Welsh Names

Welsh names are used in the country of Wales in Britain. See also about Welsh names.
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ADERYNfWelsh
Means "bird" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
AERON (1)m & fWelsh
Either derived from Welsh aeron meaning "berry" or else from the name of a river in Wales.
AERONWENfWelsh
Combination of AERON (1) and the suffix gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed".
AERONWYfWelsh
Combination of AERON (1) and the suffix wy meaning "river".
AFANENfWelsh (Rare)
Means "raspberry" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
AFONf & mWelsh
Means "river" in Welsh. This is a Welsh name of recent origin.
ALEDmWelsh
From the name of a Welsh river, of uncertain meaning.
ALISfWelsh
Welsh form of ALICE.
ALUNmWelsh
Welsh form of ALAN. This name appears in the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth.
ALWYNmWelsh
From the name of the River Alwen in Wales.
ANDRASmWelsh
Welsh variant of ANDREAS.
ANDREASmGerman, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Welsh, Ancient Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Ancient Greek and Latin form of ANDREW. It is also the form used in modern Greek, German and Welsh.
ANEIRINmWelsh
Welsh name, originally spelled Neirin, which possibly means "noble". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh poet.
ANGHARADfWelsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "more love" in Welsh. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, Angharad Golden-hand is the lover of Peredur.
ANWENfWelsh
Means "very beautiful" in Welsh.
ARIANRHODfWelsh, Welsh Mythology
Possibly means "silver wheel" or "round wheel" in Welsh. In Welsh myth Arianrhod was the mother of the brothers Dylan and Lleu Llaw Gyffes. In earlier myths she was a goddess of the moon.
ARWELmWelsh
Old Welsh name of unknown meaning.
ARWYNmWelsh
From the Welsh intensifying prefix ar- and gwyn meaning "white, fair".
AWSTINmWelsh
Welsh form of AUSTIN.
BERWYNmWelsh
Means "white head" from the Welsh elements barr "head" and wyn "white".
BETHANfWelsh
Welsh diminutive of ELIZABETH.
BETRYSfWelsh
Welsh form of BEATRICE.
BEVANmWelsh
From a Welsh surname which was derived from ap Evan meaning "son of EVAN".
BLEDDYNmWelsh
From Welsh blaidd "wolf" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an 11th-century king of Gwynedd and Powys.
BLODEUWEDDfWelsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "face of flowers" in Welsh. In a story in the Mabinogion, she is created out of flowers by Gwydion to be the wife of his nephew Lleu Llaw Gyffes. She is eventually changed into an owl for her infidelity.
BLODEUYNfWelsh
Means "flower" in Welsh.
BLODWENfWelsh
Means "white flowers" from Welsh blodau "flowers" combined with gwen "white, fair, blessed".
BRAN (2)mWelsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "raven" in Welsh. In Welsh legend Bran the Blessed (called also Bendigeid Vran) was the son of the god Llyr. Later Welsh legends describe him as a king of Britain who was killed attacking Ireland.
BRANWENfWelsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "beautiful raven" from Welsh bran "raven" and gwen "fair, white, blessed". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is the sister of the British king Bran and the wife of the Irish king Matholwch.
BRIALLENfWelsh
Derived from Welsh briallu meaning "primrose". This is a modern Welsh name.
BRINmWelsh
Variant of BRYN.
BRONfWelsh
Short form of BRONWEN.
BRONWENfWelsh
Derived from the Welsh elements bron "breast" and gwen "white, fair, blessed".
BRONWYNfWelsh
Variant of BRONWEN.
BRYNm & fWelsh, English
Means "hill, mound" in Welsh. It is now used as a feminine name as well.
BRYNMORmWelsh
From a Welsh place name meaning "great hill".
CADELLmWelsh
From Welsh cad "battle" and a diminutive suffix.
CADFAELmWelsh
Means "battle prince" from Welsh cad "battle" and mael "prince".
CADFANmWelsh
Means "battle peak" from Welsh cad "battle" and ban "peak". Saint Cadfan, from Brittany, was a 6th-century missionary to Wales.
CADIfWelsh
Short form of CATRIN.
CADOCmWelsh
Derived from Welsh cad "battle". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who was martyred by the Saxons.
CADOGANmWelsh, Irish
Anglicized form of CADWGAN.
CADWALADERmWelsh
Means "leader of the battle" from Welsh cad "battle" and gwaladr "leader". This was the name of a Welsh saint of the 7th century.
CADWGANmWelsh
Means "glory in battle" from Welsh cad "battle" and gwogawn "glory, honour". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, this name is briefly mentioned as the son of Iddon.
CAERWYNmWelsh
Derived from the Welsh elements caer "fortress" and gwyn "white, fair".
CARADOCmWelsh
Variant of CARADOG.
CARADOGmWelsh
Welsh form of CARATACOS. This is the name of several figures in Welsh history and legend, including a 6th-century king of Gwent and a Knight of the Round Table in Arthurian romance.
CARONf & mWelsh
Derived from Welsh caru meaning "to love".
CARWYNmWelsh
Means "blessed love" from Welsh caru "love" and gwyn "white, fair, blessed".
CARYSfWelsh
Derived from Welsh caru meaning "love". This is a relatively modern Welsh name, in common use only since the middle of the 20th century.
CATRINfWelsh, German
Welsh form of KATHERINE, as well as a German short form of KATHARINA.
CEFINmWelsh
Welsh form of KEVIN.
CEINWENfWelsh
Derived from the Welsh elements cain "lovely" and gwen "white, fair, blessed".
CELYNmWelsh
Means "holly" in Welsh.
CERI (1)mWelsh
Possibly derived from Welsh caru meaning "to love".
CERI (2)fWelsh
Short form of CERIDWEN.
CERIDWENfWelsh
Possibly from Welsh cyrrid "bent" or cerdd "poetry" combined with ven "woman" or gwen "white, fair, blessed". According to medieval Welsh legend this was the name of a sorceress or goddess who created a potion that would grant wisdom to her son Morfan. The potion was instead consumed by her servant Gwion Bach, who was subsequently reborn as the renowned bard Taliesin.
CERYSfWelsh
Variant of CARYS.
CLEDWYNmWelsh
Derived from the Welsh element caled "rough" combined with gwyn "white, fair, blessed".
COLWYNmWelsh
From the name of a river in northern Wales.
CRYSTINfWelsh
Welsh form of CHRISTINE.
CULHWCHmWelsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "hiding place of the pig" in Welsh. In Welsh legend he was the lover of Olwen the daughter of the giant Yspaddaden. Before the giant would allow Culhwch to marry his daughter, he insisted that Culhwch complete a series of extremely difficult tasks. Culhwch managed to complete them, and he returned to marry Olwen and kill the giant. This tale appears in the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth.
DAFYDDmWelsh
Welsh form of DAVID. This name was borne by Dafydd ap Gruffydd, a 13th-century Welsh ruler, and Dafydd ap Gwilym, a 14th-century poet.
DAImWelsh
Derived from the old Celtic word dei meaning "to shine". This name is also used as a Welsh diminutive of DAVID.
DEINIOLmWelsh
Welsh form of DANIEL.
DELWYNmWelsh
Means "pretty and white" from the Welsh element del "pretty" combined with gwyn "fair, white, blessed".
DELYTHfWelsh
From an elaboration of the Welsh element del "pretty".
DERYNfWelsh
Possibly from Welsh aderyn meaning "bird".
DEWEYmWelsh
Welsh form of DAVID.
DEWI (1)mWelsh
From Dewydd, an old Welsh form of DAVID. Saint Dewi, the patron saint of Wales, was a 6th-century Welsh bishop.
DEWYDDmWelsh (Archaic)
Old Welsh form of DAVID.
DILWENfWelsh
Feminine form of DILWYN.
DILWYNmWelsh
Means "genuine and white" from the Welsh element dilys "genuine" combined with gwyn "white, fair, blessed".
DILYSfWelsh
Means "genuine" in Welsh.
DRYSTANmWelsh
Welsh form of TRISTAN.
DYLANmWelsh, English, Welsh Mythology
From the Welsh elements dy meaning "great" and llanw meaning "tide, flow". In Welsh mythology Dylan was a god or hero associated with the sea. He was the son of Arianrhod and was accidentally slain by his uncle Govannon.... [more]
DYLISfWelsh
Variant of DILYS.
EFAfWelsh
Welsh form of EVA.
EIFIONmWelsh
Meaning unknown. This was an old Welsh name that was revived in the 19th century.
EILUNEDfWelsh
Variant of ELUNED.
EILWENfWelsh
Perhaps means "white brow" from Welsh ael "brow" and gwen "white, fair, blessed".
EINIONmWelsh
Probably from the Latin name Ennianus, a derivative of Ennius (see ENNIO). It is also a modern Welsh word meaning "anvil". This was the name of a 5th-century Welsh king who is considered a saint in some Christian traditions.
EIRA (1)fWelsh
Means "snow" in Welsh.
EIRIANf & mWelsh
Means "bright, beautiful" in Welsh.
EIRLYSfWelsh
Means "snowdrop" in Welsh.
EIRWENfWelsh
Means "white snow" from the Welsh elements eira "snow" and gwen "white, blessed".
ELAINfWelsh
Means "fawn" in Welsh.
ELENfWelsh
Welsh form of HELEN. This was the name of a 4th-century Welsh saint. It also appears in the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, belonging to a woman who built the roads in Wales.
ELERIfWelsh
Meaning unknown. In Welsh legend she was the daughter of the chieftain Brychan.
ELINfSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, Welsh
Scandinavian and Welsh form of HELEN.
ELLIS (2)mWelsh
Anglicized form of ELISEDD.
ELUNEDfWelsh
Derived from Welsh eilun "image, idol". This was the name of a 5th-century Welsh saint.
EMLYNmWelsh
Probably from the name of an ancient region in Wales, its name meaning "around the valley". It has also been suggested that this name is a Welsh form of Aemilianus (see EMILIANO).
EMRYSmWelsh
Welsh form of AMBROSE. Emrys Wledig (or Ambrosius Aurelianus) was a Romano-British military leader who fought against the invading Anglo-Saxons in the 5th century. Tales of his life were used by the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth to create the character of Merlin, who he called Merlinus Ambrosius or Myrddin Emrys.
EMYRmWelsh
Means "king" in Welsh.
ENFYSm & fWelsh
Means "rainbow" in Welsh.
ENIDfWelsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Derived from Welsh enaid meaning "soul" or "life". She is the wife of Geraint in Welsh legend and Arthurian romance.
ERCWLFFmWelsh
Welsh form of HERCULES.
ESYLLTfWelsh
Welsh form of ISOLDE.
EURIGmWelsh
Derived from Welsh aur "gold".
EURWENfWelsh
Derived from Welsh aur "gold" and gwen "white, fair, blessed".
EVANmWelsh, English
Anglicized form of Iefan, a Welsh form of JOHN.
FFIONfWelsh
Means "foxglove" in Welsh.
FFLURfWelsh
Welsh form of FLORA.
FFRAIDfWelsh
Welsh form of BRIDGET.
FFRANSISmWelsh
Welsh form of FRANCIS.
FOLANTmWelsh
Welsh form of VALENTINE (1).
GAENORfWelsh
Welsh variant of GAYNOR.
GARETHmWelsh, English (British), Arthurian Romance
Meaning unknown. It first appears in this form in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation of Arthurian legends 'Le Morte d'Arthur', in which Gareth was a Knight of the Round Table, the brother of Sir Gawain. Malory based the name on Gahariet, which was the name of a similar Arthurian character in French sources. It may ultimately have a Welsh origin, possibly related to gwaredd meaning "gentleness".
GAWAINmWelsh, Arthurian Romance
Meaning uncertain, from the Latin form Walganus used by the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth. This was the name of a nephew of King Arthur and one of the Knights of the Round Table in Arthurian legend. He can be identified with the earlier Welsh hero Gwalchmei, and it is likely that the name derives from GWALCHMEI. Alternatively it may have a different Celtic or even a Germanic origin. Gawain was a popular hero in medieval stories such as the 14th-century romantic poem 'Sir Gawain and the Green Knight'.
GERAINTmWelsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Meaning unknown, possibly a Welsh form of GERONTIUS. This was the name of a figure various Welsh legends. He was also incorporated into later Arthurian tales as one of the Knights of the Round Table and the husband of Enid.
GERALLTmWelsh
Welsh form of GERALD.
GETHINmWelsh
Means "dark-skinned, swarthy" in Welsh.
GLADYSfWelsh, English
From the old Welsh name Gwladus, possibly derived from gwlad "country". It has historically been used as a Welsh form of CLAUDIA. This name became popular outside of Wales after it was used in Ouida's novel 'Puck' (1870).
GLAWm & fWelsh
Means "rain" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
GLENDAfWelsh, English
A name created in the 20th century from the Welsh elements glân "pure, clean" and da "good".
GLENDOWERmWelsh
Anglicized form of GLYNDWR.
GLENICEfWelsh
Variant of GLENYS.
GLENNISfWelsh
Variant of GLENYS.
GLENYSfWelsh
Elaboration of the Welsh word glân meaning "pure, clean, holy". This name was created in the late 19th century.
GLYNmWelsh
Means "valley" in Welsh.
GLYNDWRmWelsh
From a Welsh surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "valley water". This name is often given in honour of Owain Glyndwr, a 14th-century Welsh patriot who led a revolt against England.
GLYNISfWelsh
Either a variant of GLENYS or an elaboration of the Welsh word glyn meaning "valley".
GLYNNmWelsh
Variant of GLYN.
GORONWYmWelsh, Welsh Mythology
Meaning unknown. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, he was the lover of Blodeuwedd. He attempted to murder her husband Lleu Llaw Gyffes but was himself killed.
GRIFFITHmWelsh
Anglicized form of GRUFFUDD.
GRIGORmWelsh, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Armenian
Welsh, Bulgarian, Macedonian and Armenian form of GREGORY. This is the name of the patron saint of Armenia (known as Saint Gregory the Illuminator in English).
GRONWmWelsh
Variant of GORONWY.
GRUFFUDDmWelsh
From the Old Welsh name Griphiud, the second element deriving from Welsh udd "lord, prince" but the first element being of uncertain meaning (possibly cryf "strong"). This was a common name among medieval Welsh royalty. Gruffudd (or Gruffydd) ap Llywelyn was an 11th-century Welsh ruler who fought against England.
GRWNmWelsh
Means "ridge" in Welsh. This is a Welsh name of recent origin.
GUTOmWelsh
Diminutive of GRUFFUDD.
GWALLTERmWelsh
Welsh form of WALTER.
GWAWRfWelsh
Means "dawn" in Welsh.
GWENfWelsh, English
From Welsh gwen, the feminine form of gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed". It can also be a short form of GWENDOLEN, GWENLLIAN, and other names beginning with Gwen.
GWENDAfWelsh, English
Derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and da meaning "good". This name was created in the 20th century.
GWENDOLENfWelsh
Means "white ring", derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and dolen meaning "ring, loop". This was the name of a mythical queen of the Britons who defeated her husband in battle, as told by Geoffrey of Monmouth.
GWENETHfWelsh
Variant of GWYNETH.
GWENFREWIfWelsh
Derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and frewi meaning "reconciliation, peace". This was the name of a 7th-century Welsh saint and martyr.
GWENITHfWelsh
Variant of GWYNETH, perhaps influenced by the Welsh word gwenith meaning "wheat".
GWENLLIANfWelsh
Derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and llian meaning "flaxen". This name was popular among medieval Welsh royalty. It was borne by the 14th-century daughter of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd.
GWENYTHfWelsh
Variant of GWYNETH.
GWILmWelsh
Welsh short form of GWILYM.
GWILIMmWelsh
Welsh form of WILLIAM.
GWILLYMmWelsh
Welsh form of WILLIAM.
GWILYMmWelsh
Welsh form of WILLIAM.
GWLADUSfWelsh
Original Welsh form of GLADYS.
GWLADYSfWelsh
Variant of GLADYS.
GWYNmWelsh
Means "white, fair, blessed" in Welsh.
GWYNEDDf & mWelsh
From the name of a region in Wales, named after an ancient kingdom, which may be derived from the old Welsh given name Cunedda.
GWYNEIRAfWelsh
Means "white snow" from the Welsh element gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with eira meaning "snow".
GWYNETHfWelsh, English (Modern)
Possibly a variant of GWYNEDD or a form of Welsh gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed". It has been common in Wales since the 19th century.
GWYNFORmWelsh
Derived from the Welsh element gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with mawr meaning "great, large".
GWYNNmWelsh
Variant of GWYN.
GWYTHYRmWelsh
Welsh form of VICTOR.
HAFfWelsh
Means "summer" in Welsh.
HARRImFinnish, Welsh
Finnish and Welsh form of HARRY.
HAULmWelsh
Means "sun" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
HEDDWYNmWelsh
Derived from the Welsh elements hedd "peace" and gwyn "white, fair, blessed".
HEFINmWelsh
Means "summer" in Welsh.
HEFINAfWelsh
Feminine form of HEFIN.
HEILYNmWelsh
Means "winebearer" in Welsh.
HELEDDfWelsh
Meaning unknown. This was the name of a semi-legendary 7th-century Welsh princess.
HEULWENfWelsh
Means "sunshine" in Welsh.
HOPCYNmWelsh
Welsh form of HOPKIN.
HOWELLmWelsh
Anglicized form of HYWEL.
HUWmWelsh
Welsh form of HUGH.
HYLEDDfWelsh
Variant of HELEDD.
HYWELmWelsh
Means "eminent" in Welsh. This was the name of a 10th-century king of Wales.
IAGOmWelsh, Galician, Portuguese
Welsh and Galician form of JACOB. This was the name of two early Welsh kings of Gwynedd. It is also the name of the villain in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Othello' (1603).
IANTOmWelsh
Diminutive of IFAN.
IDRIS (2)mWelsh
Means "ardent lord" from Welsh udd "lord, prince" combined with ris "ardent, enthusiastic, impulsive".
IDWALmWelsh
Means "lord of the wall", derived from Welsh udd "lord, prince" combined with gwal "wall, rampart".
IEFANmWelsh
Welsh form of JOHN.
IESTYNmWelsh
Welsh form of JUSTIN.
IEUANmWelsh
Old Welsh form of JOHN.
IFANmWelsh
Welsh form of JOHN.
ILARmWelsh
Welsh form of HILARIUS.
ILLTYDmWelsh
Means "multitude of land" from Welsh il "multitude" and tud "land, people". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who founded the abbey of Llanilltud in Glamorgan.
IOANmRomanian, Welsh, Bulgarian
Romanian and Welsh form of JOHN. This is also a variant transcription of the Bulgarian name YOAN (2).
IOLOmWelsh
Diminutive of IORWERTH.
IOLYNmWelsh
Diminutive of IORWERTH.
IORWERTHmWelsh
Means "handsome lord" from Welsh ior "lord" and berth "handsome". This name is used in the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, where it belongs to a son of Maredudd. This name is sometimes used as a Welsh form of EDWARD.
ISLWYNmWelsh
From the name of a mountain in Wales which means "below the grove" from Welsh is "below" and llwyn "grove".
ITHELmWelsh
Means "generous lord" from the Welsh elements udd "lord, prince" and hael "generous".
IVORmIrish, Scottish, Welsh, English (British)
From the Old Norse name Ívarr, which was derived from the elements yr "yew, bow" and arr "warrior". During the Middle Ages it was brought to Britain by Scandinavian settlers and invaders, and it was adopted in Ireland, Scotland and Wales.
IWANmWelsh, Polish
Welsh form of JOHN and a Polish form of IVAN.
LEOLINmWelsh
Variant of LLYWELYN influenced by Latin leo "lion".
LLEUCUfWelsh
Welsh form of LUCIA.
LLEWmWelsh, Welsh Mythology
Variant of LLEU. It can also be a short form of LLEWELYN. It coincides with the Welsh word llew meaning "lion".
LLEWELLAfWelsh
Feminine form of LLYWELYN.
LLEWELYNmWelsh
Variant of LLYWELYN influenced by the Welsh word llew "lion".
LLINOSfWelsh
Means "linnet, finch" in Welsh. The linnet (species Linaria cannabina) is a small European bird in the finch family.
LLYWELYNmWelsh
Possibly a Welsh form of the old Celtic name Lugubelenus, a combination of the names of the gods LUGUS and BELENUS. Alternatively it may be derived from Welsh llyw "leader". This was the name of several Welsh rulers, notably the 13th-century Llywelyn the Great who fought against England.
LOWRIfWelsh
Welsh form of LAURA.
LUNEDfWelsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Variant of ELUNED. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is a servant of the Lady of the Fountain who rescues the knight Owain.
MABONmWelsh, Welsh Mythology
Derived from Welsh mab meaning "son". This was the name of an old Celtic god.
MABYNfWelsh
Means "youth" in Welsh. This was the name of an obscure 6th-century Welsh saint. She was one of the daughters of Saint Brychan.
MACSENmWelsh
Welsh form of MAXIMUS. Magnus Maximus (known as Macsen in Welsh) was a 4th-century co-ruler of the Western Roman Empire. In Wales he was regarded as the founder of several royal lineages. He appears in the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth.
MADOCmWelsh
Possibly derived from Welsh mad "fortunate" combined with a diminutive suffix.
MADOGmWelsh
Variant of MADOC.
MAIRfWelsh
Welsh form of MARY.
MAIRWENfWelsh
Combination of MAIR and Welsh gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed".
MALDWYNmWelsh
Welsh form of BALDWIN.
MALLTfWelsh
Welsh form of MAUD.
MARCmFrench, Catalan, Welsh
French, Catalan and Welsh form of MARK.
MAREDfWelsh
Welsh form of MARGARET.
MAREDUDDmWelsh
Welsh form of MEREDITH.
MARGEDfWelsh
Welsh form of MARGARET.
MARI (1)fWelsh, Breton, Estonian, Finnish, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Welsh, Breton, Estonian and Finnish form of MARIA, as well as a Hungarian diminutive of MÁRIA. It is also a Scandinavian form of MARIE.
MARTYNmWelsh, Ukrainian
Welsh and Ukrainian form of MARTIN.
MAXENmWelsh (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of MACSEN.
MEGANfWelsh, English
Welsh diminutive of MARGARET. In the English-speaking world outside of Wales it has only been regularly used since the middle of the 20th century.
MEICALmWelsh
Welsh form of MICHAEL.
MEINIRfWelsh
Means "maiden" in Welsh.
MEINWENfWelsh
Means "slender and white" from Welsh main "slender" and gwen "white, fair, blessed".
MEIRIONmWelsh
Welsh form of MARIANUS.
MEIRIONAfWelsh
Feminine form of MEIRION.
MEREDITHm & fWelsh, English
From the Welsh name Maredudd or Meredydd, possibly meaning "great lord" or "sea lord". Since the mid-1920s it has been used more often for girls than for boys in English-speaking countries, though it is still a masculine name in Wales. A famous bearer of this name as surname was the English novelist and poet George Meredith (1828-1909).
MEREDYDDmWelsh
Welsh form of MEREDITH.
MERERIDfWelsh
Welsh form of MARGARET.
MERFYNmWelsh
Older Welsh form of MERVYN.
MERRIONmWelsh
Variant of MEIRION.
MERVYNmWelsh, English
From the Welsh name Merfyn, which possibly meant "marrow famous". This was the name of a 9th-century Welsh king, Merfyn Frych.
MEURICmWelsh
Variant of MEURIG.
MEURIGmWelsh
Welsh form of MAURICE. This was the name of a few early Welsh kings.
MIHANGELmWelsh
Welsh name of the archangel Michael, formed from a contraction of MICHAEL and "angel".
MORGAN (1)m & fWelsh, English, French
From the Old Welsh masculine name Morcant, which was possibly derived from Welsh mor "sea" and cant "circle". Since the 1980s in America Morgan has been more common for girls than boys, perhaps due to stories of Morgan le Fay or the fame of actress Morgan Fairchild (1950-).
MORWENNAfCornish, Welsh
Means "maiden" in Cornish (related to the Welsh word morwyn). This was the name of a 6th-century Cornish saint.
MOSTYNmWelsh
From a Welsh place name which means "moss town" in Old English.
MYFfWelsh
Short form of MYFANWY.
MYFANWYfWelsh
Means "my woman" from the Welsh prefix my "my" combined with banw "woman".
NEIFIONmWelsh
Welsh form of NEPTUNE.
NEIRINmWelsh
Older form of ANEIRIN.
NERYSfWelsh
Perhaps an elaboration of Welsh ner "lord", with the intended meaning of "lady".
NESTfWelsh
Welsh diminutive of AGNES.
NESTAfWelsh
Welsh diminutive of AGNES.
NIA (1)fWelsh
Welsh form of NIAMH.
NONfWelsh
Possibly derived from Latin nonna meaning "nun". This was the name of the mother of Saint David.
NYEmWelsh
Diminutive of ANEIRIN.
OFYDDmWelsh
Welsh form of OVID.
OLWENfWelsh
Means "white footprint" from Welsh ol "footprint, track" and gwen "white, fair, blessed". In Welsh legend Olwen was a beautiful maiden, the lover of Culhwch and the daughter of the giant Yspaddaden. Her father insisted that Culhwch complete several seemingly impossible tasks before he would allow them to marry, and Culhwch was successful with all of them.
OLWINfWelsh
Variant of OLWEN.
OLWYNfWelsh
Variant of OLWEN.
OWAINmWelsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Probably a Welsh form of EUGENE, though it might be derived from Welsh eoghunn meaning "youth". This was the name of several figures from Welsh history and mythology. In Arthurian legend Owain (also called Yvain in French sources) was one of the Knights of the Round Table, the son of King Urien and husband of the Lady of the Fountain. His character was based on that of Owain ap Urien, a 6th-century Welsh prince who fought against the Angles. This name was also borne by Owain Glyndwr, a 14th-century leader of Welsh resistance against English rule.
OWEN (1)mWelsh, English
Modern form of OWAIN.
OWENAfWelsh
Feminine form of OWEN (1).
PADERAUf & mWelsh
Means "beads" or "rosary" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
PADRIGmWelsh, Breton
Welsh and Breton form of PATRICK.
PARRYmWelsh
From a Welsh surname which was derived from ap Harry meaning "son of HARRY".
PEDRmWelsh
Welsh form of PETER.
PRICEmWelsh
From a Welsh surname which was derived from ap Rhys meaning "son of RHYS".
PRYCEmWelsh
Variant of PRICE.
PRYDERImWelsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "care" in Welsh. According to Welsh legend this was the name of the son of Pwyll and Rhiannon. A central character in the Mabinogion, he succeeds his father as king of Dyfed, but is ultimately killed in single combat with Gwydion.
REECEmWelsh
Anglicized form of RHYS.
REESmWelsh
Anglicized form of RHYS.
REESEmWelsh
Anglicized form of RHYS.
RHEINALLTmWelsh
Welsh form of REYNOLD.
RHIANfWelsh
Derived from Welsh rhiain meaning "maiden".
RHIANNONfWelsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Probably derived from the old Celtic name Rigantona meaning "great queen". It is speculated that this was the name of an otherwise unattested Celtic goddess of fertility and the moon. The name Rhiannon appears later in Welsh legend in the Mabinogion, borne by the wife of Pwyll and the mother of Pryderi.... [more]
RHIANUfWelsh
Variant of RHIAN.
RHISIARTmWelsh
Welsh form of RICHARD.
RHODRImWelsh
Derived from the Welsh elements rhod "wheel" and rhi "king". This name was borne by a 9th-century Welsh king.
RHONWENfWelsh
Means either "fair spear" or "fair hair" in Welsh. The first element is either rhon "spear" or rhawn "(coarse) hair", and the second element is gwen "fair, white, blessed".
RHOSYNfWelsh (Rare)
Means "rose" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
RHYDDERCHmWelsh
Means "reddish brown" in Welsh. It is sometimes used as a Welsh form of RODERICK.
RHYSmWelsh
Means "enthusiasm" in Welsh. Several Welsh rulers have borne this name.
RODERICKmEnglish, Scottish, Welsh
Means "famous power" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ric "power". This name was in use among the Visigoths; it was borne by their last king (also known as Rodrigo), who died fighting the Muslim invaders of Spain in the 8th century. It also had cognates in Old Norse and West Germanic, and Scandinavian settlers and Normans introduced it to England, though it died out after the Middle Ages. It was revived in the English-speaking world by Sir Walter Scott's poem 'The Vision of Don Roderick' (1811).
SAWYLmWelsh
Welsh form of SAMUEL.
SERENfWelsh
Means "star" in Welsh.
SHANfWelsh
Anglicized form of SIÂN.
SIÂNfWelsh
Welsh form of JEANNE.
SIANAfWelsh
Diminutive of SIÂN.
SIANIfWelsh
Diminutive of SIÂN.
SIARLmWelsh
Welsh form of CHARLES.
SIEFFREmWelsh
Welsh form of GEOFFREY.
SIÔNmWelsh
Welsh form of JOHN, via Old French Jehan.
SIONEDfWelsh
Welsh form of JANET.
SIÔRmWelsh
Welsh form of GEORGE.
SIORSmWelsh
Welsh form of GEORGE.
SIORUSmWelsh
Welsh form of GEORGE.
SIWANfWelsh
Welsh form of JOAN (1).
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