shotgun_wedding's Personal Name List

AIKO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 愛子, etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: A-EE-KO
Rating: 15% based on 8 votes
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" and (ko) meaning "child", as well as other character combinations.

AIRI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 愛莉, 愛梨, etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: A-EE-REE
Rating: 26% based on 7 votes
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" combined with (ri) meaning "white jasmine" or (ri) meaning "pear". Other combinations of kanji characters are possible.

AISLING
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: ASH-ling
Rating: 24% based on 9 votes
Means "dream" or "vision" in Irish Gaelic. This name was created in the 20th century.

AKANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: , etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: A-KA-NE
Rating: 19% based on 7 votes
From Japanese (akane) meaning "deep red, dye from the rubia plant". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can form this name as well.

ALICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Italian
Pronounced: AL-is (English), A-LEES (French), a-LEE-che (Italian)
Rating: 85% based on 8 votes
From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).

AMAIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Rating: 39% based on 7 votes
Means "the end" in Basque. This is also the name of a mountain and a village in the Basque region of Spain.

AMETHYST
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AM-ə-thist
Rating: 41% based on 7 votes
From the name of the purple semi-precious stone, which is derived from the Greek negative prefix α (a) and μεθυστος (methystos) meaning "intoxicated, drunk", as it was believed to be a remedy against drunkenness.

ANAÏS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Occitan, Catalan, French
Pronounced: A-NA-EES (French)
Rating: 27% based on 7 votes
Occitan and Catalan form of ANNA.

ANEMONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-NEM-ə-nee
Rating: 37% based on 7 votes
From the name of the anemone flower, which derives from Greek ανεμος (anemos) "wind".

ANNABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: AN-ə-bel (English)
Rating: 61% based on 7 votes
Variant of AMABEL influenced by the name ANNA. This name appears to have arisen in Scotland in the Middle Ages.

ANOUK
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, French
Rating: 53% based on 8 votes
Dutch and French diminutive of ANNA.

ARACELI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-ra-THE-lee (European Spanish), a-ra-SE-lee (Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 43% based on 7 votes
Means "altar of the sky" from Latin ara "altar" and coeli "sky". This is an epithet of the Virgin Mary in her role as the patron saint of Lucena, Spain.

ATHENAIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αθηναις (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 24% based on 7 votes
Ancient Greek personal name which was derived from the name of the Greek goddess ATHENA.

AURÉLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: O-RE-LEE
Rating: 60% based on 8 votes
French feminine form of AURELIUS.

AURORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Romanian, Finnish, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: ow-RO-ra (Spanish, Classical Latin), ə-RAWR-ə (English), OW-ro-rah (Finnish)
Rating: 60% based on 10 votes
Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.

AURORE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-RAWR
Rating: 37% based on 7 votes
French form of AURORA.

AXELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-KSEL
Rating: 16% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of AXEL.

AZALEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-ZAY-lee-ə, ə-ZAYL-yə
Rating: 39% based on 7 votes
From the name of the flower, ultimately derived from Greek αζαλεος (azaleos) "dry".

BLOSSOM
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BLAH-səm
Rating: 23% based on 8 votes
From the English word blossom, ultimately from Old English blóstm. It came into use as a rare given name in the 19th century.

CALANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kə-LAN-thee
Rating: 38% based on 8 votes
From the name of a type of orchid, ultimately meaning "beautiful flower", derived from Greek καλος (kalos) "beautiful" and ανθος (anthos) "flower".

CALLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL-ə
Rating: 44% based on 7 votes
From the name of a type of lily. Use of the name may also be inspired by Greek καλλος (kallos) meaning "beauty".

CAMELLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kə-MEEL-ee-ə, kə-MEL-ee-ə
Rating: 40% based on 7 votes
From the name of the flowering shrub, which was named for the botanist and missionary Georg Josef Kamel.

CASSIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: KAS-see-a (Classical Latin), KA-shə (English), KAS-ee-ə (English)
Rating: 50% based on 9 votes
Feminine form of CASSIUS.

CATHERINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KA-TU-REEN (French), KA-TREEN (French), KATH-ə-rin (English), KATH-rin (English)
Rating: 75% based on 8 votes
French form of KATHERINE, and also a common English variant.

CECILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Romanian, Finnish, German
Pronounced: se-SEE-lee-ə (English), se-SEEL-yə (English), che-CHEE-lya (Italian), the-THEE-lya (European Spanish), se-SEE-lya (Latin American Spanish), se-SEEL-yah (Danish, Norwegian)
Rating: 64% based on 8 votes
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.

Due to the popularity of the saint, the name became common in the Christian world during the Middle Ages. The Normans brought it to England, where it was commonly spelled Cecily - the Latinate form Cecilia came into use in the 18th century.

CERES
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Rating: 31% based on 7 votes
Derived from the Indo-European root *ker meaning "to grow". In Roman mythology Ceres was the goddess of agriculture, equivalent to the Greek goddess Demeter.

CERIDWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: ke-RID-wen
Rating: 16% based on 7 votes
Possibly from Welsh cyrrid "bent" or cerdd "poetry" combined with ven "woman" or gwen "white, fair, blessed". According to medieval Welsh legend this was the name of a sorceress or goddess who created a potion that would grant wisdom to her son Morfan. The potion was instead consumed by her servant Gwion Bach, who was subsequently reborn as the renowned bard Taliesin.

CLARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: KLA-ra (Italian, German, Spanish), KLA-ru (Portuguese), KLER-ə (American English), KLAR-ə (American English), KLAH-rə (British English)
Rating: 87% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.

CLARIBEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLER-ə-bel, KLAR-ə-bel
Rating: 32% based on 6 votes
Combination of CLARA and the popular name suffix bel. This name was used by Edmund Spenser in his poem 'The Faerie Queene' (in the form Claribell) and by Shakespeare in his play 'The Tempest' (1611). Alfred Lord Tennyson also wrote a poem entitled 'Claribel' (1830).

CLAUDIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Biblical, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: KLAW-dee-ə (English), KLOW-dya (German, Italian, Romanian), KLOW-dee-ah (Dutch), KLOW-dhya (Spanish), KLOW-dee-a (Classical Latin)
Rating: 77% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of CLAUDIUS. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament. As a Christian name it was very rare until the 16th century.

CLAUDIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KLO-DEE
Rating: 33% based on 6 votes
French feminine variant of CLAUDE.

CORALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KAW-RA-LEE
Rating: 60% based on 6 votes
Either a French form of KORALIA, or a derivative of Latin corallium "coral" (see CORAL).

CORDELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kawr-DEE-lee-ə, kawr-DEEL-yə
Rating: 81% based on 8 votes
From Cordeilla, possibly a Celtic name of unknown meaning. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Cordeilla was the youngest of the three daughters of King Lear and the only one to remain loyal to her father. When adapting the character for his play 'King Lear' (1606), Shakespeare altered the spelling to Cordelia.

DAHLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: DAL-yə
Rating: 71% based on 7 votes
From the name of the flower, which was named for the Swedish botanist Anders Dahl.

DAMIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Polish, Dutch
Pronounced: DAY-mee-ən (English), DA-myan (Polish)
Rating: 62% based on 6 votes
From the Greek name Δαμιανος (Damianos) which was derived from Greek δαμαζω (damazo) "to tame". Saint Damian was martyred with his twin brother Cosmo in Syria early in the 4th century. They are the patron saints of physicians. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in Christian Europe. Another saint by this name was Peter Damian, an 11th-century cardinal and theologian from Italy.

DÉSIRÉE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: DE-ZEE-RE
Rating: 42% based on 6 votes
French form of DESIDERATA. In part it is directly from the French word meaning "desired, wished".

ECHO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ηχω (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: E-ko (English)
Rating: 30% based on 7 votes
Means "echo" from the word for the repeating reflected sound, which derives from Greek ηχη (eche) "sound". In Greek mythology Echo was a nymph given a speech impediment by Hera, so that she could only repeat what others said. She fell in love with Narcissus, but her love was not returned, and she pined away until nothing remained of her except her voice.

EFFIE (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Pronounced: EF-ee
Rating: 42% based on 6 votes
Diminutive of EUPHEMIA.

ÉLISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: E-LEEZ
Rating: 45% based on 6 votes
French short form of ÉLISABETH.

ÉLODIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: E-LAW-DEE
Rating: 47% based on 7 votes
French form of ALODIA.

EMMANUELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: E-MA-NWEL
Rating: 32% based on 6 votes
French feminine form of EMMANUEL.

ERICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Italian
Pronounced: ER-i-kə (English)
Rating: 52% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of ERIC. It was first used in the 18th century. It also coincides with the Latin word for "heather".

ESPERANZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: es-pe-RAN-tha (European Spanish), es-pe-RAN-sa (Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 49% based on 7 votes
Spanish form of the Late Latin name Sperantia which was derived from sperare "to hope".

EVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, English, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Ευα (Greek), Ева (Bulgarian, Russian, Church Slavic), ევა (Georgian)
Pronounced: E-ba (Spanish), E-va (Italian, Czech, Slovak, Icelandic), EE-və (English), E-fa (German), AY-vah (Dutch), E-vah (Danish), YE-və (Russian), E-wa (Classical Latin)
Rating: 48% based on 6 votes
Latinate form of EVE. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. It is also a variant transcription of Russian YEVA. This name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.

EVANGELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ə-VAN-jə-leen
Rating: 62% based on 6 votes
Means "good news" from Greek ευ (eu) "good" and αγγελμα (angelma) "news, message". It was (first?) used by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in his epic poem 'Evangeline' (1847). It also appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) as the full name of the character Eva.

FLAVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: FLA-vya (Italian), FLA-bya (Spanish)
Rating: 54% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of FLAVIUS.

FLAVIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: FLA-VEE
Rating: 28% based on 6 votes
French feminine form of FLAVIUS.

FLORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Italian, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: FLAW-rə (English), FLO-ra (German)
Rating: 65% based on 6 votes
Derived from Latin flos meaning "flower". Flora was the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, the wife of Zephyr the west wind. It has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, starting in France. In Scotland it was sometimes used as an Anglicized form of Fionnghuala.

FLORE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: FLAWR
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
French form of FLORA.

FOX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: FAHKS
Rating: 23% based on 7 votes
Either from the English word fox or the surname Fox, which originally given as a nickname. The surname was borne by George Fox (1624-1691), the founder of the Quakers.

GARDENIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: gahr-DEEN-yə
Rating: 40% based on 6 votes
From the name of the tropical flower, which was named for the Scottish naturalist Alexander Garden (1730-1791).

GARNET (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GAHR-nət
Rating: 37% based on 6 votes
From the English word garnet for the precious stone, the birthstone of January. The word is derived from Middle English gernet meaning "dark red".

GEORGIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek
Other Scripts: Γεωργια (Greek)
Pronounced: JAWR-jə (English)
Rating: 71% based on 7 votes
Latinate feminine form of GEORGE. This is the name of an American state, which was named after the British king George II. A famous bearer was the American painter Georgia O'Keeffe (1887-1986).

GEORGIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Romanian
Pronounced: jor-JYAH-nə (English), jor-JAY-nə (English)
Rating: 59% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of GEORGE. This form of the name has been in use in the English-speaking world since the 18th century.

GUENIÈVRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Rating: 56% based on 7 votes
French form of GUINEVERE.

HANA (3)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 花, 華, etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: HA-NA
Rating: 30% based on 6 votes
From Japanese (hana) or (hana) which both mean "flower". Other kanji or kanji combinations can form this name as well.

HANAKO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 花子, etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: HA-NA-KO
Rating: 14% based on 7 votes
From Japanese (hana) meaning "flower" and (ko) meaning "child", as well as other kanji combinations.

IMOGEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: IM-ə-jən
Rating: 26% based on 7 votes
The name of a princess in the play 'Cymbeline' (1609) by Shakespeare. He based her on a legendary character named Innogen, but the name was printed incorrectly and never corrected. The name Innogen is probably derived from Gaelic inghean meaning "maiden".

ISEUL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Korean
Other Scripts: 이슬 (Korean Hangul)
Rating: 18% based on 6 votes
Means "dew" in Korean.

ISIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Other Scripts: Ισις (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: IE-sis (English)
Rating: 38% based on 6 votes
Greek form of Egyptian Ist (reconstructed as Iset or Ueset), which possibly meant "the throne". In Egyptian mythology Isis was the goddess of the sky and nature, the wife of Osiris and the mother of Horus. She was originally depicted wearing a throne-shaped headdress, but in later times she was conflated with the goddess Hathor and depicted having the horns of a cow on her head. She was also worshipped by people outside of Egypt, such as the Greeks and Romans.

JULIET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: joo-lee-ET, JOOL-yət
Rating: 73% based on 8 votes
Anglicized form of JULIETTE or GIULIETTA. This spelling was first used by Shakespeare for the lover of Romeo in his play 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596).

KANON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 花音, etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: KA-NON
Rating: 20% based on 7 votes
From Japanese (ka) meaning "flower, blossom" and (non) meaning "sound". Other kanji combinations are possible as well.

KASUMI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 霞, 花澄, etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: KA-SOO-MEE
Rating: 30% based on 6 votes
From Japanese (kasumi) meaning "mist". It can also come from (ka) meaning "flower, blossom" combined with (sumi) meaning "clear, pure". Other kanji combinations are also possible.

KOKORO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: , etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: KO-KO-RO
Rating: 14% based on 7 votes
From Japanese (kokoro) meaning "heart, mind, soul" or other kanji and kanji combinations having the same pronunciation. It is often written こころ using the hiragana writing system.

LAURENTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Rating: 46% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of LAURENTIN.

LAVENDER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 43% based on 6 votes
From the English word for the aromatic flower or the pale purple colour.

LEILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Persian, English, Georgian
Other Scripts: ليلى (Arabic), لیلا (Persian), ლეილა (Georgian)
Pronounced: LAY-lə (English), LEE-lə (English), LIE-lə (English)
Rating: 50% based on 7 votes
Variant of LAYLA. This spelling was used by Lord Byron for characters in 'The Giaour' (1813) and 'Don Juan' (1819), and it is through him that the name was introduced to the English-speaking world.

LÉONIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LE-AW-NEE
Rating: 28% based on 6 votes
French feminine form of LEONIUS.

LILITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Near Eastern Mythology, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: LIL-ith (English)
Rating: 63% based on 6 votes
Derived from Akkadian lilitu meaning "of the night". This was the name of a demon in ancient Assyrian myths. In Jewish tradition she was Adam's first wife, sent out of Eden and replaced by Eve because she would not submit to him. The offspring of Adam (or Samael) and Lilith were the evil spirits of the world.

LUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Rating: 59% based on 8 votes
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.

MANON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Dutch
Pronounced: MA-NAWN (French)
Rating: 44% based on 7 votes
French diminutive of MARIE.

MARIBEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Rating: 48% based on 6 votes
Contraction of MARÍA and ISABEL.

MARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Romanian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Georgian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Μαρινα (Greek), Марина (Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian), მარინა (Georgian)
Pronounced: ma-REE-na (Italian, Spanish, German), mə-REEN-ə (English), mu-RYEE-nə (Russian)
Rating: 69% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of MARINUS.

MEI (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Chinese
Other Scripts: 美, 梅, etc. (Chinese)
Rating: 45% based on 6 votes
From Chinese (měi) meaning "beautiful" or (méi) meaning "plum", as well as other characters which are pronounced similarly.

MINA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch, Limburgish
Pronounced: MEE-nə (English), MEE-nah (Dutch, Limburgish)
Rating: 32% based on 6 votes
Short form of WILHELMINA and other names ending in mina. This was the name of a character in the novel 'Dracula' (1897) by Bram Stoker.

MIYU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 美優, 美結, 実優, 美夕, etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: MEE-YOO
Rating: 25% based on 6 votes
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful" or (mi) meaning "fruit, good result, truth" combined with (yu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness" or (yu) meaning "tie, bind" or (yu) meaning "evening". Other kanji combinations are possible.

NIMUE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: NIM-oo-ay (English)
Rating: 27% based on 7 votes
Meaning unknown. In Arthurian legends this is the name of a sorceress, also known as the Lady of the Lake, Vivien, or Niniane. Various versions of the tales have Merlin falling in love with her and becoming imprisoned by her magic. She first appears in the medieval French 'Lancelot-Grail' cycle.

NINON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: NEE-NAWN
Rating: 18% based on 6 votes
French diminutive of ANNE (1).

NOÉMIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: NAW-E-MEE
Rating: 43% based on 6 votes
French form of NAOMI (1).

NOVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NO-və
Rating: 53% based on 8 votes
Derived from Latin novus meaning "new". It was first used as a name in the 19th century.

OPHELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Literature
Pronounced: o-FEEL-yə (English)
Rating: 76% based on 7 votes
Derived from Greek οφελος (ophelos) meaning "help". This name was probably created by the 15th-century poet Jacopo Sannazaro for a character in his poem 'Arcadia'. It was borrowed by Shakespeare for his play 'Hamlet' (1600), in which it belongs to Hamlet's lover who eventually goes insane and drowns herself. In spite of this, the name has been used since the 19th century.

OPHÉLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-FE-LEE
Rating: 63% based on 6 votes
French form of OPHELIA.

PALOMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: pa-LO-ma
Rating: 58% based on 6 votes
Means "dove, pigeon" in Spanish.

PARTHENOPE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Παρθενοπη (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 35% based on 6 votes
Means "maiden's voice", derived from Greek παρθενος (parthenos) "maiden, virgin" and οψ (ops) "voice". In Greek legend this is the name of one of the Sirens who enticed Odysseus.

PERSEPHONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Περσεφονη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PER-SE-PO-NE (Classical Greek), pər-SEF-ə-nee (English)
Rating: 57% based on 7 votes
Meaning unknown, probably of Pre-Greek origin, but perhaps related to Greek περθω (pertho) "to destroy" and φονη (phone) "murder". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus. She was abducted to the underworld by Hades, but was eventually allowed to return to the surface for part of the year. The result of her comings and goings is the changing of the seasons.

PSYCHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ψυχη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PSUY-KE (Classical Greek), SIE-kee (English)
Rating: 20% based on 6 votes
Means "the soul", derived from Greek ψυχω (psycho) "to breathe". The Greeks thought that the breath was the soul. In Greek mythology Psyche was a beautiful maiden who was beloved by Eros (or Cupid in Roman mythology). She is the subject of Keats's poem 'Ode to Psyche' (1819).

QUENTIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KAHN-TEN (French), KWEN-tin (English)
Rating: 38% based on 6 votes
French form of the Roman name QUINTINUS. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint, a missionary who was martyred in Gaul. The Normans introduced this name to England. In America it was brought to public attention by president Theodore Roosevelt's son Quentin Roosevelt (1897-1918), who was killed in World War I.

RHIAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: REE-an
Rating: 17% based on 6 votes
Derived from Welsh rhiain meaning "maiden".

RHIANNON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: ree-AN-awn (Welsh), ree-AN-ən (English), REE-ən-ən (English)
Rating: 40% based on 7 votes
Probably derived from the old Celtic name Rigantona meaning "great queen". It is speculated that this was the name of an otherwise unattested Celtic goddess of fertility and the moon. The name Rhiannon appears later in Welsh legend in the Mabinogion, borne by the wife of Pwyll and the mother of Pryderi.

As an English name, it became popular due to the Fleetwood Mac song 'Rhiannon' (1976).

ROCÍO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ro-THEE-o (European Spanish), ro-SEE-o (Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 28% based on 6 votes
Means "dew" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary María del Rocío meaning "Mary of the Dew".

ROMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German
Other Scripts: Роман (Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: ru-MAN (Russian), RAW-man (Polish)
Rating: 50% based on 8 votes
From the Late Latin name Romanus which meant "Roman".

ROSALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German, Dutch, English
Pronounced: RAW-ZA-LEE (French), ro-za-LEE (German), RO-zə-lee (English)
Rating: 73% based on 7 votes
French, German and Dutch form of ROSALIA. In the English-speaking this name received a boost after the release of the movie 'Rosalie' (1938), which was based on an earlier musical.

ROSALINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAWZ-ə-lien, ROZ-ə-leen
Rating: 58% based on 6 votes
Medieval variant of ROSALIND. This is the name of characters in Shakespeare's 'Love's Labour's Lost' (1594) and 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596).

ROSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: ROZ
Rating: 65% based on 6 votes
Originally a Norman form of a Germanic name, which was composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.

SCARLET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SKAHR-lit
Rating: 53% based on 6 votes
Either a variant of SCARLETT or else from the English word for the red colour. The word is derived (via Old French and medieval Latin) from Persian سقرلاط (saghrilat), the name of a type of cloth.

SERAPHINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: ze-ra-FEE-na (German)
Rating: 61% based on 8 votes
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Seraphinus, derived from the biblical word seraphim which was Hebrew in origin and meant "fiery ones". The seraphim were an order of angels, described by Isaiah in the Bible as having six wings each. This was the name of a 13th-century Italian saint who made clothes for the poor. As an English name, it has never been common.

SÉRAPHINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SE-RA-FEEN
Rating: 53% based on 7 votes
French form of SERAPHINA.

SOLÈNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SAW-LEN
Rating: 27% based on 6 votes
Variant of SOLANGE.

SOPHIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Σοφια (Greek)
Pronounced: so-FEE-ə (English), sə-FIE-ə (British English), zo-FEE-a (German)
Rating: 45% based on 6 votes
Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred during the reign of the emperor Hadrian. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which is the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.

This name was common among continental European royalty during the Middle Ages, and it was popularized in Britain by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century. It was the name of characters in the novels 'Tom Jones' (1749) by Henry Fielding and 'The Vicar of Wakefield' (1766) by Oliver Goldsmith. A famous bearer is the Italian actress Sophia Loren (1934-).

SOPHY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SO-fee
Rating: 26% based on 7 votes
Variant of SOPHIE or a diminutive of SOPHIA.

TAMSIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: TAM-sin
Rating: 30% based on 7 votes
Contracted form of THOMASINA. It was traditionally used in Cornwall.

THAIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Θαις (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 17% based on 6 votes
Variant transcription of THAÏS.

TRISTAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English, French, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: TRIS-tən (English), TREES-TAHN (French)
Rating: 25% based on 6 votes
Old French form of the Pictish name Drustan, a diminutive of DRUST. The spelling was altered by association with Latin tristis "sad". Tristan is a character in medieval French tales, probably inspired by older Celtic legends, and ultimately merged into Arthurian legend. According to the story Tristan was sent to Ireland in order to fetch Isolde, who was to be the bride of King Mark of Cornwall. On the way back, Tristan and Isolde accidentally drink a potion which makes them fall in love. Their tragic story was very popular in the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.

VALENTINE (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: VA-LAHN-TEEN
Rating: 37% based on 6 votes
French feminine form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)).

VASHTI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: וַשְׁתִּי (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: VASH-tee (English)
Rating: 37% based on 7 votes
Possibly means "thread" in Hebrew, but it is most likely of Persian origin. In the Old Testament this is the name of the first wife of King Ahasuerus of Persia before he marries Esther.

VICTOIRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: VEEK-TWAR
Rating: 57% based on 6 votes
French form of VICTORIA.

VINCENT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak
Pronounced: VIN-sənt (English), VEN-SAHN (French)
Rating: 83% based on 6 votes
From the Roman name Vincentius, which was from Latin vincere "to conquer". This name was popular among early Christians, and it was borne by many saints. As an English name, Vincent has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 19th century. Famous bearers include the French priest Saint Vincent de Paul (1581-1660) and the post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890).

VIOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Czech
Pronounced: vie-O-lə (English), vi-O-lə (English), VIE-ə-lə (English), VYAW-la (Italian), VYO-la (German), VEE-o-law (Hungarian)
Rating: 47% based on 6 votes
Means "violet" in Latin. This was the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's play 'Twelfth Night' (1602).

VIOLANTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, Italian
Pronounced: vee-o-LAN-te (Italian)
Rating: 37% based on 6 votes
Latin form of YOLANDA.

VIOLET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VIE-lit, VIE-ə-lit
Rating: 79% based on 8 votes
From the English word violet for the purple flower, ultimately derived from Latin viola. It was common in Scotland from the 16th century, and it came into general use as an English given name during the 19th century.

WILLOW
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: WIL-o
Rating: 43% based on 7 votes
From the name of the tree, which is ultimately derived from Old English welig.

XANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ξανθη (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 39% based on 8 votes
Derived from Greek ξανθος (xanthos) meaning "yellow" or "fair hair". This was the name of a few minor figures in Greek mythology.

XAVIER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Catalan, Spanish (Archaic)
Pronounced: ZAY-vyər (English), ig-ZAY-vyər (English), GZA-VYE (French), sha-VYER (Portuguese)
Rating: 49% based on 7 votes
Derived from the Basque place name Etxeberria meaning "the new house". This was the surname of the Jesuit priest Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552) who was borne in a village of this name. He was a missionary to India, Japan, China, and other areas in East Asia, and he is the patron saint of the Orient and missionaries. His surname has since been adopted as a given name in his honour, chiefly among Catholics.
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2017.