Etoile's Personal Name List

ABIGAIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: אֲבִיגַיִל (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: AB-ə-gayl (English), A-bee-giel (German)
Personal note: Not my absolute favorite, but I have a character named Abigail
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew name אֲבִיגָיִל ('Avigayil) meaning "my father is joy". In the Old Testament this is the name of Nabal's wife. After Nabal's death she became the third wife of King David.

As an English name, Abigail first became common after the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans. The biblical Abigil refers to herself as a servant, and beginning in the 17th century the name became a slang term for a servant, especially after the release of the play 'The Scornful Lady' (1616) which featured a character named Abigail. The name went out of fashion at that point, but it was revived in the 20th century.

ADA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Polish, Hungarian, Italian, Finnish
Pronounced: AY-də (English), A-da (Polish), AH-dah (Finnish)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Short form of ADELAIDE and other names beginning with the same sound. This name was borne by Augusta Ada King (1815-1852), the Countess of Lovelace (known as Ada Lovelace), a daughter of Lord Byron. She was an assistant to Charles Babbage, the inventor of an early mechanical computer.

ADÉLAÏDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-DE-LA-EED
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
French form of ADELAIDE.

ADELAIDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese
Pronounced: A-də-layd (English), a-de-LIE-de (Italian), ə-də-LIED (Portuguese)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
From the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman Emperor Otto the Great. The name became common in Britain in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.

ADRIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Romanian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian
Other Scripts: Адриан (Russian)
Pronounced: AY-dree-ən (English), A-dryan (Polish), A-dree-an (German), u-dryi-AN (Russian)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Form of Hadrianus (see HADRIAN). Several saints and six popes have borne this name, including the only English pope, Adrian IV, and the only Dutch pope, Adrian VI. As an English name, it has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it was not popular until modern times.

AELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αελλα (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Means "whirlwind" in Greek. In Greek myth this was the name of an Amazon warrior killed by Herakles during his quest for Hippolyta's girdle.

ALAIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Means "joyful, happy" in Basque.

ALCYONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αλκυονη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: al-SIE-ə-nee (English)
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of Greek Αλκυονη (Alkyone), derived from the word αλκυων (alkyon) meaning "kingfisher". In Greek myth this name belonged to a daughter of Aeolus and the wife of Ceyx. After her husband was killed in a shipwreck she threw herself into the water, but the gods saved her and turned them both into kingfishers. This is also the name of the brightest of the Pleiades, the seven stars in the constellation Taurus.

ALETHEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: al-ə-THEE-ə, ə-LEE-thee-ə
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Derived from Greek αληθεια (aletheia) meaning "truth". This name was coined in the 17th century.

ALEXA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Hungarian
Pronounced: ə-LEK-sə (English), AW-lek-saw (Hungarian)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Short form of ALEXANDRA.

ALEXANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: a-lig-ZAN-dər (English), a-le-KSAN-du (German), ah-lək-SAHN-dər (Dutch), AW-lek-sawn-der (Hungarian)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ALEXANDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρα (Greek), Александра (Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: al-əg-ZAN-drə (English), a-le-KSAN-dra (German), ah-lək-SAHN-drah (Dutch), A-LUG-ZAHN-DRA (French), a-le-KSAN-dhra (Greek), ə-li-SHUN-drə (European Portuguese), a-le-SHUN-dru (Brazilian Portuguese), a-lek-SAN-dra (Romanian, Spanish, Italian), A-lek-san-dra (Slovak), A-LE-KSAN-DRA (Classical Greek)
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.

ALEXANDRIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: al-əg-ZAN-dree-ə
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. Alexander the Great founded several cities by this name (or renamed them) as he extended his empire eastward. The most notable of these is Alexandria in Egypt, founded by Alexander in 331 BC.

ALEXANDRIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: A-LEK-SAHN-DREE
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
French variant of ALEXANDRA.

ALEXEI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Алексей (Russian), Олексій (Ukrainian), Аляксей (Belarusian)
Pronounced: u-lyi-KSYAY (Russian)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Variant transcription of ALEKSEY.

ALGERNON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AL-jər-nahn
Personal note: It's an interesting name, to say the least
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from aux gernons "having a moustache", which was applied to William de Percy, a companion of William the Conqueror. It was first used a given name in the 15th century (for a descendant of William de Percy).

ALIX
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-LEEKS
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Medieval French variant of ALICE.

ALLEGRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-LEG-rə (English), al-LE-gra (Italian)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Means "cheerful, lively" in Italian. It is not a traditional Italian name. It was borne by a short-lived illegitimate daughter of Lord Byron.

AMAIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "the end" in Basque. This is also the name of a mountain and a village in the Basque region of Spain.

AMIRA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: أميرة (Arabic)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Variant transcription of AMIRAH.

ANASTASIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, English, Spanish, Italian, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αναστασια (Greek), Анастасия (Russian), Анастасія (Ukrainian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: u-nu-stu-SYEE-yə (Russian), a-nə-STAY-zhə (English), a-nə-STAS-yə (English), a-nas-TA-sya (Spanish), a-nas-TA-zya (Italian), A-NA-STA-SEE-A (Classical Greek)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of ANASTASIUS. This was the name of a 4th-century Dalmatian saint who was martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. Due to her, the name has been common in Eastern Orthodox Christianity (in various spellings). As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the youngest daughter of the last Russian tsar Nicholas II, who was rumoured to have escaped the execution of her family in 1918.

ANASTASIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-NAS-TA-ZEE
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
French form of ANASTASIA.

ANASTASIYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Анастасия (Russian, Bulgarian), Анастасія (Ukrainian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: u-nu-stu-SYEE-yə (Russian), ah-nah-stah-SEE-yah (Ukrainian), a-na-sta-SEE-ya (Bulgarian)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian form of ANASTASIA. This name was borne by the wife of the Russian czar Ivan the Terrible.

ANTHONY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AN-thə-nee (American English), AN-tə-nee (British English)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
English form of the Roman family name Antonius, which is of unknown Etruscan origin. The most notable member of the Roman family was the general Marcus Antonius (called Mark Antony in English), who for a period in the 1st century BC ruled the Roman Empire jointly with Augustus. When their relationship turned sour, he and his mistress Cleopatra were attacked and forced to commit suicide, as related in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Antony and Cleopatra' (1606).

The name became regularly used in the Christian world due to the fame of Saint Anthony the Great, a 4th-century Egyptian hermit who founded Christian monasticism. Its popularity was reinforced in the Middle Ages by the 13th-century Saint Anthony of Padua, the patron saint of Portugal. It has been commonly (but incorrectly) associated with Greek ανθος (anthos) "flower", which resulted in the addition of the h to this spelling in the 17th century.

ARIANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: a-RYAN-na
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Italian form of ARIADNE.

ARIANNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-RYAN
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Variant of ARIANE.

ASTOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AS-tər
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
From a surname derived from Occitan astur meaning "hawk".

ASTRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AS-trə
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "star", ultimately from Greek αστηρ (aster). This name has only been (rarely) used since the 20th century.

ASTRAEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αστραια (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of the Greek Αστραια (Astraia), derived from Greek αστηρ (aster) meaning "star". Astraea was a Greek goddess of justice and innocence. After wickedness took root in the world she left the earth and became the constellation Virgo.

ATALANTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αταλαντη (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
From the Greek Αταλαντη (Atalante) meaning "equal in weight", derived from αταλαντος (atalantos), a word related to ταλαντον (talanton) meaning "a scale, a balance". In Greek legend she was a fast-footed maiden who refused to marry anyone who could not beat her in a race. She was eventually defeated by Hippomenes, who dropped three golden apples during the race causing her to stop to pick them up.

ATHENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Αθηνα (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-TE-NA (Classical Greek), ə-THEE-nə (English)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Meaning unknown, perhaps derived from Greek αθηρ (ather) "sharp" and αινη (aine) "praise". Athena was the Greek goddess of wisdom and warfare, the daughter of Zeus and the patron goddess of the city of Athens in Greece. She is associated with the olive tree and the owl.

ATHÉNAÏS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-TE-NA-EES
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
French form of ATHENAIS.

AURELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Romanian, Italian, Spanish, Polish
Pronounced: ow-RE-lya (Italian, Polish)
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of AURELIUS.

AURÉLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: O-RE-LEE
Personal note: When I had to use a French name in class, I used Aurélie
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
French feminine form of AURELIUS.

AURORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Romanian, Finnish, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: ow-RO-ra (Spanish, Classical Latin), ə-RAWR-ə (English), OW-ro-rah (Finnish)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.

AURORE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-RAWR
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
French form of AURORA.

AZALEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-ZAY-lee-ə, ə-ZAYL-yə
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From the name of the flower, ultimately derived from Greek αζαλεος (azaleos) "dry".

AZZURRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ad-JOOR-ra
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "azure, sky blue" in Italian.

BEATA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: be-A-ta (Polish, German)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Derived from Latin beatus meaning "blessed". This was the name of a few minor saints.

BEATRICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English, Swedish
Pronounced: be-a-TREE-che (Italian), BEE-ə-tris (English), BEET-ris (English), BE-ah-trees (Swedish), be-ah-TREES (Swedish)
Personal note: Because of Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Italian form of BEATRIX. Beatrice Portinari (1266-1290) was the woman who was loved by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. She serves as Dante's guide through paradise in his epic poem the 'Divine Comedy' (1321). This is also the name of a character in Shakespeare's comedy 'Much Ado About Nothing' (1599), in which Beatrice and Benedick are fooled into confessing their love for one another.

BIANCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: BYANG-ka (Italian), BYAN-ka (Romanian)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Italian cognate of BLANCHE. Shakespeare used characters named Bianca in 'Taming of the Shrew' (1593) and 'Othello' (1603).

BLAISE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: BLEZ
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
From the Roman name Blasius which meant "lisping" from Latin blaesus. A famous bearer was the French mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal (1623-1662).

BRAVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: BRA-va
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Means "valiant, brave" in Esperanto.

BRYONY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BRIE-ə-nee
Rating: 90% based on 1 vote
From the name of a type of Eurasian vine, formerly used as medicine. It ultimately derives from Greek βρυω (bryo) "to swell".

CALEB
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: כָּלֵב (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAY-ləb (English)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Most likely related to Hebrew כֶּלֶב (kelev) meaning "dog". An alternate theory connects it to Hebrew כָּל (kal) "whole, all of" and לֵב (lev) "heart". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve spies sent by Moses into Canaan. Of the Israelites who left Egypt with Moses, Caleb and Joshua were the only ones who lived to see the Promised Land.

As an English name, Caleb came into use after the Protestant Reformation. It was common among the Puritans, who introduced it to America in the 17th century.

CALISTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Portuguese, Spanish
Pronounced: kə-LIS-tə (English), ka-LEE-sta (Spanish)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of CALLISTUS. As an English name it might also be a variant of KALLISTO.

CALLISTO (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Καλλιστω (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kə-LIS-to (English)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of KALLISTO. A moon of Jupiter bears this name.

CAMILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, German, Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: kə-MIL-ə (English), ka-MEEL-la (Italian), kah-MEEL-lah (Danish), KAH-meel-lah (Finnish), ka-MI-la (German)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of CAMILLUS. This was the name of a legendary warrior maiden of the Volsci, as told by Virgil in the 'Aeneid'. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Fanny Burney's novel 'Camilla' (1796).

CAMILLE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KA-MEE (French), kə-MEEL (English)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
French feminine and masculine form of CAMILLA. It is also used in the English-speaking world, where it is generally only feminine.

CAMMIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAM-ee
Personal note: Nickname for Camilla/phonetic nickname for Camille
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of CAMILLA.

CARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAHR-ə, KER-ə
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
From an Italian word meaning "beloved". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century, though it did not become popular until after the 1950s.

CASSANDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κασσανδρα (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kə-SAN-drə (English), kə-SAHN-drə (English), kas-SAN-dra (Italian), ka-SAN-dra (German)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
From the Greek name Κασσανδρα (Kassandra), derived from possibly κεκασμαι (kekasmai) "to excel, to shine" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek myth Cassandra was a Trojan princess, the daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but when she spurned his advances he cursed her so nobody would believe her prophecies.

In the Middle Ages this name was common in England due to the popularity of medieval tales about the Trojan War. It subsequently became rare, but was revived in the 20th century.

CASSIOPEIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κασσιοπεια, Κασσιεπεια (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ka-see-ə-PEE-ə (English)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of Greek Κασσιοπεια (Kassiopeia) or Κασσιεπεια (Kassiepeia), possibly meaning "cassia juice". In Greek myth Cassiopeia was the wife of Cepheus and the mother of Andromeda. She was changed into a constellation and placed in the northern sky after she died.

CATALINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ka-ta-LEE-na
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Spanish form of KATHERINE.

CECILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SES-i-lee
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
English form of CECILIA. This was the usual English form during the Middle Ages.

CÉLESTE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SE-LEST
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
French feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS.

CELESTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: the-les-TEE-na (European Spanish), se-les-TEE-na (Latin American Spanish), che-le-STEE-na (Italian)
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Latinate feminine form of CAELESTINUS.

CÉLESTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SE-LES-TEEN
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
French feminine form of CAELESTINUS.

CLIO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Italian
Other Scripts: Κλειω (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KLEE-o (Italian)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of KLEIO.

CLYTEMNESTRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κλυταιμνηστρα (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: klie-təm-NES-trə (English)
Personal note: This would make an amazing name for a villain
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of Greek Κλυταιμνηστρα (Klytaimnestra), from κλυτος (klytos) "famous, noble" and μνηστηρ (mnester) "courter, wooer". In Greek legend Clytemnestra was the wife of Agamemnon and the mother of Orestes and Electra. While her husband was away during the Trojan War she took a lover, and upon his return she had him murdered. She was subsequently killed by Orestes.

COLETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KAW-LET
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Short form of NICOLETTE. Saint Colette was a 15th-century French nun who gave her money to the poor. This was also the pen name of the French author Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (1873-1954).

CONRAD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: KAHN-rad (English), KAWN-rat (German)
Personal note: I love this for some reason; I've used it for a character
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Derived from the Germanic elements kuoni "brave" and rad "counsel". This was the name of a 10th-century saint and bishop of Konstanz, in southern Germany. It was also borne by several medieval German kings and dukes. In England it was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has only been common since the 19th century when it was reintroduced from Germany.

CONSTANCE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: KAHN-stənts (English), KAWNS-TAHNS (French)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Medieval form of CONSTANTIA. The Normans introduced this name to England (it was the name of a daughter of William the Conqueror).

CONSTANTIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian, French
Pronounced: kon-stan-TEEN (Romanian), KAWNS-TAHN-TEN (French)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Romanian and French form of Constantinus (see CONSTANTINE).

CORALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KAW-RA-LEE
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Either a French form of KORALIA, or a derivative of Latin corallium "coral" (see CORAL).

CORDELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kawr-DEE-lee-ə, kawr-DEEL-yə
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
From Cordeilla, possibly a Celtic name of unknown meaning. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Cordeilla was the youngest of the three daughters of King Lear and the only one to remain loyal to her father. When adapting the character for his play 'King Lear' (1606), Shakespeare altered the spelling to Cordelia.

COSIMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Italian feminine form of COSIMO.

COSIMO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: KAW-zee-mo, KO-zee-mo
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Italian variant of COSMAS. A famous bearer was Cosimo de' Medici, the 15th-century founder of Medici rule in Florence, who was a patron of the Renaissance and a successful merchant. Other members of the Medici family have also borne this name.

DAMIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Polish, Dutch
Pronounced: DAY-mee-ən (English), DA-myan (Polish)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
From the Greek name Δαμιανος (Damianos) which was derived from Greek δαμαζω (damazo) "to tame". Saint Damian was martyred with his twin brother Cosmo in Syria early in the 4th century. They are the patron saints of physicians. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in Christian Europe. Another saint by this name was Peter Damian, an 11th-century cardinal and theologian from Italy.

DAMIEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: DA-MYEN
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
French form of DAMIAN.

DAVID
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: דָּוִד (Hebrew), Давид (Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: DAY-vid (English), dah-VEED (Hebrew), DA-VEED (French), da-BEEDH (Spanish), DA-vit (German), DAH-vid (Swedish, Norwegian), DAH-vit (Dutch), du-VYEET (Russian)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was probably derived from Hebrew דוד (dwd) meaning "beloved". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.

This name has been used in Britain since the Middle Ages. It has been especially popular in Wales, where it is used in honour of the 5th-century patron saint of Wales (also called Dewi), as well as in Scotland, where it was borne by two kings. Famous bearers include empiricist philosopher David Hume (1711-1776), explorer David Livingstone (1813-1873), musician David Bowie (1947-2016), and soccer player David Beckham (1975-). This is also the name of the hero of Charles Dickens' semi-autobiographical novel 'David Copperfield' (1850).

DMITRI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Дмитрий (Russian)
Pronounced: DMEE-tree
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Variant transcription of DMITRIY.

ELECTRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ηλεκτρα (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ə-LEKT-rə (English)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of Greek Ηλεκτρα (Elektra), derived from ηλεκτρον (elektron) meaning "amber". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra and the sister of Orestes. She helped her brother kill their mother and her lover Aegisthus in vengeance for Agamemnon's murder. Also in Greek mythology, this name was borne by one of the Pleiades, who were the daughters of Atlas and Pleione.

ELÉONORE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: E-LE-AW-NAWR
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
French form of ELEANOR.

ELISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Finnish, English
Pronounced: e-LEE-za (Italian, German), E-lee-sah (Finnish)
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Short form of ELISABETH.

ÉLISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: E-LEEZ
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
French short form of ÉLISABETH.

ÉLODIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: E-LAW-DEE
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
French form of ALODIA.

ESPERANZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: es-pe-RAN-tha (European Spanish), es-pe-RAN-sa (Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Spanish form of the Late Latin name Sperantia which was derived from sperare "to hope".

EVANDER (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Ευανδρος (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ee-VAN-dər (English), ə-VAN-dər (English)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Variant of Evandrus, the Latin form of the Greek name Ευανδρος (Euandros), derived from Greek ευ (eu) meaning "good" and ανηρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Roman mythology Evander was an Arcadian hero of the Trojan War who founded the city of Pallantium near the spot where Rome was later built.

FABIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Polish, History
Pronounced: FA-byan (German, Polish), FAH-bee-ahn (Dutch), FAY-bee-ən (English)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From the Roman cognomen Fabianus, which was derived from FABIUS. Saint Fabian was a 3rd-century pope.

FAINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Фаина (Russian)
Pronounced: fu-EE-nə
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Meaning unknown, possibly derived from PHAENNA.

FAROUK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: فاروق (Arabic)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Variant transcription of FARUQ.

FAYE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAY
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Variant of FAY.

FÉLIX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: FE-LEEKS (French), FE-leeks (Portuguese)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
French, Spanish and Portuguese form of FELIX.

FIAMMETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: fyam-MET-ta
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Derived from Italian fiamma "fire" combined with a diminutive suffix.

FIERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: fee-E-ra
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Means "proud" in Esperanto.

FIORELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: fyo-REL-la
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
From Italian fiore "flower" combined with a diminutive suffix.

FLAVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: FLA-vya (Italian), FLA-bya (Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of FLAVIUS.

FLORIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Polish, French
Pronounced: FLO-ryan (German), FLAW-ryan (Polish), FLAW-RYAHN (French)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
From the Roman name Florianus, a derivative of FLORUS. Saint Florian, a martyr of the 3rd century, is the patron saint of Poland and Upper Austria.

FYODOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Фёдор (Russian)
Pronounced: FYUY-dər
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Russian form of THEODORE. It was borne by three tsars of Russia. Another notable bearer was Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881), the Russian author of such works as 'Crime and Punishment' and 'The Brothers Karamazov'.

GABRIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: גַּבְרִיאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Γαβριηλ (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: GA-BREE-YEL (French), ga-BRYEL (Spanish), GA-bree-el (German, Classical Latin), GAHB-ree-el (Finnish), GAY-bree-əl (English), GAB-ryel (Polish)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "God is my strong man", derived from גֶּבֶר (gever) "strong man, hero" and אֶל ('El) "God". Gabriel was one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition, often appearing as a messenger of God. In the Old Testament he is sent to interpret the visions of the prophet Daniel, while in the New Testament he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Qur'an to Muhammad.

This name has been used occasionally in England since the 12th century. It was not common in the English-speaking world until the end of the 20th century.

GALAHAD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: GAL-ə-had (English)
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Meaning unknown. In Arthurian legend Sir Galahad was the son of Lancelot and Elaine. He was the most pure of the Knights of the Round Table, and he was the only one to succeed in finding the Holy Grail. He first appears in the medieval French 'Lancelot-Grail' cycle.

GENEVIÈVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHU-NU-VYEV, ZHUN-VYEV
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
From the medieval name Genovefa, which is of uncertain origin. It could be derived from the Germanic elements kuni "kin, family" and wefa "wife, woman". Alternatively it could be of Gaulish origin, from the related Celtic element genos "kin, family" combined with a second element of unknown meaning. This name was borne by Saint Geneviève, the patron saint of Paris, who inspired the city to resist the Huns in the 5th century.

GIADA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: JA-da
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Italian form of JADE.

GILBERT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: GIL-bərt (English), ZHEEL-BER (French), KHIL-bərt (Dutch), GIL-bert (German)
Personal note: French pronunciation
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "bright pledge", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "pledge, hostage" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it was common during the Middle Ages. It was borne by a 12th-century British saint, the founder of the religious order known as the Gilbertines.

GINEVRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jee-NEV-ra
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Italian form of GUINEVERE. This is also the Italian name for the city of Geneva, Switzerland. It is also sometimes associated with the Italian word ginepro meaning "juniper".

GLORIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German
Pronounced: GLAW-ree-ə (English), GLAW-rya (Italian)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Means "glory" in Latin. The name (first?) appeared in E. D. E. N. Southworth's novel 'Gloria' (1891) and subsequently in George Bernard Shaw's play 'You Never Can Tell' (1898). It was popularized in the early 20th century by American actress Gloria Swanson (1899-1983). Another famous bearer is feminist Gloria Steinem (1934-).

GRAHAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: GRAY-əm (English), GRAM (English)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
From a Scottish surname, originally derived from the English place name Grantham, which probably meant "gravelly homestead" in Old English. The surname was first taken to Scotland in the 12th century by the Norman baron William de Graham. A famous bearer was Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor who devised the telephone.

GUILLAUME
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: GEE-YOM
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
French form of WILLIAM.

GUINEVERE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: GWIN-ə-vir (English)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
From the Norman French form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar, derived from the elements gwen meaning "fair, white" and sebara meaning "phantom, magical being". In Arthurian legend she was the beautiful wife of King Arthur. According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, she was seduced by Mordred before the battle of Camlann, which led to the deaths of both Mordred and Arthur. According to the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes, she engaged in an adulterous affair with Sir Lancelot.

The Cornish form of this name, Jennifer, has become popular in the English-speaking world.

GWENAËLLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Breton
Pronounced: GWE-NA-EL (French)
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of GWENAËL.

HAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAL
Personal note: I love this as a nickname but can't think of a full name
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Medieval diminutive of HARRY.

HALA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: هالة (Arabic)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "halo around the moon" in Arabic. This was the name of a sister-in-law of the Prophet Muhammad.

HAMLET
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, Armenian
Other Scripts: Համլետ (Armenian)
Pronounced: HAM-lət (English)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of the Danish name Amleth. Shakespeare used this name for the Prince of Denmark in his play 'Hamlet' (1600), which he based upon earlier Danish tales.

HARRIET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HER-ee-ət, HAR-ee-ət
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
English form of HENRIETTE, and thus a feminine form of HARRY. It was first used in the 17th century, becoming very common in the English-speaking world by the 18th century. A famous bearer was Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896), the American author who wrote 'Uncle Tom's Cabin'.

HAZEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAY-zəl
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
From the English word hazel for the tree or the light brown colour, derived ultimately from Old English hæsel. It was coined as a given name in the 19th century.

HELENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Finnish, Estonian, Slovene, Croatian, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: ‘Ελενη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HE-le-na (German), he-LE-nah (Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish), khe-LE-na (Polish), HE-le-nah (Finnish), HEL-ə-nə (English)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Latinate form of HELEN.

HERMIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: HER-mee-ə (English)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of HERMES. Shakespeare used this name in his comedy 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' (1595).

HERMIONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: ‘Ερμιονη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HER-MEE-O-NE (Classical Greek), hər-MIE-ə-nee (English)
Rating: 90% based on 1 vote
Derived from the name of the Greek messenger god HERMES. In Greek myth Hermione was the daughter of Menelaus and Helen. This is also the name of the wife of Leontes in Shakespeare's play 'The Winter's Tale' (1610). It is now closely associated with the character Hermione Granger from the Harry Potter series of books, first released in 1997.

HERO (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: ‘Ηρω (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HIR-o (English)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Derived from Greek ‘ηρως (heros) meaning "hero". In Greek legend she was the lover of Leander, who would swim across the Hellespont each night to meet her. He was killed on one such occasion when he got caught in a storm while in the water, and when Hero saw his dead body she drowned herself. This is also the name of a character in Shakespeare's play 'Much Ado About Nothing' (1599).

HONORATA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, Polish
Pronounced: khaw-naw-RA-ta (Polish)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of HONORATUS.

HONORÉ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-NAW-RE
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
French form of HONORATUS. It is also sometimes used as a French form of HONORIUS.

HORATIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: hə-RAY-shee-o, hə-RAY-sho
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Variant of HORATIUS. It was borne by the British admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805), famous for his defeat of Napoleon's forces in the Battle of Trafalgar, in which he was himself killed. Since his time the name has been occasionally used in his honour.

ILEANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian, Spanish, Italian
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Possibly a Romanian variant of ELENA. In Romanian folklore this is the name of a princess kidnapped by monsters and rescued by a heroic knight.

IMOGEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: IM-ə-jən
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
The name of a princess in the play 'Cymbeline' (1609) by Shakespeare. He based her on a legendary character named Innogen, but the name was printed incorrectly and never corrected. The name Innogen is probably derived from Gaelic inghean meaning "maiden".

INANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Near Eastern Mythology
Pronounced: i-NAH-nə (English)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Possibly derived from Sumerian (n)in-an-na "lady of the heavens". Inanna was the Sumerian goddess of the earth, love, fertility and war. She descended into the underworld where the ruler of that place, her sister Ereshkigal, had her killed. The god Enki interceded, and Inanna was allowed to leave the underworld as long as her husband Dumuzi took her place.

INDIGO
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: IN-di-go
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
From the English word indigo for the purplish-blue dye or the colour. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ινδικον (Indikon) "Indic, from India".

INDIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Tamil
Other Scripts: इन्दिरा (Sanskrit), इन्दिरा, इंदिरा (Hindi), इंदिरा (Marathi), ಇಂದಿರಾ (Kannada), இந்திரா (Tamil)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "beauty" in Sanskrit. This is another name of Lakshmi, the wife of the Hindu god Vishnu. A notable bearer was India's first female prime minister, Indira Gandhi (1917-1984).

IO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ιω (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EE-AW (Classical Greek), IE-o (English)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Meaning unknown. In Greek mythology Io was a princess loved by Zeus, who changed her into a heifer in order to hide her from Hera. A moon of Jupiter bears this name in her honour.

IOLANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hawaiian
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "to soar" in Hawaiian.

IONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Ιονη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ie-O-nee (English), IE-o-nee (English), ie-ON (English)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From Greek ιον (ion) meaning "violet flower". This was the name of a sea nymph in Greek mythology. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, though perhaps based on the Greek place name Ionia, a region on the west coast of Asia Minor.

IPHIGENEIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ιφιγενεια (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Derived from Greek ιφιος (iphios) "strong, stout" and γενης (genes) "born". In Greek myth Iphigenia was the daughter of king Agamemnon. When her father offended Artemis it was divined that the only way to appease the goddess was to sacrifice Iphigenia. Just as Agamemnon was about to sacrifice his daughter she was magically transported to the city of Taurus.

In Christian tradition this was also the name of a legendary early saint, the daughter of an Ethiopian King Egippus.

IRENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Czech, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Dutch, Lithuanian
Other Scripts: Ирена (Serbian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: ee-RE-na (Polish), ee-RAY-nah (Dutch)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Latinate form of IRENE.

IRIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Galician
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Possibly a Portuguese and Galician form of IRENE. This was the name of a 7th-century saint (also known as Irene) from Tomar in Portugal. This is also the name of an ancient town in Galicia (now a district of Padrón).

IRINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Romanian, Finnish, Georgian
Other Scripts: Ирина (Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian), ირინა (Georgian)
Pronounced: i-RYEE-nə (Russian), EE-ree-nah (Finnish)
Cognate of IRENE.

ISAAC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: יִצְחָק (Hebrew)
Pronounced: IE-zək (English)
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
From the Hebrew name יִצְחָק (Yitzchaq) meaning "he will laugh, he will rejoice", derived from צָחַק (tzachaq) meaning "to laugh". The Old Testament explains this meaning, by recounting that Abraham laughed when God told him that his aged wife Sarah would become pregnant with Isaac (see Genesis 17:17). When Isaac was a boy, God tested Abraham's faith by ordering him to sacrifice his son, though an angel prevented the act at the last moment. Isaac went on to become the father of Esau and Jacob with his wife Rebecca.

As an English Christian name, Isaac was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, though it was more common among Jews. It became more widespread after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers include the physicist and mathematician Sir Isaac Newton (1643-1727) and the science-fiction writer Isaac Asimov (1920-1992).

ISADORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Variant of ISIDORA. A famous bearer was the American dancer Isadora Duncan (1877-1927).

ISOTTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ee-ZOT-ta
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Italian form of ISOLDE.

IVANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Ивана (Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of IVAN.

IVONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Ивона (Serbian, Macedonian)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Form of YVONNE.

IVY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: IE-vee
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
From the English word for the climbing plant that has small yellow flowers. It is ultimately derived from Old English ifig.

JANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAYN
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Medieval English form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). This became the most common feminine form of John in the 17th century, surpassing Joan.

Famous bearers include the uncrowned English queen Lady Jane Grey (1536-1554), who ruled for only 9 days, the British novelist Jane Austen (1775-1817), who wrote 'Sense and Sensibility' and 'Pride and Prejudice', and the British primatologist Jane Goodall (1934-). This is also the name of the central character in Charlotte Brontë's novel 'Jane Eyre' (1847), which tells of her sad childhood and her relationship with Edward Rochester.

JUDE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JOOD (English)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Variant of JUDAS. It is used in many English versions of the New Testament to denote the second apostle named Judas, in order to distinguish him from Judas Iscariot. He was supposedly the author of the Epistle of Jude. In the English-speaking world, Jude has occasionally been used as a given name since the time of the Protestant Reformation.

JULES (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHUYL
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
French form of JULIUS. A notable bearer of this name was the French novelist Jules Verne (1828-1905), author of 'Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea' and other works of science fiction.

JULIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Polish, German
Pronounced: JOO-lee-ən (English), JOOL-yən (English), YOO-lyan (Polish, German)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From the Roman name Iulianus, which was derived from JULIUS. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints, including the legendary Saint Julian the Hospitaller. This name has been used in England since the Middle Ages, at which time it was also a feminine name (from Juliana, eventually becoming Gillian).

JULIET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: joo-lee-ET, JOOL-yət
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of JULIETTE or GIULIETTA. This spelling was first used by Shakespeare for the lover of Romeo in his play 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596).

JUSTIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Slovene
Pronounced: JUS-tin (English), ZHUYS-TEN (French)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From the Latin name Iustinus, which was derived from JUSTUS. This was the name of several early saints including Justin Martyr, a Christian philosopher of the 2nd century who was beheaded in Rome. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors. As an English name, it has occasionally been used since the late Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 20th century. Famous modern bearers include pop stars Justin Timberlake (1981-) and Justin Bieber (1994-).

KALLIOPE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Καλλιοπη (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Means "beautiful voice" from Greek καλλος (kallos) "beauty" and οψ (ops) "voice". In Greek mythology she was a goddess of epic poetry and eloquence, one of the nine Muses.

KARI (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Norwegian short form of KATARINA.

KLEIO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Κλειω (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Derived from Greek κλεος (kleos) meaning "glory". In Greek mythology she was the goddess of history and heroic poetry, one of the nine Muses. She was said to have introduced the alphabet to Greece.

LAELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: LIE-lee-a
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of Laelius, a Roman family name of unknown meaning. This is also the name of a type of flower, an orchid found in Mexico and Central America.

LAETITIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, French
Pronounced: LE-TEE-SYA (French)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Original form of LETITIA, as well as the French form.

LAYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, English
Other Scripts: ليلى (Arabic)
Pronounced: LAY-lə (English)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "night" in Arabic. This was the name of the object of romantic poems written by the 7th-century poet known as Qays. The story of Qays and Layla became a popular romance in medieval Arabia and Persia. The name became used in the English-speaking world after the 1970 release of the song 'Layla' by Derek and the Dominos, the title of which was inspired by the medieval story.

LÉA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LE-A
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
French form of LEAH.

LEANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Λεανδρος (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: lee-AN-dər (English)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of the Greek name Λεανδρος (Leandros), derived from λεων (leon) meaning "lion" and ανηρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek legend Leander was the lover of Hero. Every night he swam across the Hellespont to meet her, but on one occasion he was drowned when a storm arose. When Hero saw his dead body she threw herself into the waters and perished.

LENORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Short form of ELENORA.

LENORE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: lə-NAWR
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Short form of ELEANOR. This was the name of the departed love of the narrator in Edgar Allan Poe's poem 'The Raven' (1845).

LEO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Pronounced: LE-o (German, Danish, Finnish), LAY-o (Dutch), LEE-o (English)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.

LINNÉA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: lin-NE-ah
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
From the name of a flower, also known as the twinflower. The Swedish botanist Carolus Linnaeus named it after himself, it being his favourite flower.

LUC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LUYK
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
French form of LUKE.

LUCAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: LOO-kəs (English), LUY-kahs (Dutch), LUY-KA (French), LOO-kəsh (Portuguese), LOO-kas (Spanish, Classical Latin)
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Latin form of Loukas (see LUKE).

LUKE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: LOOK (English)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
English form of the Greek name Λουκας (Loukas) which meant "from Lucania", Lucania being a region in southern Italy (of uncertain meaning). Luke was a doctor who travelled in the company of the apostle Paul. According to tradition, he was the author of the third gospel and Acts in the New Testament. He was probably of Greek ethnicity. He is considered a saint by many Christian denominations.

Due to his renown, the name became common in the Christian world (in various spellings). As an English name, Luke has been in use since the 12th century alongside the Latin form Lucas. A famous fictional bearer was the hero Luke Skywalker from the 'Star Wars' movies, beginning in 1977.

LUMINIȚA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian
Pronounced: loo-mee-NEE-tsa
Personal note: ...or the more Anglophone-friendly "Luminitsa"
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Means "little light", derived from Romanian lumina "light" combined with a diminutive suffix.

LUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.

LYRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: LIE-rə (English)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
The name of the constellation in the northern sky containing the star Vega. It is said to be shaped after the lyre of Orpheus.

LYSANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Λυσανδρος (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of the Greek name Λυσανδρος (Lysandros), derived from Greek λυσις (lysis) meaning "a release" and ανηρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ανδρος). This was the name of a notable 5th-century BC Spartan general and naval commander.

MAIARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Native American, Tupí
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Means "wise" in Tupí.

MANON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Dutch
Pronounced: MA-NAWN (French)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
French diminutive of MARIE.

MARA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: מָרָא (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: MAHR-ə (English), MAR-ə (English)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Means "bitter" in Hebrew. This is a name taken by Naomi in the Old Testament (see Ruth 1:20).

MARCEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Catalan, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, German
Pronounced: MAR-SEL (French), MAR-tsel (Polish), mahr-SEL (Dutch), mar-SEL (German)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Form of MARCELLUS. A notable bearer was the French author Marcel Proust (1871-1922).

MARGOT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MAR-GO
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
French short form of MARGARET.

MARIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Spanish, Romanian, Czech, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: mə-RYA-nə (Portuguese), ma-RYA-na (Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Roman feminine form of MARIANUS. After the classical era it was frequently interpreted as a combination of MARIA and ANA. In Portuguese it is further used as a form of MARIAMNE.

MARIELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MA-RYEL
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
French diminutive of MARIE.

MARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Romanian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Georgian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Μαρινα (Greek), Марина (Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian), მარინა (Georgian)
Pronounced: ma-REE-na (Italian, Spanish, German), mə-REEN-ə (English), mu-RYEE-nə (Russian)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of MARINUS.

MARK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical
Other Scripts: Марк (Russian)
Pronounced: MAHRK (English), MARK (Russian)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Form of MARCUS. Saint Mark was the author of the second gospel in the New Testament. Though the author's identity is not certain, some traditions hold him to be the same person as the John Mark who appears in the Book of Acts. He is the patron saint of Venice, where he is supposedly buried. Though in use during the Middle Ages, Mark was not common in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when it began to be used alongside the classical form Marcus.

In the Celtic legend of Tristan and Isolde this was the name of a king of Cornwall. It was also borne by the American author Mark Twain (1835-1910), real name Samuel Clemens, the author of 'Tom Sawyer' and 'Huckleberry Finn'. He took his pen name from a call used by riverboat workers on the Mississippi River to indicate a depth of two fathoms. This is also the usual English spelling of the name of the 1st-century BC Roman triumvir Marcus Antonius (Mark Antony).

MARLOWE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: MAHR-lo
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "remnants of a lake" in Old English.

MARTIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish
Other Scripts: Мартин (Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: MAHR-tin (English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish), MAR-TEN (French), MAR-teen (German, Slovak), MAWR-teen (Hungarian), mar-TIN (Bulgarian), MAHR-teen (Finnish)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god MARS. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.

An influential bearer of the name was Martin Luther (1483-1546), the theologian who began the Protestant Reformation. The name was also borne by five popes (two of them more commonly known as Marinus). Other more recent bearers include the German philosopher Martin Heidegger (1889-1976), the American civil rights leader Martin Luther King (1929-1968), and the American filmmaker Martin Scorsese (1942-).

MARTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Slovene, Hungarian, English, Swedish, Dutch, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: mar-TEE-na (German, Italian, Spanish), mər-TEE-nə (Catalan), mahr-TEEN-ə (English), mahr-TEE-nah (Dutch)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of Martinus (see MARTIN). Saint Martina was a 3rd-century martyr who is one of the patron saints of Rome.

MARTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Dutch, Norwegian
Pronounced: MAR-TEEN (French), mahr-TEE-nə (Dutch)
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
French, Dutch and Norwegian feminine form of Martinus (see MARTIN).

MAXIMILIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: ma-ksee-MEE-lyan (German), mak-si-MIL-yən (English)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
From the Roman name Maximilianus, which was derived from MAXIMUS. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint and martyr. In the 15th century the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick III gave this name to his son and eventual heir. In this case it was a blend of the names of the Roman generals Fabius Maximus and Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus (see EMILIANO), who Frederick admired. It was subsequently borne by a second Holy Roman Emperor, two kings of Bavaria, and a short-lived Habsburg emperor of Mexico.

MAXIMILIEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MAK-SEE-MEE-LYEN
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
French form of Maximilianus (see MAXIMILIAN).

MIREIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan, Spanish
Pronounced: mee-RE-yə (Catalan)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Catalan form of Mirèio (see MIREILLE).

MIREILLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MEE-RAY
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
From the Occitan name Mirèio, which was first used by the poet Frédéric Mistral for the main character in his poem 'Mirèio' (1859). He probably derived it from the Occitan word mirar meaning "to admire".

MIRÈIO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Occitan
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Original Occitan form of MIREILLE.

MORGAN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English, French
Pronounced: MAWR-gən (English), MAWR-GAN (French)
Personal note: I prefer this as a masculine name only
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
From the Old Welsh masculine name Morcant, which was possibly derived from Welsh mor "sea" and cant "circle". Since the 1980s in America Morgan has been more common for girls than boys, perhaps due to stories of Morgan le Fay or the fame of actress Morgan Fairchild (1950-).

MORGANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: mawr-GAN-ə
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of MORGAN (1).

MORRIGAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish Mythology
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Derived from Irish Mór Ríoghain meaning "great queen". In Irish myth she was a goddess of war and death who often took the form of a crow.

MUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: منى (Arabic)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "wishes, desires", from the plural of Arabic منية (munyah).

NADEZHDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Надежда (Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: nu-DYEZH-də (Russian)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "hope" in Slavic.

NADIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Italian, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Надя (Russian, Bulgarian), Надія (Ukrainian)
Pronounced: NA-DYA (French), NAD-yə (English), NAHD-yə (English), NA-dyə (Russian)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Variant of NADYA (1) used in the Western world, as well as a variant transcription of the Slavic name. It began to be used in France in the 19th century. The name received a boost in popularity from the Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci (1961-).

NAIARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From the Basque name of the Spanish city of Nájera, which is Arabic in origin. In the 12th century there was a reported apparition of the Virgin Mary in a nearby cave.

NANAEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Near Eastern Mythology (Latinized)
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of NANAYA.

NATALYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Наталья (Russian)
Pronounced: nu-TA-lyə
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Russian form of Natalia (see NATALIE).

NATASHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English
Other Scripts: Наташа (Russian)
Pronounced: nu-TA-shə (Russian), nə-TAHSH-ə (English)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Russian diminutive of NATALYA. This is the name of a character in Leo Tolstoy's novel 'War and Peace' (1865). It has been used in the English-speaking world only since the 20th century.

NELL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NEL
Medieval diminutive of names beginning with El, such as ELEANOR, ELLEN (1) or HELEN. It may have arisen from the medieval affectionate phrase mine El, which was later reinterpreted as my Nel.

NELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: NEL-la
Short form of ANTONELLA.

NEREIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ne-RAY-dha
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Derived from Greek Νηρειδες (Nereides) meaning "nymphs, sea sprites", ultimately derived from the name of the Greek sea god NEREUS, who supposedly fathered them.

NERISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Created by Shakespeare for a character in his play 'The Merchant of Venice' (1596). He possibly took it from Greek Νηρεις (Nereis) meaning "nymph, sea sprite", ultimately derived from the name of the Greek sea god NEREUS, who supposedly fathered them.

NIKITA (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Никита (Russian), Нікіта (Ukrainian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: nyi-KYEE-tə (Russian)
Personal note: ONLY as a male name, as it's supposed to be
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Russian form of NIKETAS. This form is also used in Ukrainian and Belarusian alongside the more traditional forms Mykyta and Mikita.

NIMUE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: NIM-oo-ay (English)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Meaning unknown. In Arthurian legends this is the name of a sorceress, also known as the Lady of the Lake, Vivien, or Niniane. Various versions of the tales have Merlin falling in love with her and becoming imprisoned by her magic. She first appears in the medieval French 'Lancelot-Grail' cycle.

NINIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, Irish, Ancient Celtic
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Meaning unknown. It appears in a Latinized form Niniavus, which could be from the Welsh name NYNNIAW. This was the name of a 5th-century British saint who was apparently responsible for many miracles and cures. He is known as the Apostle to the Picts.

NIOBE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Νιοβη (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Meaning unknown. In Greek mythology Niobe was the daughter of Tantalos, a king of Asia Minor. Because she boasted that she was superior to Leto, Leto's children Apollo and Artemis killed her 14 children with poison arrows. In grief, Niobe was turned to stone by Zeus.

NOÉMIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: NAW-E-MEE
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
French form of NAOMI (1).

OCTAVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: awk-TAY-vee-ə (English), ok-TA-bya (Spanish), ok-TA-wee-a (Classical Latin)
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of OCTAVIUS. Octavia was the wife of Mark Antony and the sister of Roman emperor Augustus. In 19th-century England it was sometimes given to the eighth-born child.

OCTAVIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History, Romanian
Pronounced: awk-TAY-vee-ən (English)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
From the Roman name Octavianus, which was derived from the name OCTAVIUS. After Gaius Octavius (later Roman emperor Augustus) was adopted by Julius Caesar he took the name Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus.

ODILE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-DEEL
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
French form of ODILIA.

OIHANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Means "forest" in Basque.

OLIVER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
Other Scripts: Оливер (Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: AWL-ə-vər (English), O-lee-vu (German), O-lee-ver (Finnish)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.

In England Oliver was a common medieval name, however it became rare after the 17th century because of the military commander Oliver Cromwell, who ruled the country following the civil war. The name was revived in the 19th century, perhaps in part due to the title character in Charles Dickens' novel 'Oliver Twist' (1838), which was about a poor orphan living on the streets of London.

OLIVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: o-LIV-ee-ə (English), o-LEE-vya (Italian, German), o-LEE-bya (Spanish), O-lee-vee-ah (Finnish)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
This name was first used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy 'Twelfth Night' (1602). Shakespeare may have based it on OLIVER or OLIVA, or perhaps directly on the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.

The name has been used in the English-speaking world since the 18th century, though it did not become overly popular until the last half of the 20th century. Its rise in popularity in America was precipitated by a character on the 1970s television series 'The Waltons'.

OLIVIER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Dutch
Pronounced: AW-LEE-VYE (French), O-lee-veer (Dutch)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
French and Dutch form of OLIVER.

OONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Finnish
Pronounced: OO-na (Irish), O-nah (Finnish)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Irish variant and Finnish form of ÚNA.

OPHELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Literature
Pronounced: o-FEEL-yə (English)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Derived from Greek οφελος (ophelos) meaning "help". This name was probably created by the 15th-century poet Jacopo Sannazaro for a character in his poem 'Arcadia'. It was borrowed by Shakespeare for his play 'Hamlet' (1600), in which it belongs to Hamlet's lover who eventually goes insane and drowns herself. In spite of this, the name has been used since the 19th century.

OPHÉLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-FE-LEE
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
French form of OPHELIA.

ORIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: o-RYA-na
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Possibly derived from Latin aurum "gold" or from its derivatives, Spanish oro or French or. In medieval legend Oriana was the daughter of a king of England who married the knight Amadis.

ORIANNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-RYAN
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
French form of ORIANA.

PANDORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Πανδωρα (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PAN-DAW-RA (Classical Greek), pan-DAWR-ə (English)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Means "all gifts", derived from a combination of Greek παν (pan) "all" and δωρον (doron) "gift". In Greek mythology Pandora was the first mortal woman. Zeus gave her a jar containing all of the troubles and ills that mankind now knows, and told her not to open it. Unfortunately her curiosity got the best of her and she opened it, unleashing the evil spirits into the world.

PARIS (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Παρις (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PA-REES (Classical Greek), PER-is (English), PAR-is (English)
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Meaning unknown. In Greek mythology he was the Trojan prince who kidnapped Helen and began the Trojan War. Though presented as a somewhat of a coward in the 'Iliad', he did manage to slay the great hero Achilles. He was himself eventually slain in battle by Philoctetes.

PARVANEH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: پروانه (Persian)
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Means "butterfly" in Persian.

PAUL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Biblical
Pronounced: PAWL (English, French), POWL (German)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From the Roman family name Paulus, which meant "small" or "humble" in Latin. Paul was an important leader of the early Christian church. According to Acts in the New Testament, he was a Jewish Roman citizen who converted to Christianity after the resurrected Jesus appeared to him. After this he travelled the eastern Mediterranean as a missionary. His original Hebrew name was Saul. Many of the epistles in the New Testament were authored by him.

Due to the renown of Saint Paul the name became common among early Christians. It was borne by a number of other early saints and six popes. In England it was relatively rare during the Middle Ages, but became more frequent beginning in the 17th century. A notable bearer was the American Revolutionary War figure Paul Revere (1735-1818), who warned of the advance of the British army. Famous bearers in the art world include the French impressionists Paul Cezanne (1839-1906) and Paul Gauguin (1848-1903), and the Swiss expressionist Paul Klee (1879-1940). It is borne by British musician Paul McCartney (1942-). This is also the name of the legendary American lumberjack Paul Bunyan.

PENELOPE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Πηνελοπη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: pi-NEL-ə-pee (English)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Possibly derived from Greek πηνελοψ (penelops), a type of duck. Alternatively it could be from πηνη (pene) "threads, weft" and ωψ (ops) "face, eye". In Homer's epic the 'Odyssey' this is the name of the wife of Odysseus, forced to fend off suitors while her husband is away fighting at Troy. It has occasionally been used as an English given name since the 16th century.

PENINNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: פְּנִנָּה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: pi-NIN-ə (English), pee-NIN-ə (English)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Means "precious stone" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the wives of Elkanah, the other being Hannah.

PENNY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PEN-ee
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of PENELOPE.

PERCIVAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arthurian Romance, English
Pronounced: PUR-si-vəl (English)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Created by the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes for his poem 'Perceval, the Story of the Grail'. In the poem Perceval was one of King Arthur's Knights of the Round Table who was given a glimpse of the Holy Grail. The character (and probably the name) of Perceval was based on that of the Welsh hero PEREDUR. The spelling was perhaps altered under the influence of Old French percer val "to pierce the valley".

PERDITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Derived from Latin perditus meaning "lost". Shakespeare created this name for the daughter of Hermione in his play 'The Winter's Tale' (1610).

PERSEPHONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Περσεφονη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PER-SE-PO-NE (Classical Greek), pər-SEF-ə-nee (English)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Meaning unknown, probably of Pre-Greek origin, but perhaps related to Greek περθω (pertho) "to destroy" and φονη (phone) "murder". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus. She was abducted to the underworld by Hades, but was eventually allowed to return to the surface for part of the year. The result of her comings and goings is the changing of the seasons.

PETRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Swedish, Finnish, English
Pronounced: PE-tra (German), PET-rah (Finnish), PET-rə (English)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of PETER. This was also the name of an ancient city in the region that is now Jordan.

PHAEDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Φαιδρα (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
From the Greek Φαιδρα (Phaidra), derived from φαιδρος (phaidros) meaning "bright". Phaedra was the daughter of Minos and the wife of Theseus in Greek mythology. Aphrodite caused her to fall in love with her stepson Hippolytos, and after she was rejected by him she killed herself.

PHILOMEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: FIL-ə-mel (English)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
From an English word meaning "nightingale" (ultimately from PHILOMELA). It has been used frequently in poetry to denote the bird.

PHILOMELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Φιλομηλα (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Derived from Greek φιλος (philos) "lover, friend" and μηλον (melon) "fruit". The second element has also been interpreted as Greek μελος (melos) "song". In Greek myth Philomela was the sister-in-law of Tereus, who raped her and cut out her tongue. Prokne avenged her sister by killing her son by Tereus, after which Tereus attempted to kill Philomela. However, the gods intervened and transformed her into a nightingale.

PHOEBE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Φοιβη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: FEE-bee (English)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβη (Phoibe), which meant "bright, pure" from Greek φοιβος (phoibos). In Greek mythology Phoibe was a Titan associated with the moon. This was also an epithet of her granddaughter, the moon goddess Artemis. The name appears in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament, where it belongs to a female minister in the church at Cenchreae. In England, it began to be used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. A moon of Saturn bears this name (in honour of the Titan).

PORTIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAWR-shə
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Variant of Porcia, the feminine form of the Roman family name PORCIUS, used by William Shakespeare for the heroine of his play 'The Merchant of Venice' (1596). In the play Portia is a woman who disguises herself as a man in order to defend Antonio in court. It is also the name of a moon of Uranus, after the Shakespearian character.

PROSERPINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Means "to emerge" in Latin. She was the Roman equivalent of the Greek goddess Persephone.

PROSERPINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Variant of PROSERPINA.

PROSPER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: PRAWS-PER (French), PRAHS-pər (English)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
From the Latin name Prosperus, which meant "fortunate, successful". This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a supporter of Saint Augustine. It has never been common as an English name, though the Puritans used it, partly because it is identical to the English word prosper.

PROSPERO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: PRAW-spe-ro
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Italian form of PROSPER. This was the name of the shipwrecked magician in 'The Tempest' (1611) by Shakespeare.

PSYCHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ψυχη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PSUY-KE (Classical Greek), SIE-kee (English)
Personal note: Why do I love this so much?
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Means "the soul", derived from Greek ψυχω (psycho) "to breathe". The Greeks thought that the breath was the soul. In Greek mythology Psyche was a beautiful maiden who was beloved by Eros (or Cupid in Roman mythology). She is the subject of Keats's poem 'Ode to Psyche' (1819).

QUINCY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KWIN-see
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
From a surname which was derived (via the place name CUINCHY) from the personal name QUINTIUS. A famous bearer was John Quincy Adams (1767-1848), sixth president of the United States, who was born in the town of Quincy, Massachusetts.

RADA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Рада (Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Derived from the Slavic element rad meaning "happy, willing".

RADANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovene
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Derived from the Slavic element rad meaning "happy, willing".

RAINIER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French (Rare)
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
French form of RAYNER.

RAISA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Раиса (Russian)
Pronounced: ru-EES-ə
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Possibly from the Greek name HERAIS. This was the name of a saint and martyr killed in Alexandria during the early 4th-century persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian.

RANIYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: رانية (Arabic)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "looking at", derived from Arabic رنا (rana) "to gaze".

RASA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "dew" in Lithuanian.

RAVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: RA-va
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "ravishing" in Esperanto.

RAYNA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish
Other Scripts: רֵײנָא (Yiddish)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Variant transcription of REINA (2).

REGINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: rə-JEEN-ə (English), rə-GEEN-ə (English), rə-JIEN-ə (English), re-GEE-na (German), re-JEE-na (Italian), re-KHEE-na (Spanish), re-GYEE-na (Polish), RE-gee-naw (Hungarian)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Means "queen" in Latin (or Italian). It was in use as a Christian name from early times, and was borne by a 2nd-century saint. In England it was used during the Middle Ages in honour of the Virgin Mary, and it was later revived in the 19th century. A city in Canada bears this name, in honour of Queen Victoria.

RÉGINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: RE-ZHEEN
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
French form of REGINA.

REINA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Means "queen" in Spanish.

RÉMY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: RE-MEE
Personal note: Masculine only
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
French form of the Latin name Remigius, which was derived from Latin remigis "oarsman". Saint Rémy was a 5th-century bishop who converted and baptized Clovis, king of the Franks.

RENATA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Polish, Czech, Croatian, Slovene, Late Roman
Pronounced: re-NA-ta (Italian, Spanish, German, Polish)
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of RENATUS.

RENÉ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, German, Spanish, Slovak, Czech
Pronounced: RU-NE (French), rə-NE (German)
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
French form of RENATUS. A famous bearer was the French mathematician and rationalist philosopher René Descartes (1596-1650).

RENÉE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Dutch
Pronounced: RU-NE (French)
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
French feminine form of RENÉ.

RHIANNON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: ree-AN-awn (Welsh), ree-AN-ən (English), REE-ən-ən (English)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Probably derived from the old Celtic name Rigantona meaning "great queen". It is speculated that this was the name of an otherwise unattested Celtic goddess of fertility and the moon. The name Rhiannon appears later in Welsh legend in the Mabinogion, borne by the wife of Pwyll and the mother of Pryderi.

As an English name, it became popular due to the Fleetwood Mac song 'Rhiannon' (1976).

RIVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: רִיבָה (Hebrew)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of RIVKA.

RIYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali
Other Scripts: रिया (Hindi, Marathi), রিয়া (Bengali)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "singer" in Sanskrit.

ROMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German
Other Scripts: Роман (Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: ru-MAN (Russian), RAW-man (Polish)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
From the Late Latin name Romanus which meant "Roman".

RORY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: RAWR-ee
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of RUAIDHRÍ.

ROSALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Late Roman
Pronounced: ro-za-LEE-a (Italian)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Late Latin name derived from rosa "rose". This was the name of a 12th-century Sicilian saint.

ROSALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German, Dutch, English
Pronounced: RAW-ZA-LEE (French), ro-za-LEE (German), RO-zə-lee (English)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
French, German and Dutch form of ROSALIA. In the English-speaking this name received a boost after the release of the movie 'Rosalie' (1938), which was based on an earlier musical.

ROSALIND
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROZ-ə-lind
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Derived from the Germanic elements hros "horse" and linde "soft, tender". The Normans introduced this name to England, though it was not common. During the Middle Ages its spelling was influenced by the Latin phrase rosa linda "beautiful rose". The name was popularized by Edmund Spencer, who used it in his poetry, and by William Shakespeare, who used it for the heroine in his comedy 'As You Like It' (1599).

ROSETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ro-ZET-ta
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Italian diminutive of ROSA (1).

ROWENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ro-EE-nə
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Latinized form of a Germanic name derived from the elements hrod "fame" and wunn "joy, bliss". According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, this was the name of a daughter of the Saxon chief Hengist. It was popularized by Sir Walter Scott, who used it for a character in his novel 'Ivanhoe' (1819).

ROXANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ρωξανη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: rahk-SAN-ə (English), rok-SA-na (Spanish)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Latin form of Ρωξανη (Roxane), the Greek form of the Persian or Bactrian name روشنک (Roshanak) which meant "bright" or "dawn". This was the name of Alexander the Great's first wife, a daughter of the Bactrian nobleman Oxyartes. In the modern era it came into use during the 17th century. In the English-speaking world it was popularized by Daniel Defoe, who used it in his novel 'Roxana' (1724).

ROXANNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: rahk-SAN (English), RAWK-SAN (French)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Variant of ROXANE.

RUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of RUNE.

SAFIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: sa-FEE-ra
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Means "like a sapphire" in Esperanto.

SAKURA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 桜, 咲良, etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: SA-KOO-RA
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
From Japanese (sakura) meaning "cherry blossom", though it is often written さくら using the hiragana writing system. It can also come from (saku) meaning "blossom" and (ra) meaning "good, virtuous, respectable" as well as other kanji combinations.

SANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: SAHN-dər (Dutch)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Dutch and Scandinavian short form of ALEXANDER.

SASHA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, English, French
Other Scripts: Саша (Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: SA-SHA (French)
Personal note: Nickname for both genders, possibly masc. full name
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Russian and Ukrainian diminutive of ALEKSANDR or ALEKSANDRA.

SCHEHERAZADE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: shə-HER-ə-zahd (English)
Personal note: I wouldn't use it, but I like how it sounds
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of SHAHRAZAD.

SELAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: סֶלַה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: SEE-lə (English)
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
From a Hebrew musical term which occurs many times in the Old Testament Psalms. It was probably meant to indicate a musical pause.

SELENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Russian, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Селена (Russian), Σεληνη (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of SELENE. This name was borne by popular Mexican-American singer Selena Quintanilla (1971-1995), who was known simply as Selena.

SELENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Greek
Other Scripts: Σεληνη (Greek)
Pronounced: SE-LE-NE (Classical Greek), si-LEE-nee (English)
Rating: 90% based on 1 vote
Means "moon" in Greek. This was the name of a Greek goddess of the moon, sometimes identified with the goddess Artemis.

SERAPHINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: ze-ra-FEE-na (German)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Seraphinus, derived from the biblical word seraphim which was Hebrew in origin and meant "fiery ones". The seraphim were an order of angels, described by Isaiah in the Bible as having six wings each. This was the name of a 13th-century Italian saint who made clothes for the poor. As an English name, it has never been common.

SERENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Late Roman
Pronounced: sə-REEN-ə (English), se-RE-na (Italian)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
From a Late Latin name which was derived from Latin serenus meaning "clear, tranquil, serene". This name was borne by an obscure early saint. Edmund Spenser also used it in his poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590).

SERGEI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Сергей (Russian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: syir-GYAY (Russian)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Variant transcription of SERGEY.

SETH (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: שֵׁת (Ancient Hebrew), Σηθ (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SETH (English)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "placed" or "appointed" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the third named son of Adam and Eve. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

SHIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: שִׁירָה (Hebrew)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "poetry" or "singing" in Hebrew.

SHOSHANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: שׁוֹשַׁנָּה (Hebrew)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Hebrew form of SUSANNA.

SIDNEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SID-nee
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From the English surname SIDNEY. It was first used as a given name in honour of executed politician Algernon Sidney (1622-1683). Another notable bearer of the surname was the poet and statesman Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586).

SIDONIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SEE-DAW-NEE
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
French feminine form of SIDONIUS.

SITARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Urdu
Other Scripts: ستارہ (Urdu)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "star" in Urdu, ultimately from Persian.

STELARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: ste-LA-ra
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Means "like a constellation" in Esperanto.

STELLA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Dutch, German
Pronounced: STEL-ə (English)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets 'Astrophel and Stella'. It was a nickname of a lover of Jonathan Swift, real name Esther Johnson (1681-1728), though it was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play 'A Streetcar Named Desire' (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.

SURAYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: ثريّة, ثريّا (Arabic)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Variant transcription of THURAYYA.

SVETLANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Slovak, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Светлана (Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: svyit-LA-nə (Russian)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Derived from Slavic svet meaning "light, world". It was popularized by the poem 'Svetlana' (1813) by the Russian poet Vasily Zhukovsky. It is sometimes used as a translation of Photine.

SYLVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German
Pronounced: SIL-vee-ə (English), SUYL-vee-ah (Finnish)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Variant of SILVIA. This has been the most common English spelling since the 19th century.

TALIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: טַלְיָה, טַלְיָא (Hebrew)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Variant transcription of TALYA.

TALYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: טַלְיָה, טַלְיָא (Hebrew)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "dew from God" in Hebrew.

TARA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAHR-ə, TER-ə, TAR-ə
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of the Irish place name Teamhair, which possibly means "elevated place" in Gaelic. This was the name of the sacred hill near Dublin where the Irish high kings resided. It was popularized as a given name by the novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1939), in which it is the name of the O'Hara plantation.

TASIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Τασια (Greek)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Short form of ANASTASIA.

THALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Greek
Other Scripts: Θαλεια (Greek)
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
From the Greek name Θαλεια (Thaleia), derived from θαλλω (thallo) meaning "to blossom". In Greek mythology she was one of the nine Muses, presiding over comedy and pastoral poetry. This was also the name of one of the three Graces or Χαριτες (Charites).

THOMAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Θωμας (Greek)
Pronounced: TAHM-əs (American English), TAWM-əs (British English), TAW-MA (French), TO-mas (German), TO-mahs (Dutch), tho-MAHS (Greek)
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Greek form of the Aramaic name תָּאוֹמָא (Ta'oma') which meant "twin". In the New Testament this is the name of an apostle. When he heard that Jesus had risen from the dead he initially doubted the story, until Jesus appeared before him and he examined his wounds himself. According to tradition he was martyred in India. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world.

In England the name was introduced by the Normans and became very popular due to Saint Thomas Becket, a 12th-century archbishop of Canterbury and martyr. Another notable saint by this name was the 13th-century Italian philosopher and theologian Thomas Aquinas, who is regarded as a Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include philosopher Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), American president Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), novelist Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), and inventor Thomas Edison (1847-1931).

TITANIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: tə-TAYN-yə (English), tə-TAHN-yə (English), tie-TAYN-yə (English)
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Perhaps based on Latin Titanius meaning "of the Titans". This name was (first?) used by Shakespeare in his comedy 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' (1595) where it is the name of queen of the fairies. This is also a moon of Uranus, named after the Shakespearian character.

TRISTAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English, French, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: TRIS-tən (English), TREES-TAHN (French)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Old French form of the Pictish name Drustan, a diminutive of DRUST. The spelling was altered by association with Latin tristis "sad". Tristan is a character in medieval French tales, probably inspired by older Celtic legends, and ultimately merged into Arthurian legend. According to the story Tristan was sent to Ireland in order to fetch Isolde, who was to be the bride of King Mark of Cornwall. On the way back, Tristan and Isolde accidentally drink a potion which makes them fall in love. Their tragic story was very popular in the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.

ÚNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: OO-na
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Possibly derived from Irish uan meaning "lamb".

VALENTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Russian, Croatian, Macedonian, Slovene, Romanian, Spanish, Greek, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Валентина (Russian, Macedonian), Βαλεντινα (Greek)
Pronounced: va-len-TEE-na (Italian), və-lyin-TYEE-nə (Russian)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)). A famous bearer was the Soviet cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova (1937-), who in 1963 became the first woman to visit space.

VALENTINE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VAL-ən-tien
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
From the Roman cognomen Valentinus which was itself from the name Valens meaning "strong, vigourous, healthy" in Latin. Saint Valentine was a 3rd-century martyr. His feast day was the same as the Roman fertility festival of Lupercalia, which resulted in the association between Valentine's day and love. As an English name, it has been used occasionally since the 12th century.

VALORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: va-LO-ra
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "valuable" in Esperanto.

VASILIY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Василий (Russian)
Pronounced: vu-SYEE-lyee
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Russian form of BASIL (1).

VEDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Telugu, Kannada
Other Scripts: వేద (Telugu), ವೇದ (Kannada)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "knowledge" in Sanskrit.

VELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: VE-lya
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
From the Roman family name Velius which possibly means "concealed" in Latin.

VERA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Вера (Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: VYE-rə (Russian), VEER-ə (English), VER-ə (English), VE-ra (German), VE-rah (Swedish), VE-raw (Hungarian)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.

VERENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Late Roman
Pronounced: ve-RE-na (German)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Possibly related to Latin verus "true". This might also be a Coptic form of the Ptolemaic name BERENICE. Saint Verena was a 3rd-century Egyptian-born nurse who went with the Theban Legion to Switzerland. After the legion was massacred she settled near Zurich.

VERITY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VER-i-tee
Personal note: Maybe as a middle name, but I really do love it
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
From the English word meaning "verity, truth". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.

VICTOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish, Late Roman
Pronounced: VIK-tər (English), VEEK-TAWR (French)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Roman name meaning "victor, conqueror" in Latin. It was common among early Christians, and was borne by several early saints and three popes. It was rare as an English name during the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the French writer Victor Hugo (1802-1885), who authored 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.

VIOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Czech
Pronounced: vie-O-lə (English), vi-O-lə (English), VIE-ə-lə (English), VYAW-la (Italian), VYO-la (German), VEE-o-law (Hungarian)
Personal note: I pronounce it VIE-oh-lah
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Means "violet" in Latin. This was the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's play 'Twelfth Night' (1602).

VIVIAN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: VIV-ee-ən (English)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From the Latin name Vivianus which was derived from Latin vivus "alive". Saint Vivian was a French bishop who provided protection during the Visigoth invasion of the 5th century. It has been occasionally used as an English (masculine) name since the Middle Ages. In modern times it is also used as a feminine name, in which case it is either an Anglicized form of BÉBINN or a variant of VIVIEN (2).

VIVIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Late Roman
Pronounced: vee-VYA-na (Italian)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of Vivianus (see VIVIAN). Saint Viviana (also known as Bibiana) was a Roman saint and martyr of the 4th century.

VIVIANNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: VEE-VYAN
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Variant of VIVIANE.

VIVIEN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: VEE-VYEN
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
French form of Vivianus (see VIVIAN).

VIVIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: VEE-VYEN
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
French form of VIVIANA.

WESLEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WES-lee, WEZ-lee
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "west meadow" in Old English. It has been sometimes given in honour of John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism.

WESTLEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WEST-lee
Personal note: This spelling from The Princess Bride
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
From a surname which was a variant of WESLEY.

XANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch, English (Modern)
Pronounced: KSAHN-dər (Dutch), ZAN-dər (English)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Short form of ALEXANDER. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by a character on the television series 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer' (1997-2003).

XENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: ZEE-nə (English)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Probably a variant of XENIA. This was the name of the main character in the 1990s television series 'Xena: Warrior Princess'.

XIMENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: khee-ME-na
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of XIMENO. This was the name of the wife of El Cid.

YANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Яна (Bulgarian, Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: YA-nə (Russian)
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Bulgarian, Russian and Ukrainian form of JANA (1).

YELENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Елена (Russian)
Pronounced: yi-LYE-nə, i-LYE-nə
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Russian form of HELEN.

YEVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Armenian
Other Scripts: Ева (Russian), Եվա (Armenian)
Pronounced: YE-və (Russian)
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Russian and Armenian form of EVE.

YURI (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Юрий (Russian), Юрій (Ukrainian)
Pronounced: YOO-ryee (Russian)
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Variant transcription of YURIY.

YVAIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Form of OWAIN used by the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes for his Arthurian tales.

YVONNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: EE-VAWN (French), i-VAWN (English), ee-VAWN (German)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
French feminine form of YVON. It has been regularly used in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.

ZAHRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Persian
Other Scripts: زهراء (Arabic), زهرا (Persian)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "brilliant, bright" in Arabic. This is an epithet of the Prophet Muhammad's daughter Fatimah.

ZENAIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Greek
Other Scripts: Ζηναιδα (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Apparently a Greek derivative of Ζηναις (Zenais), which was derived from the name of the Greek god ZEUS. This was the name of a 1st-century saint who was a doctor with her sister Philonella.

ZÉNAÏDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZE-NA-EED
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
French form of ZENAIDA.

ZIBA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: زیبا (Persian)
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Means "beautiful" in Persian.

ZINNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ZIN-ee-ə
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
From the name of the flower, which was itself named for the German botanist Johann Zinn.

ZIVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: זִיוָה (Hebrew)
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of ZIV.

ZORAIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Perhaps means "enchanting" or "dawn" in Arabic. This was the name of a minor 12th-century Spanish saint, a convert from Islam. The name was used by Cervantes for a character in his novel 'Don Quixote' (1606), in which Zoraida is a beautiful Moorish woman of Algiers who converts to Christianity and elopes with a Spanish officer.

ZULEIKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: zoo-LAY-kə (English)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Possibly means "brilliant beauty" in Persian. According to medieval legends this was the name of Potiphar's wife in the Bible. She has been a frequent subject of poems and tales.
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2017.