps based on Latin Titanius meaning "of the Titans". This name was (first?) used by Shakespeare in his comedy 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' (1595) where it is the name of queen of the fairies... [more]
TRISTAN   m   Welsh, English, French, Arthurian Romance
Old French form of the Pictish name Drustan, a diminutive of DRUST. The spelling was altered by association with Latin tristis "sad"... [more]
TUOR   m   Literature
Means "strength vigour" in Sindarin. In the 'Silmarillion' (1977) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Tuor was the mortal man who came to the hidden city of Gondolin to warn of its imminent doom... [more]
TURIN   m   Literature
Means "victory mood" in Sindarin. In the 'Silmarillion' (1977) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Turin was a cursed hero, the slayer of the dragon Glaurung. He was also called Turambar, Mormegil, and other names... [more]
TYBALT   m   Literature
Medieval form of THEOBALD. This is the name of a cousin of Juliet killed by Romeo in Shakespeare's drama 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596).
UNDINE   f   Literature
Derived from Latin unda meaning "wave". The word undine was created by the medieval author Paracelsus, who used it for female water spirits.
URIEN   m   Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Means "privileged birth" from Celtic orbo "privileged" and gen "birth". In Welsh legend and Arthurian romances Urien is a king of Gore and the husband of Morgan le Fay.
UTHER   m   Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
From the Welsh name Uthyr, derived from Welsh uthr "terrible". In Arthurian legend Uther was the father of King Arthur... [more]
VIVIEN (2)   f   Literature
Used by Alfred Lord Tennyson as the name of the Lady of the Lake in his Arthurian epic 'Idylls of the King' (1859). Tennyson may have based it on VIVIENNE, but it possibly arose as a misreading of NINIAN... [more]
WALGANUS   m   Arthurian Romance
Latin form of GAWAIN.
YORICK   m   Literature, English, Dutch
Altered form of JØRG. Shakespeare used this name for a deceased court jester in his play 'Hamlet' (1600).
YSEUT   f   Arthurian Romance
Old French form of ISOLDE, appearing in the 12th-century Norman poem 'Tristan' by Béroul.
YSOLT   f   Arthurian Romance
Old French form of ISOLDE, appearing in the 12th-century Old French poem 'Tristan' by Thomas of Britain.
YVAIN   m   Arthurian Romance
Form of OWAIN used by the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes for his Arthurian tales.
YWAIN   m   Arthurian Romance
Variant of YVAIN.
ZAÏRE   f   Literature
Used by Voltaire for the heroine of his tragic play 'Zaïre' (1732), about a Christian woman enslaved by Muslims. The heroine is named Zara in some English translations... [more]
ZEMFIRA   f   Tatar, Bashkir, Azerbaijani, Literature
Meaning unknown, possibly of Romani origin. This name was (first?) used by Aleksandr Pushkin in his poem 'The Gypsies' (1827).
ZULEIKA   f   Literature
Possibly means "brilliant beauty" in Persian. According to medieval legends this was the name of Potiphar's wife in the Bible. She has been the subject of many poems and tales.
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