Slovene Names

Slovene names are used in the country of Slovenia in central Europe.
Filter Results     
more options...
ADRIJANA   f   Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Slovene, Serbian, Croatian and Macedonian feminine form of ADRIAN.
ALBINA   f   Russian, Ukrainian, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Slovene, Polish, German, Lithuanian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of ALBINUS. Saint Albina was a 3rd-century martyr from Caesarea.
ALEKS   m   Russian, Ukrainian, Slovene, Polish
Short form of ALEKSEY or ALEKSANDR.
ALEKSEJ   m   Slovene
Slovene form of ALEXIS.
ALEN   m   Croatian, Slovene
Croatian and Slovene form of ALAN.
ALENA   f   German, Czech, Slovak, Slovene
Short form of MAGDALENA or HELENA.
ALENKA   f   Slovene
Slovene diminutive of ALENA.
ALEŠ   m   Czech, Slovak, Slovene
Diminutive of ALEXEJ or ALEKSANDER.
ALFONZ   m   Slovene
Slovene form of ALFONSO.
ALJAŽ   m   Slovene
Derived from a Slovene surname, which is of unknown meaning.
ALJOŠA   m   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian form of ALYOSHA.
ALOJZ   m   Slovene, Slovak, Croatian
Slovene, Slovak and Croatian form of ALOYSIUS.
ALOJZIJ   m   Slovene
Slovene form of ALOYSIUS.
ALOJZIJA   f   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian feminine form of ALOYSIUS.
AMADEJ   m   Slovene
Slovene form of AMADEUS.
AMALIJA   f   Lithuanian, Slovene, Croatian
Lithuanian, Slovene and Croatian form of AMALIA.
AMBROŽ   m   Slovene, Czech (Rare)
Slovene and Czech form of Ambrosius (see AMBROSE).
ANASTAZIJA   f   Croatian, Slovene
Croatian and Slovene form of ANASTASIA.
ANDRAŽ   m   Slovene
Slovene form of ANDREW.
ANDREJA (1)   f   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian feminine form of ANDREJ.
ANEJ   m   Slovene
Slovene form of AENEAS.
ANGELA   f   English, Italian, German, Dutch, Romanian, Slovene, Slovak, Russian, Macedonian, Late Roman
Feminine form of Angelus (see ANGEL). As an English name, it came into use in the 18th century.
ANICA   f   Slovene, Croatian, Serbian
Slovene, Croatian and Serbian diminutive of ANNA.
ANIKA (1)   f   German, Dutch, Danish, Slovene
German, Dutch, Danish and Slovene diminutive of ANNA or ANA.
ANITA (1)   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian, Slovene, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Latvian
Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian and Slovene diminutive of ANA.
ANTONIJA   f   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Croatian, Serbian and Slovene form of ANTONIA.
ANŽE   m   Slovene
Variant of JANEZ.
APOLONIJA   f   Slovene
Slovene form of APOLLONIA.
AVGUST   m   Slovene, Russian, Ukrainian
Slovene, Russian and Ukrainian form of AUGUSTUS.
AVGUSTA   f   Slovene
Slovene feminine form of AUGUSTUS.
AVGUŠTIN   m   Slovene
Slovene form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
BARBARA   f   English, Italian, French, German, Polish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Late Roman
Derived from Greek βαρβαρος (barbaros) meaning "foreign". According to legend, Saint Barbara was a young woman killed by her father Dioscorus, who was then killed by a bolt of lightning. She is the patron of architects, geologists, stonemasons and artillerymen. Because of her renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was revived in the 19th century.
BERNARD   m   English, French, Dutch, Polish, Croatian, Slovene, Czech, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element bern "bear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Beornheard. This was the name of several saints, including Saint Bernard of Menthon who built hospices in the Swiss Alps in the 10th century, and Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, a 12th-century theologian and Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include the Irish playwright and essayist George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) and the British World War II field marshal Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976).
BERNARDA   f   Slovene, Croatian, Spanish
Feminine form of BERNARD.
BLAŽ   m   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian form of BLAISE. It may also be derived from the Slavic element blagu meaning "sweet, pleasant, blessed".
BOGDAN   m   Polish, Russian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Romanian, Medieval Slavic
Means "given by God" from the Slavic elements bogu "god" and dan "given".
BOGOMIR   m   Slovene
Slovene form of BOHUMÍR.
BOJAN   m   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
Derived from the Slavic element boji meaning "battle". This was the name of a 9th-century Bulgarian saint.
BOJANA   f   Slovene, Macedonian, Serbian, Croatian
Feminine form of BOJAN.
BOR   m   Slovene
Short form of names containing bor, such as BORISLAV or BORIS. It is also a South Slavic word meaning "pine tree".
BORIS   m   Bulgarian, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian, German, History
From the Turkic name Bogoris, perhaps meaning "short" or "wolf" or "snow leopard". It was borne by the 9th-century king Boris I of Bulgaria who converted his country to Christianity, as well as two later Bulgarian emperors. The name was popularized in the Slavic world due to the 11th-century Saint Boris, who was a Russian prince martyred with his brother Gleb. His mother may have been Bulgarian. Another famous bearer was the 16th-century Russian emperor Boris Godunov, later the subject of a play of that name by Aleksandr Pushkin.
BORISLAV   m   Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Russian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element borti "battle" combined with slava "glory".
BORUT   m   Slovene
Diminutive of BORIS.
BOŠKO   m   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene
Diminutive of BOGDAN or BOŽIDAR.
BOŠTJAN   m   Slovene
Short form of SEBASTJAN.
BOŽENA   f   Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian
Derived from the Slavic element bozy meaning "divine".
BOŽIDAR   m   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene
Means "divine gift" from the Slavic elements bozy "divine" and daru "gift".
BOŽO   m   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Originally a diminutive of BOŽIDAR and other names beginning with the Slavic element bozy meaning "divine".
BRANIMIR   m   Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Slovene
Derived from the Slavic element borna "protection" combined with miru meaning "peace, world".
BRANISLAVA   f   Serbian, Slovak, Czech, Slovene
Serbian, Slovak, Czech and Slovene feminine form of BRONISŁAW.
BRANKA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene
Feminine form of BRANKO.
BRIGITA   f   Slovene, Croatian, Latvian
Slovene, Croatian and Latvian form of BRIDGET.
CECILIJA   f   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian form of CECILIA.
CILA   f   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian diminutive of CECILIA.
CILKA   f   Slovene
Slovene diminutive of CECILIA.
CIRIL   m   Slovene
Slovene form of CYRIL.
CIRILA   f   Slovene
Slovene feminine form of CYRIL.
ČRT   m   Slovene
Short form of ČRTOMIR.
ČRTOMIR   m   Slovene
Derived from the Slavic elements črt "hatred" and miru "peace, world". This is the name of the hero in the Slovene national epic 'Baptism on the Savica' (1835) by France Prešeren.
CVETKA   f   Slovene
Derived from Slovene cvet meaning "blossom, flower".
CVETKO   m   Slovene
Masculine form of CVETKA.
DALIBOR   m   Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements dali meaning "distance" and borti meaning "to fight".
DALIBORKA   f   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Feminine form of DALIBOR.
DAMIJAN   m   Slovene
Slovene form of DAMIAN.
DAMIJANA   f   Slovene
Slovene feminine form of DAMIAN.
DAMIR   m   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Possibly derived from the Slavic elements dan "given" and miru "peace, world". Otherwise, it might be of Turkic origin.
DAMJAN   m   Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Slovene, Croatian, Serbian and Macedonian form of DAMIAN.
DAMJANA   f   Slovene, Serbian, Macedonian
Slovene, Serbian and Macedonian feminine form of DAMIAN.
DANICA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Slovak, Czech, Macedonian, English
From a Slavic word meaning "morning star, Venus". This name occurs in Slavic folklore as a personification of the morning star. It has sometimes been used in the English-speaking world since the 1970s.
DANIEL   m   English, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Armenian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.... [more]
DANIJEL   m   Slovene, Croatian, Serbian
Cognate of DANIEL.
DANIJELA   f   Slovene, Croatian, Serbian
Feminine form of DANIEL.
DARIJA   f   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Croatian, Serbian and Slovene form of DARIA.
DARINKA   f   Slovene, Croatian
Either a diminutive of DARIJA, or a derivative of the Slavic word dar meaning "gift".
DARJA   f   Slovene, Czech
Slovene and Czech form of DARIA.
DARKO   m   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian
Originally a diminutive of names containing the Slavic element daru meaning "gift".
DAVID   m   English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was probably derived from Hebrew דוד (dwd) meaning "beloved". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.... [more]
DAVOR   m   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Possibly from an old Slavic exclamation expressing joy or sorrow.
DEJAN   m   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
Possibly derived from the South Slavic word dejati meaning "to act, to do". Otherwise it may be related to Latin deus "god".
DEJANA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene
Feminine form of DEJAN.
DENIS   m   French, Russian, English, German, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Romanian, Croatian
From Denys or Denis, the medieval French forms of DIONYSIUS. Saint Denis was a 3rd-century missionary to Gaul and the first bishop of Paris. He was martyred by decapitation, after which legend says he picked up his own severed head and walked for a distance while preaching a sermon. He is credited with converting the Gauls to Christianity and is considered the patron saint of France.... [more]
DIJANA   f   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian
Southern Slavic form of DIANA.
DIMITRIJ   m   Slovene, Macedonian
Slovene and Macedonian form of DEMETRIUS.
DOMEN   m   Slovene
Slovene form of DOMINIC.
DOMINIKA   f   Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Russian, Polish
Feminine form of DOMINIC.
DOROTEJA   f   Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Slovene, Croatian, Serbian and Macedonian form of DOROTHEA.
DRAGA   f   Slovene, Croatian, Serbian
Feminine form of DRAGO.
DRAGAN   m   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Bulgarian
Derived from the Slavic element dragu meaning "precious".
DRAGICA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene
Derived from the Slavic element dragu meaning "precious".
DRAGO   m   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Derived from the Slavic element dragu meaning "precious". It is also a short form of other Slavic names beginning with that element.
DRAGOMIR   m   Serbian, Croatian, Romanian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element dragu meaning "precious" combined with miru meaning "peace, world".
DRAGOSLAV   m   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements dragu meaning "precious" and slava "glory".
DRAGUTIN   m   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element dragu meaning "precious".
DUNJA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene
Means "quince" in the South Slavic languages, a quince being a type of fruit.
DUŠAN   m   Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovak, Slovene, Macedonian
Derived from Slavic dusha meaning "soul, spirit".
DUŠANKA   f   Serbian, Slovene, Croatian
Feminine form of DUŠAN.
EDI   m   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene diminutive of EDVARD and a Croatian diminutive of EDUARD.
ELIZABETA   f   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian form of ELIZABETH.
EMIL   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Romanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Polish, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Hungarian, Icelandic, English
From the Roman family name Aemilius, which was derived from Latin aemulus meaning "rival".
EMILIJA   f   Lithuanian, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
ENEJ   m   Slovene
Slovene form of AENEAS.
ERAZEM   m   Slovene
Slovene form of ERASMUS.
ERIK   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, German, Dutch, English
Scandinavian form of ERIC. This was the name of kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway. King Erik IX of Sweden (12th century) is the patron saint of that country.
ERIKA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovene, Croatian, English, Italian
Feminine form of ERIK. It also coincides with the word for "heather" in some languages.
ERNEST   m   English, French, Slovene, Polish
Derived from Germanic eornost meaning "serious". It was introduced to England by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century, though it did not become common until the following century. The American author and adventurer Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961) was a famous bearer of the name. It was also used by Oscar Wilde for a character in his comedy 'The Importance of Being Earnest' (1895).
EVA   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, English, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin
Latinate form of EVE. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. It is also a variant transcription of Russian YEVA. This name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.
FABIJAN   m   Croatian, Slovene
Croatian and Slovene form of Fabianus (see FABIAN).
FELIKS   m   Russian, Slovene, Polish
Russian, Slovene and Polish form of FELIX.
FERDINAND   m   German, French, Dutch, English, Czech, Slovene, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
From Ferdinando, the old Spanish form of a Germanic name composed of the elements fardi "journey" and nand "daring, brave". The Visigoths brought the name to the Iberian Peninsula, where it entered into the royal families of Spain and Portugal. From there it became common among the Habsburg royal family of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria, starting with the Spanish-born Ferdinand I in the 16th century. A notable bearer was Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan (1480-1521), called Fernão de Magalhães in Portuguese, who was the leader of the first expedition to sail around the earth.
FRAN   m & f   Spanish, English, Croatian, Slovene
Short form of FRANCIS, FRANCES or related names.
FRANC   m   Slovene
Slovene form of FRANCIS.
FRANČIŠEK   m   Slovene
Slovene form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRANČIŠKA   f   Slovene
Slovene feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRANCKA   f   Slovene
Short form of FRANČIŠKA.
FRIDERIK   m   Slovene
Slovene form of FREDERICK.
GABRIJEL   m   Croatian, Slovene
Croatian and Slovene form of GABRIEL.
GAJA (1)   f   Slovene, Polish
Either a form of GAIA or a feminine form of GAIUS.
GAL (2)   m   Slovene
Slovene form of GALLUS.
GAŠPER   m   Slovene
Slovene form of JASPER.
GORAN   m   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian
Means "mountain man", derived from South Slavic gora "mountain". It was popularized by the Croatian poet Ivan Goran Kovačić (1913-1943), who got his middle name because of the mountain town where he was born.
GREGA   m   Slovene
Slovene form of GREGORY.
GREGOR   m   German, Scottish, Slovak, Slovene
German, Scottish, Slovak and Slovene form of GREGORY. A famous bearer was Gregor Mendel (1822-1884), a Czech monk and scientist who did experiments in genetics.
HEDVIKA   f   Czech, Slovene
Czech and Slovene form of HEDWIG.
HERBERT   m   English, German, French, Slovene, Polish
Derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it replaced an Old English cognate Herebeorht. In the course of the Middle Ages it became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
HERMAN   m   English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Ancient Germanic
Means "army man", derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and man "man". It was introduced to England by the Normans, died out, and was revived in the English-speaking world in the 19th century. It was borne by a 18th-century Russian missionary to Alaska who is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church. Another famous bearer was Herman Melville (1819-1891), the author of 'Moby-Dick'.
IDA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element id meaning "work, labour". The Normans brought this name to England, though it eventually died out there in the Middle Ages. It was strongly revived in the 19th century, in part due to the heroine in Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem 'The Princess' (1847), which was later adapted into the play 'Princess Ida' (1884) by Gilbert and Sullivan.... [more]
IGNAC   m   Slovene
Slovene form of IGNATIUS.
IGNACIJ   m   Slovene
Slovene form of IGNATIUS.
IGOR   m   Russian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Russian form of Yngvarr (see INGVAR). The Varangians brought it to Russia in the 10th century. It was borne by two Grand Princes of Kiev. Famous bearers include Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971), a Russian composer whose most famous work is 'The Rite of Spring', and Igor Sikorsky (1889-1972), the Russian-American designer of the first successful helicopter.
INES   f   Italian, Slovene, Croatian
Italian, Slovene and Croatian form of INÉS.
IRENA   f   Polish, Czech, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Dutch, Lithuanian
Latinate form of IRENE.
IVA (2)   f   Czech, Slovak, Slovene
Short form of IVANA.
IVAN   m   Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Macedonian, Slovene, English, Italian
Newer form of the old Slavic name Іѡаннъ (Ioannu), which was derived from Greek Ioannes (see JOHN). This was the name of six Russian rulers, including the 15th-century Ivan III the Great and 16th-century Ivan IV the Terrible, the first tsar of Russia. It was also borne by nine emperors of Bulgaria. Other notable bearers include the Russian author Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883), who wrote 'Fathers and Sons', and the Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), who is best known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex.
IZIDOR   m   Slovene
Slovene form of ISIDORE.
JADRAN   m   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Croatian, Serbian and Slovene form of ADRIAN.
JADRANKA   f   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Croatian, Serbian and Slovene feminine form of ADRIAN.
JADRANKO   m   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Croatian, Serbian and Slovene form of ADRIAN.
JAKA   m   Slovene
Slovene form of JACOB (or JAMES).
JAN (1)   m   Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Polish, Slovene, German, Catalan
Form of JOHANNES. This name was borne by the 15th-century Flemish painter Jan van Eyck and the 17th-century Dutch painter Jan Vermeer.
JANA (1)   f   Czech, Slovak, Dutch, German, Slovene, Catalan
Feminine form of JAN (1).
JANEZ   m   Slovene
Slovene form of JOHANNES.
JANKO   m   Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Slovak
Diminutive of JANEZ or JÁN.
JAŠA   m   Slovene
Slovene diminutive of JAKOB.
JASMINA   f   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian
Croatian, Serbian, Slovene and Macedonian form of JASMINE.
JASNA   f   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian
Derived from South Slavic jasno meaning "clear, sharp".
JAVOR   m   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Means "maple tree" in South Slavic.
JELENA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian
Form of YELENA. In Serbia, Croatia and Slovenia it is also associated with the South Slavic words jelen meaning "deer, stag" and jela meaning "fir tree".
JELKA   f   Slovene, Croatian, Serbian
Diminutive of JELENA. It also means "fir tree" in Slovene.
JERNEJ   m   Slovene
Slovene form of BARTHOLOMEW.
JERNEJA   f   Slovene
Slovene feminine form of BARTHOLOMEW.
JOLANDA   f   Dutch, Slovene, Croatian, Italian
Dutch, Slovene and Croatian form of YOLANDA, as well as an Italian variant of IOLANDA.
JOSIP   m   Croatian, Slovene
Croatian and Slovene form of JOSEPH.
JOŠT   m   Slovene
Slovene form of Iudocus (see JOYCE).
JOŽE   m   Slovene
Slovene diminutive of JOSEPH.
JOŽEF   m   Slovene
Slovene form of JOSEPH.
JOŽEFA   f   Slovene
Slovene feminine form of JOSEPH.
JOZEFA   f   Hungarian, Slovene
Hungarian and Slovene feminine form of JOSEPH.
JOŽICA   f   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian feminine form of JOSEPH.
JULIJ   m   Slovene
Slovene form of JULIUS.
JULIJA   f   Slovene, Croatian, Lithuanian
Slovene, Croatian and Lithuanian form of JULIA.
JULIJANA   f   Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Slovene, Croatian, Serbian and Macedonian form of JULIANA.
JURE   m   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian form of GEORGE.
JURICA   m   Croatian, Slovene
Diminutive of JURAJ or JURIJ.
JURIJ   m   Slovene, Sorbian
Slovene and Sorbian form of GEORGE.
JUSTIN   m   English, French, Slovene
From the Latin name Iustinus, which was derived from JUSTUS. This was the name of several early saints including Justin Martyr, a Christian philosopher of the 2nd century who was beheaded in Rome. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors. As an English name, it has occasionally been used since the late Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 20th century. Famous modern bearers include pop stars Justin Timberlake (1981-) and Justin Bieber (1994-).
JUSTINA   f   English, Slovene, Czech, Lithuanian, Late Roman
Feminine form of Iustinus (see JUSTIN).
KAJA (1)   f   Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Estonian, Slovene
Scandinavian diminutive of KATARINA.
KAJA (2)   f   Polish, Slovene
Variant of GAJA (1).
KAREL   m   Dutch, Czech, Slovene
Dutch, Czech and Slovene form of CHARLES.
KARMEN   f   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian form of CARMEN.
KAROL   m   Polish, Slovak, Slovene
Polish, Slovak and Slovene form of KARL.
KATICA   f   Croatian, Slovene, Hungarian
Croatian, Slovene and Hungarian diminutive of KATHERINE.
KATJA   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Slovene
German, Scandinavian, Dutch and Slovene form of KATYA.
KLAVDIJA   f   Slovene
Slovene feminine form of CLAUDIUS.
KLEMEN   m   Slovene
Slovene form of Clemens (see CLEMENT).
KLEMENTINA   f   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian form of CLEMENTINA.
KONRAD   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Slovene
German, Scandinavian, Polish and Slovene form of CONRAD.
KRISTIJAN   m   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
Serbian, Croatian, Slovene and Macedonian form of CHRISTIAN.
KRISTJAN   m   Estonian, Slovene
Estonian and Slovene form of CHRISTIAN.
KRIŠTOF   m   Slovene, Slovak
Slovene and Slovak form of CHRISTOPHER.
KSENIJA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Slovene
Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian and Slovene form of XENIA.
LADISLAV   m   Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian
Czech, Slovak, Slovene and Croatian form of VLADISLAV.
LARA (1)   f   Russian, English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian
Russian short form of LARISA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by a character from Boris Pasternak's novel 'Doctor Zhivago' (1957) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1965).
LAURA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.... [more]
LAVRA   f   Slovene
Slovene form of LAURA.
LENART   m   Slovene
Slovene form of LEONARD.
LEON   m   English, German, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek λεων (leon) meaning "lion". During the Christian era this Greek name was merged with the Latin cognate Leo, with the result that the two forms are used somewhat interchangeably across European languages. In England during the Middle Ages this was a common name among Jews. A famous bearer was Leon Trotsky (1879-1940), a Russian Communist revolutionary.
LEOPOLD   m   German, Dutch, English, Slovene, Polish
Derived from the Germanic elements leud "people" and bald "bold". The spelling was altered due to association with Latin leo "lion". This name was common among German royalty, first with the Babenbergs and then the Habsburgs. Saint Leopold was a 12th-century Babenberg margrave of Austria, who is now considered the patron of that country. It was also borne by two Habsburg Holy Roman Emperors, as well as three kings of Belgium. Since the 19th century this name has been occasionally used in England, originally in honour of Queen Victoria's uncle, a king of Belgium, after whom she named one of her sons. It was later used by James Joyce for the main character, Leopold Bloom, in his novel 'Ulysses' (1920).
LIDIJA   f   Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Slovene, Croatian, Serbian and Macedonian form of LYDIA.
LILIJANA   f   Slovene
Slovene form of LILLIAN.
LJERKA   f   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Derived from South Slavic lijer meaning "lily".
LJUBA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovene, Macedonian
From the Slavic element lyuby meaning "love".
LJUBICA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Slovene
From the Slavic element lyuby meaning "love" combined with a diminutive suffix. It can also come from Serbo-Croatian ljubicica meaning "violet".
LJUDMILA   f   Slovene
Slovene form of LUDMILA.
LOJZE   m   Slovene
Short form of ALOJZ.
LOVRENC   m   Slovene
Slovene form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LOVRO   m   Slovene, Croatian
Short form of LOVRENC.
LUCIJA   f   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian form of LUCIA.
LUDVIK   m   Slovene
Slovene form of LUDWIG.
MAJ   m   Slovene
Either a masculine form of MAJA (1), or else from the Slovene name for the month of May.
MAJDA   f   Slovene, Croatian
Short form of MAGDALENA.
MARE   f   Estonian, Slovene, Macedonian, Croatian
Diminutive of MARIA and other names beginning with mar.
MARICA   f   Hungarian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Diminutive of MÁRIA (Hungarian) or MARIJA (Croatian, Serbian and Slovene).
MARIJAN   m   Croatian, Slovene
Croatian and Slovene form of MARIANUS.
MARIJANA   f   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian
Croatian, Serbian, Slovene and Macedonian form of MARIANA.
MARINKA   f   Croatian, Slovene
Croatian and Slovene diminutive of MARINA.
MARJAN (2)   m   Slovene, Macedonian, Serbian, Croatian
Slovene, Macedonian, Serbian and Croatian form of MARIANUS.
MARJANA   f   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene form of MARIANA.
MARJETA   f   Slovene
Slovene form of MARGARET.
MARTIN   m   English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish
From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god MARS. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.... [more]
MARTINA   f   German, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Slovene, English, Swedish, Dutch, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Martinus (see MARTIN). Saint Martina was a 3rd-century martyr who is one of the patron saints of Rome.
MAŠA   f   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian form of MASHA.
MATEJ   m   Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian
Slovak form of MATTHIAS, used to refer to the apostle chosen to replace Judas Iscariot. Also the Slovene, Croatian and Macedonian form of MATTHEW, used to refer to the evangelist and apostle also known as Levi.
MATEJA (1)   f   Slovene, Croatian
Feminine form of MATEJ.
MATEVŽ   m   Slovene
Slovene variant of MATTHEW.
MATIC   m   Slovene
Slovene variant form of MATTHIAS.
MATIJA   m & f   Slovene, Croatian, Serbian
Slovene, Croatian and Serbian form of MATTHIAS, used to refer to the apostle chosen to replace Judas Iscariot. It is occasionally used as a feminine name.
MATJAŽ   m   Slovene
Slovene variant of MATTHIAS.
METOD   m   Slovene, Slovak
Slovene and Slovak form of METHODIUS.
MIHA   m   Slovene
Short form of MIHAEL.
MIHAEL   m   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian form of MICHAEL.
MIHAELA   f   Romanian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian
Romanian, Slovene, Croatian and Macedonian feminine form of MICHAEL.
MIKLAVŽ   m   Slovene
Slovene form of NICHOLAS.
MILAN   m   Czech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Dutch
From the Slavic element milu meaning "gracious, dear", originally a short form of names that began with that element. A city in Italy bears this name, though it originates from a different source.
MILENA   f   Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Polish, Russian, Italian
Feminine form of MILAN. It began to be used in Italy in honour of Milena Vukotić (1847-1923), mother of Helen of Montenegro, the wife of Italian king Victor Emmanuel III. In Italy it can also be considered a combination of MARIA and ELENA.
MILICA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
From the Slavic element milu meaning "gracious". It was originally a diminutive of names that began with that element.
MILIVOJ   m   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements milu "gracious" and voji "soldier".
MILKA (1)   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Bulgarian
Diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear".
MILOŠ   m   Czech, Slovak, Serbian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian
Originally a diminutive of names beginning with the Slavic element milu "gracious, dear". This was the name of a 14th-century Serbian hero who apparently killed the Ottoman sultan Murad I at the Battle of Kosovo.
MIRA (2)   f   Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Polish
Short form of names containing the Slavic element miru meaning "peace" or "world".
MIRAN   m   Slovene
Derived from the Slavic element miru meaning "peace" or "world".
MIRJANA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Slovene
Possibly a form of MIRIAM.
MIRKO   m   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Italian
Originally a diminutive of MIROSLAV and other names containing the element miru "peace, world".
MIRO   m   Slovene, Croatian
Short form of MIROSLAV.
MIROSLAV   m   Czech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements miru "peace, world" and slava "glory". This was the name of a 10th-century king of Croatia who was deposed by one of his nobles after ruling for four years.
MITJA   m   Slovene
Slovene form of MITYA.
MLADEN   m   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Derived from the Slavic word младъ (mladu) meaning "young".
MOJCA   f   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian diminutive of MARIJA.
NACE   m   Slovene
Variant of IGNAC.
NADA (2)   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
Means "hope" in South Slavic.
NADJA   f   German, Slovene
German and Slovene form of NADYA (1).
NASTJA   f   Slovene
Diminutive of ANASTAZIJA.
NATALIJA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
Serbian, Croatian, Slovene and Macedonian form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATAŠA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
Serbian, Croatian, Slovene and Macedonian form of NATASHA.
NEJA   f   Slovene
Diminutive of JERNEJA.
NEJC   m   Slovene
Diminutive of JERNEJ.
NEVENKA   f   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Variant of NEVENA.
NEŽA   f   Slovene
Slovene form of AGNES.
NIK   m   English, Greek, Slovene
Short form of NIKOLAS, NIKOLAOS, NIKOLAJ or NIKOLA (1).
NIKA (2)   f   Slovene, Croatian
Feminine form of NIKOLA (1).
NIKO   m   Finnish, Croatian, Slovene
Finnish form of NICHOLAS, and a Croatian and Slovene short form of NIKOLA (1).
NIKOLAJ   m   Danish, Slovene
Danish and Slovene form of NICHOLAS.
NINA (1)   f   Russian, Italian, English, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, Polish, Slovene, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian
Short form of names that end in nina, such as ANTONINA or GIANNINA. It was imported to Western Europe from Russia and Italy in the 19th century. This name also coincides with the Spanish word niña meaning "little girl".
OLGA   f   Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian
Russian form of HELGA. The Varangians brought it from Scandinavia to Russia. The 10th-century Saint Olga was the wife of Igor I, Grand Prince of Kievan Rus (a state based around the city of Kiev). Following his death she ruled as regent for her son for 18 years. After she was baptized in Constantinople she attempted to convert her subjects to Christianity.
OŽBALT   m   Slovene
Slovene form of OSWALD.
OŽBEJ   m   Slovene
Slovene variant form of OSWALD.
PATRICIJA   f   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian feminine form of Patricius (see PATRICK).
PAVEL   m   Russian, Czech, Bulgarian, Slovene, Macedonian
Russian, Czech, Bulgarian, Slovene and Macedonian form of PAUL.
Next Page        414 results (this is page 1 of 2)