Scottish Names

Scottish names are used in the country of Scotland as well as elsewhere in the Western World as a result of the Scottish diaspora. See also about Scottish names.
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ABIfScottish
Short form of ABIGAIL.
AFRICA (2)fIrish, Scottish
Anglicized form of AIFRIC.
AIDANmIrish, Scottish, English (Modern)
Anglicized form of AODHÁN. In the latter part of the 20th century it became popular in America due to its sound, since it uses the same fashionable aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden and Hayden.
AIFRICfIrish, Scottish
Possibly means "pleasant" in Irish.
AILEASfScottish
Scottish form of ALICE.
AILPEINmScottish
Scottish Gaelic form of ALPIN.
AILSAfScottish
From Ailsa Craig, the name of an island off the west coast of Scotland, which is of uncertain derivation.
AINDREAmScottish
Scottish form of ANDREW.
AINSLEYf & mScottish, English (Modern)
From a surname which was from a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".
ALANmEnglish, Scottish, Breton, French
The meaning of this name is not known for certain. It was used in Brittany at least as early as the 6th century, and it possibly means either "little rock" or "handsome" in Breton. Alternatively, it may derive from the tribal name of the Alans, an Iranian people who migrated into Europe in the 4th and 5th centuries.... [more]
ALASDAIRmScottish
Scottish form of ALEXANDER.
ALASTAIRmScottish
Anglicized form of ALASDAIR.
ALISTAIRmScottish
Anglicized form of ALASDAIR.
ALISTERmScottish
Anglicized form of ALASDAIR.
ALLANmEnglish, Scottish, Danish
Variant of ALAN. The American author Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) got his middle name from the surname of the parents who adopted him.
ALLENmEnglish, Scottish
Variant of ALAN. A famous bearer of this name was Allen Ginsberg (1926-1997), an American beat poet. Another is the American film director and actor Woody Allen (1935-), who took the stage name Allen from his real first name.
ALLY (2)mScottish
Diminutive of ALISTAIR.
ALPINmScottish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Ailpein, possibly derived from a Pictish word meaning "white". This was the name of two kings of Dál Riata and two kings of the Picts in the 8th and 9th centuries.
AMHLAIDHmScottish
Scottish form of OLAF.
ANGUSmScottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of AONGHUS.
ANNAGfScottish
Scottish diminutive of ANNA.
AODHmIrish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
From the old Irish name Áed, which meant "fire". This was a very popular name in early Ireland, being borne by numerous figures in Irish mythology and several high kings. It has been traditionally Anglicized as Hugh.
AODHAGÁNmIrish, Scottish
Diminutive of AODH.
AODHÁNmIrish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
From the old Irish name Áedán, a diminutive of Áed (see AODH). This was the name of an Irish monk and saint of the 7th century. It was also borne by several characters in Irish mythology.
AONGHASmScottish
Scottish variant of AONGHUS.
AONGHUSmIrish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Possibly meaning "one strength" derived from Irish óen "one" and gus "force, strength, energy". Aonghus (sometimes surnamed Mac Og meaning "young son") was the Irish god of love and youth. The name was also borne by an 8th-century Pictish king and several Irish kings.
ARCHIBALDmScottish, English
Derived from the Germanic elements ercan "genuine" and bald "bold". The first element was altered due to the influence of Greek names beginning with the element αρχος (archos) meaning "master". The Normans brought this name to England. It first became common in Scotland in the Middle Ages.
ARCHIEmScottish, English
Diminutive of ARCHIBALD. This name is borne by Archie Andrews, an American comic-book character created in 1941.
ARRANmScottish
From the name of an island off the west coast of Scotland in the Firth of Clyde.
ARTAIRmScottish
Scottish form of ARTHUR.
ATHOLm & fScottish
From the name of a district in Scotland which was derived from Gaelic ath Fodhla "new Ireland".
AULAYmScottish
Anglicized form of AMHLAIDH.
BARABALfScottish
Scottish form of BARBARA.
BARCLAYmScottish, English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname which was likely derived from the English place name Berkeley, meaning "birch wood" in Old English.
BEATHAGfScottish
Feminine form of BEATHAN.
BEATHANmScottish
Derived from Scottish Gaelic beatha meaning "life".
BEILEAGfScottish
Diminutive of ISEABAIL.
BEITRISfScottish
Scottish form of BEATRICE.
BHALTAIRmScottish
Scottish form of WALTER.
BHÀTAIRmScottish
Scottish form of WALTER.
BLAIRm & fScottish, English
From a Scottish surname which is derived from Gaelic blár meaning "plain, field, battlefield".
BOYDmScottish, English
From a Scottish surname which was possibly derived from the name of the island of Bute.
BRUCEmScottish, English
From a Scottish surname, of Norman origin, which probably originally referred to the town of Brix in France. The surname was borne by Robert the Bruce, a Scottish hero of the 14th century who achieved independence from England and became the king of Scotland. It has been in use as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. A notable bearer is the American musician Bruce Springsteen (1949-).
CAILEANmScottish
Means "whelp, young dog" in Gaelic. This name is also used as a Scottish form of COLUMBA.
CAIRBREmIrish, Scottish
Means "charioteer" in Gaelic.
CAITRÌONAfScottish
Scottish form of KATHERINE.
CALLUMmScottish
Variant of CALUM.
CALUMmScottish
Scottish form of COLUMBA.
CAOIMHEfIrish, Scottish
Derived from Gaelic caomh meaning "beautiful, gentle, kind".
CARBREYmIrish, Scottish
Anglicized form of CAIRBRE.
CARBRYmIrish, Scottish
Anglicized form of CAIRBRE.
CARSONm & fScottish, English
From a Scottish surname of uncertain meaning. A famous bearer of the surname was the American scout Kit Carson (1809-1868).
CHRISTIE (2)mScottish, Irish
Scottish and Irish diminutive of CHRISTOPHER.
CHRISTY (2)mScottish, Irish
Scottish and Irish diminutive of CHRISTOPHER.
CINÁEDmScottish, Irish
Means "born of fire" in Gaelic. This was the name of the first king of the Scots and Picts (9th century). It is often Anglicized as Kenneth.
COINNEACHmScottish
Derived from Gaelic caoin "handsome". It is often Anglicized as Kenneth.
COLIN (1)mScottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of CAILEAN or COILEAN.
CONALLmIrish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Means "strong wolf" in Gaelic. This is the name of several characters in Irish legend including the hero Conall Cernach ("Conall of the victories"), a member of the Red Branch of Ulster, who avenged Cúchulainn's death by killing Lugaid.
CORMAGmScottish
Scottish form of CORMAC.
CRAIGmScottish, English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from Gaelic creag meaning "crag" or "rocks", originally indicating a person who lived near a crag.
DÀIBHIDHmScottish
Scottish Gaelic form of DAVID.
DAIVIDHmScottish (Rare)
Gaelic variant of DAVID.
DANDmScottish
Scottish diminutive of ANDREW.
DAVIDmEnglish, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was derived from Hebrew דּוֹד (dod) meaning "beloved" or "uncle". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.... [more]
DAVIEmEnglish, Scottish
Diminutive of DAVID.
DEÒIRIDHfScottish
Means "pilgrim" in Scottish Gaelic.
DEÒRSAmScottish
Scottish form of GEORGE.
DERMIDmScottish
Anglicized form of DIARMAD.
DIARMADmScottish
Scottish form of DIARMAID.
DOMHNALLmScottish, Irish
Gaelic form of DONALD.
DOMNALLmScottish, Irish
Gaelic form of DONALD.
DONALDmScottish, English
From the Gaelic name Domhnall which means "ruler of the world", composed of the old Celtic elements dumno "world" and val "rule". This was the name of two 9th-century kings of the Scots and Picts. It has traditionally been very popular in Scotland, and during the 20th century it became common in the rest of the English-speaking world. This is the name of one of Walt Disney's most popular cartoon characters, Donald Duck. It was also borne by Australian cricket player Donald Bradman (1908-2001).
DONALDAfScottish
Feminine form of DONALD.
DONALDINAfScottish
Feminine form of DONALD.
DONELLAfScottish
Feminine form of DONALD.
DONNCHADHmIrish, Scottish
Gaelic form of DUNCAN.
DOUGALmScottish, Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Dubhghall, which meant "dark stranger" from dubh "dark" and gall "stranger".
DOUGLASmScottish, English
Anglicized form of the Scottish surname Dubhghlas, meaning "dark river" from Gaelic dubh "dark" and glais "water, river" (an archaic word related to glas "grey, green"). Douglas was originally a place name (for example, a tributary of the River Clyde), which then became a Scottish clan name borne by a powerful line of earls. It has been used as a given name since the 16th century.
DUBHGHALLmIrish, Scottish
Original Gaelic form of DOUGAL.
DUBHGHLASmScottish
Original Gaelic form of DOUGLAS.
DUFFmScottish
Derived from Gaelic dubh meaning "dark".
DUGALDmScottish
Scottish variant of DOUGAL.
DUNCANmScottish, English
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Donnchadh, derived from Gaelic donn "brown" and cath "battle". This was the name of two kings of Scotland, including the one who was featured in Shakespeare's play 'Macbeth' (1606).
EACHANNmScottish, Irish
Means "brown horse" from Gaelic each "horse" and donn "brown". It was sometimes Anglicized as Hector.
EALAIRmScottish
Scottish Gaelic form of HILARY.
EALASAIDfScottish
Scottish Gaelic form of ELIZABETH.
EANRAIGmScottish
Scottish Gaelic form of HENRY.
EDANmIrish, Scottish
Variant of AIDAN.
EDNA (1)fIrish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of EITHNE.
EFFIE (2)fScottish
Anglicized form of OIGHRIG.
EIDEARDmScottish
Scottish form of EDWARD.
EILIDHfScottish
Diminutive of EILIONOIR, sometimes taken to be a Gaelic form of HELEN.
EILIONOIRfScottish
Scottish form of ELEANOR.
EIMHIRfScottish
Scottish form of EMER.
EITHNEfIrish, Scottish
Means "kernel, grain" in Irish. This was the name of a 5th-century Irish saint, sister of Saint Fidelma and follower of Saint Patrick.
ELLARmScottish
Anglicized form of EALAIR.
ELSPETfScottish
Scottish form of ELIZABETH.
ELSPETHfScottish
Scottish form of ELIZABETH.
EOGHANmIrish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "born from the yew tree" in Irish, though it is possibly derived from EUGENE. It was borne by several legendary or semi-legendary Irish figures, including a son of Niall of the Nine Hostages.
EOINmIrish, Scottish
Gaelic form of JOHN.
ERSKINEmScottish, Irish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of a Scottish town meaning "projecting height" in Gaelic. A famous bearer of the name was the Irish novelist and nationalist Erskine Childers (1870-1922).
EUANmScottish
Anglicized form of EOGHAN.
EVANDER (2)mScottish, English
Anglicized form of IOMHAR.
EWANmScottish
Anglicized form of EOGHAN.
EWENmScottish
Variant of EWAN.
FARQUHARmIrish, Scottish
Anglicized form of FEARCHAR.
FEARCHARmIrish, Scottish
Means "dear man" from Gaelic fear "man" and char "dear".
FEARGHASmIrish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Means "man of vigour", derived from the Gaelic elements fear "man" and gus "vigour". This was the name of several characters in Irish legend including the Ulster hero Fearghas mac Róich.
FENELLAfScottish
Anglicized form of FIONNUALA.
FERGIEm & fScottish
Diminutive and feminine form of FERGUS.
FIFEmScottish
From a Scottish place name which was formerly the name of a kingdom in Scotland. It is said to be named for the legendary Pictish hero Fib.
FILIBmScottish
Scottish form of PHILIP.
FINDLAYmScottish
From a Scottish surname which was derived from the given name FIONNLAGH.
FINELLAfScottish
Anglicized form of FIONNUALA.
FINGALmScottish
From Scottish Gaelic Fionnghall meaning "white stranger", derived from fionn "white, fair" and gall "stranger". This was the name of the hero in James Macpherson's epic poem 'Fingal' (1762), which he claimed to have based on early Gaelic legends about Fionn mac Cumhail.
FINLAYmIrish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of FIONNLAGH.
FINLEYm & fIrish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of FIONNLAGH.
FINOLAfIrish, Scottish
Anglicized form of FIONNUALA.
FIONAfScottish, English
Feminine form of FIONN. This name was (first?) used by Scottish poet James Macpherson in his poem 'Fingal' (1762).
FIONNGHALLmScottish
Scottish Gaelic form of FINGAL.
FIONNLAGHmIrish, Scottish
Means "white warrior" from Gaelic fionn "white, fair" and laogh "warrior".
FIONNTANmIrish, Scottish
Modern Irish form of FINTAN.
FIONOLAfIrish, Scottish
Anglicized form of FIONNUALA.
FORBESmScottish
From a surname which was originally taken from a Scottish place name meaning "field" in Gaelic.
FRANGmScottish
Scottish form of FRANCIS.
FRANGAGfScottish
Scottish feminine form of FRANCIS.
FRASERmScottish, English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname which is of unknown meaning. A famous bearer of the surname was Simon Fraser (1776-1862), a Canadian explorer.
FYFEmScottish
Variant of FIFE.
GAVINmEnglish, Scottish
Medieval form of GAWAIN. Though it died out in England, it was reintroduced from Scotland in the 20th century.
GILCHRISTmScottish
Derived from the Gaelic phrase giolla Chríost meaning "servant of Christ".
GILLESPIEmScottish
Anglicized form of Scottish Gille Easbaig or Irish Giolla Easpuig both meaning "servant of the bishop".
GILROYmIrish, Scottish
From an Irish surname, either Mac Giolla Ruaidh, which means "son of the red-haired servant", or Mac Giolla Rí, which means "son of the king's servant".
GLENNmScottish, English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from Gaelic gleann "valley". A famous bearer of the surname was American astronaut John Glenn (1921-2016).
GLENNAfScottish, English
Feminine form of GLENN.
GORAIDHmScottish
Scottish form of GODFREY.
GORDONmScottish, English
From a Scottish surname which was originally derived from a place name in Berwickshire meaning "spacious fort". It was originally used in honour of Charles George Gordon (1833-1885), a British general who died defending the city of Khartoum in Sudan.
GORMLAITHfIrish, Scottish
Derived from Irish gorm "blue" or "illustrious" and flaith "princess, lady". This was the name of a wife of the 11th-century Irish ruler Brian Boru.
GRAEMEmScottish, English (Modern)
From a surname which was a variant of GRAHAM.
GRAHAMmScottish, English
From a Scottish surname, originally derived from the English place name Grantham, which probably meant "gravelly homestead" in Old English. The surname was first taken to Scotland in the 12th century by the Norman baron William de Graham. A famous bearer was Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor who devised the telephone.
GRAHAMEmScottish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of GRAHAM.
GRANTmEnglish, Scottish
From an English and Scottish surname which was derived from Norman French grand meaning "great, large". A famous bearer of the surname was Ulysses Grant (1822-1885), the commander of the Union forces during the American Civil War who later served as president. In America the name has often been given in his honour.
GREERf & mScottish, English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname which was derived from the given name GREGOR.
GREGORmGerman, Scottish, Slovak, Slovene
German, Scottish, Slovak and Slovene form of GREGORY. A famous bearer was Gregor Mendel (1822-1884), a Czech monk and scientist who did experiments in genetics.
GREIGmScottish
Scottish diminutive of GREGORY.
GRIERmScottish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of GREER.
GRIOGAIRmScottish
Scottish form of GREGORY.
GRISELDAfEnglish, Scottish, Spanish, Literature
Possibly derived from the Germanic elements gris "grey" and hild "battle". It is not attested as a Germanic name. This was the name of a patient wife in medieval tales by Boccaccio and Chaucer.
GRIZELfScottish
Scottish variant of GRISELDA.
HAMISHmScottish
Anglicized form of a Sheumais, the vocative case of SEUMAS.
HECKmScottish
Scottish short form of HECTOR.
HECKIEmScottish
Scottish diminutive of HECTOR.
HENDRYmScottish
Scots variant of HENRY.
IAGANmScottish
Variant of Aodhagán, a diminutive of AODH.
IAINmScottish
Scottish form of JOHN.
IANmScottish, English
Scottish form of JOHN.
INNESm & fScottish
Anglicized form of AONGHUS, also used as a feminine name.
IOMHARmScottish
Scottish form of IVOR.
IONA (1)fEnglish, Scottish
From the name of the island off Scotland where Saint Columba founded a monastery. The name of the island is Old Norse in origin, and apparently derives simply from ey meaning "island".
IRVINGmEnglish, Scottish, Jewish
From a Scottish surname which was in turn derived from a Scottish place name meaning "green water". Historically this name has been relatively common among Jews, who have used it as an American-sounding form of Hebrew names beginning with I such as Isaac, Israel and Isaiah. A famous bearer was the Russian-American songwriter and lyricist Irving Berlin (1888-1989), whose birth name was Israel Beilin.
ISEABAILfScottish
Scottish form of ISABEL.
ISHBELfScottish
Anglicized form of ISEABAIL.
ISLAfScottish
Variant of ISLAY, typically used as a feminine name.
ISLAYmScottish
From the name of the island of Islay, which lies off of the west coast of Scotland.
ISOBELfScottish
Scottish form of ISABEL.
IVORmIrish, Scottish, Welsh, English (British)
From the Old Norse name Ívarr, which was derived from the elements yr "yew, bow" and arr "warrior". During the Middle Ages it was brought to Britain by Scandinavian settlers and invaders, and it was adopted in Ireland, Scotland and Wales.
JAMESINAfScottish
Feminine form of JAMES.
JAMIEm & fScottish, English
Originally a Lowland Scots diminutive of JAMES. Since the late 19th century it has also been used as a feminine form.
JEAN (2)fEnglish, Scottish
Medieval English variant of Jehanne (see JANE). It was common in England and Scotland during the Middle Ages, but eventually became rare in England. It was reintroduced to the English-speaking world from Scotland in the 19th century.
JESSIE (1)fScottish, English
Originally a Scottish diminutive of JEAN (2). In modern times it is also used as a diminutive of JESSICA.
JOCKmScottish
Scottish form of JACK.
JOCKIEmScottish
Scottish diminutive of JACK.
JOCKYmScottish
Scottish diminutive of JACK.
KEAVYfIrish, Scottish
Anglicized form of CAOIMHE.
KEIRmScottish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of KERR.
KEITHmEnglish, Scottish
From a Scottish surname which was originally derived from a place name, itself probably derived from the Brythonic element cet meaning "wood". This was the surname of a long line of Scottish nobles. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
KEITHAfScottish
Feminine form of KEITH.
KENINAfScottish
Feminine form of KENNETH.
KENNAfScottish
Feminine form of KENNETH.
KENNETHmScottish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Anglicized form of both COINNEACH and CINÁED. This name was borne by the Scottish king Kenneth (Cináed) mac Alpin, who united the Scots and Picts in the 9th century. It was popularized outside of Scotland by Sir Walter Scott, who used it for the hero in his novel 'The Talisman' (1825). A famous bearer was the British novelist Kenneth Grahame (1859-1932), who wrote 'The Wind in the Willows'.
KENNYmScottish, English
Diminutive of KENNETH.
KENTIGERNmScottish
Possibly means "chief lord" in Gaelic. This was the name of a 6th-century saint from Glasgow.
KERRmScottish, English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname which was derived from a place name meaning "rough wet ground" in Old Norse.
KIRSTIEfScottish
Diminutive of KIRSTIN.
KIRSTINfScottish
Scottish form of CHRISTINA.
KIRSTYfScottish
Diminutive of KIRSTIN.
LACHIEmScottish
Diminutive of LACHLAN.
LACHINAfScottish
Feminine form of LACHLAN.
LACHLANmScottish, English (Australian)
Originally a Scottish nickname for a person who was from Norway. In Scotland, Norway was known as the "land of the lochs", or Lochlann.
LENNONm & fScottish, English (Modern)
Anglicized form of the Irish surname Ó Leannáin, which means "descendant of Leannán". The name Leannán means "lover" in Gaelic. This surname was borne by musician John Lennon (1940-1980), a member of the Beatles.
LENNOXm & fScottish, English (Modern)
From a Scottish surname which was derived from the name of a district in Scotland. The district, called Leamhnachd in Gaelic, possibly means "place of elms".
LENOXmScottish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of LENNOX.
LILEASfScottish
Scottish form of LILLIAN.
LILIASfScottish
Scottish form of LILLIAN.
LILLIASfScottish
Scottish form of LILLIAN.
LINDSAYf & mEnglish, Scottish
From an English and Scottish surname which was originally derived from the name of the region Lindsey, which means "LINCOLN island" in Old English. As a given name it was typically masculine until the 1960s (in Britain) and 1970s (in America) when it became popular for girls, probably due to its similarity to Linda and because of American actress Lindsay Wagner (1949-).
LIÙSAIDHfScottish
Scottish form of LUCIA.
LOCKIEmScottish
Diminutive of LACHLAN.
LOGANm & fScottish, English
From a surname which was originally derived from a Scottish place name meaning "little hollow" in Scottish Gaelic.
MAIGHREADfScottish
Scottish form of MARGARET.
MAIREADfScottish
Scottish form of MARGARET.
MÀIRIfScottish
Scottish form of MARY.
MAISIEfScottish
Diminutive of MAIREAD.
MALCOLMmScottish, English
From Scottish Máel Coluim which means "disciple of Saint COLUMBA". This was the name of four kings of Scotland starting in the 10th century, including Malcolm III, who became king after killing Macbeth, the usurper who had murdered his father. The character Malcolm in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Macbeth' (1606) is based on him. Another famous bearer was Malcolm X (1925-1965), an American civil rights leader.
MALINA (1)fScottish
Feminine form of MALCOLM.
MALVINAfScottish, English, Literature
Created by the poet James MacPherson in the 18th century for a character in his Ossian poems. He probably intended it to mean "smooth brow" in Gaelic.
MAOILIOSmScottish
Means "servant of JESUS" in Scottish Gaelic.
MARCASmIrish, Scottish
Irish and Scottish form of MARK.
MARSAILIfScottish
Scottish form of both MARJORIE and MARCELLA.
MAURA (2)fIrish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of MÁIRE. It has also been associated with Gaelic mór meaning "great". This was the name of an obscure 5th-century Irish or Scottish martyr.
MHAIRIfScottish
Vocative form of MÀIRI.
MÌCHEALmScottish
Scottish form of MICHAEL.
MICHEILmScottish
Scottish Gaelic form of MICHAEL.
MOIRAfIrish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of MÁIRE. It also coincides with Greek Μοιρα (Moira) meaning "fate, destiny", the singular of Μοιραι, the Greek name for the Fates. They were the three female personifications of destiny in Greek mythology.
MONROEmScottish, English
From a Scottish surname meaning "from the mouth of the Roe". The Roe is a river in Ireland. Two famous bearers of the surname were American president James Monroe (1758-1831) and American actress Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962).
MÓRfScottish, Irish
Means "great" in Gaelic. It is sometimes translated into English as SARAH.
MORAGfScottish
Diminutive of MÓR.
MORAYmScottish
Variant of MURRAY.
MORNAfIrish, Scottish
Anglicized form of MUIRNE.
MORVENfScottish
From a Scottish place name meaning "big gap". This was the name of Fingal's kingdom in James Macpherson's poems.
MUIRmScottish
From a surname which was originally taken from a Scottish place name meaning "moor, fen". It also means "sea" in Scottish Gaelic.
MUIREALLfScottish
Scottish form of MUIRGEL.
MUNGOmScottish
Possibly derived from Welsh mwyn "gentle, kind". This was a nickname of the 6th-century Saint Kentigern.
MUNROmScottish
Variant of MONROE.
MURCHADHmIrish, Scottish
Derived from Gaelic muir "sea" and cadh "warrior".
MURDAGfScottish
Feminine form of MURDO.
MURDOmScottish
Anglicized form of MUIREADHACH or MURCHADH.
MURRAYmScottish, English
From a surname, which is either Scottish or Irish in origin (see MURRAY (1) and MURRAY (2)).
MURRONfScottish
Scottish form of MUIRENN.
MYSIEfScottish
Variant of MAISIE.
NANDAGfScottish
Scottish diminutive of ANNA.
NAOISEmIrish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Meaning unknown, presumably of Gaelic origin. In Irish legend he was the young man who eloped with Deirdre, the beloved of Conchobhar the king of Ulster. Conchobhar eventually succeeded in having Naoise murdered, which caused Deirdre to die of grief.
NAOMHÁNmIrish, Scottish
Means "little saint", derived from Irish naomh "saint" combined with a diminutive suffix.
NEACELmScottish
Scottish form of NICHOLAS.
NEILmIrish, Scottish, English
From the Gaelic name Niall, which is of disputed origin, possibly meaning "champion" or "cloud". This was the name of a semi-legendary 4th-century Irish king, Niall of the Nine Hostages.... [more]
NEILINAfScottish
Feminine form of NEIL.
NIALLmIrish, Scottish
Original Gaelic spelling of NEIL.
NICOL (1)mScottish, Medieval English
Medieval English and Scottish form of NICHOLAS. This was the middle name of character in the novel 'Rob Roy' (1817) by Sir Walter Scott.
NINIANmScottish, Irish, Ancient Celtic
Meaning unknown. It appears in a Latinized form Niniavus, which could be from the Welsh name NYNNIAW. This was the name of a 5th-century British saint who was apparently responsible for many miracles and cures. He is known as the Apostle to the Picts.
NIVENmScottish
Anglicized form of NAOMHÁN.
OIGHRIGfScottish
Means "new speckled one" in Scottish Gaelic.
PÀDRAIGmScottish
Scottish form of PATRICK.
PÀLmScottish
Scottish form of PAUL.
PEADARmIrish, Scottish
Irish and Scottish form of PETER.
PEIGIfScottish
Scottish diminutive of MARGARET.
PÒLmScottish
Scottish form of PAUL.
RABmScottish
Scottish short form of ROBERT.
RABBIEmScottish
Scottish diminutive of ROBERT.
RAGHNAIDfScottish
Scottish form of RAGNHILD.
RAIBEARTmScottish
Scottish form of ROBERT.
RANALDmScottish
Scottish form of REYNOLD.
RANULFmScottish
Scottish form of the Old Norse name Randúlfr, a cognate of RANDOLF. Scandinavian settlers and invaders introduced this name to Scotland in the Middle Ages.
RHONAfScottish
Possibly derived from the name of the Hebridean island Rona, which means "rough island" in Gaelic.
RODERICKmEnglish, Scottish, Welsh
Means "famous power" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ric "power". This name was in use among the Visigoths; it was borne by their last king (also known as Rodrigo), who died fighting the Muslim invaders of Spain in the 8th century. It also had cognates in Old Norse and West Germanic, and Scandinavian settlers and Normans introduced it to England, though it died out after the Middle Ages. It was revived in the English-speaking world by Sir Walter Scott's poem 'The Vision of Don Roderick' (1811).
RODINAfScottish
Scottish feminine form of RODERICK.
RONALDmScottish, English
Scottish form of RAGNVALDR, a name introduced to Scotland by Scandinavian settlers and invaders. It became popular outside Scotland during the 20th century. A famous bearer was American actor and president Ronald Reagan (1911-2004).
RONALDAfScottish
Feminine form of RONALD.
RORIEmIrish, Scottish
Variant of RORY.
RORYmIrish, Scottish
Anglicized form of RUAIDHRÍ.
ROSSmScottish, English
From a Scottish and English surname which originally indicated a person from a place called Ross (such as the region of Ross in northern Scotland), derived from Gaelic ros meaning "promontory, headland". A famous bearer of the surname was Sir James Clark Ross (1800-1862), an Antarctic explorer.
ROYmScottish, English, Dutch
Anglicized form of RUADH. A notable bearer was the Scottish outlaw and folk hero Rob Roy (1671-1734). It is often associated with French roi "king".
RUADHmIrish, Scottish
Gaelic byname meaning "red", often a nickname for one with red hair. This was the nickname of the Scottish outlaw Raibeart Ruadh MacGregor (1671-1734), known as Rob Roy in English.
RUAIRImScottish
Scottish cognate of RUAIDHRÍ.
RUAIRIDHmScottish
Scottish cognate of RUAIDHRÍ.
RUARAIDHmScottish
Scottish cognate of RUAIDHRÍ.
RUARIDHmScottish
Scottish cognate of RUAIDHRÍ.
SACHAIRImScottish
Scottish form of ZECHARIAH.
SAUNDRAfScottish
Scottish form of SANDRA.
SAWNEYmScottish
Scottish form of SANDY.
SCOTmEnglish, Scottish
Variant form of SCOTT.
SCOTTmEnglish, Scottish
From an English and Scottish surname which referred to a person from Scotland or a person who spoke Scottish Gaelic. It is derived from Latin Scoti meaning "Gaelic speaker", with the ultimate origin uncertain.
SCOTTIEmEnglish, Scottish
Diminutive of SCOTT.
SCOTTYmEnglish, Scottish
Diminutive of SCOTT.
SEAGHDHmScottish
Scottish form of SÉAGHDHA.
SENGAfScottish
Sometimes explained as an anagram of AGNES, but more likely derived from Gaelic seang "slender".
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