LullabyMoon11's Personal Name List

ABIDEMI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Western African, Yoruba
Means "born during father's absence" in Yoruba.

ABITAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: אֲבִיטָל (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: AB-i-tal (English)
Means "my father is the night dew" in Hebrew. She is the fifth wife of David in the Old Testament.

ADONIRAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: אֲדֹנִירָם (Ancient Hebrew)
Means "my lord is exalted" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of an overseer of tribute under the kings David, Solomon and Rehoboam. He was stoned to death when the Israelites revolted.

AFZAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: أفضل (Arabic)
Means "better, superior" in Arabic.

AHARON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: אַהֲרֹן (Hebrew)
Hebrew form of AARON.

AIDAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: AY-dən (English)
Personal note: Guilty pleasure
Anglicized form of AODHÁN. In the latter part of the 20th century it became popular in America due to its sound, since it uses the same fashionable aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden and Hayden.

AKSELI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: AHK-se-lee
Finnish form of AXEL.

ALBA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Catalan
Pronounced: AL-ba (Italian, Spanish), AL-bə (Catalan)
Personal note: Grown on me, but i don't like Jessica Alba
This name is derived from two distinct names, ALBA (2) and ALBA (3), with distinct origins, Latin and Germanic. Over time these names have become confused with one another. To further complicate the matter, alba means "dawn" in Italian, Spanish and Catalan. This may be the main inspiration behind its use in Italy and Spain.

ALEKSANDRU
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval Slavic
Other Scripts: Алеѯандръ (Church Slavic)
Old Slavic form of ALEXANDER.

ALEKSANTERI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: AH-lek-sahn-te-ree
Finnish form of ALEXANDER.

ALEXANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: a-lig-ZAN-dər (English), a-le-KSAN-du (German), ah-lək-SAHN-dər (Dutch), AW-lek-sawn-der (Hungarian)
Personal note: My favourite boys name
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ALEXIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, French, English, Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αλεξης (Greek), Αλεξις (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: a-LE-ksis (German), A-LEK-SEE (French), ə-LEK-sis (English)
Personal note: ONLY on a boy!
From the Greek name Αλεξις (Alexis), which meant "helper" or "defender", derived from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, to help". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek comic poet, and also of several saints. It is used somewhat interchangeably with the related name Αλεξιος or Alexius, borne by five Byzantine emperors. In the English-speaking world it is more commonly used as a feminine name.

ALICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Italian
Pronounced: AL-is (English), A-LEES (French), a-LEE-che (Italian)
From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).

ALINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian, German, Italian, Polish
Pronounced: a-LEE-na (German, Italian), a-LYEE-na (Polish)
Short form of ADELINA and names that end in alina.

ÁLMOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: AL-mosh
Possibly from Hungarian álmos "sleepy", though perhaps of Turkic origin meaning "bought". This was the name of the semi-legendary father of Árpád, the founder of the Hungarian state. Álmos's mother Emese supposedly had a dream in which a turul bird impregnated her and foretold that her son would be the father of a great nation.

AMAIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Means "the end" in Basque. This is also the name of a mountain and a village in the Basque region of Spain.

AMIAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Variant of AMYAS.

ANAÏS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Occitan, Catalan, French
Pronounced: A-NA-EES (French)
Occitan and Catalan form of ANNA.

ANASTASIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, English, Spanish, Italian, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αναστασια (Greek), Анастасия (Russian), Анастасія (Ukrainian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: u-nu-stu-SYEE-yə (Russian), a-nə-STAY-zhə (English), a-nə-STAS-yə (English), a-nas-TA-sya (Spanish), a-nas-TA-zya (Italian), A-NA-STA-SEE-A (Classical Greek)
Personal note: a-na-STAH-see-ya
Feminine form of ANASTASIUS. This was the name of a 4th-century Dalmatian saint who was martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. Due to her, the name has been common in Eastern Orthodox Christianity (in various spellings). As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the youngest daughter of the last Russian tsar Nicholas II, who was rumoured to have escaped the execution of her family in 1918.

ANASTASIJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Macedonian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Анастаија (Macedonian, Serbian)
Personal note: I like j's in names (the y sound)
Macedonian and Serbian form of ANASTASIA.

ANDOR (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: AWN-dor
Variant of ANDRÁS.

ANDREAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Welsh, Ancient Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ανδρεας, Ανδριας (Greek)
Pronounced: an-DRE-as (German), ahn-DRE-ahs (Swedish), ahn-DRHAY-ahs (Dutch)
Ancient Greek and Latin form of ANDREW. It is also the form used in modern Greek, German and Welsh.

ANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Αννα (Greek), Анна (Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Bulgarian, Church Slavic)
Pronounced: AN-ə (English), AN-na (Italian, Polish, Icelandic), A-na (German, Greek), AHN-nah (Dutch, Norwegian, Finnish), AN-nah (Danish), AWN-naw (Hungarian), AN-nə (Russian, Catalan)
Personal note: I didn't really like it at first but now i love it!
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary. In the English-speaking world, this form came into general use in the 18th century, joining Ann and Anne.

The name was borne by several Russian royals, including an 18th-century empress of Russia. It is also the name of the main character in Leo Tolstoy's novel 'Anna Karenina' (1877), about a married aristocrat who begins an ultimately tragic relationship with Count Vronsky.

ANNE (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Basque
Pronounced: AN (French, English), AN-ne (Danish), AHN-ne (Finnish), A-nə (German), AHN-nə (Dutch)
French form of ANNA. In the 13th-century it was imported to England, where it was also commonly spelled Ann. The name was borne by a 17th-century English queen and also by the second wife of Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn (the mother of Queen Elizabeth I), who was eventually beheaded in the Tower of London. This is also the name of the heroine in 'Anne of Green Gables' (1908) by Canadian author L. M. Montgomery.

ANNELIEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: ahn-nə-LEEN
Combination of ANNA and lien (from names such as CAROLIEN).

ANSELM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: AN-zelm (German), AN-selm (English)
Derived from the Germanic elements ans "god" and helm "helmet, protection". This name was brought to England in the late 11th century by Saint Anselm, who was born in northern Italy. He was archbishop of Canterbury and a Doctor of the Church.

ANSGAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: ANS-gar (German)
Derived from the Germanic elements ans "god" and ger "spear". Saint Ansgar was a 9th-century missionary who tried to convert the Danes and Norwegians.

ANYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Аня (Russian)
Pronounced: A-nyə
Personal note: But not Ania or Anja
Russian diminutive of ANNA.

ARIADNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αριαδνη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-REE-AD-NE (Classical Greek), ar-ee-AD-nee (English)
Means "most holy", composed of the Cretan Greek elements αρι (ari) "most" and αδνος (adnos) "holy". In Greek mythology, Ariadne was the daughter of King Minos. She fell in love with Theseus and helped him to escape the Labyrinth and the Minotaur, but was later abandoned by him. Eventually she married the god Dionysus.

ARTAXERXES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Persian (Hellenized), History, Biblical
Other Scripts: Αρταξερξης (Ancient Greek)
Greek form of the Persian name Artakhshathra meaning "righteous ruler". This was the name of several Achaemenid Persian rulers. It was also borne by the founder of the Sassanid Empire, usually known by the Middle Persian form Ardashir.

ARTEMISIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αρτεμισια (Ancient Greek)
Feminine form of ARTEMISIOS. This was the name of the 4th-century BC builder of the Mausoleum, one of the seven wonders of the world. She built it in memory of her husband, the Carian prince Mausolus.

ARTEMISIOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αρτεμισιος (Ancient Greek)
From an ancient Greek name which was derived from the name of the Greek goddess ARTEMIS.

ARTHUR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: AHR-thər (English), AR-TUYR (French), AR-tuwr (German), AHR-tuyr (Dutch)
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.

The name came into general use in England in the Middle Ages due to the prevalence of Arthurian romances, and it enjoyed a surge of popularity in the 19th century. Famous bearers include German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), mystery author and Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), and science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008).

ARTYOM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Артём (Russian)
Pronounced: ur-TYUYM
Russian form of ARTEMIOS.

ASHERAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Near Eastern Mythology
Personal note: ah-SHEH-rah
Perhaps derived from Semitic roots meaning "she who walks in the sea". This was the name of an ancient Israelite goddess who was worshipped before the advent of monotheism.

AUDREY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AW-dree
Medieval diminutive of ÆÐELÞRYÐ. This was the name of a 7th-century saint, a princess of East Anglia who founded a monastery at Ely. It was also borne by a character in Shakespeare's comedy 'As You Like It' (1599). At the end of the Middle Ages the name became rare due to association with the word tawdry (which was derived from St. Audrey, the name of a fair where cheap lace was sold), but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was British actress Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).

AURELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Romanian, Italian, Spanish, Polish
Pronounced: ow-RE-lya (Italian, Polish)
Feminine form of AURELIUS.

AYSEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish, Azerbaijani
Means "moon stream" in Turkish and Azerbaijani.

AYTAÇ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Personal note: Porbably more the meaning than the name itself
Means "moon crown" in Turkish.

BARBARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, French, German, Polish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Late Roman
Pronounced: BAHR-bə-rə (English), BAHR-brə (English), BAR-BA-RA (French), BAR-ba-ra (German), bar-BA-ra (Polish), BAWR-baw-raw (Hungarian)
Derived from Greek βαρβαρος (barbaros) meaning "foreign". According to legend, Saint Barbara was a young woman killed by her father Dioscorus, who was then killed by a bolt of lightning. She is the patron of architects, geologists, stonemasons and artillerymen. Because of her renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was revived in the 19th century.

BERNADETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: BER-NA-DET (French)
French feminine form of BERNARD. Saint Bernadette was a young woman from Lourdes in France who claimed to have seen visions of the Virgin Mary.

BERTIL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of BERTILO or BERTHOLD.

BETTY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BET-ee
Personal note: nn for Elizabeth...or even Bertha (my great grandmother)
Diminutive of ELIZABETH.

BOAZ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: בֹּעַז (Hebrew)
Pronounced: BO-az (English)
Personal note: As in Boaz Mauda. Awesome!
Means "swiftness" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of the man who marries Ruth.

BOJAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Бојан (Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: BO-yan (Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian)
Derived from the Slavic element boji meaning "battle". This was the name of a 9th-century Bulgarian saint.

BOLORMAA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mongolian
Other Scripts: Болормаа (Mongolian Cyrillic)
Means "crystal mother" in Mongolian.

CAITRIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Possibly a form of CAITRÍONA.

CASIMIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: KAZ-i-meer (English), KA-ZEE-MEER (French)
Personal note: Not such a great meaning, though.
English form of the Polish name Kazimierz, derived from the Slavic element kaziti "to destroy" combined with miru "peace, world". Four kings of Poland have borne this name, including Casimir III the Great, who greatly strengthened the Polish state in the 14th century. It was also borne Saint Casimir, a 15th-century Polish prince and a patron saint of Poland and Lithuania. The name was imported into Western Europe via Germany, where it was borne by some royalty.

CASPIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: KAS-pee-ən (English)
Used by author C. S. Lewis for a character in his 'Chronicles of Narnia' series, first appearing in 1950. Prince Caspian first appears in the fourth book, where he is the rightful king of Narnia driven into exile by his evil uncle Miraz. Lewis probably based the name on the Caspian Sea, which was named for the city of Qazvin, which was itself named for the ancient Cas tribe.

CEDRIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SED-rik
Invented by Sir Walter Scott for a character in his novel 'Ivanhoe' (1819). Apparently he based it on the actual name Cerdic, the name of the semi-legendary founder of the kingdom of Wessex in the 6th century. The meaning of Cerdic is uncertain, but it does not appear to be Old English in origin. It could be connected to the Brythonic name CARATACOS. The name was also used by Frances Hodgson Burnett for the main character in her novel 'Little Lord Fauntleroy' (1886).

CHARLOTTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: SHAR-LAWT (French), SHAHR-lət (English), shar-LAW-tə (German), shah-LOT (Swedish), shahr-LAWT-tə (Dutch)
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.

CHARNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish
From a Slavic word meaning "black".

CHIAMAKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Western African, Igbo
Means "God is beautiful" in Igbo.

CHOLPON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kyrgyz
Other Scripts: Чолпон (Kyrgyz)
Means "Venus (the planet)" in Kyrgyz.

ĈIELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: chee-E-la
Means "heavenly, from the sky" in Esperanto.

COLETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KAW-LET
Short form of NICOLETTE. Saint Colette was a 15th-century French nun who gave her money to the poor. This was also the pen name of the French author Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (1873-1954).

CORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κορη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KAWR-ə (English), KO-ra (German)
Personal note: From Downton (not that i watch that show though)
Latinized form of KORE. It was not used as a given name in the English-speaking world until after it was employed by James Fenimore Cooper for a character in his novel 'The Last of the Mohicans' (1826). In some cases it may be a short form of CORDULA, CORINNA or other names beginning with a similar sound.

COSMO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAWZ-mo
English form of COSMAS. It was introduced to Britain in the 18th century by the second Scottish Duke of Gordon, who named his son and successor after his friend Cosimo III de' Medici.

CSILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: CHEEL-law
Derived from Hungarian csillag meaning "star". This name was created by the Hungarian author András Dugonics for an 1803 novel and later used and popularized by the poet Mihály Vörösmarty.

DAFINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Albanian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Дафина (Macedonian)
Albanian and Macedonian form of DAPHNE.

DAGMAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic, German, Czech, Slovak
Pronounced: DAK-mar (German)
From the Old Norse name Dagmær, derived from the elements dagr "day" and mær "maid". This was the name adopted by the popular Bohemian wife of the Danish king Valdemar II when they married in 1205. Her birth name was Markéta.

DAGNY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: DAHNG-nuy (Swedish)
From the Old Norse name Dagný, which was derived from the elements dagr "day" and "new".

DAMIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Other Scripts: Дамир (Serbian)
Pronounced: DA-meer (Croatian, Serbian)
Possibly derived from the Slavic elements dan "given" and miru "peace, world". Otherwise, it might be of Turkic origin.

DANICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Slovak, Czech, Macedonian, English
Other Scripts: Даница (Serbian, Macedonian)
Personal note: dah-NEE-tsa
From a Slavic word meaning "morning star, Venus". This name occurs in Slavic folklore as a personification of the morning star. It has sometimes been used in the English-speaking world since the 1970s.

DANIELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, Czech, Slovak, Romanian, Portuguese, Spanish, Bulgarian, Macedonian, English
Other Scripts: Даниела (Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: da-NYE-la (German)
Feminine form of DANIEL.

DANIILU
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Old Church Slavic
Other Scripts: Данїилъ (Church Slavic)
Old Slavic form of DANIEL.

DANTE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: DAN-te
Medieval short form of DURANTE. The most notable bearer of this name was Dante Alighieri, the 13th-century Italian poet who wrote the 'Divine Comedy'.

DANUTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: da-NOO-ta
Polish form of DANUTĖ.

DANUTĖ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian
Meaning uncertain, possibly a feminine form of DANIEL. It is found in Lithuania from at least 14th century, being borne by a sister of Vytautas the Great.

DAPHNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, Dutch
Other Scripts: Δαφνη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DAF-nee (English), DAHF-nə (Dutch)
Means "laurel" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was a nymph turned into a laurel tree by her father in order that she might escape the pursuit of Apollo. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the end of the 19th century.

DARDAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Albanian
From the name of the Dardani, an Illyrian tribe who lived on the Balkan Peninsula. Their name may derive from an Illyrian word meaning "pear". They were unrelated to the ancient people who were also called the Dardans who lived near Troy.

DARIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Lithuanian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: də-RIE-əs (English), DER-ee-əs (English), DAR-ee-əs (English)
Personal note: I kinda like it less now...
Roman form of Δαρειος (Dareios), which was the Greek form of the Persian name Dārayavahush, which was composed of the elements dâraya "to possess" and vahu "good". Three ancient kings of Persia bore this name, including Darius the Great who expanded the Achaemenid Empire to its greatest extent. His forces invaded Greece but were defeated in the Battle of Marathon.

It has never been very common as a given name in the English-speaking world, though it rose in popularity after the middle of the 20th century.

DAVOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Other Scripts: Давор (Serbian)
Possibly from an old Slavic exclamation expressing joy or sorrow.

DEMETRIOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek, Greek
Other Scripts: Δημητριος (Greek)
Original Greek form of DEMETRIUS.

DESIDERIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Late Roman
Feminine form of DESIDERIO. This was the Latin name of a 19th-century queen of Sweden, the wife of Karl XIV. She was born in France with the name Désirée.

DESIDERIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of DESIDERIUS.

DIEDERIK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: DEE-də-rik
Dutch form of THEODORIC.

DİLEK
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Means "wish, desire" in Turkish.

DIMA (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Дима (Russian)
Pronounced: DYEE-mə
Personal note: Dima Bilan, and my hamster's name (R.I.P)
Diminutive of DIMITRI.

DMITRY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Дмитрий (Russian)
Pronounced: DMEE-tree
Variant transcription of DMITRIY.

DOLORES
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English
Pronounced: do-LO-res (Spanish), də-LAWR-is (English)
Means "sorrows", taken from the Spanish title of the Virgin Mary María de los Dolores, meaning "Mary of Sorrows". It has been used in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, becoming especially popular in America during the 1920s and 30s.

DONAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Germanic Mythology
Continental Germanic cognate of Þórr (see THOR).

DORIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Croatian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Δωρις (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DAWR-is (English), DO-ris (German)
From the ancient Greek name Δωρις (Doris) which meant "Dorian woman". The Dorians were a Greek tribe who occupied the Peloponnese starting in the 12th century BC. In Greek mythology Doris was a sea nymph, one of the many children of Oceanus and Tethys. It began to be used as an English name in the 19th century. A famous bearer is the American actress Doris Day (1924-).

DRAHOMÍRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak feminine form of DRAGOMIR.

DURAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Tamil
Other Scripts: துரை (Tamil)
Means "chief, leader" in Tamil.

DUŠAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovak, Slovene, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Душан (Serbian, Macedonian)
Derived from Slavic dusha meaning "soul, spirit".

ELENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovak, Lithuanian, Russian, Greek, German, Medieval Slavic
Other Scripts: Елена (Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Church Slavic), Ελενα (Greek)
Pronounced: E-le-na (Italian, German), e-LE-na (Spanish), yi-LYE-nə (Russian), i-LYE-nə (Russian)
Personal note: e-LE:-nah
Cognate of HELEN, and a variant transcription of Russian YELENA.

ELENORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: el-ə-NAWR-ə
Form of ELEANOR.

ELERI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Meaning unknown. In Welsh legend she was the daughter of the chieftain Brychan.

ELIZABETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: i-LIZ-ə-bəth (English)
From Ελισαβετ (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath" or perhaps "my God is abundance". The Hebrew form appears in the Old Testament where Elisheba is the wife of Aaron, while the Greek form appears in the New Testament where Elizabeth is the mother of John the Baptist.

Among Christians, this name was originally more common in Eastern Europe. It was borne in the 12th century by Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, a daughter of King Andrew II who used her wealth to help the poor. In medieval England it was occasionally used in honour of the saint, though the form Isabel (from Occitan and Spanish) was more common. It has been very popular in England since the reign of Queen Elizabeth I in the 16th century. It has also been borne (in various spellings) by many other European royals, including a ruling empress of Russia in the 18th century. Famous modern bearers include the British queen Elizabeth II (1926-) and actress Elizabeth Taylor (1932-2011).

EMIL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Romanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Polish, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Hungarian, Icelandic, English
Other Scripts: Емил (Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: E-mil (Swedish), E-meel (German, Hungarian), e-MEEL (Romanian, English), E-myeel (Polish)
From the Roman family name Aemilius, which was derived from Latin aemulus meaning "rival".

ENDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Means "very rare" in Turkish.

ENDZELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Georgian
Other Scripts: ენძელა (Georgian)
Means "snowdrop flower" in Georgian (genus Galanthus).

ENID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Personal note: guilty pleasure
Derived from Welsh enaid meaning "soul" or "life". She is the wife of Geraint in Welsh legend and Arthurian romance.

ENKI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Near Eastern Mythology
Pronounced: EN-kee (English)
Personal note: I'd probably save it for a pet
Derived from Sumerian en-ki "lord of the earth" (though maybe originally from en-kur "lord of the underworld"). Enki, called Ea by the Babylonians, was the Sumerian god of water and wisdom and the keeper of the Me, the divine laws.

ESMÉE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: EZ-may (English), EZ-mee (English), es-MAY (Dutch)
Feminine form of ESMÉ.

ESTHER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Spanish, Dutch, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: אֶסְתֵר (Hebrew), Εσθηρ (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ES-tər (English, Dutch), ES-TER (French)
Possibly means "star" in Persian. Alternatively it could be a derivative of the name of the Near Eastern goddess ISHTAR. The Book of Esther in the Old Testament tells the story of Queen Esther, the Jewish wife of the king of Persia. The king's advisor Haman persuaded the king to exterminate all the Jews in the realm. Warned of this plot by her cousin Mordecai, Esther revealed her Jewish ancestry and convinced the king to execute Haman instead. Her original Hebrew name was Hadassah.

This name has been used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. In America it received a boost in popularity after the birth of Esther Cleveland (1893-1980), the daughter of President Grover Cleveland.

EUGENE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: YOO-jeen, yoo-JEEN
Personal note: Old-guy chic
English form of Eugenius, the Latin form of the Greek name Ευγενιος (Eugenios) which was derived from the Greek word ευγενης (eugenes) meaning "well born". It is composed of the elements ευ (eu) "good" and γενης (genes) "born". This was the name of several saints and four popes.

This name was not particularly common in Western Europe during the Middle Ages. It became more popular in part due to the fame of Prince Eugene of Savoy (1663-1736), a French-born general who served the Austrian Empire. A notable bearer was the American playwright Eugene O'Neill (1888-1953).

EVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: חַוָּה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: EEV (English)
From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חוה (chawah) "to breathe" or the related word חיה (chayah) "to live". According to the Old Testament Book of Genesis, Eve and Adam were the first humans. God created her from one of Adam's ribs to be his companion. At the urging of a serpent she ate the forbidden fruit and shared some with Adam, causing their expulsion from the Garden of Eden.

Despite this potentially negative association, the name was occasionally used by Christians during the Middle Ages. In the English-speaking world both Eve and the Latin form Eva were revived in the 19th century.

FARIDOON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: فریدون (Persian)
Variant transcription of FEREYDOUN.

FEREYDOUN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Persian, Persian Mythology
Other Scripts: فریدون (Persian)
Means "the third" in Persian. In the 11th-century Persian epic the 'Shahnameh' this is the name of a virtuous king who ruled for 500 years.

FLEUR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Dutch, English (Rare)
Pronounced: FLUUR (French, Dutch), FLUR (English)
Means "flower" in French. This was the name of a character in John Galsworthy's novels 'The Forsyte Saga' (1922).

GABRIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: גַּבְרִיאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Γαβριηλ (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: GA-BREE-YEL (French), ga-BRYEL (Spanish), GA-bree-el (German, Classical Latin), GAHB-ree-el (Finnish), GAY-bree-əl (English), GAB-ryel (Polish)
From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "God is my strong man", derived from גֶּבֶר (gever) "strong man, hero" and אֶל ('El) "God". Gabriel was one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition, often appearing as a messenger of God. In the Old Testament he is sent to interpret the visions of the prophet Daniel, while in the New Testament he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Qur'an to Muhammad.

This name has been used occasionally in England since the 12th century. It was not common in the English-speaking world until the end of the 20th century.

GERTRUDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: GUR-trood (English), khər-TRUY-də (Dutch)
Personal note: Why not? I think it's kinda cute!
Means "spear of strength", derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and thrud "strength". Saint Gertrude the Great was a 13th-century nun and mystic writer. It was probably introduced to England by settlers from the Low Countries in the 15th century. Shakespeare used the name in his play 'Hamlet' (1600) for the mother of the title character. A famous bearer was the American writer Gertrude Stein (1874-1946).

GIDEON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew
Other Scripts: גִּדְעוֹן (Hebrew)
Pronounced: GID-ee-ən (English)
Personal note: Someone i know.
Means "feller" or "hewer" in Hebrew. Gideon is a hero and judge of the Old Testament. He led the vastly outnumbered Israelites against the Midianites, defeated them, and killed their two kings. In the English-speaking world, Gideon has been used as a given name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans.

GILGAMESH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Near Eastern Mythology
Pronounced: GIL-gə-mesh (English)
Possibly means "the ancestor is a young man" in Sumerian. This was the name of a Sumerian hero, later appearing in the Akkadian poem the 'Epic of Gilgamesh'. Gigamesh, with his friend Enkidu, battled the giant Humbaba and stopped the rampage of the Bull of Heaven, besides other adventures. Gilgamesh was probably based on a real person: a king of Erech who ruled around the 27th century BC.

GIORGI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Georgian
Other Scripts: გიორგი (Georgian)
Personal note: A fictional character i made.
Georgian form of GEORGE. This was the name of several kings of Georgia.

GRACE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GRAYS
From the English word grace, which ultimately derives from Latin gratia. This was one of the virtue names created in the 17th century by the Puritans. The actress Grace Kelly (1929-1982) was a famous bearer.

GRETA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, English
Pronounced: GRE-ta (German), GRET-ə (English)
Short form of MARGARETA. A famous bearer of this name was Swedish actress Greta Garbo (1905-1990).

GUS (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: GUS
Short form of AUGUSTUS or ANGUS.

GYATSO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Tibetan
Other Scripts: རྒྱ་མཚོ (Tibetan)
From Tibetan རྒྱ་མཚོ (rgya-mtsho) meaning "ocean". This is one of the given names of the current Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso (1935-).

HADASSAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: הֲדַסָּה (Hebrew)
From Hebrew הֲדַס (hadas) meaning "myrtle tree". In the Old Testament this is the Hebrew name of Queen Esther.

HALINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: kha-LEE-na
Polish form of GALINA.

HANNELORE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: HA-nə-lo-rə
Combination of HANNE (1) and ELEONORE.

HECTOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Arthurian Romance
Other Scripts: ‘Εκτωρ (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEK-tər (English), EK-TAWR (French)
Latinized form of Greek ‘Εκτωρ (Hektor), which was derived from ‘εκτωρ (hektor) "holding fast", ultimately from εχω (echo) meaning "to hold, to possess". In Greek legend Hector was one of the Trojan champions who fought against the Greeks. After he killed Achilles' friend Patroclus in battle, he was himself brutally slain by Achilles, who proceeded to tie his dead body to a chariot and drag it about. This name also appears in Arthurian legends belonging to King Arthur's foster father.

Hector has occasionally been used as a given name since the Middle Ages, probably because of the noble character of the classical hero. It was historically common in Scotland, where it was used as an Anglicized form of Eachann.

HELGA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Ancient Scandinavian
Pronounced: HEL-ga (German), HEL-gaw (Hungarian)
Personal note: Helga G. Pataki!
Feminine form of HELGE.

HENRY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HEN-ree
From the Germanic name Heimirich which meant "home ruler", composed of the elements heim "home" and ric "power, ruler". It was later commonly spelled Heinrich, with the spelling altered due to the influence of other Germanic names like Haganrich, in which the first element is hagan "enclosure".

Heinrich was popular among continental royalty, being the name of seven German kings, starting with the 10th-century Henry I the Fowler, and four French kings. In France it was rendered Henri from the Latin form Henricus.

The Normans introduced the French form to England, and it was subsequently used by eight kings, ending with the infamous Henry VIII in the 16th century. During the Middle Ages it was generally rendered as Harry or Herry in English pronunciation. Notable bearers include arctic naval explorer Henry Hudson (1570-1611), British novelist Henry James (1843-1916), and American automobile manufacturer Henry Ford (1863-1947).

HERBERT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, French, Slovene, Polish
Pronounced: HUR-bərt (English), HER-bert (German), ER-BER (French), KHER-bert (Polish)
Derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it replaced an Old English cognate Herebeorht. In the course of the Middle Ages it became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.

HIKARI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: , etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: KHEE-KA-REE
From Japanese (hikari) meaning "light". Other kanji can also form this name. It is often written ひかり using the hiragana writing system.

HIKARU
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 光, 輝, etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: KHEE-KA-ROO
From Japanese (hikaru) meaning "light" or (hikaru) meaning "brightness". Other kanji can also form this name.

HIRAKU
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: , etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: KHEE-RA-KOO
From Japanese (hiraku) meaning "expand, open, support". Other kanji can also form this name.

HRVOJE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian
Derived from Croatian Hrvat meaning "Croat".

IGOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Игорь (Russian), Игор (Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: EE-gər (Russian), EE-gawr (Polish)
Personal note: I associate it with Igor Cukrov
Russian form of Yngvarr (see INGVAR). The Varangians brought it to Russia in the 10th century. It was borne by two Grand Princes of Kiev. Famous bearers include Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971), a Russian composer whose most famous work is 'The Rite of Spring', and Igor Sikorsky (1889-1972), the Russian-American designer of the first successful helicopter.

ILMATAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish Mythology
Pronounced: EEL-mah-tahr (Finnish)
Derived from Finnish ilma "air". In Finnish mythology Ilmatar was a semi-androgynous goddess of the heavens. She was the mother of Ilmarinen, Väinämöinen and Lemminkäinen.

INDIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Tamil
Other Scripts: इन्दिरा (Sanskrit), इन्दिरा, इंदिरा (Hindi), इंदिरा (Marathi), ಇಂದಿರಾ (Kannada), இந்திரா (Tamil)
Means "beauty" in Sanskrit. This is another name of Lakshmi, the wife of the Hindu god Vishnu. A notable bearer was India's first female prime minister, Indira Gandhi (1917-1984).

IPATI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Ипатий (Russian)
Pronounced: i-PA-tyee
Variant transcription of IPATIY.

IRMUSKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian (Rare)
Pronounced: EER-moosh-kaw
Hungarian diminutive of IRMA.

ISADORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Variant of ISIDORA. A famous bearer was the American dancer Isadora Duncan (1877-1927).

ISKANDAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Indonesian, Malay
Other Scripts: إسكندر (Arabic)
Arabic, Indonesian and Malay form of ALEXANDER.

ISKRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Искра (Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)
From a South Slavic word meaning "spark".

ISOLDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-ZOL-də (English), i-SOL-də (English), ee-ZAWL-də (German)
The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, perhaps from a hypothetic name like Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice, iron" and hild "battle".

In medieval Arthurian legend Isolde was an Irish princess betrothed to King Mark of Cornwall. After accidentally drinking a love potion, she became the lover of his knight Tristan, which led to their tragic deaths. The story was popular during the Middle Ages and the name became relatively common in England at that time. It was rare by the 19th century, though some interest was generated by Richard Wagner's opera 'Tristan und Isolde' (1865).

ITZEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Native American, Mayan
Possibly a variant of IXCHEL.

ITZIAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque, Spanish
From the name of a Basque village which contains an important shrine to the Virgin Mary, possibly meaning "old stone".

IXCHEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mayan Mythology
Means "rainbow lady" in Mayan. She was the Mayan goddess of the earth, the moon, and medicine. She was often depicted with a snake in her hair and crossbones embroidered on her skirt.

JADWIGA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: yad-VYEE-ga
Polish form of HEDWIG. This was the name of a 14th-century ruling queen of Poland who has recently been canonized as a saint.

JAMAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: جمال (Arabic)
Means "beauty" in Arabic. Jamal al-Din al-Afghani was a political activist who promoted pan-Islamism in the 19th century.

JANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAYN
Medieval English form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). This became the most common feminine form of John in the 17th century, surpassing Joan.

Famous bearers include the uncrowned English queen Lady Jane Grey (1536-1554), who ruled for only 9 days, the British novelist Jane Austen (1775-1817), who wrote 'Sense and Sensibility' and 'Pride and Prejudice', and the British primatologist Jane Goodall (1934-). This is also the name of the central character in Charlotte Brontë's novel 'Jane Eyre' (1847), which tells of her sad childhood and her relationship with Edward Rochester.

JÁNOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: YA-nosh
Hungarian form of JOHN.

JELENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian
Other Scripts: Јелена (Serbian)
Form of YELENA. In Serbia, Croatia and Slovenia it is also associated with the South Slavic words jelen meaning "deer, stag" and jela meaning "fir tree".

JOHANN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: YO-han
German form of Iohannes (see JOHN). Famous bearers include German composer Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750), German novelist and poet Johann Goethe (1749-1832), and Austrian composers Johann Strauss the Elder (1804-1849) and his son Johann Strauss the Younger (1825-1899).

JORDAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Јордан (Macedonian)
Pronounced: JAWR-dən (English)
From the name of the river which flows between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". In the New Testament John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name in Europe after crusaders brought water back from the river to baptize their children. There may have been some influence from the Germanic name JORDANES, notably borne by a 6th-century Gothic historian.

This name died out after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. In America and other countries it became fairly popular in the second half of the 20th century. A famous bearer of the surname is former basketball star Michael Jordan (1963-).

JUDITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Jewish, French, German, Spanish, Biblical
Other Scripts: יְהוּדִית (Hebrew)
Pronounced: JOO-dəth (English), ZHUY-DEET (French), YOO-dit (German)
From the Hebrew name יְהוּדִית (Yehudit) meaning "woman from Judea", Judea being an ancient region in Israel. In the Old Testament Judith is one of the Hittite wives of Esau. This is also the name of the main character of the apocryphal Book of Judith. She killed Holofernes, an invading Assyrian commander, by beheading him in his sleep.

As an English name it did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation, despite a handful of early examples during the Middle Ages. It was however used earlier on the European continent, being borne by several European royals, such as the 9th-century Judith of Bavaria.

JUHANI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: YOO-hah-nee
Finnish form of JOHN.

JULIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Roman, Biblical
Other Scripts: Юлия (Russian), Юлія (Ukrainian)
Pronounced: JOO-lee-ə (English), YOO-lya (German, Polish), YOO-lee-ah (Swedish, Danish, Finnish), KHOO-lya (Spanish), YOO-lyi-yə (Russian), YOO-lee-a (Classical Latin)
Feminine form of the Roman family name JULIUS. Among the notable women from this family were Julia Augusta (also known as Livia Drusilla), the wife of Emperor Augustus, and Julia the Elder, the daughter of Augustus and the wife of Tiberius. A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was also borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. Additionally, Shakespeare used it in his comedy 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594).

It has been common as a given name in the English-speaking world only since the 18th century. A famous modern bearer is American actress Julia Roberts (1967-).

JUNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JOON
From the name of the month, which was originally derived from the name of the Roman goddess Juno. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.

JUNIPER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: JOON-ə-pər
From the English word for the type of tree, derived ultimately from Latin iuniperus.

JURIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval Low German
Medieval Low German form of GEORGE.

KAAPO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: KAH-po
Finnish form of GABRIEL.

KALEVI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: KAH-le-vee
Variant of KALEVA.

KAMARIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Eastern African, Swahili
Swahili name, likely related to QAMAR.

KARI (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: KAH-ree
Finnish form of Macarius (see MACARIO).

KARIM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Persian
Other Scripts: كريم (Arabic), کریم (Persian)
Means "generous, noble" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition الكريم (al-Karim) is one of the 99 names of Allah.

KAUSALYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism
Other Scripts: कौसल्या (Sanskrit)
Means "of the Kosala people" in Sanskrit. Kosala was an ancient Indian kingdom that was at its most powerful in the 6th century BC. In Hindu legend Kausalya is the name of the mother of the hero Rama.

KAZIMIERZ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: ka-ZHEE-myesh
Polish form of CASIMIR.

KAZIMIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Medieval Slavic
Other Scripts: Казимир (Russian, Church Slavic)
Pronounced: kə-zyi-MYEER (Russian)
Russian form of CASIMIR.

KEREN-HAPPUCH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: קֶרֶן הַפּוּך (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KER-ən HAP-ook (English)
Means "horn of antimony" in Hebrew. Antimony is a substance that was formerly used as an eye cosmetic (eyeshadow). A hollowed animal horn could have been used to store this material. Keren-Happuch is the name of the third daughter of Job in the Old Testament.

KERTTU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: KERT-too
Finnish form of GERTRUDE.

KHALED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: خالد (Arabic)
Personal note: "Aicha, Aicha..."
Variant transcription of KHALID.

KNUT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Pronounced: KNOOT (German)
Derived from Old Norse knútr meaning "knot". Knut was a Danish prince who defeated Æðelræd II, king of England, in the early 11th century and became the ruler of Denmark, Norway and England.

KOFI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Western African, Akan
Means "born on Friday" in Akan.

LÁILÁ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Sami
Personal note: Separate from Leila
Sami variant form of HELGA.

LAZAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Лазарь (Russian), Лазар (Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: LA-zər (Russian), LA-zar (Serbian, Croatian)
Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian and Macedonian form of LAZARUS.

LAZARUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Λαζαρος (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LAZ-ər-əs (English)
Latinized form of Λαζαρος (Lazaros), a Greek form of ELEAZAR used in the New Testament. Lazarus was a man from Bethany, the brother of Mary and Martha, who was restored to life by Jesus.

LEAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: לֵאָה (Hebrew)
Pronounced: LEE-ə (English)
Personal note: Just not "Lia", but "Lea" is ok.
From the Hebrew name לֵאָה (Le'ah) which was probably derived from the Hebrew word לְאָה (le'ah) meaning "weary". Alternatively it might derive from a Chaldean name meaning "mistress" or "ruler" in Akkadian. In the Old Testament Leah is the first wife of Jacob and the mother of seven of his children. Jacob's other wife was Leah's sister Rachel. Although this name was used by Jews in the Middle Ages, it was not typical as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation, being common among the Puritans.

LEELO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Estonian
Means "folk song" in Estonian.

LEILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Persian, English, Georgian
Other Scripts: ليلى (Arabic), لیلا (Persian), ლეილა (Georgian)
Pronounced: LAY-lə (English), LEE-lə (English), LIE-lə (English)
Personal note: THIS SPELLING ONLY!
Variant of LAYLA. This spelling was used by Lord Byron for characters in 'The Giaour' (1813) and 'Don Juan' (1819), and it is through him that the name was introduced to the English-speaking world.

LENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Russian, English, Italian, Portuguese, Greek
Other Scripts: Лена (Russian), Λενα (Greek)
Pronounced: LE-na (German, Polish, Italian), LYE-nə (Russian), LEE-nə (English)
Personal note: I hate Lena Meyer-Landrut but i like this name.
Short form of names ending in lena, such as HELENA, MAGDALENA or YELENA.

LEON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Λεων (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LEE-awn (English), LE-awn (German, Polish, Slovene)
Derived from Greek λεων (leon) meaning "lion". During the Christian era this Greek name was merged with the Latin cognate Leo, with the result that the two forms are used somewhat interchangeably across European languages. In England during the Middle Ages this was a common name among Jews. A famous bearer was Leon Trotsky (1879-1940), a Russian Communist revolutionary.

LEONTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Late Roman
Feminine form of LEONTIUS.

LÉONTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LE-AWN-TEEN
French form of LEONTINA.

LEV (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Лев (Russian)
Pronounced: LYEF
Means "lion" in Russian, functioning as a vernacular form of Leo. This was the real Russian name of both author Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910) and revolutionary Leon Trotsky (1879-1940).

LILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee
From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.

LIOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: לִיאוֹר (Hebrew)
Means "light for me" in Hebrew.

LISETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: LEE-ZET (French)
Diminutive of ÉLISABETH.

LUCIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: loo-CHEE-a (Italian), loo-TSEE-a (German), LOO-tsya (German), LOO-shə (English), loo-SEE-ə (English), LOO-chya (Romanian), LOO-kee-a (Classical Latin)
Personal note: loo-CHEE-a
Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus she is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.

LUDMILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Russian
Other Scripts: Людмила (Russian)
Pronounced: lyuwd-MYEE-lə (Russian)
Means "favour of the people" from the Slavic elements lyudu "people" and milu "gracious, dear". Saint Ludmila was a 10th-century duchess of Bohemia, the grandmother of Saint Václav. She was murdered on the orders of her daughter-in-law Drahomíra.

As a Russian name, this is a variant transcription of Людмила (usually rendered LYUDMILA).

LUDWIG
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: LOOT-vikh
From the Germanic name Chlodovech, which was composed of the elements hlud "famous" and wig "war, battle". This was the name of three Merovingian kings of the Franks (though their names are usually spelled in the Latinized form Clovis) as well as several Carolingian kings and Holy Roman Emperors (names often spelled in the French form Louis). Other famous bearers include the German composer Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) and the Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951), who contributed to logic and the philosophy of language.

LUIZ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese form of LOUIS.

LUMI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: LOO-mee
Means "snow" in Finnish.

LUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.

MADELEINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Swedish
Pronounced: MAD-LEN (French), MAD-ə-lin (English), MAD-ə-lien (English), mahd-e-LEN (Swedish)
French form of MAGDALENE.

MAIALEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Basque form of MAGDALENE.

MAIMU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Estonian
Pronounced: MIE-moo
Means "little" in Estonian.

MARDUK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Near Eastern Mythology
Pronounced: MAHR-dook (English)
Possibly from Sumerian amar-Utu meaning "calf of UTU". In Babylonian mythology he was the chief god, presiding over heaven, light, sky, battle, and fertility. After killing the dragon Tiamat, who was an old enemy of the gods, he created the world and sky from the pieces of her body.

MARIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Other Scripts: Μαρια (Greek), Мария (Russian, Bulgarian), Марія (Ukrainian), Маріа (Church Slavic)
Pronounced: ma-REE-a (Italian, German, Dutch, Greek), mu-REE-u (European Portuguese), ma-REE-u (Brazilian Portuguese), mə-REE-ə (Catalan, English), mah-REE-ah (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish), MAR-ya (Polish), MAH-ree-ah (Finnish), mu-RYEE-yə (Russian), mu-RYEE-yu (Ukrainian)
Personal note: Love it but prefer Marija.
Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.

This was the name of two ruling queens of Portugal. It was also borne by the Habsburg queen Maria Theresa (1717-1780), whose inheritance of the domains of her father, the Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI, began the War of the Austrian Succession.

MARIABELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Combination of MARIA and BELLA.

MARIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Czech, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: MA-REE (French), MA-ri-ye (Czech), ma-REE (German), mə-REE (English)
French and Czech form of MARIA. A notable bearer of this name was Marie Antoinette, a queen of France who was executed by guillotine during the French Revolution. Another was Marie Curie (1867-1934), a physicist and chemist who studied radioactivity with her husband Pierre.

MARIJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian, Slovene, Serbian, Macedonian, Lithuanian, Latvian
Other Scripts: Марија (Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: ma-REE-ya (Slovene)
Personal note: Just not Mariya
Form of MARIA.

MARISOL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: mar-ee-SOL
Combination of MARÍA and SOL (1) or SOLEDAD. It also resembles Spanish mar y sol "sea and sun".

MATILDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Finnish
Pronounced: mə-TIL-də (English), MAH-teel-dah (Finnish)
From the Germanic name Mahthildis meaning "strength in battle", from the elements maht "might, strength" and hild "battle". Saint Matilda was the wife of the 10th-century German king Henry I the Fowler. The name was common in many branches of European royalty in the Middle Ages. It was brought to England by the Normans, being borne by the wife of William the Conqueror himself. Another notable royal by this name was a 12th-century daughter of Henry I of England, known as the Empress Matilda because of her first marriage to the Holy Roman Emperor Henry V. She later invaded England, laying the foundations for the reign of her son Henry II.

The name was popular until the 15th century in England, usually in the vernacular form Maud. Both forms were revived by the 19th century. This name appears in the popular Australian folk song 'Waltzing Matilda', written in 1895.

MATLEENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: MAHT-le-nah
Finnish form of MAGDALENE.

MAUDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAWD
Variant of MAUD.

MAYA (3)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: מַיָּה (Hebrew)
Derived from Hebrew מַיִם (mayim) "water".

MEITAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: מֵיטַל (Hebrew)
Means "dew drop" in Hebrew.

MÉLISANDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
French form of MILLICENT used by Maurice Maeterlinck in his play 'Pelléas et Mélisande' (1893). The play was later adapted by Claude Debussy into an opera (1902).

MERCY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MUR-see
From the English word mercy, ultimately from Latin merces "wages, reward", a derivative of merx "goods, wares". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.

MICHAL (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew
Other Scripts: מִיכַל (Hebrew)
Possibly means "brook" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is a daughter of Saul. She was married to David, but after David fled from Saul he remarried her to someone else. Later, when David became king, he ordered her returned to him.

MIHAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Romanian form of MICHAEL. Mihai the Brave was a prince of Wallachia who united Romania in the early 17th century.

MIKA (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: MEE-kah
Finnish short form of MIKAEL.

MILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Мила (Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian), Міла (Ukrainian)
Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear".

MILOŠ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Serbian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Милош (Serbian, Macedonian)
Originally a diminutive of names beginning with the Slavic element milu "gracious, dear". This was the name of a 14th-century Serbian hero who apparently killed the Ottoman sultan Murad I at the Battle of Kosovo.

MIREIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan, Spanish
Pronounced: mee-RE-yə (Catalan)
Catalan form of Mirèio (see MIREILLE).

MIREILLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MEE-RAY
From the Occitan name Mirèio, which was first used by the poet Frédéric Mistral for the main character in his poem 'Mirèio' (1859). He probably derived it from the Occitan word mirar meaning "to admire".

MIRIAM
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, English, German, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: מִרְיָם (Hebrew)
Pronounced: MIR-ee-əm (English), MI-ryam (German)
Original Hebrew form of MARY. It is used in the Old Testament, where it belongs to the elder sister of Moses and Aaron. She watched over the infant Moses as the pharaoh's daughter drew him from the Nile. The name has long been popular among Jews, and it has been used as an English Christian name since the Protestant Reformation.

MIROSLAV
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Medieval Slavic
Other Scripts: Мирослав (Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Church Slavic)
Pronounced: myi-ru-SLAF (Russian)
Derived from the Slavic elements miru "peace, world" and slava "glory". This was the name of a 10th-century king of Croatia who was deposed by one of his nobles after ruling for four years.

MITRODORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Macedonian
Other Scripts: Митродора (Macedonian)
Macedonian form of METRODORA.

MITROFAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Митрофан (Russian)
Pronounced: myi-tru-FAN
Russian form of METROPHANES.

MIU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 美羽, etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: MEE-OO
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful" and (u) meaning "feather". Other kanji combinations are possible.

NADEZHDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Надежда (Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: nu-DYEZH-də (Russian)
Personal note: Prettier than Nadia/Nadya, soundwise anyway.
Means "hope" in Slavic.

NAHUM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: נַחוּם (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: NAY-əm (English), NAY-həm (English)
Means "comforter" in Hebrew. Nahum is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament. He authored the Book of Nahum in which the downfall of Nineveh is foretold.

NAOISE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: NEE-shə (Irish)
Meaning unknown, presumably of Gaelic origin. In Irish legend he was the young man who eloped with Deirdre, the beloved of Conchobhar the king of Ulster. Conchobhar eventually succeeded in having Naoise murdered, which caused Deirdre to die of grief.

NATALIJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Наталија (Serbian, Macedonian)
Serbian, Croatian, Slovene and Macedonian form of Natalia (see NATALIE).

NATANAIL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Натанаил (Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Bulgarian and Macedonian form of NATHANAEL.

NATASHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English
Other Scripts: Наташа (Russian)
Pronounced: nu-TA-shə (Russian), nə-TAHSH-ə (English)
Russian diminutive of NATALYA. This is the name of a character in Leo Tolstoy's novel 'War and Peace' (1865). It has been used in the English-speaking world only since the 20th century.

NAZAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Назар (Russian, Ukrainian)
Russian and Ukrainian form of Nazarius (see NAZARIO).

NERIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous Australian
Possibly means "water lily" in an Australian Aboriginal language.

NESTOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Russian
Other Scripts: Νεστωρ (Ancient Greek), Нестор (Russian)
Pronounced: NES-TAWR (Classical Greek), NES-tər (English)
Means "homecoming" in Greek. In Homer's 'Iliad' this was the name of the king of Pylos, famous for his great wisdom and longevity, who acted as a counselor to the Greek allies.

NIAMH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: NYEE-əv (Irish), NYEEV (Irish)
Means "bright" in Irish. She was the daughter of the sea god in Irish legends. She fell in love with the poet Oisín, son of Fionn.

NICOLA (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: nee-KAW-la
Personal note: The guy from Miodio.
Italian form of NICHOLAS. A notable bearer was the 13th-century sculptor Nicola Pisano.

NIKOL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Никол (Bulgarian)
Czech and Bulgarian form of NICOLE.

NIKOLA (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Czech, Basque, Medieval Slavic
Other Scripts: Никола (Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Church Slavic)
Personal note: Do i like this or Nicola better?
Cognate of NICHOLAS.

NOAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: נוֹעַם (Hebrew)
Means "pleasantness" in Hebrew. A famous bearer is Noam Chomsky (1928-), an American linguist and philosopher.

NOOR (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Urdu
Other Scripts: نور (Arabic, Urdu)
Pronounced: NOOR (Arabic)
Variant transcription of NUR.

OLGA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian, Greek
Other Scripts: Ольга (Russian, Ukrainian), Олга (Serbian, Bulgarian), Ολγα (Greek)
Pronounced: OL-gə (Russian), AWL-ga (Polish, German), AWL-ka (Icelandic)
Personal note: Why not?
Russian form of HELGA. The Varangians brought it from Scandinavia to Russia. The 10th-century Saint Olga was the wife of Igor I, Grand Prince of Kievan Rus (a state based around the city of Kiev). Following his death she ruled as regent for her son for 18 years. After she was baptized in Constantinople she attempted to convert her subjects to Christianity.

OLIVER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
Other Scripts: Оливер (Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: AWL-ə-vər (English), O-lee-vu (German), O-lee-ver (Finnish)
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.

In England Oliver was a common medieval name, however it became rare after the 17th century because of the military commander Oliver Cromwell, who ruled the country following the civil war. The name was revived in the 19th century, perhaps in part due to the title character in Charles Dickens' novel 'Oliver Twist' (1838), which was about a poor orphan living on the streets of London.

OLIVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: o-LIV-ee-ə (English), o-LEE-vya (Italian, German), o-LEE-bya (Spanish), O-lee-vee-ah (Finnish)
This name was first used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy 'Twelfth Night' (1602). Shakespeare may have based it on OLIVER or OLIVA, or perhaps directly on the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.

The name has been used in the English-speaking world since the 18th century, though it did not become overly popular until the last half of the 20th century. Its rise in popularity in America was precipitated by a character on the 1970s television series 'The Waltons'.

ORIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: o-RYA-na
Possibly derived from Latin aurum "gold" or from its derivatives, Spanish oro or French or. In medieval legend Oriana was the daughter of a king of England who married the knight Amadis.

ORION
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ωριων (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AW-REE-AWN (Classical Greek), o-RIE-ən (English)
Meaning unknown, but possibly related to Greek ‘οριον (horion) "boundary, limit". Alternatively it may be derived from Akkadian Uru-anna meaning "light of the heavens". This is the name of a constellation, which gets its name from a legendary Greek hunter killed by a scorpion sent by Gaia.

ORSOLYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: OR-sho-yaw
Hungarian form of URSULA.

OSIRIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Other Scripts: Οσιρις (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: o-SIE-ris (English)
Greek form of the Egyptian Asar which is of unknown meaning. In Egyptian mythology Osiris was the god of the dead and the judge of the underworld. He was slain by his brother Seth, but revived by his wife Isis.

PAOLO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: PA-o-lo
Personal note: "Per che, per me lo sai sei musica..."
Italian form of Paulus (see PAUL). Paolo Uccello and Paolo Veronese were both Italian Renaissance painters.

PENELOPE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Πηνελοπη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: pi-NEL-ə-pee (English)
Possibly derived from Greek πηνελοψ (penelops), a type of duck. Alternatively it could be from πηνη (pene) "threads, weft" and ωψ (ops) "face, eye". In Homer's epic the 'Odyssey' this is the name of the wife of Odysseus, forced to fend off suitors while her husband is away fighting at Troy. It has occasionally been used as an English given name since the 16th century.

PERCY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PUR-see
From an English surname which was derived from the name of a Norman town Perci, which was itself perhaps derived from a Gaulish given name which was Latinized as Persius. The surname was borne by a noble English family, and it first used as a given name in their honour. A famous bearer was Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), an English romantic poet whose works include 'Adonais' and 'Ozymandias'. This name can also be used as a short form of PERCIVAL.

PERSEPHONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Περσεφονη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PER-SE-PO-NE (Classical Greek), pər-SEF-ə-nee (English)
Meaning unknown, probably of Pre-Greek origin, but perhaps related to Greek περθω (pertho) "to destroy" and φονη (phone) "murder". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus. She was abducted to the underworld by Hades, but was eventually allowed to return to the surface for part of the year. The result of her comings and goings is the changing of the seasons.

PETAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Петар (Serbian, Macedonian), Петър (Bulgarian)
Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian and Macedonian form of PETER.

PETRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Swedish, Finnish, English
Pronounced: PE-tra (German), PET-rah (Finnish), PET-rə (English)
Feminine form of PETER. This was also the name of an ancient city in the region that is now Jordan.

PHILIP
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Biblical
Pronounced: FIL-ip (English), FEE-lip (Dutch)
From the Greek name Φιλιππος (Philippos) which means "friend of horses", composed of the elements φιλος (philos) "friend, lover" and ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse". This was the name of five kings of Macedon, including Philip II the father of Alexander the Great. The name appears in the New Testament belonging to two people who are regarded as saints. First, one of the twelve apostles, and second, an early figure in the Christian church known as Philip the Deacon.

This name was initially more common among Eastern Christians, though it came to the West by the Middle Ages. It was borne by six kings of France and five kings of Spain. It was regularly used in England during the Middle Ages, although the Spanish king Philip II, who attempted an invasion of England, helped make it less common by the 17th century. It was revived in the English-speaking world in the 19th century. Famous bearers include the Elizabethan courtier and poet Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586) and the American science fiction novelist Philip K. Dick (1928-1982).

PHINEAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: פִּינְחָס (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: FIN-ee-əs (English)
Variant of PHINEHAS used in some versions of the Bible.

POSEIDON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ποσειδων (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PO-SE-DAWN (Classical Greek), pə-SIE-dən (English)
Possibly derived from Greek ποσις (posis) "husband, lord" and δα (da) "earth". In Greek mythology Poseidon was the unruly god of the sea and earthquakes, the brother of Zeus. He was often depicted carrying a trident and riding in a chariot drawn by white horses.

PRIYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Kannada, Bengali
Other Scripts: प्रिया (Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi), பிரியா (Tamil), ప్రియ (Telugu), പ്രിയാ (Malayalam), ಪ್ರಿಯಾ (Kannada), প্রিয়া (Bengali)
Means "beloved" in Sanskrit. In Hindu legend this is the name of a daughter of King Daksha.

QUENTIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KAHN-TEN (French), KWEN-tin (English)
French form of the Roman name QUINTINUS. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint, a missionary who was martyred in Gaul. The Normans introduced this name to England. In America it was brought to public attention by president Theodore Roosevelt's son Quentin Roosevelt (1897-1918), who was killed in World War I.

RADZIM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish (Rare)
Short form of RADZIMIERZ.

RAPHAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: רָפָאֵל, רְפָאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Ραφαηλ (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: RA-fa-el (German), ra-fie-EL (English), ra-fee-EL (English)
From the Hebrew name רָפָאֵל (Rafa'el) which meant "God has healed". In Hebrew tradition Raphael was the name of one of the seven archangels. He appears in the Book of Tobit, in which he disguises himself as a man named Azarias and accompanies Tobias on his journey to Media, aiding him along the way. In the end he cures Tobias's father Tobit of his blindness. He is not mentioned in the New Testament, though tradition identifies him with the angel troubling the water in John 5:4.

This name has never been common in the English-speaking world, though it has been well-used elsewhere in Europe. A famous bearer was the 16th-century Renaissance master Raphael Sanzio (1483-1520), usually known simply as Raphael.

RASMUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Pronounced: RAHS-moos
Scandinavian form of ERASMUS.

RENATA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Polish, Czech, Croatian, Slovene, Late Roman
Pronounced: re-NA-ta (Italian, Spanish, German, Polish)
Feminine form of RENATUS.

ROSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: ROZ
Originally a Norman form of a Germanic name, which was composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.

ROSICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Росица (Bulgarian)
Personal note: ro-SEE-tsa
Variant transcription of ROSITSA.

RUFINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Руфина (Russian)
Pronounced: roo-FEE-na (Spanish)
Feminine form of RUFINUS.

RURIK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Рюрик (Russian)
Russian form of the Old Norse name HRŒREKR.

RUSLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Tatar, Bashkir, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Uzbek, Azerbaijani, Ossetian, Chechen, Ingush
Other Scripts: Руслан (Russian, Tatar, Bashkir, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Ossetian, Chechen)
Pronounced: ruws-LAN (Russian)
Personal note: This is my fave Russian boys name.
Form of YERUSLAN used by Aleksandr Pushkin in his poem 'Ruslan and Ludmila' (1820), which was loosely based on Russian and Tatar folktales of Yeruslan Lazarevich.

SAMPO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish, Finnish Mythology
Pronounced: SAHM-po (Finnish)
Meaning unknown. In Finnish mythology this is the name of a magical artifact (perhaps a mill) created by the smith god Ilmarinen.

SANAA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Eastern African, Swahili
Means "artwork" in Swahili.

SANDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian
Other Scripts: Сандра (Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: SAN-dra (Italian, Polish), SAN-drə (English), SAHN-DRA (French), ZAN-dra (German), SAHN-drah (Dutch)
Personal note: As in Sandra Nurmsalu.
Short form of ALESSANDRA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by author George Meredith, who used it for the heroine in his novel 'Emilia in England' (1864) and the reissued version 'Sandra Belloni' (1887). A famous bearer is American actress Sandra Bullock (1964-).

SASHA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, English, French
Other Scripts: Саша (Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: SA-SHA (French)
Personal note: I Love Sasha Son. My 2nd fave Russian boys name.
Russian and Ukrainian diminutive of ALEKSANDR or ALEKSANDRA.

SAUL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Jewish, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: שָׁאוּל (Hebrew)
Pronounced: SAWL (English)
From the Hebrew name שָׁאוּל (Sha'ul) which meant "asked for, prayed for". This was the name of the first king of Israel, as told in the Old Testament. Before the end of his reign he lost favour with God, and after a defeat by the Philistines he was succeeded by David as king. In the New Testament, Saul was the original Hebrew name of the apostle Paul.

SENKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian
Other Scripts: Сенка (Serbian)
Means "shadow" in Serbian and Croatian.

SERAPHINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: ze-ra-FEE-na (German)
Personal note: Again, after one of my characters.
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Seraphinus, derived from the biblical word seraphim which was Hebrew in origin and meant "fiery ones". The seraphim were an order of angels, described by Isaiah in the Bible as having six wings each. This was the name of a 13th-century Italian saint who made clothes for the poor. As an English name, it has never been common.

SERGIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: SER-jo (Italian), SER-khyo (Spanish)
Italian and Spanish form of SERGIUS.

SERKAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Means "leader, chief" from Turkish ser "head, top" and kan "blood".

SHAHRAZAD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian (Rare), Arabic
Other Scripts: شهرزاد (Persian, Arabic)
Means "free city" from the Persian elements شهر (shahr) "city" and آزاد (azad) "free". This is the name of the fictional storyteller in 'The 1001 Nights'. She tells a story to her husband the king every night for 1001 nights in order to delay her execution.

SIMEON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Bulgarian, Serbian
Other Scripts: שִׁמְעוֹן (Ancient Hebrew), Симеон (Bulgarian, Serbian)
Pronounced: SIM-ee-ən (English)
From Συμεων (Symeon), the Old Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name Shim'on (see SIMON (1)). In the Old Testament this is the name of the second son of Jacob and Leah and the founder of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. In the New Testament the Greek rendering Σιμων (Simon) is more common, though Συμεων occurs belonging to a man who blessed the newborn Jesus. He is recognized as a saint in most Christian traditions.

This name was also borne by a powerful 10th-century ruler of Bulgaria who expanded the empire to its greatest extent.

SIRIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: SIR-ee-əs (English), SEER-ee-əs (English)
The name of a bright star in the constellation Canis Major, derived via Latin from Greek σειριος (seirios) "burning".

SORA
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 空, 昊, etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: SO-RA
From Japanese (sora) or (sora) which both mean "sky". Other kanji with the same pronunciations can also form this name.

SPOMENKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian
From Croatian spomenak meaning "forget-me-not flower".

STELIOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Στελιος (Greek)
Variant of STYLIANOS.

STOJAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Macedonian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene
Other Scripts: Стојан (Macedonian, Serbian)
Macedonian, Serbian, Croatian and Slovene form of STOYAN.

SWANHILD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Rare)
Personal note: GP
Derived from the Germanic elements swan "swan" and hild "battle".

TADIJA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Тадија (Serbian)
Pronounced: TA-dee-ya
Croatian and Serbian form of THADDEUS.

TAIKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish (Rare)
Pronounced: TAH-ee-kah
Means "magic, spell" in Finnish.

TAISIYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Таисия (Russian)
Pronounced: tu-EE-syi-yə
Possibly a Russian form of THAÏS.

TALIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: טַלְיָה, טַלְיָא (Hebrew)
Variant transcription of TALYA.

TALIESIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: tal-ee-ES-in (Welsh)
Means "shining brow", derived from Welsh tal "brow" and iesin "shining". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh poet and bard. In later Welsh legends he is portrayed as a wizard and prophet, or as a companion of King Arthur.

TALMAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: תַּלְמַי (Ancient Hebrew)
Means "furrowed" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this name is borne by both a giant and also the father of King David's wife Maacah.

TAMAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: תָּמָר (Hebrew), თამარ (Georgian)
Pronounced: TAH-mahr (English), TAY-mahr (English)
Means "palm tree" in Hebrew. According to the Old Testament Tamar was the daughter-in-law of Judah and later his wife. This was also the name of a daughter of King David. She was raped by her half-brother Amnon, leading to his murder by her brother Absalom. The name was borne by a 12th-century ruling queen of Georgia who presided over the kingdom at the peak of its power.

TARAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ukrainian, Russian
Other Scripts: Тарас (Ukrainian, Russian)
Pronounced: tu-RAS (Russian)
Ukrainian and Russian form of the Greek name Ταρασιος (Tarasios), which possibly means "from Taras". Taras was an Italian city, now called Taranto, which was founded by Greek colonists in the 8th century BC and was named for the Greek mythological figure Taras, a son of Poseidon. Saint Tarasios was an 8th-century bishop of Constantinople. It was also borne by the Ukrainian writer and artist Taras Shevchenko (1814-1861).

TARJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: TAHR-yah
Finnish form of DARIA.

TATIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
French form of TATIANA.

TENZIN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Tibetan, Bhutanese
Other Scripts: བསྟན་འཛིན (Tibetan)
From Tibetan བསྟན་འཛིན (bstan-'dzin) which means "upholder of teachings". This is one of the given names of the current Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso (1935-).

TIAMAT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Near Eastern Mythology
Pronounced: TEE-ə-maht (English), TYAH-maht (English)
From Akkadian tâmtu meaning "sea". In Babylonian myth Tiamat was the personification of the sea, appearing in the form of a huge dragon. By Apsu she gave birth to the first of the gods. Later, the god Marduk (her great-grandson) defeated her, cut her in half, and used the pieces of her body to make the earth and the sky.

TIBOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian, Czech, Slovak
Pronounced: TEE-bor (Hungarian)
Hungarian, Czech and Slovak form of Tiburtius (see TIBURCIO).

TIHANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Тихана (Serbian)
Short form of Slavic names beginning with the element tikhu "quiet".

TIHOMIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Тихомир (Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Derived from the Slavic elements tikhu "quiet" and miru "peace, world".

TIMON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek, Biblical, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Dutch
Other Scripts: Τιμων (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: TEE-MAWN (Classical Greek), TIE-mən (English), TEE-mawn (Dutch)
Derived from Greek τιμαω (timao) meaning "to honour, to esteem". It appears briefly in the New Testament. This is also the name of the main character in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Timon of Athens' (1607).

TIMUR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History, Tatar, Chechen, Kazakh, Uzbek, Russian
Other Scripts: Тимур (Tatar, Chechen, Kazakh, Russian)
Pronounced: tyi-MOOR (Russian)
From the Turkic name Temür meaning "iron". Timur, also known as Tamerlane (from Persian تیمور لنگ (Timur e Lang) meaning "Timur the lame"), was a 14th-century Turkic leader who conquered large areas of Western Asia.

TIRZAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: תִּרְצָה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: TIR-zə (English)
From the Hebrew name תִּרְצָה (Tirtzah) meaning "favourable". Tirzah is the name of one of the daughters of Zelophehad in the Old Testament. It also occurs in the Old Testament as a place name, the early residence of the kings of the northern kingdom.

TODOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Тодор (Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Personal note: Cuz it was Toše's real name and it sounds so cool.
Bulgarian, Serbian and Macedonian form of THEODORE.

TÖMÖRBAATAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Mongolian
Other Scripts: Төмөрбаатар (Mongolian Cyrillic)
Means "iron hero" in Mongolian.

TOŠE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Macedonian
Other Scripts: Тоше (Macedonian)
Pronounced: TO-she
Personal note: For Toše Proeski (r.i.p...)
Variant transcription of TOSHE. This is the usual Romanized spelling of the name of the Macedonian pop star Toše Proeski (1981-2007).

URIAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical Latin
Latin form of URIAH.

UWE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: OO-və
German form of OVE.

VADIK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Вадик (Russian)
Diminutive of VADIM.

VALENCIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: ba-LEN-sya (Latin American Spanish), ba-LEN-thya (European Spanish), və-LEN-see-ə (English)
From the name of cities in Spain and Venezuela, both derived from Latin valentia meaning "strength, vigour".

VALENTIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Romanian, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Czech, Russian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Валентин (Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: VA-LAHN-TEN (French), VA-len-teen (German), və-lyin-TYEEN (Russian)
Form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)).

VALKO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Вълко (Bulgarian)
Derived from Bulgarian вълк (valk) "wolf".

VERA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Вера (Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: VYE-rə (Russian), VEER-ə (English), VER-ə (English), VE-ra (German), VE-rah (Swedish), VE-raw (Hungarian)
Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.

VESNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Весна (Serbian, Macedonian)
Means "messenger" in Slavic. This was the name of a Slavic spirit associated with the springtime. In many Slavic languages this is now the poetic word for "spring". It has been used as a given name only since the 20th century.

VESPERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: ves-PE-ra
Means "of the evening" in Esperanto.

VICTOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish, Late Roman
Pronounced: VIK-tər (English), VEEK-TAWR (French)
Roman name meaning "victor, conqueror" in Latin. It was common among early Christians, and was borne by several early saints and three popes. It was rare as an English name during the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the French writer Victor Hugo (1802-1885), who authored 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.

VIDAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
Pronounced: VEE-dahr (Swedish)
From the Old Norse Víðarr, which is possibly derived from víðr "wide" and arr "warrior". In Norse mythology Víðarr was the son of Odin and Grid. At the time of the end of the world, the Ragnarok, he will avenge his father's death.

VIKTOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Виктор (Bulgarian, Russian, Serbian, Macedonian), Віктор (Ukrainian)
Pronounced: VIK-to (German), VEEK-tor (Hungarian), VYEEK-tər (Russian)
Personal note: Dima Bilan's birth name.
Form of VICTOR.

VILMOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: VEEL-mosh
Hungarian form of WILLIAM.

VIOLETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Russian, Hungarian
Other Scripts: Виолетта (Russian)
Pronounced: vyo-LET-ta (Italian), vyi-u-LYET-tə (Russian), VEE-o-let-taw (Hungarian)
Personal note: Violet is just too harsh for me.
Italian, Russian and Hungarian form of VIOLET.

VLAD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian, Russian, Medieval Slavic
Other Scripts: Влад (Russian)
Old short form of VLADISLAV and other Slavic names beginning with the element vladeti meaning "rule". Vlad Dracula, a 15th-century prince of Wallachia, was Bram Stoker's inspiration for the name of his vampire, Count Dracula.

VLATKO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Влатко (Serbian, Macedonian)
Personal note: Someone i met in Ohrid.
Diminutive of VLADIMIR.

VSEVOLOD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Medieval Slavic
Other Scripts: Всеволод (Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: FSYE-və-lət (Russian)
Derived from the Slavic elements visi "all" and vladeti "rule". This was the name of an 11th-century Grand Prince of Kiev.

VUKAŠIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Serbian
Other Scripts: Вукашин (Serbian)
Personal note: Yet another Eurovision name. Very cool.
Derived from Serbian vuk "wolf". This was the name of a 14th-century Serbian ruler.

VYTAUTAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Lithuanian
From the Baltic elements vyti- "chase, drive away" or vyd- "see" combined with tauta "people, nation". This was the name of a 15th-century Grand Duke of Lithuania, revered as a national hero in that country.

WILBUR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIL-bər
From an English surname which was originally derived from the nickname Wildbor meaning "wild boar" in Middle English. This name was borne by Wilbur Wright (1867-1912), one half of the Wright brothers, who together invented the first successful airplane. Wright was named after the Methodist minister Wilbur Fisk (1792-1839).

WILFRED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIL-frəd
Personal note: Cousin's name. Cool & old-fashioned.
Means "desiring peace" from Old English wil "will, desire" and friþ "peace". Saint Wilfrid was a 7th-century Anglo-Saxon bishop. The name was rarely used after the Norman conquest, but it was revived in the 19th century.

WOLFGANG
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: VAWLF-gang (German), WUWLF-gang (English)
Derived from the Germanic elements wulf meaning "wolf" and gang "path". Two famous bearers of this name were Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) and German novelist and poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832).

XANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ξανθη (Ancient Greek)
Derived from Greek ξανθος (xanthos) meaning "yellow" or "fair hair". This was the name of a few minor figures in Greek mythology.

XERXES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: ZURK-seez (English)
Greek form of the Persian name Khshayarsha which meant "ruler over heroes". This was a 5th-century BC king of Persia, the son of Darius the Great. He attempted an invasion of Greece, which ended unsuccessfully at the battle of Salamis.

XIMENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: khee-ME-na
Feminine form of XIMENO. This was the name of the wife of El Cid.

XOCHITL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Native American, Nahuatl, Spanish (Latin American)
Means "flower" in Nahuatl.

YANNI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Γιαννη (Greek)
Variant transcription of GIANNI.

YASEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Ясен (Bulgarian)
Means both "ash tree" and "clear, serene" in Bulgarian.

YEFIM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Ефим (Russian)
Pronounced: yi-FYEEM, i-FYEEM
Russian form of the Greek name Ευφεμιος (Euphemios), the masculine form of EUPHEMIA.

YURI (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Юрий (Russian), Юрій (Ukrainian)
Pronounced: YOO-ryee (Russian)
Variant transcription of YURIY.

ZAHARI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Захари (Bulgarian)
Bulgarian form of ZECHARIAH.

ZAIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: DZIE-ra (Italian), THIE-ra (European Spanish), SIE-ra (Latin American Spanish)
Italian and Spanish form of ZAÏRE.

ZBIGNIEW
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: ZBYEEGY-nyef
Derived from the Slavic elements zbyti "to dispel" and gnyevu "anger".

ZDENKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Czech
Feminine form of ZDENKO.

ZDENKO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Slovak, Slovene, Croatian
Derived from the Slavic element zidati meaning "build, create", originally a short form of names beginning with that element.

ZELDA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish
Other Scripts: זֶעלְדָא (Yiddish)
Feminine form of SELIG.

ZELIG
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Yiddish
Other Scripts: זֶעלִיג (Yiddish)
Variant of SELIG.

ŽELJKO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Other Scripts: Жељко (Serbian)
Personal note: As in Željko Joksimovic.
Derived from South Slavic želja meaning "desire".

ZIPPORAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew
Other Scripts: צִפּוֹרָה (Hebrew)
Pronounced: zi-PAWR-ə (English), ZIP-ər-ə (English)
Personal note: My Hebrew name.
From the Hebrew name צִפּוֹרָה (Tzipporah), derived from צִפּוֹר (tzippor) meaning "bird". In the Old Testament this is the name of the Midianite wife of Moses. She was the daughter of the priest Jethro.

ZLATA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak, Russian
Other Scripts: Злата (Serbian, Macedonian, Russian)
Pronounced: ZLA-tə (Russian)
Feminine form of ZLATAN.

ZOHAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: זֹהַר (Hebrew)
Personal note: Oh dear, this means "cockroach" in Croatian! Ah well...
Means "light, brilliance" in Hebrew.

ZORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Зора (Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
From a South and West Slavic word meaning "dawn, aurora".

ZRINKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian
Possibly from Zrin, the name of a village in Croatia.

ŽYDRŪNAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Lithuanian
Possibly from Lithuanian žydras "blue".
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2017.