Scandinavian Names

Scandinavian names are used in the Scandinavia region of northern Europe. For more specific lists, see Swedish names, Danish names and Norwegian names. See also about Scandinavian names.
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AAGE   m   Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of ÁKI.
ABELONE   f   Danish
Danish form of APOLLONIA.
ABRAHAM   m   English, Hebrew, Spanish, French, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
This name may be viewed either as meaning "father of many" in Hebrew or else as a contraction of ABRAM (1) and הָמוֹן (hamon) "many, multitude". The biblical patriarch Abraham was originally named Abram but God changed his name (see Genesis 17:5). With his father Terah, he led his wife Sarah, his nephew Lot and their other followers from Ur into Canaan. He is regarded by Jews as being the founder of the Hebrews through his son Isaac and by Muslims as being the founder of the Arabs through his son Ishmael.... [more]
ACKE   m   Swedish
Swedish short form of AXEL.
ADAM   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make".... [more]
ADOLF   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalwolf, which meant "noble wolf" from the Germanic elements adal "noble" and wulf. It was borne by several Swedish kings as a first or second name, most notably by Gustav II Adolf in the 17th century. Association with Adolf Hitler (1889-1945), the leader of the Nazi party in Germany during World War II, has lessened the use of this name.
ADRIAN   m   English, Romanian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian
Form of Hadrianus (see HADRIAN). Several saints and six popes have borne this name, including the only English pope, Adrian IV, and the only Dutch pope, Adrian VI. As an English name, it has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it was not popular until modern times.
AGDA   f   Swedish
Swedish form of AGATHA.
ÅGE   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of ÁKI.
AGNAR   m   Norwegian, Icelandic
From the Old Norse name Agnarr, derived from agi "awe, terror" or ag "edge of a sword" combined with arr "warrior".
AGNER   m   Danish
Danish form of AGNAR.
AGNES   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Αγνη (Hagne), derived from Greek ‘αγνος (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe, being especially popular in England in the Middle Ages.
AGNETA   f   Swedish
Swedish variant of AGNES.
AGNETE   f   Danish
Danish variant of AGNES.
AGNETHA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian variant of AGNES.
AGNETHE   f   Danish
Danish variant of AGNES.
ÅGOT   f   Norwegian
Norwegian form of AGATHA.
AINA (1)   f   Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Variant of AINO. It also means "always" in Finnish.
ÅKE   m   Swedish
Swedish form of ÁKI.
ÁKI   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse diminutive of names containing the element anu "ancestor, father".
AKSEL   m   Danish, Norwegian
Variant of AXEL.
ALBERT   m   English, French, Catalan, German, Polish, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Romanian, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalbert, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and beraht "bright". This name was common among medieval German royalty. The Normans introduced it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Æðelberht. Though it became rare in England by the 17th century, it was repopularized in the 19th century by the German-born Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.... [more]
ALBERTE (2)   f   French, Danish
French and Danish feminine form of ALBERT.
ALDA (3)   f   Icelandic
Means "wave" in Icelandic.
ALEX   m & f   English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Russian
Short form of ALEXANDER, ALEXANDRA, and other names beginning with Alex.
ALEXANDER   m   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.... [more]
ALEXANDRA   f   English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
ALF (1)   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse alfr "elf". In Norse legend this was the name of king, the suitor of a reluctant maiden named Alfhild. She avoided marrying him by disguising herself as a warrior, but when they fought she was so impressed by his strength that she changed her mind.
ALF (3)   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of ADOLF.
ALFHILD   f   Norwegian, Swedish
From the Old Norse name Alfhildr which was composed of the elements alfr "elf" and hildr "battle". In Norse legend Alfhild was a maiden who disguised herself as a warrior in order to avoid marriage to king Alf. Her life was perhaps based on that of a 9th-century Viking pirate.
ALFRED   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Dutch
Derived from the Old English name Ælfræd, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and ræd "counsel". Alfred the Great was a 9th-century king of Wessex who fought unceasingly against the Danes living in northeast England. He was also a scholar, and he translated many Latin books into Old English. His fame helped to ensure the usage of this name even after the Norman conquest, when most Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. It became rare by the end of the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 18th century.... [more]
ALLAN   m   English, Scottish, Danish
Variant of ALAN. The American author Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) got his middle name from the surname of the parents who adopted him.
ALV   m   Norwegian
Variant of ALF (1).
ALVA (1)   f   Swedish, Norwegian
Feminine form of ALF (1).
ALVAR   m   Swedish, Estonian
From the Old Norse name Alfarr, formed of the elements alfr "elf" and arr "warrior".
ALVILDA   f   Danish (Rare)
Danish form of ALFHILD.
AMALIA   f   Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Greek, Swedish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Germanic name Amala, a short form of names beginning with the element amal meaning "work".
AMALIE   f   Norwegian, Danish, German (Rare)
Norwegian, Danish and German form of AMALIA.
AMANDA   f   English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Late Roman
In part this is a feminine form of AMANDUS. However, it was not used during the Middle Ages. In the 17th century it was recreated by authors and poets who based it directly on Latin amanda "lovable, worthy of love". Notably, the playwright Colley Cibber used it for a character in his play 'Love's Last Shift' (1696). It came into regular use during the 19th century.
AMUND   m   Norwegian
Derived from the Old Norse name Agmundr, from the element ag "edge of a sword" or agi "awe, terror" combined with mundr "protection".
ANDERS   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of Andreas (see ANDREW). A famous bearer was the Swedish physicist Anders Jonas Ångström (1814-1874).
ANDOR (1)   m   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Arnþórr, derived from the element arn "eagle" combined with the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR).
ANDREA (2)   f   English, German, Spanish, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Dutch, Croatian, Serbian
Feminine form of ANDREW. As an English name, it has been used since the 17th century, though it was not common until the 20th century.
ANDREAS   m   German, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Welsh, Ancient Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Ancient Greek and Latin form of ANDREW. It is also the form used in modern Greek, German and Welsh.
ANDRÉS   m   Spanish, Icelandic
Spanish and Icelandic form of ANDREW.
ANE (1)   f   Danish
Danish diminutive of ANNA.
ANIKA (1)   f   German, Dutch, Danish, Slovene
German, Dutch, Danish and Slovene diminutive of ANNA or ANA.
ANITA (1)   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian, Slovene, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Latvian
Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian and Slovene diminutive of ANA.
ANNA   f   English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary. In the English-speaking world, this form came into general use in the 18th century, joining Ann and Anne.... [more]
ANNBJØRG   f   Norwegian
Variant of ARNBJØRG.
ANNE (1)   f   French, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Basque
French form of ANNA. In the 13th-century it was imported to England, where it was also commonly spelled Ann. The name was borne by a 17th-century English queen and also by the second wife of Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn (the mother of Queen Elizabeth I), who was eventually beheaded in the Tower of London. This is also the name of the heroine in 'Anne of Green Gables' (1908) by Canadian author L. M. Montgomery.
ANNELIE   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of ANNELIESE.
ANNELISE   f   Danish
Danish form of ANNELIESE.
ANNETTE   f   French, English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch
French diminutive of ANNE (1). It has also been widely used in the English-speaking world, and it became popular in America in the late 1950s due to the fame of actress Annette Funicello (1942-).
ANNIKA   f   Swedish, Dutch, Finnish, German, English (Modern)
Swedish diminutive of ANNA.
ANNIKEN   f   Norwegian
Norwegian diminutive of ANNA.
ANSGAR   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ans "god" and ger "spear". Saint Ansgar was a 9th-century missionary who tried to convert the Danes and Norwegians.
ARI (2)   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic, Finnish
Old Norse byname meaning "eagle".
ÁRMANN   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of HERMAN.
ARNBJÖRG   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse name derived from the elements arn meaning "eagle" and björg meaning "help, save, rescue".
ARNBJØRG   f   Norwegian (Rare)
Norwegian form of ARNBJÖRG.
ARNBORG   f   Swedish (Rare)
Swedish form of ARNBJÖRG.
ARNE (1)   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Originally an Old Norse short form of names beginning with the element arn meaning "eagle".
ARNFINN   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of Arnfinnr, which was derived from the elements arn "eagle" and Finnr "Sámi, person from Finland".
ÁRNI   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of ARNE (1).
ARNÓR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic variant form of ANDOR (1).
ARNT   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of AREND.
ARNÞÓR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of ANDOR (1).
ARON   m   Polish, Croatian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic
Polish, Croatian and Scandinavian form of AARON.
ARTHUR   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.... [more]
ARVID   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Arnviðr, derived from the elements arn "eagle" and viðr "tree".
ÁSA   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic, Faroese
Old Norse, Icelandic and Faroese form of ÅSA.
ÅSA   f   Swedish
Short form of Old Norse feminine names beginning with the element áss "god".
ÁSBJÖRN   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse name derived from the elements áss "god" and björn "bear". It is therefore a cognate of OSBORN.
ASBJÖRN   m   Swedish
Swedish form of ÁSBJÖRN.
ASBJØRN   m   Norwegian, Danish
Norwegian and Danish form of ÁSBJÖRN.
ÁSDÍS   f   Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements áss "god" and dís "goddess".
ÅSE   f   Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Danish and Norwegian form of ÅSA, as well as a Swedish variant.
ÁSGEIR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of ASGER.
ASGEIR   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of ASGER.
ASGER   m   Danish
From the Old Norse name Ásgeirr, derived from the elements áss meaning "god" and geirr meaning "spear".
ÁSLAUG   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of ASLAUG.
ASLAUG   f   Norwegian
Derived from the Old Norse elements áss meaning "god" and laug possibly meaning "betrothed woman".
ASLÖG   f   Swedish
Swedish form of ASLAUG.
ASLØG   f   Danish
Danish form of ASLAUG.
ÅSMUND   m   Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Ásmundr, cognate of OSMOND.
ÁSMUNDUR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of ÅSMUND.
ASTA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of ASTRID.
ASTRID   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French
Modern form of ÁSTRÍÐR. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of 'Pippi Longstocking'.
ÁSTRÍÐUR   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of ÁSTRÍÐR.
AÐALBJÖRG   f   Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements aðal "noble" and björg "help, save, rescue".
AÐALSTEINN   m   Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements aðal "noble" and steinn "stone".
AUDHILD   f   Norwegian
Derived from the Old Norse elements auðr "wealth, fortune" and hildr "battle".
AUGUST   m   German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Catalan, English
German, Polish, Scandinavian and Catalan form of AUGUSTUS.
AXEL   m   Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, German
Medieval Danish form of ABSALOM.
BAARD   m   Norwegian
Variant of BÅRD.
BALDUR   m   German, Icelandic
German and Icelandic form of BALDER.
BARBARA   f   English, Italian, French, German, Polish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Late Roman
Derived from Greek βαρβαρος (barbaros) meaning "foreign". According to legend, Saint Barbara was a young woman killed by her father Dioscorus, who was then killed by a bolt of lightning. She is the patron of architects, geologists, stonemasons and artillerymen. Because of her renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was revived in the 19th century.
BARBRO   f   Swedish
Swedish form of BARBARA.
BÅRD   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of the Old Norse name Bárðr, which was derived from the elements baðu "battle" and friðr "peace".
BEATA   f   Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Derived from Latin beatus meaning "blessed". This was the name of a few minor saints.
BEATRICE   f   Italian, English, Swedish
Italian form of BEATRIX. Beatrice Portinari (1266-1290) was the woman who was loved by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. She serves as Dante's guide through paradise in his epic poem the 'Divine Comedy' (1321). This is also the name of a character in Shakespeare's comedy 'Much Ado About Nothing' (1599), in which Beatrice and Benedick are fooled into confessing their love for one another.
BENDT   m   Danish
Danish form of BENEDICT.
BENEDIKT   m   German, Russian, Icelandic, Czech
Form of Benedictus (see BENEDICT).
BENEDIKTE   f   Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian feminine form of BENEDICT.
BENGT   m   Swedish
Swedish form of BENEDICT.
BENGTA   f   Swedish
Swedish feminine form of BENEDICT.
BENJAMÍN   m   Spanish, Czech, Slovak, Icelandic
Spanish, Czech, Slovak and Icelandic form of BENJAMIN.
BENJAMIN   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Biblical
From the Hebrew name בִּנְיָמִין (Binyamin) which means "son of the south" or "son of the right hand". Benjamin in the Old Testament is the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob and the founder of one of the southern tribes of the Hebrews. He was originally named בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oniy) meaning "son of my sorrow" by his mother Rachel, who died shortly after childbirth, but it was later changed by his father (see Genesis 35:18).... [more]
BENT (1)   m   Danish
Danish form of BENEDICT.
BENTE   f   Danish, Norwegian, Dutch
Danish feminine form of BENEDICT.
BERGLIOT   f   Norwegian
Variant of BERGLJOT.
BERGLJÓT   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of BERGLJOT.
BERGLJOT   f   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Bergljót, which was composed of the elements berg "protection, help" and ljótr "light".
BERIT   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Variant of BIRGIT.
BERNHARD   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
German, Dutch and Scandinavian form of BERNARD.
BERNT   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of BERNARD.
BERTIL   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of BERTILO or BERTHOLD.
BINE   f   Danish
Short form of JACOBINE.
BIRGER   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Birgir, probably derived from bjarga meaning "help, save, rescue".
BIRGIR   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of BIRGER.
BIRGIT   f   Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, German
Scandinavian variant of BIRGITTA.
BIRGITTA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish
Most likely a Scandinavian form of BRIDGET via the Latinized form Brigitta. Alternatively it could be a feminine derivative of BIRGER. This is the name of the patron saint of Europe, Birgitta of Sweden, the 14th-century founder of the Bridgettine nuns. Her father's name was Birger.
BIRGITTE   f   Danish, Norwegian
Danish form of BIRGITTA.
BIRITA   f   Faroese
Faroese form of BRIDGET.
BIRTE   f   Danish
Danish diminutive of BIRGITTA.
BIRTHE   f   Danish
Danish diminutive of BIRGITTA.
BJARKE   m   Danish
Danish diminutive of BJØRN.
BJARNE   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern form of BJARNI.
BJARNI   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic, Faroese
Old Norse diminutive of BJÖRN and other names containing the element björn meaning "bear".
BJARTE   m   Norwegian
From the Old Norse byname Bjartr, which meant "bright".
BJARTUR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of Bjartr (see BJARTE).
BJOERN   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Variant of BJÖRN or BJØRN.
BJÖRG   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of BJØRG.
BJØRG   f   Norwegian
Derived from Old Norse björg meaning "help, save, rescue".
BJÖRK   f   Icelandic
Means "birch tree" in Icelandic.
BJÖRN   m   Swedish, Icelandic, German, Ancient Scandinavian
From an Old Norse byname meaning "bear".
BJØRN   m   Norwegian, Danish
Danish and Norwegian form of BJÖRN.
BJÖRNE   m   Swedish
Diminutive of BJÖRN.
BO (1)   m   Swedish, Danish
From the Old Norse byname Búi which was derived from Old Norse bua meaning "to live".
BODIL   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Bóthildr, derived from bót "remedy" and hildr "battle".
BORGHILD   f   Norwegian, Norse Mythology
Derived from the Old Norse elements borg "fortification" and hildr "battle". In Norse mythology she was the wife of Sigmund.
BORGHILDUR   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of BORGHILD.
BÖRJE   m   Swedish
Variant of BIRGER.
BOSSE   m   Swedish
Swedish diminutive of BO (1).
BRIT   f   Norwegian
Norwegian short form of BIRGITTA.
BRITA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Diminutive of BIRGITTA.
BRITT   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian short form of BIRGITTA.
BRITTA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian short form of BIRGITTA.
BRYNHILD   f   Norwegian, Norse Mythology
Norwegian form of BRYNHILDR.
BRYNHILDUR   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of BRYNHILDR.
BRYNJA   f   Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "armour" in Old Norse.
BRYNJAR   m   Norwegian, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements bryn "armour" and arr "warrior".
CAI (1)   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Variant of KAI (1).
CAJ   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Variant of KAI (1).
CAJA   f   Danish
Variant of KAJA (1).
CAJSA   f   Swedish
Variant of KAJSA.
CAMILLA   f   English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, German, Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of CAMILLUS. This was the name of a legendary warrior maiden of the Volsci, as told by Virgil in the 'Aeneid'. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Fanny Burney's novel 'Camilla' (1796).
CARIN   f   Swedish
Variant of KARIN.
CARITA   f   Swedish
Derived from Latin caritas meaning "dearness, esteem, love".
CARL   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
German form of CHARLES. Two noteworthy bearers of the name were the German mathematician Carl Gauss (1777-1855), who made contributions to number theory and algebra as well as physics and astronomy, and the Swiss psychologist Carl Jung (1875-1961), who founded analytical psychology. It was imported to America in the 19th century by German immigrants.
CAROLA   f   Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish
Feminine form of CAROLUS.
CAROLINA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Swedish
Latinate feminine form of CAROLUS. This is the name of two American states: North and South Carolina. They were named for Charles I, king of England.
CAROLINE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French feminine form of CAROLUS.
CARSTEN   m   Low German, Danish
Variant of KARSTEN.
CASPER   m   Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Dutch and Scandinavian form of JASPER. This is the name of a friendly ghost in a series of comic books.
CATHARINA   f   Dutch, Swedish
Dutch and Swedish form of KATHERINE.
CATHRINE   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of KATHERINE.
CATRINE   f   Swedish
Swedish variant of KATRINE.
CECILIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Romanian, Finnish, German
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.... [more]
CECILIE   f   Norwegian, Danish, Czech
Norwegian, Danish and Czech form of CECILIA.
CHARLOTTA   f   Swedish
Swedish variant of CHARLOTTE.
CHARLOTTE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.
CHRISTA   f   German, Danish, English
Short form of CHRISTINA.
CHRISTER   m   Swedish, Danish
Swedish and Danish diminutive of CHRISTIAN.
CHRISTIAN   m   English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the medieval Latin name Christianus meaning "a Christian" (see CHRISTOS). In England it has been in use since the Middle Ages, during which time it was used by both males and females, but it did not become common until the 17th century. In Denmark the name has been borne by ten kings since the 15th century. A famous bearer was Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), the Danish author of such fairy tales as 'The Ugly Duckling' and 'The Emperor's New Clothes'.
CHRISTINA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Greek
From Christiana, the Latin feminine form of CHRISTIAN. This was the name of an early, possibly legendary, saint who was tormented by her pagan father. It was also borne by a 17th-century Swedish queen and patron the arts who gave up her crown in order to become a Roman Catholic.
CHRISTINE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French form of CHRISTINA, as well as a variant in other languages.
CHRISTOFFER   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian variant of KRISTOFFER.
CILLA   f   Swedish, Dutch
Diminutive of CECILIA.
CILLE   f   Danish
Danish diminutive of CECILIA.
CLAES   m   Swedish
Swedish short form of NICHOLAS.
CLARA   f   Italian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.
CLAUS   m   German, Danish
German short form of NICHOLAS.
CLEMENS   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Original Latin form of CLEMENT, as well as the German, Dutch and Scandinavian form.
DAG   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Derived from Old Norse dagr meaning "day".
DAGFINN   m   Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Dagfinnr, which was composed of the elements dagr "day" and Finnr "Sámi, person from Finland".
DAGMAR   f   Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic, German, Czech, Slovak
From the Old Norse name Dagmær, derived from the elements dagr "day" and mær "maid". This was the name adopted by the popular Bohemian wife of the Danish king Valdemar II when they married in 1205. Her birth name was Markéta.
DAGNY   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Dagný, which was derived from the elements dagr "day" and "new".
DAGNÝ   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of DAGNY.
DAGRÚN   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of DAGRUN.
DAGRUN   f   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Dagrún, which was derived from the Old Norse elements dagr "day" and rún "secret lore".
DAGUR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of DAG.
DAN (3)   m   Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
From the Old Norse byname Danr meaning "a Dane". This was the name of several semi-legendary Danish kings.
DÁNIEL   m   Hungarian, Faroese
Hungarian and Faroese form of DANIEL.
DANÍEL   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of DANIEL.
DANIEL   m   English, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Armenian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.... [more]
DÁNJAL   m   Faroese
Faroese form of DANIEL.
DANNE   m   Swedish
Diminutive of DAN (3).
DAVID   m   English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was probably derived from Hebrew דוד (dwd) meaning "beloved". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.... [more]
DIANA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Polish, Roman Mythology
Probably derived from an old Indo-European root meaning "heavenly, divine", related to dyeus (see ZEUS). Diana was a Roman goddess of the moon, hunting, forests, and childbirth, often identified with the Greek goddess Artemis.... [more]
DITTE   f   Danish
Danish diminutive of EDITH or DOROTHEA.
DÓRA   f   Hungarian, Icelandic
Short form of DOROTTYA and names that end in dóra, such as TEODÓRA or HALLDÓRA.
DORETE   f   Danish
Danish variant of DOROTHEA.
DORIT (2)   f   Danish
Danish diminutive of DOROTHEA.
DOROTHEA   f   German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, English, Late Greek
Feminine form of the Late Greek name Δωροθεος (Dorotheos), which meant "gift of God" from Greek δωρον (doron) "gift" and θεος (theos) "god". The name Theodore is composed of the same elements in reverse order. Dorothea was the name of two early saints, notably the 4th-century martyr Dorothea of Caesarea. It was also borne by the 14th-century Saint Dorothea of Montau, who was the patron saint of Prussia.
DORTE   f   Danish
Danish form of DOROTHY.
DORTHE   f   Danish
Danish form of DOROTHY.
EA (2)   f   Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
Short form of names ending in ea.
EBBA (1)   f   Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, German (Rare)
Feminine form of EBBE.
EBBE   m   Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, German (Rare)
Diminutive of EBERHARD and other names beginning with the Germanic element ebur meaning "wild boar". In Scandinavia it is also a diminutive of ESBEN.
EDDA (2)   f   Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Possibly from Old Norse meaning "great-grandmother". This was the name of two 13th-century Icelandic literary works: the Poetic Edda and the Prose Edda. This is also the name of a character in the Poetic Edda, though it is unclear if her name is connected to the name of the collection.
EDIT   f   Hungarian, Swedish
Hungarian and Swedish form of EDITH.
EDITH   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
From the Old English name Eadgyð, derived from the elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gyð "war". It was popular among Anglo-Saxon royalty, being borne for example by Saint Eadgyeth;, the daughter of King Edgar the Peaceful. The name remained common after the Norman conquest. It became rare after the 15th century, but was revived in the 19th century.
EDVIN   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian
Scandinavian, Finnish, Estonian and Hungarian form of EDWIN.
EGIL   m   Norwegian, Swedish, Danish
From the Old Norse name Egill, a diminutive of names that began with the element agi "awe, terror". This was the name of a semi-legendary Icelandic warrior.
EGILL   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of EGIL.
EILERT   m   Frisian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Frisian and Scandinavian form of EGILHARD.
EINAR   m   Norwegian, Icelandic, Swedish, Danish
From the Old Norse name Einarr, derived from the elements ein "one, alone" and arr "warrior". This name shares the same roots as einherjar, the word for the slain warriors in Valhalla.
EINDRIDE   m   Norwegian
Derived from the Old Norse name Eindriði, possibly from the elements ein "one, alone" and ríða "to ride".
EIR   f   Norse Mythology, Icelandic, Norwegian
Means "mercy" in Old Norse. This was the name of a Norse goddess of healing and medicine.
EIRA (2)   f   Swedish, Norwegian
Modern form of EIR.
EIRIK   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of Eiríkr (see ERIC).
EIRÍKUR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of Eiríkr (see ERIC).
EIVIND   m   Norwegian
Variant of ØYVIND.
EJVIND   m   Danish
Danish form of ØYVIND.
ELEONOR   f   Swedish
Swedish variant of ELEANOR.
ELFA   f   Icelandic
Feminine form of ALF (1).
ELI (3)   f   Spanish, Norwegian, Danish
Spanish, Norwegian and Danish short form of ELISABET or ELIN.
ELÍAS   m   Spanish, Icelandic
Spanish and Icelandic form of ELIJAH.
ELIAS   m   Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Cognate of ELIJAH. This is the form used in the Greek New Testament.
ELIN   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Welsh
Scandinavian and Welsh form of HELEN.
ELINA   f   Finnish, Swedish
Finnish and Swedish form of HELEN.
ELIS   m   Swedish, Medieval English
Swedish variant of ELIAS, as well as the Medieval English form.
ELÍSABET   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of ELIZABETH.
ELISABET   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Spanish, Biblical Greek
Scandinavian and Finnish form of ELIZABETH. It is also used in Spain alongside the traditional form Isabel.
ELISABETH   f   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
German and Dutch form of ELIZABETH. It is also a variant English form, reflecting the spelling used in the Authorized Version of the New Testament.
ELLA (2)   f   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Diminutive of ELEANOR, ELLEN (1), and other names beginning with El. It can also be a short form of names ending in ella.
ELLINOR   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of ELEANOR.
ELOF   m   Swedish
From the Old Norse name Eileifr, which was derived from the elements ei "ever, always" and leifr "descendant, heir".
ELOV   m   Swedish
Variant of ELOF.
ELSE   f   Danish, Norwegian, German, Dutch
Short form of ELISABETH.
ELUF   m   Danish
Danish form of ELOF.
ELVA (2)   f   Danish, Icelandic
Feminine form of ALF (1).
ELVAR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of ALVAR.
EMBLA   f   Norse Mythology, Icelandic, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Meaning uncertain, perhaps related to Old Norse almr "elm". In Norse mythology Embla and her husband Ask were the first humans. They were created by three of the gods from two trees.
EMELIE   f   Swedish
Swedish feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMIL   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Romanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Hungarian, Icelandic, English
From the Roman family name Aemilius, which was derived from Latin aemulus meaning "rival".
EMILÍA   f   Icelandic
Icelandic feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMILIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Finnish, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMILIE   f   German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
German and Scandinavian feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMMA   f   English, French, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of king Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of king Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.... [more]
ENDRE (2)   m   Norwegian
Norwegian short form of EINDRIDE.
ENOK   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of ENOCH.
ERIC   m   English, Swedish, German, Spanish
From the Old Norse name Eiríkr, derived from the elements ei "ever, always" and ríkr "ruler". A notable bearer was Eiríkr inn Rauda (Eric the Red in English), a 10th-century navigator and explorer who discovered Greenland. This was also the name of several early kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway.... [more]
ERICA   f   English, Swedish, Italian
Feminine form of ERIC. It was first used in the 18th century. It also coincides with the Latin word for "heather".
ERIK   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, German, Dutch, English
Scandinavian form of ERIC. This was the name of kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway. King Erik IX of Sweden (12th century) is the patron saint of that country.
ERIKA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovene, Croatian, English, Italian
Feminine form of ERIK. It also coincides with the word for "heather" in some languages.
ERLAND   m   Swedish, Danish
From the Old Norse byname Erlendr, which was derived from örlendr meaning "foreigner".
ERLE (1)   f   Norwegian
Feminine form of JARL.
ERLEND   m   Norwegian, Danish
Variant of ERLAND.
ERLENDUR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of ERLAND.
ERLING   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Means "descendant of the jarl", a derivative of the Old Norse word jarl meaning "chieftain, nobleman, earl".
ERLINGUR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of ERLING.
ERNA (1)   f   German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Feminine form of ERNEST.
ERNA (2)   f   Norse Mythology, Icelandic, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Means "brisk, vigourous, hale" in Old Norse. This was the name of the wife of Jarl in Norse legend.
ERNST   m   German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
German, Dutch and Scandinavian form of ERNEST.
ESBEN   m   Danish, Norwegian
Variant of ASBJØRN.
ESBJÖRN   m   Swedish
Swedish variant form of ÁSBJÖRN.
ESPEN   m   Norwegian, Danish
Variant of ASBJØRN.
ESTHER   f   English, French, Spanish, Dutch, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Possibly means "star" in Persian. Alternatively it could be a derivative of the name of the Near Eastern goddess ISHTAR. The Book of Esther in the Old Testament tells the story of Queen Esther, the Jewish wife of the king of Persia. The king's advisor Haman persuaded the king to exterminate all the Jews in the realm. Warned of this plot by her cousin Mordecai, Esther revealed her Jewish ancestry and convinced the king to execute Haman instead. Her original Hebrew name was Hadassah.... [more]
EVA   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, English, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin
Latinate form of EVE. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. It is also a variant transcription of Russian YEVA. This name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.
EVELINA   f   English, Italian, Swedish
Latinate form of AVELINE. It was revived by the author Fanny Burney for the heroine of her first novel 'Evelina' (1778). It is often regarded as a variant of the related name EVELYN or an elaboration of EVE.
EVEN   m   Norwegian
Variant of ØYVIND.
EYDÍS   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements ey "good fortune" or "island" and dís "goddess".
EYSTEINN   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements ey meaning "island" or "good fortune" and steinn meaning "stone".
EYVINDUR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of Eyvindr (see ØYVIND).
FANNAR   m   Icelandic
Possibly derived from Old Norse fönn meaning "snow drift".
FELICIA   f   English, Spanish, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Latin name Felicius, a derivative of FELIX. In England, it has occasionally been used since the Middle Ages.
FELIX   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.... [more]
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