michelle.ramirez's Personal Name List

ADELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: a-də-LEEN (French), AD-ə-lien (English)

Rating: 0% based on 1 vote

Diminutive of ADÈLE

ALEJANDRO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: ah-le-KHAHN-dro

Rating: 85% based on 2 votes

Spanish form of ALEXANDER

ALEXANDRIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: al-əg-ZAN-dree-ə

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

Feminine form of ALEXANDER. Alexander the Great founded several cities by this name (or renamed them) as he extended his empire eastward. The most notable of these is Alexandria in Egypt, founded by Alexander in 331 BC.

ARABELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Rating: 0% based on 1 vote

Medieval Scottish name, probably a variant of ANNABEL. It has long been associated with Latin orabilis meaning "invokable".

BRENDAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English

Pronounced: BREN-dən (English)

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

From Brendanus, the Latinized form of the Irish name Bréanainn which was derived from a Welsh word meaning "prince". Saint Brendan was a 6th-century Irish abbot who, according to legend, crossed the Atlantic and reached North America with 17 other monks.

BRIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English, Ancient Irish

Pronounced: BRIE-ən (Irish, English)

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

The meaning of this name is not known for certain but it is possibly related to the old Celtic element bre meaning "hill", or by extension "high, noble". It was borne by the semi-legendary Irish king Brian Boru, who thwarted Viking attempts to conquer Ireland in the 11th century. He was slain in the Battle of Clontarf, though his forces were decisively victorious. The name was common in Ireland before his time, and even more so afterwards. It came into use in England in the Middle Ages, introduced by Breton settlers. It subsequently became rare, but was revived in the 20th century.

BROOKE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BRUWK

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

Variant of BROOK. The name came into use in the 1950s, probably influenced by American socialite Brooke Astor (1902-2007). It was further popularized by actress Brooke Shields (1965-).

COLETTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: ko-LET

Rating: 0% based on 1 vote

Short form of NICOLETTE. Saint Colette was a 15th-century French nun who gave her money to the poor. This was also the pen name of the French author Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (1873-1954).

DILLON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DIL-ən

Rating: 0% based on 1 vote

Variant of DYLAN based on the spelling of the surname Dillon, which has an unrelated origin.

DUSTIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DUS-tin

Rating: 0% based on 1 vote

From an English surname which was derived from the Old Norse given name Þórsteinn (see TORSTEN). The name was popularized by the actor Dustin Hoffman (1937-), who was apparently named after the earlier silent movie star Dustin Farnum (1874-1929).

ENRIQUE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: en-REE-ke

Rating: 60% based on 2 votes

Spanish form of HENRY

ERIK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, German, Dutch, English

Pronounced: E-rik (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German), E-reek (Finnish), I-rik (Dutch), ER-ik (English)

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

Form of ERIC. This was the name of kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway. King Erik IX of Sweden (12th century) is the patron saint of that country.

ESTELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: es-TEL

Rating: 10% based on 1 vote

From an Old French name which was derived from Latin stella, meaning "star". It was rare in the English-speaking world in the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due to the character Estella Havisham in Charles Dickens' novel 'Great Expectations' (1860).

EZEKIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English

Other Scripts: יְחֶזְקֵאל (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: i-ZEE-kee-əl (English), i-ZEE-kyəl (English)

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

From the Hebrew name יְחֶזְקֵאל (Yechezqel) meaning "God strengthens". Ezekiel is a major prophet of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Ezekiel. He lived in Jerusalem until the Babylonian conquest and captivity of Israel, at which time he was taken to Babylon. The Book of Ezekiel describes his vivid symbolic visions that predict the restoration of the kingdom of Israel. As an English given name, Ezekiel has been used since the Protestant Reformation.

FAYE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: FAY

Rating: 0% based on 1 vote

Variant of FAY

GAVIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Scottish

Pronounced: GAV-in (English)

Personal note: This is my son's name. He was born in May 2007

Rating: 50% based on 2 votes

Medieval form of GAWAIN. Though it died out in England, it was reintroduced from Scotland in the 20th century.

GIOVANNI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: jo-VAHN-nee

Rating: 60% based on 1 vote

Italian form of Iohannes (see JOHN). The Renaissance painter Giovanni Bellini and the 17th-century painter and sculptor Giovanni Bernini are two famous bearers of this name.

GUNNAR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology

Rating: 60% based on 1 vote

From the Old Norse name Gunnarr which was derived from the elements gunnr "war" and arr "warrior" (making it a cognate of GÜNTHER). Gunnar was a character in Norse legend, the husband of Brynhild.

ILANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: אִילָנָה (Hebrew)

Rating: 0% based on 1 vote

Feminine form of ILAN

ISAAC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: יִצְחָק (Hebrew)

Pronounced: IE-zək (English)

Rating: 15% based on 2 votes

From the Hebrew name יִצְחָק (Yitzchaq) which meant "he laughs". Isaac in the Old Testament is the son of Abraham and the father of Esau and Jacob. As recounted in Genesis, God tested Abraham's faith by ordering him to sacrifice his son, though an angel prevented the act at the last moment.

As an English Christian name, Isaac was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, though it was more common among Jews. It became more widespread after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers include the physicist and mathematician Sir Isaac Newton (1643-1727) and the science-fiction writer Isaac Asimov (1920-1992).

JACI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Rating: 0% based on 1 vote

Diminutive of JACQUELINE

JAEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: יָעֵל (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: JAY-əl (English), JAYL (English)

Rating: 10% based on 1 vote

From the Hebrew name יָעֵל (Ya'el) meaning "mountain goat". In the Old Testament this is the name of a woman who killed the captain of the Canaanite army.

JOANNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Polish, Biblical

Pronounced: jo-AN-ə (English), yaw-AHN-nah (Polish)

Rating: 0% based on 1 vote

English and Polish form of Latin Iohanna, which was derived from Greek Ιωαννα (Ioanna), the feminine form of Ioannes (see JOHN). This is the spelling used in the English New Testament, where it belongs to a follower of Jesus who is regarded as a saint. In the Middle Ages in England it was used as a Latinized form of Joan (the usual feminine form of John) and it became common as a given name in the 19th century.

JORDAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Јордан (Macedonian)

Pronounced: JAWR-dən (English)

Rating: 0% based on 1 vote

From the name of the river which flows between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". In the New Testament John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name in Europe after crusaders brought water back from the river to baptize their children. There may have been some influence from the Germanic name JORDANES, notably borne by a 6th-century Gothic historian.

This name died out after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. In America and other countries it became fairly popular in the second half of the 20th century. A famous bearer of the surname is former basketball star Michael Jordan (1963-).

JOSHUA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Other Scripts: יְהוֹשֻׁעַ (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: JAH-shə-wə (English), JAW-shwə (English)

Rating: 10% based on 1 vote

From the Hebrew name יְהוֹשֻׁעַ (Yehoshu'a) meaning "YAHWEH is salvation". Joshua was one of the twelve spies sent into Canaan by Moses, as told in the Old Testament. After Moses died Joshua succeeded him as leader of the Israelites. As an English name, Joshua has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

The name Jesus comes from a Greek translation of the Aramaic short form יֵשׁוּעַ (Yeshu'a), which was the real name of Jesus.

KIERSTEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Rating: 10% based on 1 vote

Variant of KIRSTEN

LAUREL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LAWR-əl

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

From the name of the laurel tree, ultimately from Latin laurus.

LEILA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic, Persian, English, Georgian

Other Scripts: ليلى (Arabic), لیلا (Persian), ლეილა (Georgian)

Pronounced: LAY-lə (English), LEE-lə (English), LIE-lə (English)

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

Variant of LAYLA. This spelling was used by Lord Byron for characters in 'The Giaour' (1813) and 'Don Juan' (1819), and it is through him that the name was introduced to the English-speaking world.

LORRAINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: lə-RAYN

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

From the name of a region in France, originally meaning "kingdom of LOTHAR". Lothar was a Frankish king, the great-grandson of Charlemagne, whose realm was in the part of France that is now called Lorraine, or in German Lothringen (from Latin Lothari regnum). As a given name, it has been used in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century, perhaps due to its similar sound with Laura. It became popular after World War I when the region was in the news, as it was contested between Germany and France.

LYLE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LIE-əl, LIEL

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

From an English surname which was derived from Norman French l'isle "island".

NATHANIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: nə-THAN-ee-əl (English), nə-THAN-yəl (English)

Personal note: My son's middle name

Rating: 70% based on 2 votes

Variant of NATHANAEL. It has been regularly used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. This has been the most popular spelling, even though the spelling Nathanael is found in most versions of the New Testament. The American writer Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864), author of 'The Scarlet Letter', was a famous bearer of this name.

NICOLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, Dutch, German, Czech

Pronounced: nee-KOL (French), ni-KOL (English)

Rating: 0% based on 1 vote

French feminine form of NICHOLAS, commonly used in the English-speaking world since the middle of the 20th century. A famous bearer is American-Australian actress Nicole Kidman (1967-).

NOAH (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Other Scripts: נוֹחַ (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: NO-ə (English)

Rating: 20% based on 2 votes

Derived from the Hebrew name נוֹחַ (Noach) meaning "rest, comfort". According to the Old Testament, Noah was the builder of the Ark that allowed him, his family, and animals of each species to survive the great Flood. After the Flood he received the sign of the rainbow as a covenant from God. As an English Christian name, Noah has been used since the Protestant Reformation, being common among the Puritans.

NORAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish, English

Pronounced: NAWR-ə

Rating: 10% based on 1 vote

Variant of NORA

REINA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

Means "queen" in Spanish.

ROSELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French (Rare)

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

French diminutive of ROSE

ROYCE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ROIS

Rating: 30% based on 1 vote

From a surname which was derived from the medieval given name Royse, a variant of ROSE.

RYAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English

Pronounced: RIE-ən

Rating: 60% based on 1 vote

From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Riain meaning "descendent of Rían". The given name Rían probably means "little king" (from Irish "king" combined with a diminutive suffix).

SASHA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Саша (Russian)

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

Russian diminutive of ALEKSANDR or ALEKSANDRA

SCOTT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Scottish

Pronounced: SKAHT

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

From an English and Scottish surname which referred to a person from Scotland or a person who spoke Scottish Gaelic. It is derived from Latin Scoti meaning "Gaelic speaker", with the ultimate origin uncertain.

TESSA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: TES-ə

Rating: 0% based on 1 vote

Diminutive of THERESA

VALERIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Czech

Pronounced: VAL-ə-ree (English), VAH-le-ree (German)

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

English and German form of VALERIA and Czech variant of VALÉRIE.

VERONICA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Romanian, Late Roman

Pronounced: və-RAHN-i-kə (English)

Rating: 80% based on 1 vote

Latin alteration of BERENICE, the spelling influenced by the ecclesiastical Latin phrase vera icon meaning "true image". This was the name of a legendary saint who wiped Jesus' face with a towel and then found his image imprinted upon it. Due to popular stories about her, the name was occasionally used in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. It was borne by the 17th-century Italian saint and mystic Veronica Giuliani. As an English name, it was not common until the 19th century, when it was imported from France and Scotland.

VICTOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Romanian, Late Roman

Pronounced: VIK-tər (English), veek-TOR (French)

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

Roman name meaning "victor, conqueror" in Latin. It was common among early Christians, and was borne by several early saints and three popes. It was rare as an English name during the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the French writer Victor Hugo (1802-1885), who authored 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.

VIOLET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: VIE-lət, VIE-ə-lət

Rating: 70% based on 1 vote

From the English word violet for the purple flower, ultimately derived from Latin viola. It was common in Scotland from the 16th century, and it came into general use as an English given name during the 19th century.

XAVIER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Catalan, Spanish (Archaic)

Pronounced: ZAY-vee-ər (English), ZAY-vyər (English), ig-ZAY-vee-ər (English), za-VYAY (French), sha-VYER (Portuguese)

Rating: 30% based on 1 vote

Derived from the Basque place name Etxaberri meaning "the new house". This was the surname of the Jesuit priest Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552). He was a missionary to India, Japan, China, and other areas in East Asia, and he is the patron saint of the Orient and missionaries. His surname has since been adopted as a given name in his honour, chiefly among Catholics.
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2014.