Scandinavian Names

Scandinavian names are used in the Scandinavia region of northern Europe. For more specific lists, see Swedish names, Danish names and Norwegian names. See also about Scandinavian names.
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FINN (2)   m   Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
From the Old Norse name Finnr which meant "Sámi, person from Finland".
FINNUR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of FINN (2).
FLEMMING   m   Danish
From a medieval Norse nickname meaning "from Flanders".
FOLKE   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of various Old Norse names that contain the element folk meaning "people", and thus a cognate of FULK.
FRANS   m   Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Dutch, Scandinavian and Finnish form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FREDERIK   m   Danish, Dutch
Danish and Dutch form of FREDERICK. This was the name of nine kings of Denmark over the past 500 years, alternating each generation with the name Christian.
FREDERIKKE   f   Danish
Danish feminine form of FREDERICK.
FREDRIK   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish
Swedish and Norwegian form of FREDERICK. This was the name of a 18th-century king of Sweden.
FREDRIKA   f   Swedish, Finnish
Swedish and Finnish feminine form of FREDERICK.
FREJ   m   Danish, Swedish
Danish and Swedish form of FREYR.
FREJA   f   Danish, Swedish
Danish and Swedish form of FREYA.
FREYJA   f   Icelandic, Norse Mythology
Icelandic and Old Norse form of FREYA.
FREYR   m   Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Means "lord" in Old Norse. This was the name of a Norse god. He may have originally been called Yngvi, with the name Freyr being his title. Freyr presided over fertility, sunlight and rain, and was the husband of the frost giantess Gerd. With his twin sister Freya and father Njord he was one of the group of deities called the Vanir.
FRIDA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, originally a short form of other feminine names containing the Germanic element frid meaning "peace". This is also the Scandinavian equivalent, from the Old Norse cognate Fríða. A famous bearer was Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907-1954).
FRIDTJOF   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Variant of FRITJOF.
FRÍÐA   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse cognate of FRIDA, also in part derived from Old Norse fríðr meaning "beautiful, beloved".
FRIÐRIK   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of FREDERICK.
FRIÐRIKA   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of FREDERICA.
FRITJOF   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Friðþjófr meaning "thief of peace", derived from the elements friðr "peace" and þjófr "thief".
FRODE   m   Danish, Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Fróði, which was derived from fróðr meaning "learned, wise".
FRØYA   f   Norwegian
Norwegian form of FREYA.
GABRIEL   m   French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "God is my strong man", derived from גֶּבֶר (gever) "strong man, hero" and אֶל ('El) "God". Gabriel was one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition, often appearing as a messenger of God. In the Old Testament he is sent to interpret the visions of the prophet Daniel, while in the New Testament he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Qur'an to Muhammad.... [more]
GABRIELLA   f   Italian, Hungarian, English, Swedish
Feminine form of GABRIEL.
GEIR   m   Norwegian, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse element geirr meaning "spear".
GEORG   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Estonian
Form of GEORGE. This name was borne by the German idealist philosopher Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831).
GERD (2)   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse garðr meaning "enclosure". In Norse myth Gerd was a fertility goddess, a frost giantess who was the wife of Freyr.
GERDA (2)   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Latinized form of GERD (2).
GERHARD   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Ancient Germanic
German, Dutch and Scandinavian form of GERARD.
GINA   f   Italian, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of GEORGINA, REGINA, LUIGINA, and other names ending in gina. It can also be used as a diminutive of VIRGINIA or EUGENIA. It was popularized in the 1950s by Italian actress Gina Lollobrigida (1927-), whose birth name was Luigina.
GITTAN   f   Swedish
Swedish diminutive of BIRGITTA.
GITTE   f   Danish
Danish short form of BIRGITTE.
GJORD   m   Swedish (Rare)
Contracted form of GUÐFRIÐR.
GJURD   m   Norwegian (Rare)
Contracted form of GUÐFRIÐR.
GODTFRED   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of GODFREY.
GÖRAN   m   Swedish
Medieval Swedish form of GEORGE.
GØRAN   m   Norwegian
Medieval Norwegian form of GEORGE.
GÖSTA   m   Swedish
Swedish variant of GUSTAV.
GÖSTAV   m   Swedish (Archaic)
Swedish variant of GUSTAV.
GOTTFRID   m   Swedish
Swedish form of GODFREY.
GREGER   m   Swedish
Swedish form of GREGORY.
GREGERS   m   Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of GREGORY.
GRÉTA   f   Hungarian, Icelandic
Short form of MARGARÉTA (Hungarian) or MARGRÉT (Icelandic).
GRETA   f   German, Swedish, English
Short form of MARGARETA. A famous bearer of this name was Swedish actress Greta Garbo (1905-1990).
GRETE   f   German, Danish, Norwegian
German, Danish and Norwegian short form of MARGARET.
GRETHE   f   Danish, Norwegian
Short form of MARGRETHE.
GRO   f   Norwegian
Norwegian form of GRÓA.
GRÓA   f   Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Derived from Old Norse gróa "to grow". This is the name of a seeress in Norse mythology.
GRY   f   Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Means "dawn" in Norwegian.
GUDBRAND   m   Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Guðbrandr meaning "god's sword", derived from the elements guð "god" and brandr "sword".
GUDMUND   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Guðmundr which was derived from the elements guð "god" and mundr "protection".
GUDRUN   f   Norse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Guðrún meaning "god's secret lore", derived from the elements guð "god" and rún "secret lore". In Norse legend Gudrun was the wife of Sigurd. After his death she married Atli, but when he murdered her brothers, she killed her sons by him, fed him their hearts, and then slew him.
GULBRAND   m   Norwegian (Rare), Danish (Rare)
From the Old Norse name Gulbrandr, a variant of Guðbrandr (see GUDBRAND).
GULL   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of various Scandinavian names beginning with the Old Norse element guð meaning "god".
GUN   f   Swedish
Modern form of GUNNR.
GUNBORG   f   Swedish
From the Old Norse name Gunnbjörg, derived from the elements gunnr "war" and björg "help, save, rescue".
GUNDA   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Short form of names containing the Germanic element gund which means "war".
GUNHILD   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Gunnhildr, derived from the elements gunnr "war" and hildr "battle".
GUNILLA   f   Swedish
Swedish variant of GUNHILD.
GUNN   f   Norwegian
Modern form of GUNNR.
GUNNA   f   Danish, Ancient Scandinavian
Feminine form of GUNNE.
GUNNAR   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
From the Old Norse name Gunnarr which was derived from the elements gunnr "war" and arr "warrior" (making it a cognate of GÜNTHER). In Norse legend Gunnar was the husband of Brynhildr. He had his brother-in-law Sigurd murdered based on his wife's false accusations that Sigurd had taken her virginity.
GUNNE   m   Swedish, Norwegian
Short form of Old Norse names beginning with the element gunnr "war".
GUNNEL   f   Swedish
Swedish variant of GUNHILD.
GUNNHILD   f   Norwegian, Danish
Variant of GUNHILD.
GUNNHILDUR   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of GUNHILD.
GUNNVOR   f   Norwegian
Variant of GUNVOR.
GUNVOR   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Gunnvör meaning "cautious in war" from gunnr "war" combined with vor "vigilant, cautious".
GUSTAF   m   Swedish, German
Swedish and German variant of GUSTAV.
GUSTAV   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Possibly means "staff of the Goths", derived from the Old Norse elements Gautr "Goth" and stafr "staff". However, the root name Gautstafr is not well attested in the Old Norse period. Alternatively, it might be derived from the Slavic name GOSTISLAV. This name has been borne by six kings of Sweden, including the 16th-century Gustav I Vasa.
GUÐLAUG   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements guð meaning "god" and laug possibly meaning "betrothed woman".
GUÐRÚN   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse form of GUDRUN, as well as the modern Icelandic form.
GYDA   f   Danish
Danish form of Gyða (see GYTHA).
GYÐA   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of GYTHA.
HAAKON   m   Norwegian
Variant of HÅKON.
HAGEN (2)   m   Danish
Danish form of HÅKON.
HÅKAN   m   Swedish
Swedish form of Hákon (see HÅKON).
HÁKON   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse form of HÅKON, as well as the modern Icelandic form.
HÅKON   m   Norwegian
Modern Norwegian form of the Old Norse name Hákon, which meant "high son" from "high" and konr "son, descendant". This was the name of seven kings of Norway.
HALDOR   m   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Hallþórr, which meant "Thor's rock" from hallr "rock" combined with the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR).
HÁLFDAN   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of HALFDAN.
HALFDAN   m   Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Hálfdan, composed of the elements hálfr "half" and Danr "Dane", originally a nickname for a person who was half Danish.
HALLBJÖRN   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements hallr "rock" and björn "bear".
HALLDÓR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of HALDOR.
HALLDOR   m   Norwegian
Variant of HALDOR.
HALLDÓRA   f   Icelandic
Icelandic feminine form of HALDOR.
HALLE (1)   m   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Halli, a diminutive of names containing the element hallr meaning "rock".
HALLVARD   m   Norwegian
Variant of HALVARD.
HALSTEIN   m   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Hallsteinn, derived from the elements hallr "rock" and steinn "stone".
HALSTEN   m   Swedish
Old Swedish form of Hallsteinn (see HALSTEIN).
HALVAR   m   Swedish
Swedish form of HALVARD.
HALVARD   m   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Hallvarðr, which meant "rock guardian" from hallr "rock" combined with varðr "guardian".
HALVDAN   m   Norwegian
Variant of HALFDAN.
HALVOR   m   Norwegian
Variant of HALVARD.
HAMPUS   m   Swedish
Swedish diminutive of HANS.
HANNAH   f   English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name חַנָּה (Channah) meaning "favour" or "grace". In the Old Testament this is the name of the wife of Elkanah. Her rival was Elkanah's other wife Peninnah, who had children while Hannah remained barren. After a blessing from Eli she finally became pregnant with Samuel.... [more]
HANNE (1)   f & m   Danish, Norwegian, German, Dutch
Danish and Norwegian short form of JOHANNE, or a German and Dutch short form of JOHANNA. This can also be a Dutch short form of JOHANNES (masculine).
HANNES   m   German, Swedish, Dutch, Finnish
Short form of JOHANNES.
HANS   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German, Dutch and Scandinavian short form of JOHANNES. Two famous bearers were Hans Holbein (1497-1543), a Renaissance portrait painter from Germany, and Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), a Danish writer of fairy tales.
HARALD   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Scandinavian and German cognate of HAROLD. This was the name of several kings of Norway and Denmark.
HARALDUR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic cognate of HAROLD.
HASSE   m   Swedish
Swedish diminutive of HANS.
HÅVARD   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of HÁVARÐR.
HEDDA   f   Norwegian, Swedish
Diminutive of HEDVIG. This is the name of the heroine of the play 'Hedda Gabler' (1890) by the Norwegian dramatist Henrik Ibsen.
HEDVIG   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of HEDWIG.
HEGE   f   Norwegian, Danish
Diminutive of HELGA.
HEIDI   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English
German diminutive of ADELHEID. This is the name of the title character in the children's novel 'Heidi' (1880) by Johanna Spyri. The name began to be used in the English-speaking world shortly after the 1937 release of the movie adaptation, which starred Shirley Temple.
HEINO   m   German, Dutch, Danish, Finnish, Estonian
German form of Haimo (see HAMO).
HEIÐRÚN   f   Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of HEIDRUN.
HELEN   f   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
English form of the Greek ‘Ελενη (Helene), probably from Greek ‘ελενη (helene) "torch" or "corposant", or possibly related to σεληνη (selene) "moon". In Greek mythology Helen was the daughter of Zeus and Leda, whose kidnapping by Paris was the cause of the Trojan War. The name was also borne by the 4th-century Saint Helena, mother of the Roman emperor Constantine, who supposedly found the True Cross during a trip to Jerusalem.... [more]
HELENE   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek form of HELEN, as well as the modern Scandinavian and German form.
HELGE   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Helgi, derived from heilagr meaning "holy, blessed".
HELLA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Variant of HELGA.
HELLE (1)   f   Danish
Danish variant of HELGA.
HELMI   f   Finnish, Swedish
Diminutive of VILHELMIINA or VILHELMINA. It also means "pearl" in Finnish.
HEMMING   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Perhaps derived from Old Norse hamr "shape", and possibly originally a nickname for a person believed to be a shape changer.
HENNING   m   German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Diminutive of HENRIK.
HENRIETTA   f   English, Hungarian, Finnish, Swedish, Dutch
Latinate form of HENRIETTE. It was introduced to England by Henriette Marie, the wife of the 17th-century English king Charles I. The name Henriette was also Anglicized as Harriet, a form which was initially more popular.
HENRIETTE   f   French, German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
French feminine diminutive of HENRY.
HENRIKA   f   Swedish
Swedish feminine form of HENRY.
HENRIKE   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German and Scandinavian feminine form of HENRY.
HERLEIF   m   Norwegian
Modern Scandinavian form of HERLEIFR.
HERMAN   m   English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Ancient Germanic
Means "army man", derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and man "man". It was introduced to England by the Normans, died out, and was revived in the English-speaking world in the 19th century. It was borne by a 18th-century Russian missionary to Alaska who is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church. Another famous bearer was Herman Melville (1819-1891), the author of 'Moby-Dick'.
HILDA   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element hild "battle". The short form was used for both Old English and continental Germanic names. Saint Hilda of Whitby was a 7th-century English saint and abbess. The name became rare in England during the later Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century.
HILDE   f   German, Dutch, Norwegian
German, Dutch and Norwegian variant of HILDA.
HILDEGARD   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and gard "enclosure". Saint Hildegard was a 12th-century mystic from Bingen in Germany who was famous for her writings and poetry and also for her prophetic visions.
HILDUR   f   Icelandic, Norwegian
Icelandic form of HILDR.
HILLEVI   f   Swedish, Finnish
Swedish and Finnish form of HEILWIG.
HINRIK   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of HENRY.
HJALMAR   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Hjálmarr meaning "helmeted warrior" from the element hjalmr "helmet" combined with arr "warrior".
HJÖRDÍS   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Means "sword goddess", derived from Old Norse hjörr "sword" and dís "goddess".
HJÖRDIS   f   Swedish
Modern Swedish form of HJÖRDÍS.
HJØRDIS   f   Danish, Norwegian
Modern Danish and Norwegian form of HJÖRDÍS.
HJÖRTUR   m   Icelandic
Means "deer" in Icelandic.
HLÍF   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of LIV (1).
HOLGER   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Hólmgeirr, derived from the elements hólmr "island" and geirr "spear". This was the name of one of Charlemagne's generals, a nobleman from Denmark.
HRAFN   m   Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "raven" in Old Norse.
HUGO   m   Spanish, Portuguese, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of HUGH. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.
HULDA (1)   f   Icelandic, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse hulda meaning "hiding, secrecy". This was the name of a sorceress in Norse mythology. As a modern name, it can also derive from archaic Swedish huld meaning "sweet, lovable".
IB   m   Danish
Danish diminutive of JAKOB.
IDA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element id meaning "work, labour". The Normans brought this name to England, though it eventually died out there in the Middle Ages. It was strongly revived in the 19th century, in part due to the heroine in Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem 'The Princess' (1847), which was later adapted into the play 'Princess Ida' (1884) by Gilbert and Sullivan.... [more]
INA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Limburgish, Croatian
Short form of names ending with ina.
INDRIÐI   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of EINDRIDE.
INGE   f & m   Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, German, Dutch
Short form of Scandinavian and German names beginning with the element ing, which refers to the Germanic god ING. In Sweden and Norway this is primarily a masculine name, elsewhere it is usually feminine.
INGEBJØRG   f   Norwegian, Danish
Norwegian and Danish variant of INGEBORG.
INGEBORG   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Ingibjörg, which was derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with björg meaning "help, save, rescue".
INGEGÄRD   f   Swedish
Swedish variant of INGEGERD.
INGEGERD   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Ingigerðr, which was derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with garðr meaning "enclosure".
INGEMAR   m   Swedish
From the Old Norse name Ingimárr, derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with mærr "famous".
INGER   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Variant of INGRID or INGEGERD.
INGIBJÖRG   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of INGEBORG.
INGMAR   m   Swedish
Variant of INGEMAR. This name was borne by the Swedish film director Ingmar Bergman (1918-2007).
INGOLF   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Ingólfr, which was derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with úlfr meaning "wolf".
INGRID   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Ingríðr meaning "Ing is beautiful", derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with fríðr "beautiful". A famous bearer was the Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman (1915-1982).
INGVAR   m   Swedish, Icelandic, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Yngvarr, which was derived from the name of the Germanic god YNGVI combined with arr meaning "warrior".
INGVILD   f   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Yngvildr, derived from the name of the Norse god YNGVI combined with hildr "battle".
IRENE   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Ειρηνη (Eirene), derived from a word meaning "peace". This was the name of the Greek goddess who personified peace, one of the ‘Ωραι (Horai). It was also borne by several early Christian saints. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, notably being borne by an 8th-century empress, who was the first woman to lead the empire. She originally served as regent for her son, but later had him killed and ruled alone.... [more]
ÍRIS   f   Portuguese, Icelandic
Portuguese and Icelandic form of IRIS.
IRIS   f   Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the name of the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.
ISABELLA   f   Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Romanian
Latinate form of ISABEL. This name was borne by many medieval royals, including queen consorts of England, France, Portugal, the Holy Roman Empire and Hungary, as well as the powerful ruling queen Isabella of Castile (properly called Isabel).
ISAK   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of ISAAC.
IVAN   m   Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Macedonian, Slovene, English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Newer form of the old Slavic name Іѡаннъ (Ioannu), which was derived from Greek Ioannes (see JOHN). This was the name of six Russian rulers, including the 15th-century Ivan III the Great and 16th-century Ivan IV the Terrible, the first tsar of Russia. It was also borne by nine emperors of Bulgaria. Other notable bearers include the Russian author Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883), who wrote 'Fathers and Sons', and the Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), who is best known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex.
IVAR   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of IVOR.
JACOB   m   English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Jewish, Biblical
From the Latin Iacobus, which was from the Greek Ιακωβος (Iakobos), which was from the Hebrew name יַעֲקֹב (Ya'aqov). In the Old Testament Jacob (later called Israel) is the son of Isaac and Rebecca and the father of the twelve founders of the twelve tribes of Israel. He was born holding his twin brother Esau's heel, and his name is explained as meaning "holder of the heel" or "supplanter", because he twice deprived his brother of his rights as the firstborn son (see Genesis 27:36). Other theories claim that it is in fact derived from a hypothetical name like יַעֲקֹבְאֵל (Ya'aqov'el) meaning "may God protect".... [more]
JACOBINE   f   Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Norwegian, Danish and Dutch feminine form of JACOB (or JAMES).
JÁKUP   m   Faroese
Faroese form of JACOB (or JAMES).
JAN (1)   m   Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Polish, Slovene, German, Catalan
Form of JOHANNES. This name was borne by the 15th-century Flemish painter Jan van Eyck and the 17th-century Dutch painter Jan Vermeer.
JANINA   f   Polish, Finnish, German, Swedish, Lithuanian
Latinate form of JEANNINE.
JANNA   f   Dutch, Swedish, Finnish, English
Feminine form of JAN (1). As an English name, it is an elaboration of JAN (2).
JANNE (1)   m   Finnish, Swedish
Finnish form of JOHN, as well as a Swedish diminutive of JAN (1).
JANNE (2)   f   Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian diminutive of JOHANNA.
JANNICK   m   Danish
Danish diminutive of JAN (1).
JANNICKE   f   Norwegian, Swedish, Danish
Scandinavian feminine diminutive of JAN (1), from Low German.
JANNIK   m   Danish
Danish diminutive of JAN (1).
JANNIKE   f   Norwegian, Swedish, Danish
Scandinavian feminine diminutive of JAN (1), from Low German.
JARL   m   Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "chieftain, nobleman, earl" in Old Norse. In Norse legend Jarl was the son of the god Ríg and the founder of the race of warriors.
JARLE   m   Norwegian
Variant of JARL.
JENNIE   f   English, Swedish
Variant of JENNY. Before the 20th century this spelling was more common.
JENNIFER   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Spanish
From a Cornish form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar (see GUINEVERE). This name has only been common outside of Cornwall since the beginning of the 20th century, after it was featured in George Bernard Shaw's play 'The Doctor's Dilemma' (1906).
JENNY   f   English, Swedish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Spanish
Originally a medieval English diminutive of JANE. Since the middle of the 20th century it has been primarily considered a diminutive of JENNIFER.
JENNÝ   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of JENNY.
JENS   m   Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Danish form of JOHN.
JEPPE   m   Danish
Diminutive of JAKOB.
JERK   m   Swedish
Old Swedish variant of ERIK.
JERKER   m   Swedish
Old Swedish variant of ERIK.
JERRIK   m   Danish
Danish variant of ERIK.
JESPER   m   Danish
Danish form of JASPER.
JESSICA   f   English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian, Spanish
This name was first used in this form by Shakespeare in his play 'The Merchant of Venice' (1596), where it belongs to the daughter of Shylock. Shakespeare probably based it on the biblical name ISCAH, which would have been spelled Jescha in his time. It was not commonly used as a given name until the middle of the 20th century. Notable bearers include actresses Jessica Tandy (1909-1994) and Jessica Lange (1949-).
JOAKIM   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Serbian, Macedonian
Scandinavian, Macedonian and Serbian form of JOACHIM.
JÓANNES   m   Faroese
Faroese form of JOHN.
JOEL   m   English, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Finnish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יוֹאֵל (Yo'el) meaning "YAHWEH is God". Joel is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Joel, which describes a plague of locusts. In England, it was first used as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation.
JOHAN   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Scandinavian and Dutch form of Iohannes (see JOHN).
JÓHANN   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of Iohannes (see JOHN).
JÓHANNA   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of Iohanna (see JOANNA).
JOHANNA   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Hungarian, Finnish, Estonian, English, Late Roman
Latinate form of Ioanna (see JOANNA).
JOHANNE   f   French, Danish, Norwegian, Medieval French
French, Danish and Norwegian form of Iohanna (see JOANNA).
JÓHANNES   m   Icelandic, Faroese
Icelandic and Faroese form of JOHN.
JOHANNES   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Late Roman
Latin form of Ioannes (see JOHN). Notable bearers include the inventor of the printing press Johannes Gutenberg (1398-1468), astronomer Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) and composer Johannes Brahms (1833-1897).
JOKUM   m   Danish
Danish form of JOACHIM.
JÓN   m   Icelandic, Faroese
Icelandic and Faroese form of JOHN.
JON (1)   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Basque
Scandinavian and Basque form of JOHN.
JÓNA   f   Icelandic
Icelandic feminine form of JOHN.
JÓNAS   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of JONAH.
JONAS (2)   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Biblical
From Ιωνας (Ionas), the Greek form of JONAH. This spelling is used in some English translations of the New Testament.
JÓNATAN   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of JONATHAN.
JONATAN   m   Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Spanish form of JONATHAN, as well as a Scandinavian and German variant form.
JONATHAN   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹנָתָן (Yehonatan),contracted to יוֹנָתָן (Yonatan), meaning "YAHWEH has given". According to the Old Testament, Jonathan was the eldest son of Saul. His relationship with his father was strained due to his close friendship with his father's rival David. Along with Saul he was killed in battle with the Philistines.... [more]
JONE (2)   m   Norwegian
Norwegian variant of JON (1).
JONNA   f   Danish, Swedish, Finnish
Short form of JOHANNA.
JÖRAN   m   Swedish
Variant of GÖRAN.
JØRG   m   Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian short form of JØRGEN.
JÖRGEN   m   Swedish
Swedish form of JÜRGEN.
JØRGEN   m   Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of JÜRGEN.
JØRN   m   Danish, Norwegian
Short form of JØRGEN.
JORUN   f   Norwegian
Variant of JORUNN.
JORUNN   f   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Jórunnr, derived from the elements jór "horse" and unna "love".
JOSEF   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech
German, Scandinavian and Czech form of JOSEPH.
JOSEFINA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish
Spanish, Portuguese and Swedish feminine form of JOSEPH.
JOSEFINE   f   Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, German
Scandinavian and German form of JOSÉPHINE.
JULIA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Roman, Biblical
Feminine form of the Roman family name JULIUS. Among the notable women from this family were Julia Augusta (also known as Livia Drusilla), the wife of Emperor Augustus, and Julia the Elder, the daughter of Augustus and the wife of Tiberius. A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was also borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. Additionally, Shakespeare used it in his comedy 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594).... [more]
JULIE   f   French, Danish, Norwegian, Czech, English, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Danish, Norwegian and Czech form of JULIA. It has spread to many other regions as well. It has been common in the English-speaking world since the early 20th century.
JYTTE   f   Danish
Danish form of JUTTA.
KAI (1)   m   Frisian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Frisian diminutive of GERHARD, NICOLAAS, CORNELIS or GAIUS.
KAI (2)   f   Swedish
Variant of KAJA (1).
KAIA   f   Norwegian, Estonian
Diminutive of KATARINA or KATARIINA.
KAJ (1)   m   Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
Variant of KAI (1).
KAJ (2)   f   Swedish (Rare)
Variant of KAJA (1).
KAJA (1)   f   Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Estonian, Slovene
Scandinavian diminutive of KATARINA.
KAJSA   f   Swedish
Swedish diminutive of KATARINA.
KALLE   m   Swedish, Finnish
Swedish and Finnish diminutive of KARL.
KAMILLA   f   Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Hungarian form of CAMILLA, as well as a Scandinavian variant. This is also the Hungarian word for the chamomile flower (species Matricaria chamomilla).
KÅRE   m   Norwegian, Swedish, Danish
From the Old Norse name Kári meaning "curly, curved".
KAREN (1)   f   Danish, Norwegian, Icelandic, German, English
Danish short form of KATHERINE. It became common in the English-speaking world after the 1930s.
KARI (1)   f   Norwegian
Norwegian short form of KATARINA.
KARIN   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, English
Swedish short form of KATHERINE.
KARINA   f   Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Polish, German, Russian, English
Elaborated form of KARIN.
KARINE (2)   f   Norwegian
Elaborated form of KARIN.
KARITA   f   Swedish
Variant of CARITA.
KARL   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
German and Scandinavian form of CHARLES. This was the name of seven emperors of the Holy Roman Empire and an emperor of Austria, as well as kings of Sweden and Norway. Other famous bearers include Karl Marx (1818-1883), the German philosopher and revolutionary who laid the foundations for communism, and Karl Jaspers (1883-1969), a German existentialist philosopher.
KARLA   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian
German, Scandinavian and Croatian feminine form of CHARLES.
KAROLINE   f   German, Danish, Norwegian
Feminine form of CAROLUS.
KARSTEN   m   Low German, Danish, Norwegian
Low German form of CHRISTIAN.
KASPER   m   Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Dutch and Scandinavian form of JASPER.
KATHARINA   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German form of KATHERINE.
KATHRINE   f   Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of KATHERINE.
KATRÍN   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of KATHERINE.
KATRIN   f   German, Swedish, Estonian
German, Swedish and Estonian short form of KATHERINE.
KATRINA   f   English, German, Swedish, Dutch
Variant of CATRIONA. It is also a German, Swedish and Dutch contracted form of KATHERINE.
KATRINE   f   Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of KATHERINE.
KELD   m   Danish
Danish form of KETIL.
KENNET   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of KENNETH.
KENNETH   m   Scottish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Anglicized form of both COINNEACH and CINÁED. This name was borne by the Scottish king Kenneth (Cináed) mac Alpin, who united the Scots and Picts in the 9th century. It was popularized outside of Scotland by Sir Walter Scott, who used it for the hero in his novel 'The Talisman' (1825). A famous bearer was the British novelist Kenneth Grahame (1859-1932), who wrote 'The Wind in the Willows'.
KERSTIN   f   Swedish, German
Swedish form of CHRISTINA.
KETIL   m   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Ketill meaning "kettle, cauldron" (later also acquiring the meaning "helmet"). In old Scandinavian rituals the ketill was used to catch the blood of sacrificed animals.
KETTIL   m   Swedish
Swedish form of KETIL.
KEVIN   m   English, Irish, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Anglicized form of the Irish name Caoimhín, derived from the older Irish Cóemgein, composed of the Old Irish elements cóem "kind, gentle, handsome" and gein "birth". Saint Caoimhín established a monastery in Glendalough, Ireland in the 6th century and is the patron saint of Dublin. It became popular in the English-speaking world outside of Ireland in the 20th century.
KIA   f   Swedish
Diminutive of KRISTINA.
KIM (2)   m   Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish
Scandinavian short form of JOACHIM.
KINE   f   Norwegian
Norwegian short form of KRISTINE.
KIRSTEN   f   Danish, Norwegian, English
Danish and Norwegian form of CHRISTINA.
KIRSTINE   f   Danish
Danish form of CHRISTINA.
KJELD   m   Danish
Danish form of KETIL.
KJELL   m   Swedish, Norwegian
Variant of KETIL.
KJELLFRID   f   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Ketilriðr, derived from the elements ketill meaning "kettle" and fríðr meaning "beautiful".
KJERSTI   f   Norwegian
Norwegian form of CHRISTINA.
KJERSTIN   f   Norwegian, Swedish
Swedish and Norwegian and Swedish form of CHRISTINA.
KJETIL   m   Norwegian
Variant of KETIL.
KLAS   m   Swedish
Swedish short form of NICHOLAS.
KLAUS   m   German, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish
German short form of NICHOLAS.
KLEMENS   m   German, Danish, Swedish, Polish
German, Danish, Swedish and Polish form of Clemens (see CLEMENT). Prince Klemens Metternich was a 19th-century Austrian chancellor who guided the Austrian Empire to victory in the Napoleonic Wars.
KNUD   m   Danish
Danish form of KNUT.
KNUT   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Derived from Old Norse knútr meaning "knot". Knut was a Danish prince who defeated Æðelræd II, king of England, in the early 11th century and became the ruler of Denmark, Norway and England.
KNUTE   m   Norwegian
Norwegian variant of KNUT.
KONRAD   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Slovene
German, Scandinavian, Polish and Slovene form of CONRAD.
KRESTEN   m   Danish
Danish variant of CHRISTIAN.
KRIS   m & f   English, Danish
Short form of KRISTIAN, KRISTOFFER, and other names beginning with Kris.
KRISTEN (1)   m   Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of CHRISTIAN.
KRISTER   m   Swedish
Swedish variant of CHRISTER.
KRISTIAN   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Scandinavian and Finnish form of CHRISTIAN.
KRISTÍN   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of CHRISTINA.
KRISTIN   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, English
Scandinavian and German form of CHRISTINA.
KRISTINE   f   Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, English, German
Scandinavian form of CHRISTINE, as well as an English and German variant.
KRISTJÁN   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of CHRISTIAN.
KRISTJANA   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of CHRISTINA.
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