abster's Personal Name List

AARON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: אַהֲרֹן(Hebrew) Ααρων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EHR-ən(English) AR-ən(English)
Personal note: Pronunced erin
From the Hebrew name אַהֲרֹן ('Aharon), which is most likely of unknown Egyptian origin. Other theories claim a Hebrew derivation, and suggest meanings such as "high mountain" or "exalted". In the Old Testament this name is borne by the older brother of Moses. He acted as a spokesman for his brother when they appealed to the pharaoh to release the Israelites from slavery. Aaron's rod produced miracles and plagues to intimidate the pharaoh. After the departure from Egypt and arrival at Mount Sinai, God installed Aaron as the first high priest of the Israelites and promised that his descendants would form the priesthood.

As an English name, Aaron has been in use since the Protestant Reformation. This name was borne by the American politician Aaron Burr (1756-1836), notable for killing Alexander Hamilton in a duel.

ABIJAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: אֲבִיָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ə-BIE-jə(English)
Means "my father is YAHWEH" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of several characters, both male and female, including the second king of Judah.
ADAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Catalan, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: Адам(Russian, Ukrainian, Serbian, Macedonian) אָדָם(Hebrew) آدم(Arabic) ადამ(Georgian) Αδαμ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AD-əm(English) A-DAHN(French) A-dam(German, Polish, Czech, Arabic) A-dahm(Dutch) AH-dam(Swedish) u-DAM(Russian) ah-DAHM(Ukrainian) ə-DHAM(Catalan)
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make".

According to Genesis in the Old Testament Adam was created from the earth by God (there is a word play on Hebrew אֲדָמָה ('adamah) meaning "earth"). He and Eve were supposedly the first humans, living happily in the Garden of Eden until they ate the forbidden fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil. As a result they were expelled from Eden to the lands to the east, where they gave birth the second generation, including Cain, Abel and Seth.

As an English Christian name, Adam has been common since the Middle Ages, and it received a boost after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Scottish economist Adam Smith (1723-1790).

ALEJANDRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-leh-KHAN-dro
Spanish form of ALEXANDER. This was the most popular name for boys in Spain from the 1990s until 2006 (and again in 2011).
ALESSANDRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: a-lehs-SAN-dro
Italian form of ALEXANDER. A famous bearer was Alessandro Volta (1745-1827), the Italian physicist who invented the battery.
ALJAŽ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Slovene
Derived from a Slovene surname, which is of unknown meaning.
AMBROSE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AM-broz
From the Late Latin name Ambrosius, which was derived from the Greek name Αμβροσιος (Ambrosios) meaning "immortal". Saint Ambrose was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Milan, who is considered a Doctor of the Church. Due to the saint, the name came into general use in Christian Europe, though it was never particularly common in England.
AMIR (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Malay, Indonesian
Other Scripts: أمير(Arabic) امیر(Persian, Urdu)
Pronounced: a-MEER(Arabic)
Means "commander, prince" in Arabic. This was originally a title, which has come into English as the Arabic loanword emir.
ANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: AN-dehr
Basque form of Andreas (see ANDREW).
ANGELO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ANG-jeh-lo
Italian form of Angelus (see ANGEL).
ANTONIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Croatian
Pronounced: an-TO-nyo(Spanish, Italian)
Spanish and Italian form of Antonius (see ANTHONY). This has been a common name in Italy since the 14th century. In Spain it was the most popular name for boys in the 1950s and 60s.

A famous bearer was the Italian Renaissance painter Antonio Pisanello (c. 1395-1455). It is also the name of the main character in The Merchant of Venice (1596) by William Shakespeare.

ARI (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֲרִי(Hebrew)
Means "lion" in Hebrew.
ARMANDO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese
Pronounced: ar-MAN-do(Spanish, Italian)
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of HERMAN.
ASHER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: אָשֵׁר(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ASH-ər(English)
Means "happy, blessed" in Hebrew. Asher in the Old Testament is a son of Jacob by Leah's handmaid Zilpah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. The meaning of his name is explained in Genesis 30:13.
ASLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish, Kazakh, Azerbaijani, Chechen, Ossetian, Circassian
Other Scripts: Аслан(Kazakh, Chechen, Ossetian) Аслъан(Western Circassian) Аслъэн(Eastern Circassian)
From Turkic arslan meaning "lion". This was a byname or title borne by several medieval Turkic rulers, including the Seljuk sultan Alp Arslan (a byname meaning "brave lion") who drove the Byzantines from Anatolia in the 11th century. The author C. S. Lewis later used the name Aslan for the main protagonist (a lion) in his Chronicles of Narnia series of books, first appearing in 1950.
AUGUST
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Catalan, English
Pronounced: OW-guwst(German) OW-goost(Polish) OW-guyst(Swedish) AW-gəst(English)
German, Polish, Scandinavian and Catalan form of AUGUSTUS. This was the name of three Polish kings.
AXONN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: Acks-on
Axonn was once an arbitrator long before the coming of the Toa, but later pledged to protect the Kanohi Ignika. (From the series BIONICLE by Greg Farshtey)
AYALA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אַיָּלָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ie-ah-LAH
Means "doe, female deer" in Hebrew.
AYOZE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Canarian)
Pronounced: a-YOTHEH(Canarian Spanish)
Derived from Guanche *ayuhsah meaning "he (who) arrives". Ayoze or Yose was a Guanche chieftain from Fuerteventura, one of the Canary Islands, at the time of Jean de Béthencourt's arrival to the island. He converted to Christianity and assumed the baptismal name Luis. This is borne by multiple Spanish footballers from the Canaries: Ayoze Díaz (1982-), Ayoze García (1985-), Ayoze Placeres (1991-), and Ayoze Pérez (1993-).
AZARIA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: עֲזַרְיָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Variant of AZARIAH.
BAILEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAY-lee
From a surname derived from Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", originally denoting one who was a bailiff.
BENJAMIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Biblical
Other Scripts: בִּנְיָמִין(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: BEHN-jə-min(English) BEHN-ZHA-MEHN(French) BEHN-ya-meen(German)
From the Hebrew name בִּנְיָמִין (Binyamin) meaning "son of the south" or "son of the right hand", from the roots בֵּן (ben) meaning "son" and יָמִין (yamin) meaning "right hand, south". Benjamin in the Old Testament was the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob and the founder of one of the southern tribes of the Hebrews. He was originally named בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oni) meaning "son of my sorrow" by his mother Rachel, who died shortly after childbirth, but it was later changed by his father (see Genesis 35:18).

As an English name, Benjamin came into general use after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), an American statesman, inventor, scientist and philosopher.

BLAISE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: BLEHZ
From the Roman name Blasius, which was derived from Latin blaesus meaning "lisping". A famous bearer was the French mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal (1623-1662).
BRAYDEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRAY-dən
Variant of BRADEN.
BRONTE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BRAHN-tee
From a surname, an Anglicized form of Irish Ó Proinntigh meaning "descendant of Proinnteach". The given name Proinnteach meant "bestower" in Gaelic. The Brontë sisters - Charlotte, Emily, and Anne - were 19th-century English novelists. Their father changed the spelling of the family surname from Brunty to Brontë, possibly to make it coincide with Greek βροντη meaning "thunder".
BRONX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRAHNKS
From the surname Bronck, meaning "branch". More notably the name of a borough of New York, it began gaining popularity as a given name after singers Pete Wentz and Ashlee Simpson used it for their son in 2008.
CALEB
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: כָּלֵב(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAY-ləb(English)
Most likely related to Hebrew כֶּלֶב (kelev) meaning "dog". An alternate theory connects it to Hebrew כָּל (kal) meaning "whole, all of" and לֵב (lev) meaning "heart". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve spies sent by Moses into Canaan. Of the Israelites who left Egypt with Moses, Caleb and Joshua were the only ones who lived to see the Promised Land.

As an English name, Caleb came into use after the Protestant Reformation. It was common among the Puritans, who introduced it to America in the 17th century.

CASSIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: KAS-see-oos(Classical Latin) KASH-əs(English) KAS-ee-əs(English)
Roman family name that was possibly derived from Latin cassus meaning "empty, vain". This name was borne by several early saints. In modern times, it was the original first name of boxer Muhammad Ali (1942-2016), who was named after his father Cassius Clay, who was himself named after the American abolitionist Cassius Clay (1810-1903).
CAYDEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-dən
Variant of CADEN.
DAVID
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: דָּוִד(Hebrew) Давид(Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: DAY-vid(English) da-VEED(Hebrew, Brazilian Portuguese) DA-VEED(French) da-BEEDH(Spanish) du-VEED(European Portuguese) DA-vit(German, Czech) DAH-vid(Swedish, Norwegian) DAH-vit(Dutch) du-VYEET(Russian)
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was derived from Hebrew דּוֹד (dod) meaning "beloved" or "uncle". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.

This name has been used in Britain since the Middle Ages. It has been especially popular in Wales, where it is used in honour of the 5th-century patron saint of Wales (also called Dewi), as well as in Scotland, where it was borne by two kings. Over the last century it has been one of the English-speaking world's most consistently popular names, never leaving the top 30 names for boys in the United States, and reaching the top rank in England and Wales during the 1950s and 60s. In Spain it was the most popular name for boys during the 1970s and 80s.

Famous bearers include empiricist philosopher David Hume (1711-1776), explorer David Livingstone (1813-1873), musician David Bowie (1947-2016), and soccer player David Beckham (1975-). This is also the name of the hero of Charles Dickens' semi-autobiographical novel David Copperfield (1850).

DIMA (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Дима(Russian)
Pronounced: DYEE-mə
Diminutive of DIMITRI.
DRACO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Δρακων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DRAY-ko(English)
From the Greek name Δρακων (Drakon), which meant "dragon, serpent". This was the name of a 7th-century BC Athenian legislator. This is also the name of a constellation in the northern sky.
DRAYDEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (American, Rare)
Pronounced: Dray-den(American English)
Variant of DRAYTON.
EKKO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: EK-ko
ELIAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Dutch, Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ηλιας(Greek)
Pronounced: i-LEE-ush(European Portuguese) eh-LEE-us(Brazilian Portuguese) eh-LEE-as(German) EH-lee-ahs(Finnish) i-LIE-əs(English) ee-LIE-əs(English)
Form of ELIJAH used in several languages. This is also the form used in the Greek New Testament.
ELIJAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical
Other Scripts: אֱלִיָּהוּ(Hebrew)
Pronounced: i-LIE-jə(English) i-LIE-zhə(English)
From the Hebrew name אֱלִיָּהוּ ('Eliyyahu) meaning "my God is YAHWEH", derived from the elements אֵל ('el) and יָה (yah), both referring to the Hebrew God. Elijah was a Hebrew prophet and miracle worker, as told in the two Books of Kings in the Old Testament. He was active in the 9th century BC during the reign of King Ahab of Israel and his Phoenician-born queen Jezebel. Elijah confronted the king and queen over their idolatry of the Canaanite god Ba'al and other wicked deeds. At the end of his life he was carried to heaven in a chariot of fire, and was succeeded by Elisha. In the New Testament, Elijah and Moses appear next to Jesus when he is transfigured.

Because Elijah was a popular figure in medieval tales, and because his name was borne by a few early saints (who are usually known by the Latin form Elias), the name came into general use during the Middle Ages. In medieval England it was usually spelled Elis. It died out there by the 16th century, but it was revived by the Puritans in the form Elijah after the Protestant Reformation.

EVAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: EHV-ən(English)
Anglicized form of Iefan, a Welsh form of JOHN.
EZEKIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: יְחֶזְקֵאל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: i-ZEE-kee-əl(English)
From the Hebrew name יְחֶזְקֵאל (Yechezqel) meaning "God will strengthen", from the roots חָזַק (chazaq) meaning "to strengthen" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Ezekiel is a major prophet of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Ezekiel. He lived in Jerusalem until the Babylonian conquest and captivity of Israel, at which time he was taken to Babylon. The Book of Ezekiel describes his vivid symbolic visions that predict the restoration of the kingdom of Israel. As an English given name, Ezekiel has been used since the Protestant Reformation.
EZRA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֶזְרָא(Hebrew)
Pronounced: EHZ-rə(English)
Means "help" in Hebrew. Ezra is a prophet of the Old Testament and the author of the Book of Ezra. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. The American poet Ezra Pound (1885-1972) was a famous bearer.
FINNÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Older form of FIONNÁN.
FRANCISCO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: fran-THEES-ko(European Spanish) fran-SEES-ko(Latin American Spanish) frun-SEESH-koo(Portuguese) frun-SEES-koo(Portuguese)
Spanish and Portuguese form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS). This is the Spanish name of Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552). Other notable bearers include the Spanish painter and engraver Francisco de Goya (1746-1828) and the Spanish dictator Francisco Franco (1892-1975).
GÁBRIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: GA:-bree-ehl
Hungarian form of GABRIEL.
GEORDI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare), Popular Culture
Pronounced: JOR-dee
Variant of GEORDIE. Geordi La Forge (male) from Star Trek: The Next Generation has this name.
GEORGIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Interlingua
Pronounced: zhe-OR-zhio, je-OR-jio, zhe-OR-zho, je-OR-jo
Interlingua form GEORGE.
GERÓNIMO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Variant of JERÓNIMO.
GIACOBBE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ja-KOB-beh
Italian form of Iacobus (see JACOB).
GIOVANNI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jo-VAN-nee
Italian form of Iohannes (see JOHN). This name has been very common in Italy since the late Middle Ages, as with other equivalents of John in Europe. The Renaissance painter Giovanni Bellini (1430-1516) and the painter and sculptor Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini (1598-1680) were two famous bearers of the name.
GLEB
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Глеб(Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: GLYEHP(Russian) HLEHB(Ukrainian)
Russian and Ukrainian form of the Old Norse name Guðleifr, which was derived from the elements guð "god" and leifr "heir".
HAVEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAY-vən
From the English word for a safe place, derived ultimately from Old English hæfen.
HAYDEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAY-dən
From an English surname that was derived from place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
HUNTER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HUN-tər
From an occupational English surname for a hunter, derived from Old English hunta. A famous bearer was the eccentric American journalist Hunter S. Thompson (1937-2005).
IAGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, Galician, Portuguese
Pronounced: ee-A-gaw(Welsh) ee-AH-go(English) ee-A-ghuw(Galician)
Welsh and Galician form of JACOB. This was the name of two early Welsh kings of Gwynedd. It is also the name of the villain in Shakespeare's tragedy Othello (1603).
IAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: EE-ən(English)
Scottish form of JOHN.
IRÉNÉE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EE-REH-NEH
French form of IRENAEUS.
ISAAC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Spanish, Catalan, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: יִצְחָק(Hebrew)
Pronounced: IE-zək(English)
From the Hebrew name יִצְחָק (Yitzchaq) meaning "he will laugh, he will rejoice", derived from צָחַק (tzachaq) meaning "to laugh". The Old Testament explains this meaning, by recounting that Abraham laughed when God told him that his aged wife Sarah would become pregnant with Isaac (see Genesis 17:17), and later Sarah laughed when overhearing the same prophecy (see Genesis 18:12). When Isaac was a boy, God tested Abraham's faith by ordering him to sacrifice his son, though an angel prevented the act at the last moment. Isaac went on to become the father of Esau and Jacob with his wife Rebecca.

As an English Christian name, Isaac was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, though it was more common among Jews. It became more widespread after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers include the physicist and mathematician Sir Isaac Newton (1643-1727) and the science-fiction writer Isaac Asimov (1920-1992).

JACE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAYS
Short form of JASON.
JAMES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JAYMZ(English)
English form of the Late Latin name Iacomus, which was derived from Ιακωβος (Iakobos), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name Ya'aqov (see JACOB). This was the name of two apostles in the New Testament. The first was Saint James the Greater, the apostle John's brother, who was beheaded under Herod Agrippa in the Book of Acts. The second was James the Lesser, son of Alphaeus. Another James (known as James the Just) is also mentioned in the Bible as being the brother of Jesus.

This name has been used in England since the 13th century, though it became more common in Scotland where it was borne by several kings. In the 17th century the Scottish king James VI inherited the English throne, becoming the first ruler of all Britain, and the name grew much more popular. In American name statistics (recorded since 1880) this name has never been out of the top 20, making it arguably the era's most consistently popular name. It was the top ranked name for boys in the United States from 1940 to 1952.

Famous bearers include the English explorer Captain James Cook (1728-1779), the Scottish inventor James Watt (1736-1819), and the Irish novelist and poet James Joyce (1882-1941). This name has also been borne by six American presidents. A notable fictional bearer is the British spy James Bond, created by author Ian Fleming.

JAROMIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: ya-RAW-myeer
Polish form of JAROMÍR.
JASPER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: JAS-pər(English) YAHS-pər(Dutch)
From Latin Gaspar, perhaps from the biblical Hebrew word גִּזְבָּר (gizbar) meaning "treasurer", derived from Persian ganzabara. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.
JAVIER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: kha-BYEHR
Spanish form of XAVIER.
JAY (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAY
Short form of names beginning with the sound J, such as JAMES or JASON. It was originally used in America in honour of founding father John Jay (1749-1825), whose surname was derived from the jaybird.
JAYDEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JAY-dən
Variant of JADEN. This spelling continued to rapidly rise in popularity in the United States past 2003, unlike Jaden, which stalled. It peaked at the fourth rank for boys in 2010, showing tremendous growth over only two decades. It has since declined.
JAYLEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American (Modern), English (Modern)
Pronounced: JAY-lən(English)
Variant of JALEN. It can also be a feminine elaboration of JAY (1).
JAYLON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American (Modern)
Pronounced: JAY-lən(English)
Variant of JALEN.
JEFF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JEHF
Short form of JEFFREY.
JESSE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Finnish, Biblical
Other Scripts: יִשַׁי(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JEHS-ee(English) YEH-sə(Dutch) YEHS-seh(Finnish)
From the Hebrew name יִשַׁי (Yishai), which possibly means "gift". In the Old Testament Jesse is the father of King David. It began to be used as an English given name after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Jesse James (1847-1882), an American outlaw who held up banks and stagecoaches. He was eventually shot by a fellow gang member for a reward. Another famous bearer was the American athlete Jesse Owens (1913-1980), whose real name was James Cleveland (or J. C.) Owens.
JET
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: YEHT
Short form of HENRIËTTE or MARIËTTE.
JETHRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יִתְרוֹ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JETH-ro(English)
From the Hebrew name יִתְרוֹ (Yitro), which was derived from the Hebrew word יֶתֶר (yeter) meaning "abundance". According to the Old Testament, Jethro was a Midianite priest who sheltered Moses when he fled Egypt. He was the father of Zipporah, who became Moses's wife. A famous bearer of the name was Jethro Tull (1674-1741), an English inventor and agriculturist.
JONATHAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹנָתָן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAHN-ə-thən(American English) JAWN-ə-thən(British English) YO-na-tan(German) ZHAW-NA-TAHN(French)
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹנָתָן (Yehonatan), contracted to יוֹנָתָן (Yonatan), meaning "YAHWEH has given", derived from the roots יְהוֹ (yeho) referring to the Hebrew God and נָתַן (natan) meaning "to give". According to the Old Testament, Jonathan was the eldest son of Saul. His relationship with his father was strained due to his close friendship with his father's rival David. Along with Saul he was killed in battle with the Philistines.

As an English name, Jonathan did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was the Anglo-Irish satirist Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), who wrote Gulliver's Travels and other works.

JORDAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Јордан(Macedonian)
Pronounced: JAWR-dən(English) ZHAWR-DAHNN(French)
From the name of the river that flows between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". In the New Testament John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name in Europe after crusaders brought water back from the river to baptize their children. There may have been some influence from the Germanic name JORDANES, notably borne by a 6th-century Gothic historian.

This name died out after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. In America and other countries it became fairly popular in the second half of the 20th century. A famous bearer of the surname is former basketball star Michael Jordan (1963-).

JOSEPH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹסֵף(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-səf(English) ZHO-ZEHF(French) YO-zehf(German)
From Ioseph, the Latin form of Greek Ιωσηφ (Ioseph), which was from the Hebrew name יוֹסֵף (Yosef) meaning "he will add", from the root יָסַף (yasaf). In the Old Testament Joseph is the eleventh son of Jacob and the first with his wife Rachel. Because he was the favourite of his father, his older brothers sent him to Egypt and told their father that he had died. In Egypt, Joseph became an advisor to the pharaoh, and was eventually reconciled with his brothers when they came to Egypt during a famine. This name also occurs in the New Testament, belonging to Saint Joseph the husband of Mary, and to Joseph of Arimathea.

In the Middle Ages, Joseph was a common Jewish name, being less frequent among Christians. In the late Middle Ages Saint Joseph became more highly revered, and the name became popular in Spain and Italy. In England it became common after the Protestant Reformation. In the United States it has stayed within the top 25 names for boys since 1880, making it one of the most enduringly popular names of this era.

This name was borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Portugal. Other notable bearers include the founder of Mormonism Joseph Smith (1805-1844), Polish-British author Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) and the Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin (1878-1953).

JULIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Polish, German
Pronounced: JOO-lee-ən(English) JOOL-yən(English) YOO-lyan(Polish, German)
From the Roman name Iulianus, which was derived from JULIUS. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints, including the legendary Saint Julian the Hospitaller. This name has been used in England since the Middle Ages, at which time it was also a feminine name (from Juliana, eventually becoming Gillian).
JUNO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: YOO-no(Classical Latin) JOO-no(English)
Meaning unknown, possibly related to an Indo-European root meaning "youth", or possibly of Etruscan origin. In Roman mythology Juno was the wife of Jupiter and the queen of the heavens. She was the protectress of marriage and women, and was also the goddess of finance.
KASPAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: KAS-par
German form of JASPER.
KEANU
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hawaiian
Pronounced: keh-A-noo
Means "the cool breeze" from Hawaiian ke, a definite article, and anu "coolness". This name is now associated with Canadian actor Keanu Reeves (1964-).
KEISUKE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 恵介, 恵助, 恵輔, 恵亮, 慶助, 慶介, 慶輔, 慶亮, 蛍介, 蛍助, 蛍輔, 蛍亮, けいすけ (hiragana), ケイスケ (katakana)
Pronounced: ke:-ske
This name combines 恵 (e, kei, megu.mi, megu.mu) meaning "blessing, favour, grace, kindness," 慶 (kei, yoroko.bi) meaning "congratulation, jubilation, felicitation" or 蛍 (kei, hotaru) meaning "firefly, lightning-bug" with 介 (kai, suke) meaning "concern oneself with, jammed in, mediate, help, care," 助 (jo, suke, su.keru, tasu.karu, tasu.keru) meaning "assist, help, save, rescue," 輔 (fu, ho, tasuke.ru, suke) meaning "help" or 亮 (ryou, akiraka, suke) meaning "clear, help."
KENJI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 健二, 研二, 賢二, 謙二, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: KEHN-JEE
From Japanese (ken) meaning "healthy, strong" or (ken) meaning "study, sharpen" combined with (ji) meaning "two". This name can also be formed from other combinations of kanji characters.
KYLER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KIE-lər
Probably a variant of KYLE, blending it with TYLER. It also coincides with the rare surname Kyler, an Anglicized form of Dutch Cuyler, which is of uncertain meaning.
LEON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Λεων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LEE-ahn(English) LEH-awn(German, Polish, Slovene)
Derived from Greek λεων (leon) meaning "lion". During the Christian era this Greek name was merged with the Latin cognate Leo, with the result that the two forms are used somewhat interchangeably across European languages. In England during the Middle Ages this was a common name among Jews. A famous bearer was Leon Trotsky (1879-1940), a Russian Communist revolutionary.
LINDEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIN-dən
From a German surname that was derived from Old High German linta meaning "linden tree".
LIONEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: LYAW-NEHL(French) LIE-ə-nəl(English) LIE-nəl(English)
French diminutive of LÉON. A notable bearer is Argentine soccer star Lionel Messi (1987-).
LOKI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norse Mythology
Pronounced: LO-kee(English)
Meaning unknown, possibly derived from the Germanic root *luka meaning "knot, lock". In Norse legend Loki was a trickster god associated with magic and fire. Over time he became more and more evil, and he was eventually chained to a rock by the other gods.
LUCA (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: LOO-ka
Italian and Romanian form of Lucas (see LUKE). This name was borne by Luca della Robbia, a Renaissance sculptor from Florence.
LUCAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: LOO-kəs(English) LUY-kahs(Dutch) LUY-KA(French) LOO-kush(European Portuguese) LOO-kus(Brazilian Portuguese) LOO-kas(Spanish, Swedish, Classical Latin)
Latin form of Loukas (see LUKE), as well as the form used in several other languages.
MALCOLM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: MAL-kəm(English)
From Scottish Gaelic Máel Coluim, which means "disciple of Saint COLUMBA". This was the name of four kings of Scotland starting in the 10th century, including Malcolm III, who became king after killing Macbeth, the usurper who had murdered his father. The character Malcolm in Shakespeare's tragedy Macbeth (1606) is based on him. Another famous bearer was Malcolm X (1925-1965), an American civil rights leader.
MARCOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: MAR-kos(Spanish) MAR-koosh(European Portuguese) MAKH-koos(Brazilian Portuguese)
Spanish and Portuguese form of Marcus (see MARK).
MAREK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish, Czech, Slovak
Pronounced: MA-rehk
Polish, Czech and Slovak form of MARK.
MARKO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish, Basque
Other Scripts: Марко(Ukrainian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: MAHR-ko(Finnish)
Form of MARK in several languages.
MILO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: MIE-lo(English)
Old Germanic form of MILES, as well as the Latinized form. This form of the name was used in official documents during the Middle Ages, and it has been used independently since the 19th century [2].
MIRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Slovene, Croatian
Short form of MIROSLAV.
MOHINDER
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Indian (Sikh)
Other Scripts: ਮੋਹਿੰਦਰ(Gurmukhi)
Variant of MAHENDRA used by Sikhs.
MUNIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: منير(Arabic)
Pronounced: moo-NEER
Means "bright, shining" in Arabic.
NATE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NAYT
Short form of NATHAN or NATHANIEL.
NATHAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: נָתָן(Hebrew) Ναθαν(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: NAY-thən(English) NA-TAHN(French)
From the Hebrew name נָתָן (Natan) meaning "he gave". In the Old Testament this is the name of a prophet during the reign of King David. He chastised David for his adultery with Bathsheba and for the death of Uriah the Hittite. Later he championed Solomon as David's successor. This was also the name of a son of David and Bathsheba.

It has been used as a Christian given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Nathan Hale (1755-1776), an American spy executed by the British during the American Revolution.

NAYDEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Найден(Bulgarian)
Means "found" in Bulgarian.
NEYMAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Brazilian
Pronounced: NAY-mar
Of unknown meaning.

Usage is mostly likely influenced by popular Brazilian footballer (soccer player) Neymar da Silva Santos Júnior, who plays for Spanish club FC Barcelona in La Liga and the Brazilian national team, as a forward or winger. He was named after his father, Neymar da Silva, Sr.

NICKY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NIK-ee
Diminutive of NICHOLAS or NICOLE.
NICO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Dutch, German, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: NEE-ko(Italian, Dutch, Spanish)
Short form of NICHOLAS (or sometimes NICODEMUS).
NICOLÒ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: nee-ko-LO
Italian variant form of NICHOLAS.
NIKOLAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Николай(Russian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: nyi-ku-LIE(Russian)
Alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Николай (see NIKOLAY).
OLIVIER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Dutch
Pronounced: AW-LEE-VYEH(French) O-lee-veer(Dutch)
French and Dutch form of OLIVER.
OSCAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: AHS-kər(English) AWS-kar(Italian, Swedish) AWS-KAR(French)
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.

This name was popularized in continental Europe by the works of the 18th-century Scottish poet James Macpherson [1]. Napoleon was an admirer of Macpherson, and he suggested Oscar as the second middle name of his godson, who eventually became king of Sweden as Oscar I. Another notable bearer was the Irish writer and humourist Oscar Wilde (1854-1900).

PARIS (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Παρις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PA-REES(Classical Greek) PAR-is(English) PEHR-is(English)
Meaning unknown, possibly of Luwian or Hittite origin. In Greek mythology he was the Trojan prince who kidnapped Helen and began the Trojan War. Though presented as a somewhat of a coward in the Iliad, he did manage to slay the great hero Achilles. He was himself eventually slain in battle by Philoctetes.
PIETRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: PYEH-tro
Italian form of PETER. Pietro was the given name of the Renaissance painter known as Perugino.
RANIERO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ra-NYEH-ro
Italian form of RAYNER.
RAYDEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: American
Possibly an invented name, a combination of RAY and the popular name suffix -ayden, following the trend of names such as JAYDEN, KAYDEN, and BRADEN, or a variant of RAIDEN.
RAYNER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Pronounced: RAY-nər
From the Germanic name Raganhar, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and hari "army". The Normans brought this name to England where it came into general use, though it was rare by the end of the Middle Ages.
RÉMY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: REH-MEE
French form of the Latin name Remigius, which was derived from Latin remigis "oarsman, rower". Saint Rémy was a 5th-century bishop who converted and baptized Clovis, king of the Franks.
RIVER
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: RIV-ər
From the English word that denotes a flowing body of water. The word is ultimately derived (via Old French) from Latin ripa "riverbank".
ROBIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Dutch, Swedish
Pronounced: RAHB-in(American English) RAWB-in(British English) RAW-BEHN(French) RAW-bin(Dutch)
Medieval diminutive of ROBERT, now usually regarded as an independent name. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor. In modern times it has also been used as a feminine name, and it may sometimes be given in reference to the red-breasted bird.
SANTIAGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: san-TYA-gho(Spanish) sun-tee-A-goo(European Portuguese) sun-chee-A-goo(Brazilian Portuguese)
Means "Saint James", derived from Spanish santo "saint" combined with Yago, an old Spanish form of JAMES, the patron saint of Spain. This is the name of the capital city of Chile, as well as several other cities in the Spanish-speaking world.
SASHA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, English, French
Other Scripts: Саша(Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: SASH-ə(English) SAH-shə(English) SA-SHA(French)
Russian and Ukrainian diminutive of ALEKSANDR or ALEKSANDRA.
SAVIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: SA-vyo
Means "clever, bright" in Italian.
SAVION
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Meaning unknown. Possibly a variant of XAVIER or Savyon. Savyon is a Hebrew name for “Senecio,” a genus of the daisy family.
SERGIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: SEHR-jo(Italian) SEHR-khyo(Spanish)
Italian and Spanish form of SERGIUS.
SHAY (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SHAY
Anglicized form of SÉAGHDHA.
SILVER
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SIL-vər
From the English word for the precious metal or the colour, ultimately derived from Old English seolfor.
SOLOMON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English, Jewish
Other Scripts: שְׁלֹמֹה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: SAHL-ə-mən(American English) SAWL-ə-mən(British English)
From the Hebrew name שְׁלֹמֹה (Shelomoh), which was derived from Hebrew שָׁלוֹם (shalom) meaning "peace". As told in the Old Testament, Solomon was a king of Israel, the son of David and Bathsheba. He was renowned for his wisdom and wealth. Towards the end of his reign he angered God by turning to idolatry. Supposedly, he was the author of the Book of Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and the Song of Solomon.

This name has never been overly common in the Christian world, and it is considered typically Jewish. It was however borne by an 11th-century Hungarian king.

TABER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: American (Rare)
Personal note: Spell Tabor
Transferred use of the surname TABER.
THIAGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian)
Variant of TIAGO.
TIERNAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Anglicized form of TIGHEARNÁN.
TOM (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, German, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Pronounced: TAHM(American English) TAWM(British English, Dutch, Norwegian)
Short form of THOMAS. Tom Sawyer was the main character in several of Mark Twain's novels, first appearing in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876). Other famous bearers include American actors Tom Hanks (1956-) and Tom Cruise (1962-).
TREY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TRAY
From an English nickname meaning "three".
TRISTAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English, French, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: TRIS-tən(English) TREES-TAHN(French)
Old French form of the Pictish name Drustan, a diminutive of DRUST. The spelling was altered by association with Latin tristis "sad". Tristan is a character in medieval French tales, probably inspired by older Celtic legends, and ultimately merged into Arthurian legend. According to the story Tristan was sent to Ireland in order to fetch Isolde, who was to be the bride of King Mark of Cornwall. On the way back, Tristan and Isolde accidentally drink a potion that makes them fall in love. Their tragic story was very popular in the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.
TZVI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: צְבִי(Hebrew)
Means "gazelle, roebuck" in Hebrew.
VALERIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: va-LEH-ryo(Italian) ba-LEH-ryo(Spanish)
Italian and Spanish form of VALERIUS.
VILJO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: VEEL-yo
Finnish short form of WILLIAM.
VINKO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Slovene
Croatian and Slovene form of VINCENT.
WESLEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WEHS-lee, WEHZ-lee
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "west meadow" in Old English. It has been sometimes given in honour of John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism.
WILBUR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIL-bər
From an English surname that was originally derived from the nickname Wildbor meaning "wild boar" in Middle English. This name was borne by Wilbur Wright (1867-1912), one half of the Wright brothers, who together invented the first successful airplane. Wright was named after the Methodist minister Wilbur Fisk (1792-1839).
WINTER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: WIN-tər
From the English word for the season, derived from Old English winter.
WOLF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Jewish, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: VAWLF(German) WUWLF(English)
Short form of WOLFGANG, WOLFRAM or other names containing the Germanic element wulf meaning "wolf". It can also be simply from the German or English word.
WYATT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIE-ət
From an English surname that was derived from the medieval given name WYOT. Wyatt Earp (1848-1929) was an American lawman and gunfighter involved in the famous shootout at the OK Corral.
XANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch, English (Modern)
Pronounced: SAN-dər(Dutch) KSAN-dər(Dutch) ZAN-dər(English)
Short form of ALEXANDER. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by a character on the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997-2003).
XAY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Lao
XAYDEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: Zay-den
Variant of ZAYDEN.
YANNI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Γιαννη(Greek)
Alternate transcription of Greek Γιαννη (see GIANNI).
YAQUB
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: يعقوب(Arabic)
Pronounced: ya‘-KOOB
Arabic form of Ya'aqov (see JACOB).
ZARATHUSTRA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: zar-ə-THOOS-trə(English)
Possibly means "golden camel" in Old Iranian, derived from zarat meaning "golden" combined with ushtra meaning "camel". Zarathustra was the Persian prophet who founded the ancient religion of Zoroastrianism about the 10th century BC.
ZAYN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: زين(Arabic)
Pronounced: ZIEN
Means "beauty, grace" in Arabic.
ZEB
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Short form of ZEBULON.
ZEBULUN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: זְבוּלֻן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ZEHB-yə-lən(English)
Possibly derived from Ugartic zbl meaning "prince". In the Old Testament Zebulun is the tenth son of Jacob (his sixth son by Leah) and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. Genesis 30:20 implies two different roots for the name: זָבַל (zaval) meaning "to dwell" and זֵבֵד (zeved) meaning "gift, dowry". These are probably only folk etymologies.
ZEF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: ZEHF
Dutch short form of JOZEF.
ZEPHYR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
Other Scripts: Ζεφυρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ZEHF-ər(English)
From the Greek Ζεφυρος (Zephyros) meaning "the west wind". Zephyros was the Greek god of the west wind.
ZEPHYRUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ζεφυρος(Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of Zephyros (see ZEPHYR).
ZIMRI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: זִמְרִי(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ZIM-rie(English)
Means "my praise" or "my music" in Hebrew. This is the name of a king of Israel in the Old Testament. He ruled for only seven days, when he was succeeded by the commander of the army Omri.
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