SugarPlumFairy's Personal Name List

ACHILLE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, Italian

Pronounced: a-SHEEL (French), ah-KEEL-le (Italian)

French and Italian form of ACHILLES

ADELAIDE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese

Pronounced: AD-ə-layd (English), ah-de-LIE-de (Italian), ə-də-LIED (Portuguese)

From the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman Emperor Otto the Great. The name became common in Britain in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.

AGATHE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, German, Norwegian, Danish, Greek, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Αγαθη (Greek)

Pronounced: a-GAHT (French), ah-GAH-tə (German), ah-GAH-the (Ancient Greek)

Cognate of AGATHA

AGNES

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: ‘Αγνη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: AG-nəs (English), AHK-nes (German), AHKH-nəs (Dutch), AHNG-nes (Swedish)

Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Αγνη (Hagne), derived from Greek ‘αγνος (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe, being especially popular in England in the Middle Ages.

ÁGUEDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese

Pronounced: AH-ge-dhah (Spanish), A-gə-də (Portuguese)

Spanish and Portuguese form of AGATHA

AKIRA

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Japanese

Other Scripts: 昭, 明, 亮 (Japanese)

From Japanese "bright", "bright" or "clear".

ALBA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Catalan

Pronounced: AHL-bah (Italian, Spanish), AHL-bə (Catalan)

This name is derived from two distinct names, ALBA (2) and ALBA (3), with distinct origins, Latin and Germanic. Over time these names have become confused with one another. To further complicate the matter, alba means "dawn" in Italian, Spanish and Catalan. This may be the main inspiration behind its use in Italy and Spain.

ALEIXO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Portuguese, Galician

Pronounced: ə-LAY-shoo (Portuguese), a-LAY-shaw (Galician)

Portuguese and Galician form of ALEXIS

ALEXANDER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: al-əg-ZAN-dər (English), ah-lek-SAHN-der (German), ah-lək-SAHN-dər (Dutch)

Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ALEXANDRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, English, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Spanish, Russian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρα (Greek), Александра (Russian)

Pronounced: ah-lek-SAHN-drah (German, Romanian), ah-lək-SAHN-drah (Dutch), al-əg-ZAN-drə (English), ə-lə-SHAN-drə (Portuguese), ə-lə-SHAN-drə (Brazilian Portuguese)

Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.

ALEXANDRE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, Portuguese, Galician, Catalan

Pronounced: a-lek-SAWNDR (French), ə-lə-SHAN-drə (Portuguese), ə-lə-SHAN-drə (Brazilian Portuguese), a-le-SHAN-dre (Galician)

Form of ALEXANDER. This name was borne by the 19th-century French author Alexandre Dumas (1802-1870), who wrote 'The Three Musketeers'.

ALICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Italian

Pronounced: AL-is (English), a-LEES (French), ah-LEE-che (Italian)

From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).

ALLEGRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare), Italian (Rare)

Pronounced: ə-LEG-rə (English), ahl-LE-grah (Italian)

Means "cheerful, lively" in Italian. It is not a traditional Italian name. It was borne by a short-lived illegitimate daughter of Lord Byron.

ÁLVARO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese

Spanish form of a Germanic name, perhaps ALFHER. Verdi used this name in his opera 'The Force of Destiny' (1862).

AMÉLIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese

Portuguese form of AMELIA

ANNABEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: AN-ə-bel (English)

Variant of AMABEL influenced by the name ANNA. This name appears to have arisen in Scotland in the Middle Ages.

ARABELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Medieval Scottish name, probably a variant of ANNABEL. It has long been associated with Latin orabilis meaning "invokable".

ARCHIBALD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: AHR-chə-bawld

Derived from the Germanic elements ercan "genuine" and bald "bold". The first element was altered due to the influence of Greek names beginning with the element αρχος (archos) meaning "master". The Normans brought this name to England. It first became common in Scotland in the Middle Ages.

ARTEMISIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Αρτεμισια (Ancient Greek)

Feminine form of ARTEMISIOS. This was the name of the 4th-century BC builder of the Mausoleum, one of the seven wonders of the world. She built it in memory of her husband, the Carian prince Mausolus.

AUGUSTINE (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AW-gəs-teen, ə-GUS-tin

From the Roman name Augustinus, itself derived from the Roman name AUGUSTUS. Saint Augustine of Hippo was a 5th-century Christian theologian and author from North Africa. For his contributions to Christian philosophy he is known as a Doctor of the Church. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world. It became popular in England in the Middle Ages partly because of a second saint by this name, Augustine of Canterbury, a 6th-century Italian monk sent to England to convert the Anglo-Saxons.

AUGUSTO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese

Pronounced: ow-GOOS-to (Spanish)

Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of AUGUSTUS

AURORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Romanian, Finnish, Roman Mythology

Pronounced: ow-RO-rah (Spanish), ə-RAWR-ə (English)

Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.

AVELINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Germanic (Latinized)

Diminutive of AVILA

BEATRICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, English, Swedish

Pronounced: be-ah-TREE-che (Italian), BEE-ə-tris (English), BEE-tris (English), BE-ah-trees (Swedish), be-ah-TREES (Swedish)

Italian form of BEATRIX. Beatrice Portinari was the woman who was loved by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. She served as Dante's guide through paradise in his epic poem 'The Divine Comedy' (1321). This was also the name of a character in Shakespeare's play 'Much Ado About Nothing' (1599).

BENEDICT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BEN-ə-dikt

From the Late Latin name Benedictus which meant "blessed". Saint Benedict was an Italian monk who founded the Benedictines in the 6th century. After his time the name was common among Christians, being used by 16 popes. In England it did not come into use until the 12th century, at which point it became very popular. This name was also borne by the American defector Benedict Arnold (1741-1801).

BÉNÉDICTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

French feminine form of BENEDICT

BENEDITA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese

Portuguese feminine form of BENEDICT

BERENGARIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Germanic (Latinized)

Latinized feminine form of BERENGAR. This name was borne by a 13th-century queen of Castile.

BLÁTHNAT

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology

Pronounced: BLAW-nit

Means "little flower" from the Irish word blath "flower" combined with a diminutive suffix. In Irish legend she was a maiden abducted and married by Cú Roí. She was rescued by Cúchulainn, who killed her husband, but she was in turn murdered by one of Cú Roí's loyal servants.

BRANCA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese, Galician

Pronounced: BRAN-ka (Galician)

Portuguese and Galician form of BLANCHE

BRÍGIDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese

Portuguese form of BRIDGET

CADEYRN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Celtic

Means "battle king" from Welsh cad "battle" and teyrn "king, monarch". Cadeyrn (also known as Catigern) was a 5th-century king of Powys in Wales, the son of Vortigern.

CALIXTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese

Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of CALIXTUS

CAMILLE

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: ka-MEE (French), kə-MEEL (English)

French feminine and masculine form of CAMILLA. It is also used in the English-speaking world, where it is generally only feminine.

CAROLINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Swedish

Pronounced: kah-ro-LEE-nah (Italian, Spanish), ker-ə-LIEN-ə (English), kar-ə-LIEN-ə (English)

Latinate feminine form of CAROLUS. This is the name of two American states: North and South Carolina. They were named for Charles I, king of England.

CECÍLIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese, Slovak, Hungarian

Portuguese, Slovak and Hungarian form of CECILIA

CELANDINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: SEL-ən-deen

From the name of the flower, which derives from Greek χελιδων (chelidon) "a swallow".

CHARLOTTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Pronounced: shar-LOT (French), SHAHR-lət (English), shahr-LAW-tə (German), shahr-LAWT-tə (Dutch)

French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Bronte (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Bronte sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.

CHARMIAN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: CHAHR-mee-ən, SHAHR-mee-ən

Form of CHARMION used by Shakespeare in his play 'Antony and Cleopatra' (1606).

CLARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, English, Late Roman

Pronounced: KLAH-rah (Italian, German, Spanish), KLER-ə (English), KLAR-ə (English)

Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.

CLAUDE

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: KLOD (French), KLAWD (English)

French masculine and feminine form of CLAUDIUS. In France the masculine name has been common since the Middle Ages due to the 7th-century Saint Claude of Besançon. It was imported to Britain in the 16th century by the aristocratic Hamilton family, who had French connections. A famous bearer of this name was the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).

CLEMENTINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese

Pronounced: kle-men-TEE-nah (Italian, Spanish), klə-mən-TEE-nə (Portuguese)

Feminine form of CLEMENT

CLIO

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Italian

Other Scripts: Κλειω (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: KLEE-o (Italian)

Latinized form of KLEIO

COLUMBAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: kə-LUM-bən (English)

Possibly an Irish diminutive of COLUMBA. Alternatively, it may be derived from Old Irish colum "dove" and bán "white". The 7th-century Saint Columban of Leinster was the founder of several monasteries in Europe.

CONRAD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: KAHN-rad (English), KAWN-raht (German)

Derived from the Germanic elements kuoni "brave" and rad "counsel". This was the name of a 10th-century saint and bishop of Konstanz, in southern Germany. It was also borne by several medieval German kings and dukes. In England it was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has only been common since the 19th century when it was reintroduced from Germany.

CONRADO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: kon-RAH-dho

Spanish form of CONRAD

CONSTANÇA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese

Portuguese form of CONSTANTIA

CORDULA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Late Latin name meaning "heart" from Latin cor, cordis. Saint Cordula was one of the 4th-century companions of Saint Ursula.

COSME

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Portuguese, French

Portuguese and French form of COSMAS

CRISTIANO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, Portuguese

Pronounced: kree-STYAH-no (Italian), kreesh-TYA-noo (Portuguese)

Italian and Portuguese form of CHRISTIAN. A famous bearer is Portuguese soccer player Cristiano Ronaldo (1985-).

DÉSIRÉE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

French form of DESIDERATA. In part it is directly from the French word meaning "desired, wished".

DOROTEIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese

Pronounced: doo-roo-TAY-ə

Portuguese form of DOROTHEA

EASTER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EES-tər

From the English name of the Christian festival celebrating the resurrection of Jesus. It was ultimately named for the Germanic spring goddess Eostre. It was traditionally given to children born on Easter, though it is rare in modern times.

EAVAN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: EE-van

Anglicized form of AOIBHEANN

EDMÉE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French (Rare)

Feminine form of EDMÉ

ELISABETH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Pronounced: e-LEE-zah-bet (German), e-LEE-sah-bet (Danish), i-LIZ-ə-bəth (English)

German and Dutch form of ELIZABETH. It is also a variant English form, reflecting the spelling used in the Authorized Version of the New Testament.

ELLERY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ə-ree

From an English surname which was originally derived from the medieval masculine name HILARY.

ELODIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Spanish form of ALODIA

EMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Slovene, Czech, Slovak, Croatian

Cognate of EMMA

EMBLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Norse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: EM-blah (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)

Meaning uncertain, perhaps related to Old Norse almr "elm". In Norse mythology Embla and her husband Ask were the first humans. They were created by three of the gods from two trees.

EMILIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese

Pronounced: e-mee-LYAH-nah (Italian, Spanish)

Feminine form of EMILIANO

EMILY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EM-ə-lee

English feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL). In the English-speaking world it was not common until after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century; the princess Amelia Sophia (1711-1786) was commonly known as Emily in English, even though Amelia is an unrelated name.

Famous bearers include the British author Emily Bronte (1818-1848), who wrote 'Wuthering Heights', and the American poet Emily Dickinson (1830-1886).

EMMANUELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: e-man-WEL

French feminine form of EMMANUEL

EOWYN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Pronounced: AY-ə-win (English)

Means "horse joy" in Old English. This name was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien who used Old English to represent the Rohirric language. In his novel 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) Eowyn is the niece of King Theoden of Rohan. She slays the Lord of the Nazgul in the Battle of the Pelennor Fields.

EULALIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: uu-la-LEE

French form of EULALIA

EVANDER (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology

Other Scripts: Ευανδρος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ee-VAN-dər (English), ə-VAN-dər (English)

Variant of Evandrus, Latin form of the Greek name Ευανδρος (Euandros) which meant "good man", derived from Greek ευ "good" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Roman mythology Evander was an Arcadian hero of the Trojan War who founded the city of Pallantium near the spot where Rome was later built.

FÉLIX

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, Spanish, Portuguese

Pronounced: FE-leeks (Portuguese)

French, Spanish and Portuguese form of FELIX

FLORENTINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Late Roman

Feminine form FLORENTINUS

FLORENTINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

French form of FLORENTINA

FREDERICA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese, English

Pronounced: frə-də-REE-kə (Portuguese), fred-REE-ka (English), fred-ə-REE-kə (English)

Feminine form of FREDERICO or FREDERICK

FREDERICK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: FRED-ə-rik, FRED-rik

English form of a Germanic name meaning "peaceful ruler", derived from frid "peace" and ric "ruler, power". This name has long been common in continental Germanic-speaking regions, being borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire, Germany, Austria, Scandinavia, and Prussia. Notables among these rulers include the 12th-century Holy Roman Emperor and crusader Frederick I Barbarossa, the 13th-century emperor and patron of the arts Frederick II, and the 18th-century Frederick II of Prussia, known as Frederick the Great.

The Normans brought the name to England in the 11th century but it quickly died out. It was reintroduced by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century. A famous bearer was Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), an American ex-slave who became a leading advocate of abolition.

FREDERICO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Portuguese

Pronounced: frə-də-REE-koo

Portuguese form of FREDERICK

FREYA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Norse Mythology, English (British, Modern)

Pronounced: FRAY-ah (Norse Mythology), FRAY-ə (English)

From Old Norse Freyja meaning "lady". This is the name of the goddess of love, beauty, war and death in Norse mythology. She claimed half of the heroes who were slain in battle and brought them to her realm in Asgard. Some scholars connect her with the goddess Frigg.

This is not the usual spelling in any of the Scandinavian languages (in Sweden and Denmark it is Freja and in Norway it is Frøja) but it is the common spelling of the goddess's name in English. In the 2000s it became popular in Britain.

FRIEDERIKE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: free-du-REE-kə

German feminine form of FREDERICK

GENOVEVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese

Pronounced: he-no-VE-vah (Spanish), zhə-noo-VE-və (Portuguese)

Spanish and Portuguese form of GENEVIÈVE

GERARD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch, Catalan

Pronounced: jə-RAHRD (English), JER-ərd (English), KHAY-rahrt (Dutch)

Derived from the Germanic element ger "spear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain. It was initially much more common than the similar name Gerald, with which it was often confused, but it is now less common.

HANNAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Biblical

Other Scripts: חַנָּה (Hebrew)

Pronounced: HAN-ə (English), HAH-nah (German)

From the Hebrew name חַנָּה (Channah) meaning "favour" or "grace". Hannah is the mother of the prophet Samuel in the Old Testament. As an English name, Hannah was not regularly used until after the Protestant Reformation. The Greek and Latin version Anna is used in the New Testament; this form has traditionally been more widely used as a Christian name.

HONOUR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: AHN-ər

From the English word honour, which is of Latin origin. This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century. It can also be viewed as a form of HONORIA or HONORATA, which are ultimately derived from the same source.

IDONY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Medieval English vernacular form of IDONEA

IMOGEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (British)

Pronounced: IM-ə-jən

The name of a princess in the play 'Cymbeline' (1609) by Shakespeare. He based her on a legendary character named Innogen, but the name was printed incorrectly and never corrected. The name Innogen is probably derived from Gaelic inghean meaning "maiden".

ÍÑIGO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish

Medieval Spanish form of ENEKO. This was the birth name of Saint Ignatius of Loyola, who changed it in honour of Saint Ignatius of Antioch. As such, this name is sometimes regarded as a form of IGNATIUS.

IRIS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish

Other Scripts: Ιρις (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: IE-ris (English), EE-ris (German, Dutch)

Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow. This name can also be given in reference to the English word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the name of the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.

ISIDORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Serbian, Macedonian, Spanish, Portuguese, Russian (Rare), Italian (Rare), English (Rare), Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Исидора (Serbian, Macedonian, Russian), Ισιδωρα (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ee-see-DHO-rah (Spanish), ee-zee-DO-rah (Italian), iz-i-DAWR-ə (English)

Feminine form of ISIDORE. This was the name of a 4th-century Egyptian saint and hermitess.

ISIS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)

Other Scripts: Ισις (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: IE-sis (English)

Greek form of Egyptian Ist (reconstructed as Iset or Ueset), which possibly meant "the throne". In Egyptian mythology Isis was the goddess of the sky and nature, the wife of Osiris and the mother of Horus. She was originally depicted wearing a throne-shaped headdress, but in later times she was conflated with the goddess Hathor and depicted having the horns of a cow on her head. She was also worshipped by people outside of Egypt, such as the Greeks and Romans.

JOAN (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JON

Medieval English form of Johanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). This was the usual English feminine form of John in the Middle Ages, but it was surpassed in popularity by Jane in the 17th century.

This name (in various spellings) has been common among European royalty, being borne by ruling queens of Naples, Navarre and Castile. Another famous bearer was Joan of Arc, a patron saint of France (where she is known as Jeanne d'Arc). She was a 15th-century peasant girl who, after claiming she heard messages from God, was given leadership of the French army. She defeated the English in the battle of Orléans but was eventually captured and burned at the stake.

JOAQUIM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Portuguese, Catalan

Portuguese and Catalan form of JOACHIM

JULIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch, German, English, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: yuy-lee-AH-nah (Dutch), yoo-lee-AH-nah (German), joo-lee-AHN-ə (English)

Feminine form of Iulianus (see JULIAN). This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr from Nicomedia, and also of the Blessed Juliana of Norwich, also called Julian, a 14th-century mystic and author. The name was also borne by a 20th-century queen of the Netherlands. In England, this form has been in use since the 18th century, alongside the older form Gillian.

KANON

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Japanese

Other Scripts: 花音 (Japanese)

From Japanese 花 (ka) "flower" and 音 (non) "sound".

KINBOROUGH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Medieval English

Medieval form of CYNEBURGA

KOTONE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Japanese

Other Scripts: 琴音 (Japanese)

From Japanese 琴 (koto) "harp, lute" and 音 (ne) "sound".

LEO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman

Pronounced: LE-o (German), LAY-o (Dutch), LEE-o (English)

Derived from Latin leo "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.

LEOCÁDIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese

Portuguese form of LEOCADIA

LEOFRIC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Anglo-Saxon

Means "dear power", derived from the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with ric "power".

LEOPOLDO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese

Pronounced: le-o-POL-do (Spanish)

Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of LEOPOLD

LEV (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Лев (Russian)

Pronounced: LYEF

Means "lion" in Russian, functioning as a vernacular form of Leo. This was the real Russian name of both author Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910) and revolutionary Leon Trotsky (1879-1940).

LINUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized), German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Other Scripts: Λινος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: LIE-nəs (English), LEE-nuws (German)

From the Greek name Λινος (Linos) meaning "flax". In Greek legend he was the son of the god Apollo, who accidentally killed him in a contest. Another son of Apollo by this name was the music teacher of Herakles. The name was also borne by the second pope, serving after Saint Peter in the 1st century. In modern times it was the name of a character in Charles Schulz's comic strip 'Peanuts'.

LOUIS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, English, Dutch

Pronounced: loo-EE (French), LOO-is (English)

French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of 18 kings of France, starting with Louis I the son of Charlemagne, and including Louis IX (Saint Louis) who led two crusades and Louis XIV (the 'Sun King') who was the ruler of France during the height of its power, the builder of the Palace of Versailles, and the longest reigning monarch in the history of Europe.

Apart from among royalty, this name was only moderately popular in France during the Middle Ages. After the French Revolution, when Louis XVI was guillotined, it became less common. The Normans brought the name to England, where it was usually spelled Lewis, though the spelling Louis has been more common in America. Famous bearers include French scientist Louis Pasteur (1822-1895), Métis leader Louis Riel (1844-1885), who led a rebellion against Canada, and Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), who wrote 'Treasure Island' and 'Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde'.

LOURENÇO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Portuguese

Pronounced: law-REN-soo (Portuguese), law-REN-soo (Brazilian Portuguese)

Portuguese form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).

LUCAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: History

From the Roman cognomen Lucanus which is of unknown meaning. Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, commonly called Lucan, was a 1st-century Roman poet.

LUCAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Biblical Latin

Pronounced: LOO-kəs (English), LUY-kahs (Dutch), luy-KAH (French), LOO-kəsh (Portuguese)

Latin form of Loukas (see LUKE).

LUCASTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

This name was first used by the poet Richard Lovelace for a collection of poems called 'Lucasta' (1649). The poems were dedicated to Lucasta, a nickname for the woman he loved Lucy Sacheverel, who he called lux casta "pure light".

LUX

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Various

Pronounced: LUKS (English)

Derived from Latin lux meaning "light".

LUZIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese, German

Portuguese and German form of LUCIA

LYRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Astronomy

Pronounced: LIE-rə (English), LEE-rə (English)

The name of the constellation in the northern sky containing the star Vega. It is said to be shaped after the lyre of Orpheus.

MADALENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese

Pronounced: mə-də-LE-nə

Portuguese form of MAGDALENA

MAFALDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Portuguese

Italian and Portuguese form of MATILDA

MAIA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, Roman Mythology, Georgian

Other Scripts: Μαια (Ancient Greek), მაია (Georgian)

Pronounced: MAY-ə (English), MIE-ə (English)

Meaning unknown. In Greek and Roman mythology she was the eldest of the Pleiades, the group of seven stars in the constellation Taurus, who were the daughters of Atlas and Pleione. Her son by Zeus was Hermes.

MARGARET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAHR-grit, MAHR-gə-rit

Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", probably ultimately a borrowing from Sanskrit मञ्यरी (manyari). Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.

Other saints by this name include a queen of Scotland and a princess of Hungary. It was also borne by Queen Margaret I of Denmark, who united Denmark, Sweden, and Norway in the 14th century. Famous literary bearers include American writer Margaret Mitchell (1900-1949), the author of 'Gone with the Wind', and Canadian writer Margaret Atwood (1939-).

MARGARIDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese, Galician, Catalan, Occitan

Portuguese, Galician, Catalan and Occitan form of MARGARET. This is also a Portuguese and Galician word meaning "daisy flower" (species Leucanthemum vulgare).

MARIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: mah-RYAH-nah (Spanish)

Roman feminine form of MARIANUS. After the classical era it was frequently interpreted as a combination of MARIA and ANA. In Portuguese it is further used as a form of MARIAMNE.

MARY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: MER-ee (English), MAR-ee (English)

Usual English form of Maria, which was the Latin form of the New Testament Greek names Μαριαμ (Mariam) and Μαρια (Maria) - the spellings are interchangeable - which were from the Hebrew name מִרְיָם (Miryam). The meaning is not known for certain, but there are several theories including "sea of bitterness", "rebelliousness", and "wished for child". However it was most likely originally an Egyptian name, perhaps derived in part from mry "beloved" or mr "love".

This is the name of several New Testament characters, most importantly Mary the virgin mother of Jesus, and Mary Magdalene. Due to the Virgin Mary this name has been very popular in the Christian world, though at certain times in some cultures it has been considered too holy for everyday use. In England it has been used since the 12th century, and it has been among the most common feminine names since the 16th century. The Latinized form Maria is also used in English as well as in several other languages.

This name has been borne by two queens of England, as well as a Queen of Scotland, Mary Queen of Scots. Another notable bearer was Mary Shelley (1797-1851), the author of 'Frankenstein'. A famous fictional character by this name was Mary Poppins, from the children's books by P. L. Travers.

MATIAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Finnish, Portuguese

Finnish and Portuguese form of MATTHIAS

MAUD

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: MAWD (English)

Usual medieval form of MATILDA. Though it became rare after the 14th century, it was revived and once more grew popular in the 19th century, perhaps due to Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem 'Maud' (1855).

MAXIMILIANO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese

Pronounced: mahk-see-mee-LYAH-no (Spanish)

Spanish and Portuguese form of Maximilianus (see MAXIMILIAN).

MAY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAY

Derived from the name of the month of May, which derives from Maia, the name of a Roman goddess. May is also another name of the hawthorn flower. It is also used as a diminutive of MARY, MARGARET or MABEL.

MIRABELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French (Rare), English (Rare)

Derived from Latin mirabilis "wonderful". This name was coined during the Middle Ages, though it eventually died out. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.

NICOLAU

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Portuguese, Galician, Catalan

Pronounced: nee-koo-LOW (Portuguese)

Portuguese, Galician and Catalan form of NICHOLAS

NOLWENN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Breton

From the Breton phrase Noyal Gwenn meaning "holy one from Noyal". This was the epithet of a 6th-century saint and martyr from Brittany.

NOVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: NO-və

Derived from Latin novus meaning "new". It was first used as a name in the 19th century.

OLÍVIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese, Slovak, Hungarian

Portuguese, Slovak and Hungarian form of OLIVIA

PARTHENOPE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Παρθενοπη (Ancient Greek)

Means "maiden's voice", derived from Greek παρθενος (parthenos) "maiden, virgin" and οψ (ops) "voice". In Greek legend this is the name of one of the Sirens who enticed Odysseus.

PAZ (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Means "peace" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de la Paz, meaning "Our Lady of Peace".

PERDITA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Derived from Latin perditus meaning "lost". Shakespeare created this name for the daughter of Hermione in his play 'The Winter's Tale' (1610).

PHILOMEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Pronounced: FIL-ə-mel (English)

From an English word meaning "nightingale" (ultimately from PHILOMELA). It has been used frequently in poetry to denote the bird.

PLEASANCE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Pronounced: PLEZ-ənts

From the medieval name Plaisance which meant "pleasant" in Old French.

POLYMNIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Πολυμνια, Πολυυμνια (Ancient Greek)

Means "much song" from Greek πολυς (polys) "much" and ‘υμνος (hymnos) "song, hymn". In Greek mythology she was the goddess of dance and sacred songs, one of the nine Muses.

PRIMROSE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: PRIM-roz

From the English word for the flower, ultimately deriving from Latin prima rosa "first rose".

REMIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend

Means "mercy of God" in Hebrew. The Book of Enoch names him as one of the seven archangels.

ROMOLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: RO-mo-lah

Italian feminine form of ROMULUS

ROQUE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese

Pronounced: RO-ke (Spanish)

Spanish and Portuguese form of ROCCO

ROSAMUND

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: ROZ-ə-mund

Derived from the Germanic elements hros "horse" and mund "protection". The Normans introduced this name to England. It was subsequently influenced by the Latin phrase rosa munda "pure rose". This was the name of the mistress of Henry II, the king of England in the 12th century. She was possibly murdered by his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine.

SAGA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Norse Mythology, Swedish

Pronounced: SAH-gah (Swedish)

Possibly means "seeing one" in Old Norse. This was the name of the Norse goddess of poetry and history, sometimes identified with the goddess Frigg. This is also a modern Swedish word meaning "story, fairy tale".

SALOMÉ

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, Spanish, Portuguese

Pronounced: sə-loo-ME (Portuguese)

French, Spanish and Portuguese form of SALOME

SELENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Russian, Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Селена (Russian), Σεληνη (Ancient Greek)

Latinized form of SELENE. This name was borne by popular Mexican-American singer Selena Quintanilla (1971-1995), who was known simply as Selena.

SIDONY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Feminine form of SIDONIUS. This name was in use in the Middle Ages, when it became associated with the word sindon (of Greek origin) meaning "linen", a reference to the Shroud of Turin.

SOMERLED

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish

Anglicized form of the Old Norse name Somarliðr meaning "summer traveller". This was the name of a 12th-century Scottish warlord who created a kingdom on the Scottish islands.

SPRING

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SPRING

From the name of the season, ultimately from Old English springan "to leap, to burst forth".

STELA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Romanian

Derived from Latin stella meaning "star".

SUMMER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SUM-ər

From the name of the season, ultimately from Old English sumor. It has been in use as a given name since the 1970s.

SUNNIVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Norwegian

Scandinavian form of the Old English name Sunngifu, which meant "sun gift" from the Old English elements sunne "sun" and giefu "gift". This was the name of a legendary English saint who was shipwrecked in Norway and killed by the inhabitants.

TEODORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Romanian, Polish, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian

Other Scripts: Теодора (Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)

Pronounced: te-o-DAW-rah (Italian), te-o-DHO-rah (Spanish), te-aw-DAW-rah (Polish)

Feminine form of Theodoros (see THEODORE).

TEÓFILO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese

Pronounced: te-O-fee-lo (Spanish)

Spanish and Portuguese form of THEOPHILUS

THEODORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Greek, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Θεοδωρα (Greek)

Pronounced: thee-ə-DAWR-ə (English)

Feminine form of THEODORE. This name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by several empresses including the influential wife of Justinian in the 6th century.

THEODORE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: THEE-ə-dawr

From the Greek name Θεοδωρος (Theodoros), which meant "gift of god" from Greek θεος (theos) "god" and δωρον (doron) "gift". This was the name of several saints, including Theodore of Amasea, a 4th-century Greek soldier; Theodore of Tarsus, a 7th-century archbishop of Canterbury; and Theodore the Studite, a 9th-century Byzantine monk. It was also borne by two popes.

This was a common name in classical Greece, and, due to both the saints who carried it and the favourable meaning, it came into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was however rare in Britain before the 19th century. Famous bearers include three tsars of Russia (in the Russian form Fyodor) and American president Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919).

THOMAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Θωμας (Greek)

Pronounced: TAHM-əs (English), TOM-əs (English), to-MAH (French), TO-mahs (German, Dutch), tho-MAHS (Greek)

Greek form of the Aramaic name תָּאוֹמָא (Ta'oma') which meant "twin". In the New Testament this is the name of the apostle who initially doubts the resurrected Jesus. According to tradition he was martyred in India. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world.

In England the name was introduced by the Normans and became very popular due to Saint Thomas Becket, a 12th-century archbishop of Canterbury and martyr. Another notable saint by this name was the 13th-century Italian philosopher and theologian Thomas Aquinas, who is regarded as a Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include philosopher Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), American president Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), novelist Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), and inventor Thomas Edison (1847-1931).

THOMASINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: tom-ə-SEE-nə

Medieval feminine form of THOMAS

THYRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Variant of TYRA

TOMÁS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Irish

Pronounced: to-MAHS (Spanish), too-MASH (Portuguese)

Spanish, Portuguese and Irish form of THOMAS

TRISTÃO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Portuguese

Portuguese form of TRISTAN

VALÉRIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hungarian, Portuguese, Slovak

Hungarian, Portuguese and Slovak feminine form of VALERIUS

VIOLANTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Late Roman

Latin form (possibly) of YOLANDA

VITA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Roman, Italian, Lithuanian, Latvian, Danish

Feminine form of VITUS

VITÓRIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese

Portuguese form of VICTORIA (1)

WOLFGANG

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Ancient Germanic, History

Pronounced: VAWLF-gahng (German), WUWLF-gang (English)

Derived from the Germanic elements wulf meaning "wolf" and gang "path". Two famous bearers of this name were Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) and German novelist and poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832).

WREN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: REN

From the English word for the small songbird. It is ultimately derived from Old English wrenna.

XAVIER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Catalan, Spanish (Archaic)

Pronounced: ZAY-vee-ər (English), ZAY-vyər (English), ig-ZAY-vee-ər (English), za-VYAY (French), sha-VYER (Portuguese)

Derived from the Basque place name Etxaberri meaning "the new house". This was the surname of the Jesuit priest Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552). He was a missionary to India, Japan, China, and other areas in East Asia, and he is the patron saint of the Orient and missionaries. His surname has since been adopted as a given name in his honour, chiefly among Catholics.

YLVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Means "she-wolf", a derivative of Old Norse úlfr "wolf".

ZEPHYRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: ?

Feminine form of ZEPHYR

ZÉPHYRINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French (Rare)

French feminine form of Zephyrinus (see ZEFERINO).

ZITA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Portuguese, German, Czech, Slovak

Pronounced: DZEE-tah (Italian)

Means "little girl" in Tuscan Italian. This was the name of a 13th-century saint, the patron saint of servants.

ZOÉ

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: zo-AY

French form of ZOE
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2014.