Slavic Names

These names are used by Slavic peoples.
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ABDULAH m Bosnian
Bosnian form of ABD ALLAH.
ABRAM (2) m Russian, Georgian
Russian and Georgian form of ABRAHAM.
ACA m Serbian, Macedonian
Serbian and Macedonian diminutive of ALEKSANDAR.
ACE (2) m Macedonian
Macedonian diminutive of ALEXANDER.
ACO m Macedonian, Serbian
Macedonian and Serbian diminutive of ALEKSANDAR.
ADA f English, German, Polish, Hungarian, Italian, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names such as ADELAIDE or ADELINA that begin with the element adal meaning "noble". This name was borne by Augusta Ada King (1815-1852), the Countess of Lovelace (known as Ada Lovelace), a daughter of Lord Byron. She was an assistant to Charles Babbage, the inventor of an early mechanical computer.
ADAM m English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Catalan, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make".... [more]
ADÉLA f Czech
Czech form of ADELA.
ADELA f English, Spanish, Romanian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element adal meaning "noble". Saint Adela was a 7th-century Frankish princess who founded a monastery at Pfazel in France. This name was also borne by a daughter of William the Conqueror.
ADELAJDA f Polish
Polish form of ADELAIDE.
ADELINA f Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Romanian, German, Bulgarian, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
From a Latinized Germanic name that was derived from the element adal meaning "noble".
ADNAN m Arabic, Turkish, Bosnian, Urdu
Means "settler" in Arabic. According to tradition, Adnan was an ancestor of the Prophet Muhammad and the northern Arabian tribes.
ADOLF m German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalwolf, which meant "noble wolf" from the Germanic elements adal "noble" and wulf. It was borne by several Swedish kings as a first or second name, most notably by Gustav II Adolf in the 17th century. Association with Adolf Hitler (1889-1945), the leader of the Nazi party in Germany during World War II, has lessened the use of this name.
ADRIÁN m Spanish, Hungarian, Slovak
Spanish, Hungarian and Slovak form of Hadrianus (see HADRIAN).
ADRIAN m English, Romanian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian
Form of Hadrianus (see HADRIAN) used in several languages. Several saints and six popes have borne this name, including the only English pope, Adrian IV, and the only Dutch pope, Adrian VI. As an English name, it has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it was not popular until modern times.
ADRIANNA f English, Polish
Feminine form of ADRIAN.
ADRIJAN m Croatian, Macedonian
Croatian and Macedonian form of ADRIAN.
ADRIJANA f Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Slovene, Serbian, Croatian and Macedonian feminine form of ADRIAN.
AFANASIY m Russian
Russian form of ATHANASIUS.
AFANASY m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Афанасий (see AFANASIY).
AGAFYA f Russian
Russian form of AGATHA.
AGÁTA f Czech
Czech form of AGATHA.
AGATA f Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Polish, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian
Form of AGATHA in various languages.
AGATKA f Polish
Polish diminutive of AGATA.
AGLAYA f Russian
Russian form of AGLAIA.
AGNEŠA f Slovak
Slovak variant of AGNES.
AGNESA f Slovak, Albanian
Slovak and Albanian form of AGNES.
AGNESSA f Russian
Russian form of AGNES.
AGNEZA f Croatian
Croatian form of AGNES.
AGNIESZKA f Polish
Polish form of AGNES.
AGNIJA f Serbian, Macedonian, Latvian
Serbian, Macedonian and Latvian form of AGNES.
AGRAFENA f Russian
Russian form of AGRIPPINA.
AHMED m Turkish, Bosnian, Dhivehi, Arabic, Urdu, Pashto
Turkish, Bosnian and Dhivehi form of AHMAD. This was the name of three Ottoman sultans.
AJDA (2) f Slovene
Means "buckwheat" in Slovene.
AJDIN m Bosnian
Bosnian form of AYDIN.
AJLA f Bosnian
Bosnian form of AYLA (2).
AKILINA f Russian
Russian form of the Roman name Aquilina, a feminine derivative of AQUILA.
AKIM m Russian
Russian form of JOACHIM.
AKSINYA f Russian
Variant of KSENIYA.
AKULINA f Russian
Variant of AKILINA.
ALBENA f Bulgarian
Created by Bulgarian writer Yordan Yovkov for the heroine in his drama 'Albena' (1930). He may have based it on ablen, the name of a type of peony (a flowering plant).
ALBERT m English, French, Catalan, German, Polish, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Romanian, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalbert, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and beraht "bright". This name was common among medieval German royalty. The Normans introduced it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Æðelberht. Though it became rare in England by the 17th century, it was repopularized in the 19th century by the German-born Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.... [more]
ALBIN m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, French, English, Slovene
Form of ALBINUS in several languages.
ALBÍNA f Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of ALBINA.
ALBINA f Russian, Ukrainian, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Slovene, Polish, German, Lithuanian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of ALBINUS. This was the name of a few early saints, including a 3rd-century martyr from Caesarea.
ALDIN m Bosnian
Bosnian form of ALA AL-DIN.
ALDINA (2) f Bosnian
Bosnian feminine form of ALA AL-DIN.
ALDONA f Lithuanian, Polish
Meaning unknown. This was the name of a 14th-century Polish queen, the daughter of a Grand Duke of Lithuania.
ALEKSANDAR m Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian, Bosnian
Form of ALEXANDER in several languages.
ALEKSANDER m Polish, Slovene, Estonian, Norwegian, Danish
Form of ALEXANDER in several languages.
ALEKSANDR m Russian, Armenian, Ukrainian
Russian and Armenian form of ALEXANDER. This name was borne by the 19th-century Russian poet Aleksandr Pushkin.
ALEKSEI m Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Alternate transcription of Russian Алексей (see ALEKSEY), Ukrainian Олексій (see OLEKSIY) or Belarusian Аляксей (see ALIAKSEI).
ALEKSEJ m Slovene
Slovene form of ALEXIS.
ALEKSEY m Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Russian form of ALEXIS. This was the name of a 17th-century czar of Russia.
ALEKSY m Polish
Polish form of ALEXIS.
ALEM m Bosnian
Bosnian form of ALIM.
ALEN m Croatian, Slovene
Croatian and Slovene form of ALAN.
ALENKA f Slovene
Slovene diminutive of ALENA.
ALEŠ m Czech, Slovak, Slovene
Diminutive of ALEXEJ or ALEKSANDER.
ALEX m & f English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Czech, Russian
Short form of ALEXANDER, ALEXANDRA, and other names beginning with Alex.
ALEXANDER m English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, king of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.... [more]
ALEXANDR m Czech
Czech form of ALEXANDER.
ALEXANDRA f English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Catalan, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
ALEXEI m Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Alternate transcription of Russian Алексей (see ALEKSEY), Ukrainian Олексій (see OLEKSIY) or Belarusian Аляксей (see ALIAKSEI).
ALEXEJ m Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of ALEXIS.
ALEXEY m Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Alternate transcription of Russian Алексей (see ALEKSEY), Ukrainian Олексій (see OLEKSIY) or Belarusian Аляксей (see ALIAKSEI).
ALFONZ m Slovene
Slovene form of ALFONSO.
ALFRÉD m Hungarian, Slovak
Hungarian and Slovak form of ALFRED.
ALFRED m English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Dutch
Derived from the Old English name Ælfræd, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and ræd "counsel". Alfred the Great was a 9th-century king of Wessex who fought unceasingly against the Danes living in northeast England. He was also a scholar, and he translated many Latin books into Old English. His fame helped to ensure the usage of this name even after the Norman Conquest, when most Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. It became rare by the end of the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 18th century.... [more]
ALIAKSANDR m Belarusian
Belarusian form of ALEXANDER.
ALIAKSEI m Belarusian
Belarusian form of ALEXIS.
ALICA f Slovak
Slovak form of ALICE.
ALICE f English, French, Portuguese, Italian, Czech
From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).
ALICJA f Polish
Polish form of ALICE.
ALINA f Romanian, German, Italian, Polish
Short form of ADELINA and names that end in alina.
ALISA f Russian, Ukrainian, Bosnian, Finnish
Russian, Ukrainian, Bosnian and Finnish form of ALICE.
ALJA f Slovene
Diminutive of ALEKSANDRA.
ALJAŽ m Slovene
Derived from a Slovene surname, which is of unknown meaning.
ALJOŠA m Slovene, Croatian, Serbian
Slovene, Croatian and Serbian form of ALYOSHA.
ALLA f Russian, Ukrainian
Meaning unknown, possibly of German origin.
ALLOCHKA f Russian
Russian diminutive of ALLA.
ALMIR (2) m Bosnian
Bosnian form of AL-AMIR.
ALMIRA (2) f Bosnian
Bosnian feminine form of AL-AMIR.
ALOIS m German, Czech
German and Czech form of ALOYSIUS.
ALOJZ m Slovene, Slovak, Croatian
Slovene, Slovak and Croatian form of ALOYSIUS.
ALOJZIA f Slovak
Slovak feminine form of ALOYSIUS.
ALOJZIJ m Slovene
Slovene form of ALOYSIUS.
ALOJZIJA f Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian feminine form of ALOYSIUS.
ALOJZIJE m Croatian
Croatian form of ALOYSIUS.
ALOJZY m Polish
Polish form of ALOYSIUS.
ALYA (2) f Russian
Diminutive of ALEKSANDRA, ALBINA, and other names beginning with Ал.
ALYONA f Russian
Originally a Russian diminutive of YELENA. It is now used independently.
ALYOSHA m Russian
Diminutive of ALEKSEY.
ALŽBĚTA f Czech
Czech form of ELIZABETH.
ALŽBETA f Slovak
Slovak form of ELIZABETH.
AMADEJ m Slovene
Slovene form of AMADEUS.
AMÁLIA f Hungarian, Portuguese, Slovak
Hungarian, Portuguese and Slovak form of AMALIA.
AMÁLIE f Czech
Czech form of AMALIA.
AMALIJA f Lithuanian, Slovene, Croatian
Lithuanian, Slovene and Croatian form of AMALIA.
AMAR (2) m Bosnian
Bosnian form of 'AMMAR.
AMBROŽ m Slovene, Czech (Rare)
Slovene and Czech form of Ambrosius (see AMBROSE).
AMBROZIJE m Croatian (Rare)
Croatian form of Ambrosius (see AMBROSE).
AMBROŻY m Polish (Rare)
Polish form of Ambrosius (see AMBROSE).
AMEL (1) m Bosnian
Bosnian masculine form of AMAL (1).
AMELA f Bosnian
Bosnian feminine form of AMAL (1).
AMELIA f English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Variant of AMALIA, though it is sometimes confused with EMILIA, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of George II and George III. Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.
AMINA f Bosnian, Arabic
Bosnian form of AMINAH (2). It is also an alternate transcription of Arabic AMINAH (1) or AMINAH (2).
ANA f Spanish, Portuguese, Slovene, Bulgarian, Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian
Form of ANNA used in various languages.
ANAMARIJA f Croatian, Macedonian
Combination of ANA and MARIJA.
ANASTAS m Russian, Bulgarian
Russian and Bulgarian form of ANASTASIUS.
ANASTASIA f Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, English, Spanish, Italian, Georgian, Ancient Greek
Feminine form of ANASTASIUS. This was the name of a 4th-century Dalmatian saint who was martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. Due to her, the name has been common in Eastern Orthodox Christianity (in various spellings). As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the youngest daughter of the last Russian tsar Nicholas II, who was rumoured to have escaped the execution of her family in 1918.
ANASTASIJA f Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Serbian
Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian and Serbian form of ANASTASIA.
ANASTASIY m Russian (Archaic), Bulgarian (Archaic)
Older Russian and Bulgarian form of ANASTASIUS.
ANASTASIYA f Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Bulgarian
Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian form of ANASTASIA. This name was borne by the wife of the Russian czar Ivan the Terrible.
ANASTÁZIA f Slovak
Slovak form of ANASTASIA.
ANASTÁZIE f Czech
Czech form of ANASTASIA.
ANASTAZIE f Czech
Czech form of ANASTASIA.
ANASTAZIJA f Croatian, Slovene
Croatian and Slovene form of ANASTASIA.
ANASTAZJA f Polish
Polish form of ANASTASIA.
ANASTAZY m Polish
Polish form of ANASTASIUS.
ANATOL m Polish
Polish form of ANATOLIUS.
ANATOLI m Russian, Ukrainian
Alternate transcription of Russian Анатолий or Ukrainian Анатолій (see ANATOLIY).
ANATOLIY m Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of ANATOLIUS.
ANATOLY m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Анатолий (see ANATOLIY).
ANĐA f Croatian, Serbian
Diminutive of ANĐELA.
ANDĚL m Czech
Czech form of ANGEL.
ANĐELA f Croatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of ANGELA.
ANDĚLA f Czech
Czech form of ANGELA.
ANĐELKA f Croatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of ANGELA.
ANĐELKO m Croatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of ANGEL.
ANĐELO m Croatian
Croatian form of ANGEL.
ANDJELA f Serbian
Alternate transcription of Serbian Анђела (see ANĐELA).
ANDRAŽ m Slovene
Slovene form of ANDREW.
ANDREA (2) f English, German, Spanish, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Dutch, Croatian, Serbian
Feminine form of ANDREW. As an English name, it has been used since the 17th century, though it was not common until the 20th century.
ANDREI m Romanian, Russian, Bulgarian, Belarusian, Old Church Slavic
Romanian form of ANDREW, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Андрей or Belarusian Андрэй (see ANDREY).
ANDREJ m Slovene, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Form of ANDREW in several languages.
ANDREJA (1) f Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian feminine form of ANDREJ.
ANDREJA (2) m Serbian
Serbian form of ANDREW.
ANDREY m Russian, Bulgarian, Belarusian
Russian, Bulgarian and Belarusian form of ANDREW.
ANDRIANA f Greek, Bulgarian
Feminine form of ANDREAS (Greek) or ANDREY (Bulgarian).
ANDRIJA m Croatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of ANDREW.
ANDRIJANA f Croatian, Serbian
Feminine form of ANDRIJA.
ANDRIY m Ukrainian
Ukrainian form of ANDREW.
ANDRO m Croatian, Georgian
Croatian form of ANDREW, as well as a Georgian short form of ANDRIA.
ANDRZEJ m Polish
Polish form of ANDREW.
ANDŻELIKA f Polish
Polish variant of ANGELIKA.
ANEJ m Slovene
Slovene form of AENEAS.
ANELIA f Bulgarian
Alternate transcription of Bulgarian Анелия (see ANELIYA).
ANELIYA f Bulgarian
Diminutive of ANNA.
ANETA f Polish, Czech
Polish and Czech diminutive of ANNA.
ANEŽKA f Czech
Czech form of AGNES.
ANFISA f Russian
Russian form of the Greek name Ανθουσα (Anthousa), which was derived from Greek ανθος (anthos) "flower". This was the name of a 9th-century Byzantine saint.
ANGEL m & f English, Bulgarian, Macedonian
From the medieval Latin masculine name Angelus, which was derived from the name of the heavenly creature (itself derived from the Greek word αγγελος (angelos) meaning "messenger"). It has never been very common in the English-speaking world, where it is sometimes used as a feminine name in modern times.
ANGELA f English, Italian, German, Dutch, Romanian, Slovene, Slovak, Russian, Macedonian, Late Roman
Feminine form of Angelus (see ANGEL). As an English name, it came into use in the 18th century.
ANGELIKA f German, Polish, Slovak, Czech
Form of ANGELICA in several languages.
ANGELINA f Italian, English, Russian, German, Dutch, Spanish, Greek, Macedonian
Latinate diminutive of ANGELA. A famous bearer is American actress Angelina Jolie (1975-).
ANGJELKO m Macedonian
Macedonian diminutive of ANGEL.
ANIA f Polish, Russian
Polish diminutive of ANNA, and an alternate transcription of Russian Аня (see ANYA).
ANICA f Slovene, Croatian, Serbian
Slovene, Croatian and Serbian diminutive of ANNA.
ANIELA f Polish
Polish form of ANGELA.
ANIELKA f Polish
Diminutive of ANIELA.
ANIKA (1) f German, Dutch, Danish, Slovene
German, Dutch, Danish and Slovene diminutive of ANNA or ANA.
ANISIM m Russian
Russian form of ONESIMUS.
ANITA (1) f Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian, Slovene, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Latvian
Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian and Slovene diminutive of ANA.
ANJA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, German, Dutch
Form of ANYA in several languages.
ANKICA f Croatian
Diminutive of ANKA.
ANNA f English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary. In the English-speaking world, this form came into general use in the 18th century, joining Ann and Anne.... [more]
ANNUSHKA f Russian
Russian diminutive of ANNA.
ANTE (1) m Croatian
Croatian form of ANTHONY.
ANTEA f Croatian (Modern)
Feminine form of ANTE (1).
ANTICA f Croatian
Croatian diminutive of ANTONIA.
ANTO m Croatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ANTONELA f Croatian
Croatian form of ANTONELLA.
ANTONI m Polish, Catalan
Polish and Catalan form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ANTÓNIA f Portuguese, Slovak, Hungarian
Portuguese, Slovak and Hungarian feminine form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ANTONIE (1) f Czech
Czech form of ANTONIA.
ANTONIJ m Macedonian
Macedonian form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ANTONIJA f Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Croatian, Serbian and Slovene form of ANTONIA.
ANTONIJE m Serbian
Serbian form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ANTONIJO m Croatian
Croatian form of ANTHONY.
ANTONÍN m Czech
Czech form of Antoninus (see ANTONINO). A famous bearer was the Czech composer Antonín Dvořák (1841-1904).
ANTONINA f Italian, Polish, Russian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Antoninus (see ANTONINO).
ANTONIO m Spanish, Italian, Croatian
Spanish and Italian form of Antonius (see ANTHONY). A famous bearer was the Italian Renaissance painter Antonio Pisanello (c. 1395-1455). It is also the name of the main character in 'The Merchant of Venice' (1596) by William Shakespeare.
ANTONIYA f Bulgarian
Bulgarian form of ANTONIA.
ANTUN m Croatian
Croatian form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ANUŠA f Slovene
Diminutive of ANA.
ANUSHKA f Russian
Variant of ANNUSHKA.
ANYA f Russian
Russian diminutive of ANNA.
ANŽE m Slovene
Variant of JANEZ.
ANZHELA f Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of ANGELA.
ANZHELIKA f Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of ANGELICA.
APOLENA f Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of APOLLONIA.
APOLINARY m Polish
Polish form of APOLLINARIS.
APOLLINARIYA f Russian
Russian feminine form of APOLLINARIS.
APOLONIA f Spanish, Polish
Spanish and Polish form of APOLLONIA.
APOLONIJA f Slovene
Slovene form of APOLLONIA.
APOSTOL m Romanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Romanian, Bulgarian and Macedonian form of APOSTOLOS.
ARIADNA f Spanish, Catalan, Russian, Polish
Spanish, Catalan, Russian and Polish form of ARIADNE.
ARIJANA f Croatian
Croatian form of ARIANNA.
ARINA f Russian
Russian variant of IRINA.
ARISHA f Russian
Diminutive of ARINA.
ARISTARKH m Russian
Russian form of ARISTARCHUS.
ARKADI m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Аркадий (see ARKADIY).
ARKADIUSZ m Polish
Polish form of ARKADIOS.
ARKADIY m Russian
Russian form of ARKADIOS. This is the name of one of the main characters in Ivan Turgenev's 'Fathers and Sons' (1862).
ARKADY m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Аркадий (see ARKADIY).
ARKHIP m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of ARCHIPPOS.
ARNOŠT m Czech, Sorbian
Czech and Sorbian form of ERNEST.
ARON m Polish, Croatian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic
Polish, Croatian and Scandinavian form of AARON.
ARSENI m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Арсений (see ARSENIY).
ARSENIY m Russian
Russian form of ARSENIOS.
ARTEM m Ukrainian, Belarusian, Russian
Ukrainian and Belarusian form of ARTEMIOS. It is also an alternate transcription of Russian Артём (see ARTYOM).
ARTEMIY m Russian
Russian variant form of ARTEMIOS.
ARTYOM m Russian
Russian form of ARTEMIOS.
ASEN m Bulgarian
Meaning unknown, probably of Turkic origin. This was the name of a 12th-century Bulgarian emperor (Ivan Asen I) and several of his successors.
ASIA (2) f Polish
Polish diminutive of JOANNA.
ATANAS m Bulgarian, Macedonian
Bulgarian and Macedonian form of ATHANASIUS.
ATANASIJ m Macedonian
Macedonian form of ATHANASIUS.
ATANASIJA f Serbian, Macedonian
Serbian and Macedonian feminine form of ATHANASIUS.
ATANASIJE m Serbian
Serbian form of ATHANASIUS.
AUGUST m German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Catalan, English
German, Polish, Scandinavian and Catalan form of AUGUSTUS. This was the name of three Polish kings.
AUGUSTA f German, Italian, Portuguese, Polish, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of AUGUSTUS. It was introduced to Britain when King George III, a member of the German House of Hanover, gave this name to his second daughter in the 18th century.
AUGUSTÍN m Slovak, Czech
Slovak and Czech form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AUGUSTIN m French, Czech, Romanian, Croatian, German
Form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)) in several languages.
AUGUSTYN m Polish
Polish form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AUREL m German, Romanian, Czech, Slovak
German, Romanian, Czech and Slovak form of AURELIUS.
AURELIUSZ m Polish
Polish form of AURELIUS.
AVDOTYA f Russian
Russian form of EUDOCIA.
AVGUST m Slovene, Russian, Ukrainian
Slovene, Russian and Ukrainian form of AUGUSTUS.
AVGUSTA f Slovene
Slovene feminine form of AUGUSTUS.
AVGUŠTIN m Slovene
Slovene form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AVKSENTIY m Russian
Russian form of AUXENTIOS.
AZRA f Arabic, Turkish, Bosnian, Persian, Urdu
Means "virgin" in Arabic.
BAKIR m Bosnian
Bosnian form of BAQIR.
BÁRA f Czech
Czech diminutive of BARBORA.
BARA f Croatian
Croatian short form of BARBARA.
BARBARA f English, Italian, French, German, Polish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Late Roman
Derived from Greek βαρβαρος (barbaros) meaning "foreign". According to legend, Saint Barbara was a young woman killed by her father Dioscorus, who was then killed by a bolt of lightning. She is the patron of architects, geologists, stonemasons and artillerymen. Because of her renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was revived in the 19th century.
BARBORA f Czech, Slovak, Lithuanian
Czech, Slovak and Lithuanian form of BARBARA.
BARICA f Croatian
Croatian diminutive of BARBARA.
BARNABA m Italian (Rare), Polish (Rare)
Italian and Polish form of BARNABAS.
BARTEK m Polish
Polish diminutive of BARTŁOMIEJ or BARTOSZ.
BARTŁOMIEJ m Polish
Polish form of BARTHOLOMEW.
BARTOLOMĚJ m Czech
Czech form of BARTHOLOMEW.
BARTOLOMEJ m Slovak, Croatian (Rare)
Slovak and Croatian form of BARTHOLOMEW.
BARTOSZ m Polish
Polish form of BARTHOLOMEW.
BARYS m Belarusian
Belarusian form of BORIS.
BASIA (1) f Polish
Polish diminutive of BARBARA.
BAZYLI m Polish (Rare)
Polish form of BASIL (1).
BEÁTA f Hungarian, Czech, Slovak
Hungarian, Czech and Slovak form of BEATA.
BEATA f Polish, German, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Derived from Latin beatus meaning "blessed". This was the name of a few minor saints.
BEATRYCZE f Polish
Polish form of BEATRIX.
BEDŘICH m Czech
Czech form of FREDERICK.
BEDŘIŠKA f Czech
Czech feminine form of FREDERICK.
BĚLA f Czech
Derived from the old Slavic word белъ (belu) meaning "white".
BENEDIKT m German, Russian, Icelandic, Czech
Form of Benedictus (see BENEDICT) in several languages.
BENEDYKT m Polish
Polish form of Benedictus (see BENEDICT).
BENEDYKTA f Polish
Polish feminine form of BENEDICT.
BENIAMIN m Romanian, Polish, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Romanian and Polish form of BENJAMIN, as well as the form used in the Greek and Latin Bibles.
BENJAMÍN m Spanish, Czech, Slovak, Icelandic
Spanish, Czech, Slovak and Icelandic form of BENJAMIN.
BERISLAV m Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements birati "to take, to gather" (in an inflected form) and slava "glory".
BERNARD m English, French, Dutch, Polish, Croatian, Slovene, Czech, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element bern "bear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Beornheard. This was the name of several saints, including Saint Bernard of Menthon who built hospices in the Swiss Alps in the 10th century, and Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, a 12th-century theologian and Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include the Irish playwright and essayist George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) and the British World War II field marshal Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976).
BERNARDA f Slovene, Croatian, Spanish
Feminine form of BERNARD.
BERTA f Polish, Czech, Hungarian, German, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Slovene
Form of BERTHA in several languages.
BETI f Macedonian
Macedonian diminutive of ELISAVETA.
BIANKA f German, Hungarian, Polish
German, Hungarian and Polish form of BIANCA.
BILJANA f Serbian, Macedonian, Croatian
Meaning uncertain, possibly derived from the South Slavic word биље (bilje) meaning "herb".
BILYANA f Bulgarian
Bulgarian form of BILJANA.
BINE (2) m Slovene
Diminutive of ALBIN.
BISERA f Bulgarian, Macedonian
Derived from the South Slavic word бисер (biser) "pearl" (ultimately of Arabic origin).
BISERKA f Croatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of BISERA.
BISTRA f Bulgarian, Macedonian
Means "clean, pure" in Bulgarian and Macedonian.
BLAGA f Bulgarian
Feminine form of BLAGOY.
BLAGICA f Macedonian
Derived from South Slavic благ (blag) meaning "sweet, pleasant, good".
BLAGO m Croatian, Bulgarian
Croatian form of BLAGOY, as well as a Bulgarian variant.
BLAGOJ m Macedonian
Macedonian form of BLAGOY.
BLAGOJE m Serbian
Serbian form of BLAGOY.
BLAGORODNA f Macedonian, Bulgarian
Means "noble" in Macedonian and Bulgarian.
BLAGOY m Bulgarian
Derived from South Slavic благ (blag) meaning "sweet, pleasant, good".
BLAGUN m Bulgarian, Macedonian
Derived from South Slavic благ (blag) meaning "sweet, pleasant, good".
BLAGUNA f Macedonian, Bulgarian
Feminine form of BLAGUN.
BLANKA f Czech, Slovak, Polish, Hungarian, Croatian
Form of BLANCHE in several languages.
BLAŽ m Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian form of BLAISE. It is also associated with South Slavic blag meaning "sweet, pleasant, good".
BŁAŻEJ m Polish
Polish form of BLAISE.