Spanish Names

Spanish names are used in Spain and other Spanish-speaking countries (such as those in South America). See also about Spanish names.
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ABELmEnglish, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name הֶבֶל (Hevel) meaning "breath". In the Old Testament he is the second son of Adam and Eve, murdered out of envy by his brother Cain. In England, this name came into use during the Middle Ages, and it was common during the Puritan era.
ABENEfBasque
Derived from Basque abe meaning "pillar". It is a Basque equivalent of Pilar.
ABIGAÍLfSpanish
Spanish form of ABIGAIL.
ABILIOmSpanish
Spanish form of AVILIUS.
ABRAHAMmEnglish, Hebrew, Spanish, French, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
This name may be viewed either as meaning "father of many" in Hebrew or else as a contraction of ABRAM (1) and הָמוֹן (hamon) meaning "many, multitude". The biblical patriarch Abraham was originally named Abram but God changed his name (see Genesis 17:5). With his father Terah, he led his wife Sarah, his nephew Lot and their other followers from Ur into Canaan. He is regarded by Jews as being the founder of the Hebrews through his son Isaac and by Muslims as being the founder of the Arabs through his son Ishmael.... [more]
ADAMmEnglish, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Catalan, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make".... [more]
ADÁNmSpanish
Spanish form of ADAM.
ADELAfEnglish, Spanish, Romanian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element adal meaning "noble". Saint Adela was a 7th-century Frankish princess who founded a monastery at Pfazel in France. This name was also borne by a daughter of William the Conqueror.
ADELAIDAfSpanish, Hungarian
Spanish and Hungarian form of ADELAIDE.
ADELARDOmSpanish, Italian (Archaic)
Spanish and Italian form of ADALHARD.
ADELIAfEnglish, Spanish
Elaborated form of ADELA.
ADELINAfItalian, Portuguese, Spanish, Romanian, German, Bulgarian, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
From a Latinized Germanic name which was derived from the element adal meaning "noble".
ADELITAfSpanish (Latin American)
Spanish diminutive of ADELA. It is used especially in Mexico, where it is the name of a folk song about a female soldier.
ADOLFITOmSpanish
Spanish diminutive of ADOLFO.
ADOLFOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of ADOLF.
ADORAfSpanish
Short form of ADORACIÓN.
ADORACIÓNfSpanish
Means "adoration" in Spanish. This name refers to the event that is known in Christian tradition as the Adoration of the Magi, which is when the three Magi presented gifts to the infant Jesus and worshipped him.
ADRIÀmCatalan
Catalan form of ADRIAN.
ADRIÁNmSpanish, Hungarian
Spanish and Hungarian form of Hadrianus (see HADRIAN).
AFONSOmPortuguese, Galician
Portuguese and Galician form of ALFONSO.
ÁFRICAfSpanish
Spanish form of AFRICA (1). It is usually taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de África, the patron saint of the Spanish enclave of Ceuta in North Africa.
AGAPITOmSpanish, Italian
From the Late Latin name Agapitus or Agapetus which was derived from the Greek name Αγαπητος (Agapetos) meaning "beloved". The name Agapetus was borne by two popes.
AGNÈSfFrench, Catalan
French and Catalan form of AGNES.
ÁGUEDAfSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of AGATHA.
AGURNEfBasque
From Basque agur meaning "greeting, salutation".
AGURTZANEfBasque
From Basque agurtza meaning "greeting, salutation".
AGUSTÍmCatalan
Catalan form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AGUSTÍNmSpanish
Spanish form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AGUSTINAfSpanish
Spanish feminine form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AINA (2)fCatalan
Balearic form of ANNA.
AINGERUmBasque
Basque form of Angelus (see ANGEL).
AINHOAfBasque
From the name of a town in southwest France where there is a famous image of the Virgin Mary.
AINOAfSpanish
Spanish form of AINHOA.
AINTZAfBasque
Means "glory" in Basque.
AITORmBasque
Possibly means "good fathers" from Basque aita "father" and on "good". This was the name of a legendary ancestor of the Basques.
ALAIAfBasque
Means "joyful, happy" in Basque.
ALAZNEfBasque
Means "miracle" in Basque. It is a Basque equivalent of Milagros.
ALBA (1)fItalian, Spanish, Catalan
This name is derived from two distinct names, ALBA (2) and ALBA (3), with distinct origins, Latin and Germanic. Over time these names have become confused with one another. To further complicate the matter, alba means "dawn" in Italian, Spanish and Catalan. This may be the main inspiration behind its use in Italy and Spain.
ALBERTmEnglish, French, Catalan, German, Polish, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Romanian, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalbert, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and beraht "bright". This name was common among medieval German royalty. The Normans introduced it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Æðelberht. Though it became rare in England by the 17th century, it was repopularized in the 19th century by the German-born Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.... [more]
ALBERTE (1)mGalician
Galician form of ALBERT.
ALBERTOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of ALBERT.
ALBINAfRussian, Ukrainian, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Slovene, Polish, German, Lithuanian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of ALBINUS. Saint Albina was a 3rd-century martyr from Caesarea.
ALBINOmItalian, Portuguese, Spanish
Italian, Portuguese and Spanish form of ALBINUS.
ALCIDESmGreek Mythology (Latinized), Portuguese, Spanish
Latinized form of Greek Αλκειδης (Alkeides), derived from αλκη (alke) "strength" and the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides). This was another name for the hero Herakles.
ALE (1)m & fFinnish, Italian, Spanish
Finnish short form of ALEKSANTERI or ALEKSI, an Italian short form of ALESSANDRO, and a Spanish short form of ALEJANDRO or ALEJANDRA.
ALEIXmCatalan
Catalan form of ALEXIS.
ALEIXOmPortuguese, Galician
Portuguese and Galician form of ALEXIS.
ALEJANDRAfSpanish
Spanish form of ALEXANDRA.
ALEJANDROmSpanish
Spanish form of ALEXANDER.
ALEJOmSpanish
Spanish form of ALEXIS.
ALESANDERmBasque
Basque form of ALEXANDER.
ÀLEXmCatalan
Catalan short form of ALEXANDER.
ALEXANDRAfEnglish, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Catalan, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
ALEXANDREmFrench, Portuguese, Galician, Catalan
Form of ALEXANDER. This name was borne by the 19th-century French author Alexandre Dumas (1802-1870), who wrote 'The Three Musketeers'.
ALFONSOmSpanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of a Visigothic Germanic name, probably meaning "noble and ready", from the element adal "noble" combined with funs "ready". Other theories claim the first element is hadu or hild (see ILDEFONSO), both of which mean "battle". It is possible that two or more names merged into a single form. This was the name of six kings of Portugal and kings of several ancient regions of Spain.
ALFREDOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of ALFRED.
ALÍCIAfCatalan, Portuguese
Catalan form of ALICE, as well as a Portuguese variant.
ALICIAfSpanish, English, Swedish
Latinized form of ALICE.
ALMA (1)fEnglish, Spanish, Italian, Dutch
This name became popular after the Battle of Alma (1854), which took place near the River Alma in Crimea and ended in a victory for Britain and France. However, the name was in rare use before the battle; it was probably inspired by Latin almus "nourishing". It also coincides with the Spanish word meaning "the soul".
ALMUDENAfSpanish
Derived from Arabic المدينة (al-mudaynah) meaning "the citadel". It was in a building by this name that a concealed statue of the Virgin Mary was discovered during the Reconquista in Madrid. The Virgin of Almudena, that is Mary, is the patron saint of Madrid.
ALONDRAfSpanish
Derived from Spanish alondra meaning "lark".
ALONSOmSpanish
Spanish variant of ALFONSO.
ÁLVAROmSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish form of a Germanic name, perhaps ALFHER. Verdi used this name in his opera 'The Force of Destiny' (1862).
AMADAfSpanish
Feminine form of AMADO.
AMADOmSpanish
Spanish form of AMATUS.
AMADORmSpanish
Spanish form of AMATOR.
AMAIAfBasque
Means "the end" in Basque. This is also the name of a mountain and a village in the Basque region of Spain.
AMALIAfSpanish, Italian, Romanian, Greek, Swedish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Germanic name Amala, a short form of names beginning with the element amal meaning "work".
AMANCIOmSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of AMANTIUS.
AMANDAfEnglish, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Late Roman
In part this is a feminine form of AMANDUS. However, it was not used during the Middle Ages. In the 17th century it was recreated by authors and poets who based it directly on Latin amanda meaning "lovable, worthy of love". Notably, the playwright Colley Cibber used it for a character in his play 'Love's Last Shift' (1696). It came into regular use during the 19th century.
AMANDOmPortuguese, Spanish, Italian
Portuguese, Spanish and Italian form of AMANDUS.
AMARANTAfSpanish (Rare), Italian (Rare)
Spanish and Italian form of AMARANTHA.
AMARILISfSpanish
Spanish form of AMARYLLIS.
ÁMBARfSpanish
Spanish cognate of AMBER.
AMBROSIOmSpanish
Spanish form of Ambrosius (see AMBROSE).
AMELIAfEnglish, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Variant of AMALIA, though it is sometimes confused with EMILIA, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of George II and George III. Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.
AMÉRICAfSpanish, Portuguese (Rare)
Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of AMERIGO.
AMÉRICOmPortuguese, Spanish
Portuguese and Spanish form of AMERIGO.
AMETSm & fBasque
Means "dream" in Basque.
AMÍLCARmPortuguese, Spanish
Portuguese and Spanish form of HAMILCAR.
AMORm & fRoman Mythology, Late Roman, Spanish, Portuguese
Means "love" in Latin. This was another name for the Roman god Cupid. It also means "love" in Spanish and Portuguese, and the name can be derived directly from this vocabulary word.
AMPAROfSpanish
Means "protection, shelter" in Spanish.
ANABELfSpanish
Spanish form of ANNABEL.
ANACLETOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of ANACLETUS.
ANAÏSfOccitan, Catalan, French
Occitan and Catalan form of ANNA.
ANASTASIAfGreek, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, English, Spanish, Italian, Georgian, Ancient Greek
Feminine form of ANASTASIUS. This was the name of a 4th-century Dalmatian saint who was martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. Due to her, the name has been common in Eastern Orthodox Christianity (in various spellings). As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the youngest daughter of the last Russian tsar Nicholas II, who was rumoured to have escaped the execution of her family in 1918.
ANASTASIOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of ANASTASIUS.
ANDERmBasque
Basque form of Andreas (see ANDREW).
ANDONImBasque
Basque form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ANDREA (2)fEnglish, German, Spanish, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Dutch, Croatian, Serbian
Feminine form of ANDREW. As an English name, it has been used since the 17th century, though it was not common until the 20th century.
ANDRÉSmSpanish, Icelandic
Spanish and Icelandic form of ANDREW.
ANDREUmCatalan
Catalan form of ANDREW.
ANE (3)fBasque
Basque form of ANNA.
ÁNGELmSpanish
Spanish form of Angelus (see ANGEL).
ÀNGELmCatalan
Catalan form of Angelus (see ANGEL).
ÁNGELAfSpanish
Spanish feminine form of Angelus (see ANGEL).
ANGÉLICAfSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of ANGELICA.
ANGELINAfItalian, English, Russian, German, Dutch, Polish, Spanish, Greek, Macedonian
Latinate diminutive of ANGELA. A famous bearer is American actress Angelina Jolie (1975-).
ANGELITAfSpanish
Spanish diminutive of ANGELA.
ANÍBALmSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of HANNIBAL.
ANITA (1)fSpanish, Portuguese, Croatian, Slovene, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Latvian
Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian and Slovene diminutive of ANA.
ANNAfEnglish, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary. In the English-speaking world, this form came into general use in the 18th century, joining Ann and Anne.... [more]
ANNE (1)fFrench, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Basque
French form of ANNA. In the 13th-century it was imported to England, where it was also commonly spelled Ann. The name was borne by a 17th-century English queen and also by the second wife of Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn (the mother of Queen Elizabeth I), who was eventually beheaded in the Tower of London. This is also the name of the heroine in 'Anne of Green Gables' (1908) by Canadian author L. M. Montgomery.
ANSELMAfGerman, Italian, Spanish
Feminine form of ANSELM.
ANSELMOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of ANSELM.
ANTELMOmSpanish, Portuguese, Italian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of ANTHELM.
ANTÍAfGalician
Galician feminine form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ANTÓNmGalician
Galician form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ANTONImPolish, Catalan
Polish and Catalan form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ANTONIOmSpanish, Italian, Croatian
Spanish and Italian form of Antonius (see ANTHONY). A famous bearer was the Italian Renaissance painter Antonio Pisanello (c. 1395-1455). It is also the name of the main character in 'The Merchant of Venice' (1596) by William Shakespeare.
ANTTONmBasque
Basque form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ANUNCIACIÓNfSpanish
Spanish cognate of ANNUNZIATA.
ANXOmGalician
Galician form of Angelus (see ANGEL).
APOLINARmSpanish
Spanish form of APOLLINARIS.
APOLONIAfSpanish, Polish
Spanish and Polish form of APOLLONIA.
ARACELIfSpanish
Means "altar of the sky" from Latin ara "altar" and coeli "sky". This is an epithet of the Virgin Mary in her role as the patron saint of Lucena, Spain.
ARANTXAfBasque
Diminutive of ARANTZAZU.
ARANTZAZUfBasque
From the name of a place near the Spanish town of Oñati where there is a sanctuary dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Its name is derived from Basque arantza "thornbush".
ARGImBasque
Means "light" in Basque.
ARGIDERmBasque
Derived from Basque argi "light" and eder "beautiful".
ARGIÑEfBasque
Feminine form of ARGI.
ARIADNAfSpanish, Catalan, Russian, Polish
Spanish, Catalan, Russian and Polish form of ARIADNE.
ARIELm & fHebrew, English, French, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Means "lion of God" in Hebrew, from אֲרִי ('ari) meaning "lion" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". In the Old Testament it is used as another name for the city of Jerusalem. Shakespeare used it as the name of a spirit in his play 'The Tempest' (1611), and one of the moons of Uranus bears this name in his honour. As an English name, it became more common for females in the 1980s, especially after it was used for the title character in the Walt Disney film 'The Little Mermaid' (1989).
ARISTIDESmAncient Greek (Latinized), Spanish, Portuguese
From the Greek name Αριστειδης (Aristeides), derived from αριστος (aristos) "best" and the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides). This name was borne by the 5th-century BC Athenian statesman Aristides the Just, who was renowned for his integrity. It was also the name of a 2nd-century saint.
ARKAITZmBasque
Means "rock" in Basque.
ARMANDOmSpanish, Italian, Portuguese
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of HERMAN.
ARMIDAfItalian, Spanish
Probably created by the 16th-century Italian poet Torquato Tasso for his epic poem 'Jerusalem Delivered' (1580). In the poem Armida is a beautiful enchantress who bewitches many of the crusaders.
ARNAUmCatalan
Catalan form of ARNOLD.
ARRATSmBasque
Means "afternoon, dusk" in Basque.
ARSENIOmSpanish, Portuguese, Italian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of ARSENIOS.
ARTEMIOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of ARTEMIOS.
ARTUROmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of ARTHUR.
ASCENSIÓNfSpanish
Means "ascension" in Spanish. This name is given in reference to the Ascension of Jesus into heaven.
ASDRUBALmSpanish
Spanish form of HASDRUBAL.
ASIERmBasque
Means "the beginning" in Basque.
ASSUMPCIÓfCatalan
Catalan cognate of ASUNCIÓN.
ASUNfSpanish
Short form of ASUNCIÓN.
ASUNCIÓNfSpanish
Means "assumption" in Spanish. This name is given in reference to the assumption of the Virgin Mary into heaven.
ATILIOmSpanish
Spanish form of Attilius (see ATTILIO).
AUGUSTmGerman, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Catalan, English
German, Polish, Scandinavian and Catalan form of AUGUSTUS.
AUGUSTOmSpanish, Italian, Portuguese
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of AUGUSTUS.
AURAfEnglish, Italian, Spanish, Finnish
From the word aura (derived from Latin, ultimately from Greek αυρα meaning "breeze") for a distinctive atmosphere or illumination.
ÁUREAfSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of AUREA.
AURELIANOmSpanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of AURELIANUS.
AURELIOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of AURELIUS.
AURORAfItalian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Romanian, Finnish, Roman Mythology
Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.
AZENETHfSpanish
Spanish form of ASENATH.
AZUCENAfSpanish
Means "madonna lily" in Spanish.
BAKARmBasque
Means "alone" in Basque.
BAKARNEfBasque
Feminine form of BAKAR.
BALBINAfSpanish (Rare), Portuguese (Rare), Italian (Rare), Ancient Roman
Feminine form of BALBINUS. Saint Balbina was a 2nd-century Roman woman martyred with her father Quirinus.
BALBINOmSpanish (Rare), Portuguese (Rare), Italian (Rare)
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of BALBINUS.
BALDOmItalian, Spanish, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element bald "bold, brave", such as BALDOVINO and TEOBALDO. In Italian it can also be short for the non-Germanic name BALDASSARE.
BALDOMEROmSpanish
Derived from the Germanic elements bald "bold, brave" and mari "famous".
BALDUINOmSpanish
Spanish form of BALDWIN.
BALENDINmBasque
Basque form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)).
BALTASAR (1)mSpanish
Spanish form of BALTAZAR.
BÁRBARAfPortuguese, Spanish
Portuguese and Spanish form of BARBARA.
BARTOLOMEUmPortuguese, Galician
Portuguese and Galician form of BARTHOLOMEW.
BARTOMEUmCatalan
Catalan form of BARTHOLOMEW.
BASAJAUNmBasque
Means "lord of the woods" from Basque baso "woods" and jaun "lord". This is the name of a character in Basque folklore, the Old Man of the Woods.
BASILIOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of BASIL (1).
BAUDELIOmSpanish
From Baudelius, a Latinized form of a possibly Germanic name. Saint Baudelius was a 3rd-century saint and martyr from Orleans.
BAUTISTAmSpanish
Spanish form of BAPTISTE.
BEATRIUfCatalan
Catalan form of BEATRIX.
BEATRIZfSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of BEATRIX.
BELÉNfSpanish
Spanish form of Bethlehem, the name of the town in Judah where King David and Jesus were born. The town's name is from Hebrew בֵּית־לֶחֶם (Beit-lechem) meaning "house of bread".
BEÑATmBasque
Basque form of BERNARD.
BENIGNOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of the Late Latin name Benignus which meant "kind, friendly" in Latin. This was the name of several saints including a 5th-century disciple of Saint Patrick who later became the chief Bishop of Ireland.
BENITAfSpanish
Feminine form of BENITO.
BENITOmSpanish, Italian
Spanish form of BENEDICT. This name was borne by Mexican president Benito Juárez, and also by Benito Mussolini (who was named after Juárez), the fascist dictator of Italy during World War II.
BENJAMÍNmSpanish, Czech, Slovak, Icelandic
Spanish, Czech, Slovak and Icelandic form of BENJAMIN.
BERENGUERmCatalan
Catalan form of BERENGAR.
BEREZIfBasque
Means "special" in Basque.
BERNARDITAfSpanish
Spanish feminine form of BERNARD.
BERNARDOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of BERNARD.
BERNATmCatalan
Catalan form of BERNARD.
BERTOmItalian, Spanish
Short form of ROBERTO, ALBERTO, and other names containing bert (often derived from the Germanic element beraht meaning "bright").
BETHANIAfSpanish (Latin American)
Spanish variant form of BETHANY.
BIBIANAfItalian, Spanish, Late Roman
Possibly an early variant of VIVIANA. Alternatively, it may be a feminine derivative of the earlier Roman cognomen VIBIANUS.
BIDANEfBasque
Means "way" in Basque.
BIEITOmGalician
Galician form of BENEDICT.
BIELmCatalan
Catalan short form of GABRIEL.
BIENVENIDAfSpanish
Derived from Spanish bienvenido meaning "welcome".
BIHOTZfBasque
Means "heart" in Basque.
BIKENDImBasque
Basque form of VINCENT.
BITTORmBasque
Basque form of VICTOR.
BLANCAfSpanish, Catalan
Spanish and Catalan cognate of BLANCHE.
BLASmSpanish
Spanish form of BLAISE.
BOLÍVARmSpanish (Latin American)
From a surname which was taken from the Basque place name Bolibar, which was derived from bolu "mill" and ibar "riverside". A famous bearer of the surname was Simón Bolívar (1783-1830), a South American revolutionary leader, after whom the country of Bolivia is named.
BONIFACIOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Bonifatius (see BONIFACE).
BRAISmGalician
Galician form of BLAISE.
BRANCAfPortuguese, Galician
Portuguese and Galician form of BLANCHE.
BREIXOmGalician
Galician form of VERÍSSIMO.
BRÍGIDAfPortuguese, Spanish
Portuguese and Spanish form of BRIDGET.
BRUNILDAfSpanish, Italian, Portuguese
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of BRÜNHILD.
BRUNOmGerman, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Croatian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element brun "armour, protection" or brun "brown". Saint Bruno of Cologne was a German monk of the 11th century who founded the Carthusian Order. The surname has belonged Giordano Bruno, a philosopher burned at the stake by the Inquisition.
CALISTAfEnglish, Portuguese, Spanish
Feminine form of CALLISTUS. As an English name it might also be a variant of KALLISTO.
CALISTOmPortuguese, Spanish
Portuguese and Spanish form of CALLISTUS.
CALIXTAfSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of CALIXTUS.
CALIXTOmSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of CALIXTUS.
CAMILAfSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of CAMILLA.
CAMILOmSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of CAMILLUS.
CANDEf & mSpanish
Short form of CANDELARIA or CANDELARIO.
CANDELAfSpanish
Short form of CANDELARIA.
CANDELARIAfSpanish
Means "Candlemas" in Spanish, ultimately derived from Spanish candela "candle". This name is given in honour of the church festival of Candlemas, which commemorates the presentation of Christ in the temple and the purification of the Virgin Mary.
CANDELARIOmSpanish
Masculine form of CANDELARIA.
CÁNDIDAfSpanish
Spanish form of CANDIDA.
CÁNDIDOmSpanish
Spanish form of CANDIDUS.
CARIDADfSpanish
Spanish cognate of CHARITY.
CARINA (1)fEnglish, Portuguese, Spanish, German, Late Roman
Late Latin name derived from cara meaning "dear, beloved". This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr. It is also the name of a constellation in the southern sky, though in this case it means "keel" in Latin, referring to a part of Jason's ship the Argo.
CARLESmCatalan
Catalan form of CHARLES.
CARLOSmSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of CHARLES.
CARLOTAfSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of CHARLOTTE.
CARME (1)fGalician, Catalan
Galician and Catalan form of CARMEL.
CARMELAfItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of CARMEL.
CARMELITAfSpanish
Spanish diminutive of CARMEL.
CARMELOmSpanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian masculine form of CARMEL.
CARMENfSpanish, English, Italian, Romanian
Medieval Spanish form of CARMEL influenced by the Latin word carmen "song". This was the name of the main character in George Bizet's opera 'Carmen' (1875).
CAROLINAfItalian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Swedish
Latinate feminine form of CAROLUS. This is the name of two American states: North and South Carolina. They were named for Charles I, king of England.
CASIMIROmSpanish, Portuguese, Italian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of CASIMIR.
CASSANDRAfEnglish, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κασσανδρα (Kassandra), derived from possibly κεκασμαι (kekasmai) "to excel, to shine" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek myth Cassandra was a Trojan princess, the daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but when she spurned his advances he cursed her so nobody would believe her prophecies.... [more]
CATALINAfSpanish
Spanish form of KATHERINE.
CATARINAfPortuguese, Occitan, Galician
Portuguese, Occitan and Galician form of KATHERINE.
CATERINAfItalian, Catalan
Italian and Catalan form of KATHERINE.
CAYETANAfSpanish
Spanish feminine form of Caietanus (see GAETANO).
CAYETANOmSpanish
Spanish form of Caietanus (see GAETANO).
CEBRIÁNmSpanish
Spanish form of Cyprianus (see CYPRIAN).
CECILIAfEnglish, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Romanian, Finnish, German
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.... [more]
CECILIOmSpanish, Portuguese, Italian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of Caecilius (see CECILIA).
CEFERINOmSpanish
Spanish form of Zephyrinus (see ZEFERINO).
CELESTINAfSpanish, Italian
Latinate feminine form of CAELESTINUS.
CELESTINOmSpanish, Italian, Portuguese
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of CAELESTINUS.
CELIAfEnglish, Spanish
Feminine form of the Roman family name CAELIUS. Shakespeare used it in his play 'As You Like It' (1599), which introduced the name to the English-speaking public at large. It is sometimes used as a short form of CECILIA.
CELINOmItalian (Rare), Spanish (Rare)
Italian and Spanish form of CAELINUS or a short form of MARCELINO.
CELIOmItalian (Rare), Spanish (Rare)
Italian and Spanish form of CAELIUS.
CELSOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of CELSUS.
CÉSARmFrench, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Spanish and Portuguese form of CAESAR. A famous bearer was the American labour organizer César Chávez (1927-1993).
CESCmCatalan
Short form of FRANCESC.
CHAROfSpanish
Spanish diminutive of ROSARIO.
CHEmSpanish
From an Argentine expression meaning "hey!". This nickname was acquired by the Argentine revolutionary Ernesto Guevara while he was in Cuba.
CHELOfSpanish
Diminutive of CONSUELO.
CHIMOmCatalan (Rare)
Valencian diminutive of JOAQUIM.
CHITAfSpanish
Short form of CONCHITA.
CHUCHOmSpanish
Spanish diminutive of JESÚS.
CHUSm & fSpanish
Diminutive of JESÚS or JESUSA.
CHUYmSpanish
Diminutive of JESÚS.
CIBRÁNmGalician
Galician form of Cyprianus (see CYPRIAN).
CINTIAfSpanish, Hungarian
Spanish and Hungarian form of CYNTHIA.
CIPRIANOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Cyprianus (see CYPRIAN).
CIRÍACOmPortuguese, Spanish
Portuguese form and Spanish variant of CYRIACUS.
CIRIACOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of CYRIACUS.
CIRINOmItalian, Spanish
Diminutive of CIRO.
CIROmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of CYRUS.
CLARAfItalian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.
CLARISAfSpanish
Spanish variant of CLARISSA.
CLARISSAfEnglish, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
Latinate form of CLARICE. This was the name of the title character in a 1748 novel by Samuel Richardson. In the novel Clarissa is a virtuous woman who is tragically exploited by her family and her lover.
CLÀUDIAfCatalan
Catalan feminine form of CLAUDIUS.
CLAUDIAfEnglish, German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Biblical, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CLAUDIUS. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament. As a Christian name it was very rare until the 16th century.
CLAUDIOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of CLAUDIUS.
CLEMENTEmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Clemens (see CLEMENT).
CLÍMACOmSpanish
Spanish form of Climacus, derived from Greek κλιμαξ (klimax) "ladder". The 7th-century monk Saint John Climacus (also known as John of the Ladder) acquired this name because he wrote a book called 'The Ladder of Divine Ascent'.
CLIMENTmCatalan
Catalan form of Clemens (see CLEMENT).
CLOEfSpanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of CHLOE.
CLOTILDEfFrench, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
French form of the Germanic name Chlotichilda which was composed of the elements hlud "fame" and hild "battle". Saint Clotilde was the wife of the Frankish king Clovis, whom she converted to Christianity.
CONCEPCIÓNfSpanish
Means "conception" in Spanish. This name is given in reference to the Immaculate Conception of the Virgin Mary. A city in Chile bears this name.
CONCHAfSpanish
Diminutive of CONCEPCIÓN. This name can also mean "seashell" in Spanish.
CONCHITAfSpanish
Diminutive of CONCHA.
CONRADOmSpanish
Spanish form of CONRAD.
CONSTANZAfSpanish
Spanish form of CONSTANTIA.
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