Oohvintage's Personal Name List

AARON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: אַהֲרֹן (Ancient Hebrew), Ααρων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: AR-ən (English), ER-ən (English)

Rating: 55% based on 4 votes

From the Hebrew name אַהֲרֹן ('Aharon) which is most likely of unknown Egyptian origin. Other theories claim a Hebrew derivation, and suggest meanings such as "high mountain" or "exalted". In the Old Testament this name is borne by the older brother of Moses and the first high priest of the Israelites. He acted as a spokesman for his brother, and carried a miraculous rod. As an English name, Aaron has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

ADA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Polish, Hungarian, Italian, Finnish

Pronounced: AY-də (English), AH-dah (Polish)

Rating: 43% based on 4 votes

Short form of ADELAIDE and other names beginning with the same sound. This name was borne by Augusta Ada King (1815-1852), the Countess of Lovelace (known as Ada Lovelace), a daughter of Lord Byron. She was an assistant to Charles Babbage, the inventor of an early mechanical computer.

ADAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: Адам (Russian, Ukrainian, Serbian, Macedonian), אָדָם (Hebrew), آدم (Arabic), ადამ (Georgian), Αδαμ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: A-dəm (English), a-DAWN (French), AH-dahm (German, Polish), AH:-dahm (Dutch), ah-DAHM (Russian, Ukrainian)

Rating: 40% based on 5 votes

This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make". According to Genesis in the Old Testament Adam was created from the earth by God (there is a word play on Hebrew אֲדָמָה ('adamah) "earth"). He and Eve were supposedly the first humans, living happily in the Garden of Eden until Adam ate a forbidden fruit given to him by Eve.

As an English Christian name, Adam has been common since the Middle Ages, and it received a boost after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Scottish economist Adam Smith (1723-1790).

ADELA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Polish, Romanian, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: ə-DEL-ə (English), ah-DE-lah (Polish)

Rating: 18% based on 4 votes

Originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element adal meaning "noble". Saint Adela was a 7th-century Frankish princess who founded a monastery at Pfazel in France. This name was also borne by a daughter of William the Conqueror.

AGNES

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: ‘Αγνη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: AG-nəs (English), AHK-nes (German), AHKH-nəs (Dutch), AHNG-nes (Swedish)

Rating: 63% based on 3 votes

Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Αγνη (Hagne), derived from Greek ‘αγνος (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe, being especially popular in England in the Middle Ages.

ALBERT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Slovene, Polish, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic

Other Scripts: Альберт (Russian)

Pronounced: AL-bərt (English), al-BER (French), AHL-bert (German, Polish), AHL-bərt (Dutch)

Rating: 100% based on 1 vote

From the Germanic name Adalbert, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and beraht "bright". This name was common among medieval German royalty. The Normans introduced it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Æðelbeorht. Though it became rare in England by the 17th century, it was repopularized in the 19th century by the German-born Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.

This name was borne by two 20th-century kings of Belgium. Other famous bearers include the German physicist Albert Einstein (1879-1955), creator of the theory of relativity, and Albert Camus (1913-1960), a French-Algerian writer and philosopher.

ALEC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AL-ək

Rating: 35% based on 4 votes

Short form of ALEXANDER

ALEXANDER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: al-əg-ZAN-dər (English), ah-lek-SAHN-der (German), ah-lək-SAHN-dər (Dutch)

Rating: 70% based on 4 votes

Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ALFRED

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Dutch

Pronounced: AL-frəd (English), al-FRED (French), AHL-fret (German, Polish), AHL-frət (Dutch)

Rating: 53% based on 3 votes

Derived from the Old English name Ælfræd, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and ræd "counsel". Alfred the Great was a 9th-century king of Wessex who fought unceasingly against the Danes living in the northeast of England. He was also a scholar, and he translated many Latin books into Old English. His fame helped to ensure the usage of this name even after the Norman conquest, when most Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. It became rare by the end of the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 18th century. A famous bearer was the British poet Alfred Lord Tennyson (1809-1892).

ALICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Italian

Pronounced: AL-is (English), a-LEES (French), ah-LEE-che (Italian)

Rating: 67% based on 3 votes

From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).

AMALIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch, German, Finnish, Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)

Pronounced: ah-MAH-lee-ah (Dutch, German)

Rating: 40% based on 4 votes

Latinized form of the Germanic name Amala, a short form of names beginning with the element amal meaning "work".

AMELIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: ə-MEE-lee-ə (English), ə-MEEL-yə (English), ah-ME-lyah (Italian), ah-ME-lee-ah (German)

Rating: 63% based on 4 votes

Variant of AMALIA, though it is sometimes confused with EMILIA, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of George II and George III. Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.

ANNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Αννα (Greek), Анна (Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Bulgarian, Church Slavic)

Pronounced: AN-a (English), AHN-nah (Italian, Dutch, Polish), AH-nah (German, Russian)

Rating: 53% based on 3 votes

Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary. In the English-speaking world, this form came into general use in the 18th century, joining Ann and Anne.

The name was borne by several Russian royals, including an 18th-century empress of Russia. It was also the name of the main character in Leo Tolstoy's novel 'Anna Karenina' (1877), a woman forced to choose between her son and her lover.

ANNABEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: AN-ə-bel (English)

Rating: 0% based on 1 vote

Variant of AMABEL influenced by the name ANNA. This name appears to have arisen in Scotland in the Middle Ages.

ANNIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AN-ee

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

Diminutive of ANNE (1)

ANTHONY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AN-thə-nee, AN-tə-nee

Rating: 45% based on 4 votes

English form of the Roman family name Antonius, which is of unknown Etruscan origin. The most notable member of the Roman family was the general Marcus Antonius (called Mark Antony in English), who for a period in the 1st century BC ruled the Roman Empire jointly with Augustus. When their relationship turned sour, he and his mistress Cleopatra were attacked and forced to commit suicide, as related in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Antony and Cleopatra' (1606).

The name became regularly used in the Christian world due to the fame of Saint Anthony the Great, a 4th-century Egyptian hermit who founded Christian monasticism. Its popularity was reinforced in the Middle Ages by the 13th-century Saint Anthony of Padua, the patron saint of Portugal. It has been commonly (but incorrectly) associated with Greek ανθος (anthos) "flower", which resulted in the addition of the h to this spelling in the 17th century.

ARTHUR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: AHR-thər (English), ar-TUYR (French), AHR-toor (German), AHR-tur (Dutch)

Rating: 60% based on 3 votes

The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.

The name came into general use in England in the Middle Ages due to the prevalence of Arthurian romances, and it enjoyed a surge of popularity in the 19th century. Famous bearers include German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), mystery author and Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), and science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008).

ASA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: אָסָא (Hebrew)

Pronounced: AY-sə (English)

Rating: 5% based on 2 votes

Means "doctor" in Hebrew. This name was borne by a king of Judah in the Old Testament.

AUDREY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AWD-ree

Rating: 60% based on 4 votes

Medieval diminutive of ÆÐELÞRYÐ. This was the name of a 7th-century saint, a princess of East Anglia who founded a monastery at Ely. It was also borne by a character in Shakespeare's comedy 'As You Like It' (1599). At the end of the Middle Ages the name became rare due to association with the word tawdry (which was derived from St. Audrey, the name of a fair where cheap lace was sold), but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was British actress Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).

AUGUST

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Catalan, English

Pronounced: OW-guwst (German, Polish), AW-gəst (English)

Rating: 47% based on 3 votes

German, Polish, Scandinavian and Catalan form of AUGUSTUS

BASIL (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BAZ-əl

Rating: 57% based on 3 votes

From the Greek name Βασιλειος (Basileios) which was derived from βασιλευς (basileus) meaning "king". Saint Basil the Great was a 4th-century bishop of Caesarea and one of the fathers of the early Christian church. Due to him, the name (in various spellings) has come into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors.

BENJAMIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Biblical

Other Scripts: בִּנְיָמִין (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: BEN-jə-min (English), ben-zha-MEN (French), BEN-yah-meen (German)

Rating: 37% based on 3 votes

From the Hebrew name בִּנְיָמִין (Binyamin) which means "son of the south" or "son of the right hand". Benjamin in the Old Testament is the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob and the founder of one of the southern tribes of the Hebrews. He was originally named בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oniy) meaning "son of my sorrow" by his mother Rachel, who died shortly after childbirth, but it was later changed by his father.

As an English name, Benjamin came into general use after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), an American statesman, inventor, scientist and philosopher.

BESSIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BES-ee

Rating: 50% based on 3 votes

Diminutive of ELIZABETH

BLAKE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BLAYK

Rating: 20% based on 3 votes

From a surname which was derived from Old English blæc "black" or blāc "pale". A famous bearer of the surname was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).

BRIDGET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish, English, Irish Mythology

Pronounced: BRIJ-ət (English)

Rating: 38% based on 4 votes

Anglicized form of the Irish name Brighid which means "exalted one". In Irish mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire, poetry and wisdom, the daughter of the god Dagda. In the 5th century it was borne by Saint Brigid, the founder of a monastery at Kildare and a patron saint of Ireland. Because of the saint, the name was considered sacred in Ireland, and it did not come into general use there until the 17th century. In the form Birgitta this name has been common in Scandinavia, made popular by the 14th-century Saint Birgitta of Sweden, patron saint of Europe.

CAIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman

Rating: 30% based on 3 votes

Roman variant of GAIUS

CALVIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KAL-vin

Rating: 37% based on 3 votes

Derived from the French surname Chauvin, which was derived from chauve "bald". The surname was borne by Jean Chauvin (1509-1564), a theologian from France who was one of the leaders of the Protestant Reformation. His surname was Latinized as Calvinus (based on Latin calvus "bald") and he is known as John Calvin in English. It has been used as a given name in his honour since the 19th century.

CARLO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: KAHR-lo

Rating: 23% based on 3 votes

Italian form of CHARLES

CARLYLE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KAHR-liel

Rating: 23% based on 4 votes

Variant of CARLISLE

CARMINE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Rating: 30% based on 3 votes

Italian masculine form of CARMEN

CAROLINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Pronounced: ka-ro-LEEN (French), KER-ə-lien (English), KER-ə-lin (English), KAR-ə-lien (English), KAR-ə-lin (English)

Rating: 53% based on 3 votes

French feminine form of CAROLUS

CAROLYN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KER-ə-lin, KAR-ə-lin

Rating: 50% based on 3 votes

Variant of CAROLINE

CATHERINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: ka-tə-REEN (French), ka-TREEN (French), KATH-ə-rin (English), KATH-rin (English)

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

French form of KATHERINE, and also a common English variant.

CECILIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Finnish, Dutch, German

Pronounced: sə-SEE-lee-ə (English), sə-SEEL-yə (English), che-CHEE-lyah (Italian), the-THEE-lyah (Spanish), se-SEE-lyah (Latin American Spanish)

Rating: 67% based on 3 votes

Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.

Due to the popularity of the saint, the name became common in the Christian world during the Middle Ages. The Normans brought it to England, where it was commonly spelled Cecily - the Latinate form Cecilia came into use in the 18th century.

CEDRIC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SED-rik

Rating: 23% based on 3 votes

Invented by Sir Walter Scott for a character in his novel 'Ivanhoe' (1819). Apparently he based it on the actual name Cerdic, the name of the semi-legendary founder of the kingdom of Wessex in the 6th-century. The meaning of Cerdic is uncertain, but it does not appear to be Old English in origin. It could be connected to the Brythonic name CARATACOS. The name was also used by Frances Hodgson Burnett for the main character in her novel 'Little Lord Fauntleroy' (1886).

CHARLES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: CHAHR-əlz (English), SHAHRL (French)

Rating: 50% based on 3 votes

From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word which meant "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic element hari meaning "army, warrior".

The popularity of the name in continental Europe was due to the fame of Charles the Great (742-814), commonly known as Charlemagne, a king of the Franks who came to rule over most of Europe. It was subsequently borne by several Holy Roman Emperors, as well as kings of France, Spain, Portugal, Sweden and Hungary. The name did not become common in Britain until the 17th century when it was carried by the Stuart king Charles I. It had been introduced into the Stuart royal family by Mary Queen of Scots, who had been raised in France.

Famous bearers of the name include naturalist Charles Darwin (1809-1882) who revolutionized biology with his theory of evolution, novelist Charles Dickens (1812-1870) who wrote such works as 'Great Expectations' and 'A Tale of Two Cities', French statesman Charles de Gaulle (1890-1970), and American cartoonist Charles Schulz (1922-2000), the creator of the 'Peanuts' comic strip.

CHARLOTTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Pronounced: shar-LOT (French), SHAHR-lət (English), shahr-LAW-tə (German), shahr-LAWT-tə (Dutch)

Rating: 60% based on 3 votes

French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Bronte (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Bronte sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.

CHRISTOPHER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KRIS-tə-fər

Rating: 20% based on 3 votes

From the Late Greek name Χριστοφορος (Christophoros) meaning "bearing Christ", derived from Χριστος (Christos) combined with φερω (phero) "to bear, to carry". Early Christians used it as a metaphorical name, expressing that they carried Christ in their hearts. In the Middle Ages, literal interpretations of the name's etymology led to legends about a Saint Christopher who carried the young Jesus across a river. He has come to be regarded as the patron saint of travellers.

As an English given name, Christopher has been in general use since the 15th century. In Denmark it was borne by three kings (their names are usually spelled Christoffer), including the 15th-century Christopher of Bavaria who also ruled Norway and Sweden. Other famous bearers include Italian explorer Christopher Columbus (1451-1506), English playwright Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), and the fictional character Christopher Robin from A. A. Milne's 'Winnie-the-Pooh' books.

CLAIRE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: KLER

Rating: 57% based on 3 votes

French form of CLARA

CLARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, English, Late Roman

Pronounced: KLAH-rah (Italian, German, Spanish), KLER-ə (English), KLAR-ə (English)

Rating: 40% based on 3 votes

Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.

CLARK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KLAHRK

Rating: 63% based on 3 votes

From an English surname meaning "cleric" or "scribe", from Old English clerec which originally meant "priest". A famous bearer of the surname was William Clark (1770-1838), an explorer of the west of North America. It was also borne by the American actor Clark Gable (1901-1960).

COLIN (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, Irish, English

Pronounced: KAHL-in (Scottish, Irish, English), KOL-in (English)

Rating: 43% based on 3 votes

Anglicized form of CAILEAN or COILEAN

CULLEN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KUL-ən

Rating: 10% based on 4 votes

From a surname which was derived from an Old French form of Cologne, the name of a city in Germany.

DANIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian, Armenian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: דָּנִיֵּאל (Hebrew), Даниел (Macedonian), Դանիէլ (Armenian), დანიელ (Georgian), Δανιηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: DAN-yul (English), dah-nee-EL (Jewish), dan-YEL (French), DAH-nee-el (German), DAHN-yel (Polish)

Rating: 83% based on 3 votes

From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.

Due to the popularity of the biblical character, the name came into use in England during the Middle Ages. Though it became rare by the 15th century, it was revived after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers of this name include English author Daniel Defoe (1660-1731), Swiss mathematician Daniel Bernoulli (1700-1782), and American frontiersman Daniel Boone (1734-1820).

DAVID

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: דָּוִד (Hebrew), Давид (Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: DAY-vid (English), dah-VEED (Jewish), da-VEED (French), DAH-vit (German, Dutch), dah-VEET (Russian)

Rating: 40% based on 3 votes

From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was probably derived from Hebrew דוד (dwd) meaning "beloved". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.

This name has been used in Britain since the Middle Ages. It has been especially popular in Wales, where it is used in honour of the 5th-century patron saint of Wales (also called Dewi), as well as in Scotland, where it was borne by two kings. Famous bearers include empiricist philosopher David Hume (1711-1776), explorer David Livingstone (1813-1873) and soccer player David Beckham (1975-). This is also the name of the hero of Charles Dickens' semi-autobiographical novel 'David Copperfield' (1850).

DEAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DEEN

Rating: 50% based on 3 votes

From a surname, see DEAN (1) and DEAN (2). The actor James Dean (1931-1955) was a famous bearer of the surname.

DELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DEL-ə

Rating: 40% based on 3 votes

Diminutive of ADELA or ADELAIDE. A famous bearer is American actress and singer Della Reese (1931-).

DENNIS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch

Pronounced: DEN-is (English), DE-nis (German), DEN-nis (Dutch)

Rating: 23% based on 3 votes

Usual English, German and Dutch form of DENIS

DIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, German, Dutch, Romanian, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Roman Mythology

Other Scripts: Диана (Russian, Bulgarian)

Pronounced: die-AN-ə (English), dee-AH-nah (Italian, German, Dutch)

Rating: 47% based on 3 votes

Probably derived from an old Indo-European root meaning "heavenly, divine", related to dyeus (see ZEUS). Diana was a Roman goddess of the moon, hunting, forests, and childbirth, often identified with the Greek goddess Artemis.

As a given name, Diana has been regularly used since the Renaissance. It became more common in the English-speaking world following Sir Walter Scott's novel 'Rob Roy' (1817), which featured a character named Diana Vernon. It also appeared in George Meredith's novel 'Diana of the Crossways' (1885). A notable bearer was Diana Spencer (1961-1997), the Princess of Wales.

DOMINICK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DAHM-ə-nik

Rating: 0% based on 1 vote

Variant of DOMINIC

DOROTHY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DAWR-ə-thee, DAWR-thee

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

Usual English form of DOROTHEA. It has been in use since the 16th century. The author L. Frank Baum used it for the central character in his fantasy novel 'The Wonderful Wizard of Oz' (1900).

EDITH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Pronounced: EE-dith (English), E-dit (German)

Rating: 87% based on 3 votes

From the Old English name Eadgyð, derived from the elements ead "rich, blessed" and gyð "war". It was popular among Anglo-Saxon royalty, being borne for example by Saint Eadgyð, the daughter of King Edgar the Peaceful. The name remained common after the Norman conquest. It became rare after the 15th century, but was revived in the 19th century.

EDWARD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Polish

Pronounced: ED-wərd (English), ED-vahrt (Polish)

Rating: 73% based on 3 votes

Means "rich guard", derived from the Old English elements ead "rich, blessed" and weard "guard". Saint Edward the Confessor was the king of England shortly before the Norman conquest. He was known as a just ruler, and because of his popularity this name remained in use after the conquest when most other Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. The 13th-century king Henry III named his son and successor after the saint, and seven subsequent kings of England were also named Edward. This is one of the few Old English names to be used throughout Europe (in various spellings).

EDWIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: ED-win (English), ED-win (Dutch), ED-vin (Dutch)

Rating: 87% based on 3 votes

Means "rich friend" from the Old English elements ead "rich, blessed" and wine "friend". This was the name of a 7th-century Northumbrian king, regarded as a saint. After the Norman conquest the name was not popular, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century. A notable bearer was the astronaut Edwin Aldrin (1930-), also known as Buzz, the second man to walk on the moon.

ELEANOR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ə-nawr

Rating: 63% based on 3 votes

From the Old French form of the Occitan name Aliénor. It was first borne by the influential Eleanor of Aquitaine (12th century), who was the queen of Louis VII, the king of France, and later Henry II, the king of England. She was named Aenor after her mother, and was called by the Occitan phrase alia Aenor "the other AENOR" in order to distinguish her from her mother.

The popularity of the name Eleanor in England during the Middle Ages was due to the fame of Eleanor of Aquitaine, as well as two queens of the following century: Eleanor of Provence, the wife of Henry III, and Eleanor of Castile, the wife of Edward I. More recently, it was borne by first lady Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), the wife of American president Franklin Roosevelt.

ELENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Bulgarian, Romanian, Macedonian, Croatian, Slovene, Lithuanian, Russian, German, Medieval Slavic

Other Scripts: Елена (Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Church Slavic)

Pronounced: E-le-nah (Italian), e-LE-nah (Spanish), ye-LYE-nah (Russian), ee-LYE-nah (Russian)

Rating: 53% based on 3 votes

Cognate of HELEN, and a variant Russian transcription of YELENA.

ELENORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: el-ə-NAWR-ə

Form of ELEANOR

ELI (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: עֵלִי (Hebrew), Ηλι (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: EE-lie (English)

Rating: 30% based on 3 votes

Means "ascension" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the high priest of Israel and the teacher of Samuel. In England, Eli has been used as a Christian given name since the Protestant Reformation.

ELISE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English

Pronounced: e-LEE-zə (German), i-LEES (English), i-LEEZ (English)

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

Short form of ELIZABETH

ELIZABETH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: i-LIZ-ə-bəth (English)

Rating: 50% based on 4 votes

From Ελισαβετ (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath" or perhaps "my God is abundance". The Hebrew form appears in the Old Testament where Elisheba is the wife of Aaron, while the Greek form appears in the New Testament where Elizabeth is the mother of John the Baptist.

Among Christians, this name was originally more common in Eastern Europe. It was borne in the 12th century by Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, a daughter of King Andrew II who used her wealth to help the poor. In medieval England it was occasionally used in honour of the saint, though the form Isabel (from Occitan and Spanish) was more common. It has been very popular in England since the reign of Queen Elizabeth I in the 16th century. Famous modern bearers include the British queen Elizabeth II (1926-) and actress Elizabeth Taylor (1932-2011).

ELLA (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish

Pronounced: EL-ə (English)

Rating: 15% based on 4 votes

Diminutive of ELEANOR, ELLEN (1), and other names beginning with El. It can also be a short form of names ending in ella.

ELLIOTT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ee-ət

Rating: 38% based on 4 votes

From an English surname which was derived from a diminutive of the medieval name ELIAS.

ELLIS (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-is

Rating: 48% based on 4 votes

From an English surname which was derived from the given name ELIJAH.

ELOISE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-o-eez, el-o-EEZ

Rating: 87% based on 3 votes

From the Old French name Héloïse, which is probably from the Germanic name Helewidis, composed of the elements heil "hale, healthy" and wid "wide". It is sometimes associated with the Greek word ‘ηλιος (helios) "sun" or the name Louise, though there is not likely an etymological connection. This name was borne in the 12th century by Saint Eloise, the wife of the French theologian Peter Abelard. She became a nun after her husband was castrated by her uncle.

There was a medieval English form of this name, Helewis, though it died out after the 13th century. In the 19th century it was revived in the English-speaking world in the form Eloise.

ELSIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-see

Rating: 35% based on 2 votes

Diminutive of ELIZABETH

EMILIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Finnish, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English

Pronounced: e-MEEL-yah (Italian, Spanish, Polish)

Rating: 20% based on 2 votes

Feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).

EMILY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EM-ə-lee

Rating: 45% based on 2 votes

English feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL). In the English-speaking world it was not common until after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century; the princess Amelia Sophia (1711-1786) was commonly known as Emily in English, even though Amelia is an unrelated name.

Famous bearers include the British author Emily Bronte (1818-1848), who wrote 'Wuthering Heights', and the American poet Emily Dickinson (1830-1886).

EMMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: EM-ə (English), E-mah (German)

Rating: 25% based on 2 votes

Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of king Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of king Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.

After the Norman conquest this name became common in England. It was revived in the 18th century, perhaps in part due to Matthew Prior's poem 'Henry and Emma' (1709). It was also used by Jane Austen for the central character, the matchmaker Emma Woodhouse, in her novel 'Emma' (1816).

EMMELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Pronounced: EM-ə-leen, EM-ə-lien

From an Old French form of the Germanic name Amelina, originally a diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element amal meaning "work". The Normans introduced this name to England.

EMMETT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EM-it

Rating: 37% based on 3 votes

From an English surname which was derived from a diminutive of the feminine given name EMMA.

EPHRAIM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Jewish, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: אֶפְרָיִם (Hebrew), Εφραιμ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: EE-free-im (English), EE-frəm (English), E-free-im (English), E-frəm (English)

Rating: 55% based on 2 votes

From the Hebrew name אֶפְרָיִם ('Efrayim) which meant "fruitful". In the Old Testament, Ephraim is a son of Joseph and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel.

ERIC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Swedish

Pronounced: ER-ik (English)

Rating: 65% based on 2 votes

From the Old Norse name Eiríkr, derived from the elements ei "ever" and ríkr "ruler". A notable bearer was Eiríkr inn Rauda (Eric the Red in English), a 10th-century navigator and explorer who discovered Greenland. This was also the name of several early kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway.

This common Norse name was first brought to England by Danish settlers during the Anglo-Saxon period. It was not popular in England in the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th-century, in part due to the children's novel 'Eric, or Little by Little' (1858) by Frederic William Farrar.

ESMÉ

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: es-MAY (Dutch)

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

Means "esteemed" or "loved" in Old French. It was first recorded in Scotland, being borne by the first Duke of Lennox in the 16th century.

ESSIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ES-ee

Rating: 30% based on 1 vote

Diminutive of ESTELLE or ESTHER

ESTELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: es-TEL-ə

Latinate form of ESTELLE. This was the name of the heroine, Estella Havisham, in Charles Dickens' novel 'Great Expectations' (1860).

ESTHER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Spanish, Dutch, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: אֶסְתֵר (Hebrew), Εσθηρ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ES-tər (English, Dutch), es-TER (French)

Rating: 90% based on 1 vote

Possibly means "star" in Persian. Alternatively it could be a derivative of the name of the Near Eastern goddess ISHTAR. The Book of Esther in the Old Testament tells the story of Queen Esther, the Jewish wife of the king of Persia who saved the Jews of the realm from extermination. Her original Hebrew name was Hadassah.

This name has been used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. In America it received a boost in popularity after the birth of Esther Cleveland (1893-1980), the daughter of president Grover Cleveland.

ETTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ET-ə

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

Short form of HENRIETTA and other names that end with etta. A famous bearer was the American singer Etta James (1938-), who took her stage name from her real given name Jamesetta.

EVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Macedonian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: Ева (Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Church Slavic), ევა (Georgian)

Pronounced: E-vah (Italian, Spanish, Danish), EE-və (English), E-fah (German), AY-vah (Dutch)

Rating: 15% based on 2 votes

Latinate form of EVE. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. It is also a variant Russian transcription of YEVA. This name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.

EVE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Biblical

Other Scripts: חַוָּה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: EEV (English), EV (French)

Rating: 75% based on 2 votes

From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חוה (chawah) "to breathe" or the related word חיה (chayah) "to live". According to the Old Testament Book of Genesis, Eve and Adam were the first humans. She gave the forbidden fruit to Adam, causing their expulsion from the Garden of Eden. Despite this potentially negative association, the name was occasionally used during the Middle Ages. In the English-speaking world both Eve and the Latin form Eva were revived in the 19th century.

EVELINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Swedish

Pronounced: e-ve-LEE-nah (Italian)

Latinate form of AVELINE. It was revived by the author Fanny Burney for the heroine of her first novel 'Evelina' (1778). It is often regarded as a variant of the related name Evelyn.

EVELYN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German

Pronounced: EV-ə-lin (English), EV-lin (English)

Rating: 25% based on 2 votes

From an English surname which was derived from the given name AVELINE. In the 17th century when it was first used as a given name it was more common for boys, but it is now regarded as mainly feminine due to association with the related name Evelina.

EVERETT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EV-ə-rit, EV-rit

Rating: 30% based on 2 votes

From a surname which was derived from the given name EVERARD.

EZRA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew

Other Scripts: עֶזְרָא (Hebrew)

Pronounced: EZ-rə (English)

Rating: 100% based on 1 vote

Means "help" in Hebrew. Ezra is a prophet of the Old Testament and the author of the Book of Ezra. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. The American poet Ezra Pound (1885-1972) was a famous bearer.

FELIX

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Pronounced: FE-liks (German), FAY-liks (Dutch), FEE-liks (English)

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.

Due to its favourable meaning, this name was popular among early Christians, being borne by many early saints and four popes. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages, though it has been more popular in continental Europe. A notable bearer was the German composer Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847).

FLORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Italian, Roman Mythology

Pronounced: FLAWR-ə (English), FLO-rah (German)

Rating: 25% based on 2 votes

Derived from Latin flos meaning "flower". Flora was the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, the wife of Zephyr the west wind. It has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, starting in France. In Scotland it was sometimes used as an Anglicized form of Fionnghuala.

FLORENCE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: FLAWR-ənts (English), flo-RAWNS (French)

Rating: 30% based on 2 votes

From the Latin name Florentius or the feminine form Florentia, which were derived from florens "prosperous, flourishing". Florentius was borne by many early Christian saints, and it was occasionally used in their honour through the Middle Ages. In modern times it is mostly feminine.

The name can also be given in reference to the city in Italy, as in the case of Florence Nightingale (1820-1910). She was a nurse in British hospitals during the Crimean War and is usually considered the founder of modern nursing.

FORREST

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: FAWR-əst

Rating: 65% based on 2 votes

From an English surname meaning "forest", originally belonging to a person who lived near a forest. In America it has sometimes been used in honour of the Confederate Civil War general Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-1877). This name was borne by the title character in the movie 'Forrest Gump' (1994) about a loveable simpleton. Use of the name increased when the movie was released, but has since faded away.

FRANCES

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: FRANT-səs

Feminine form of FRANCIS. The distinction between Francis as a masculine name and Frances as a feminine name did not arise until the 17th century. A notable bearer was Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini (1850-1917), a social worker and the first American to be canonized.

FRANCESCO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: frahn-CHES-ko

Italian form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS). Francesco Laurana was an Italian Renaissance sculptor.

FRANCIS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: FRANT-səs (English)

Rating: 55% based on 2 votes

English form of the Late Latin name Franciscus which meant "Frenchman". This name was borne by the 13th-century Saint Francis of Assisi, who was originally named Giovanni but was given the nickname Francesco by his father, an admirer of the French. Francis went on to renounce his father's wealth and devote his life to the poor, founding the Franciscan order of friars. Later in his life he apparently received the stigmata.

Due to the renown of the saint, this name became widespread in Western Europe during the Middle Ages. However, it was not regularly used in Britain until the 16th century. Famous bearers include Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552), a missionary to East Asia, the philosopher and scientist Francis Bacon (1561-1626), and the explorer and admiral Sir Francis Drake (1540-1595). In the English-speaking world this name is occasionally used for girls.

FRANK (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, French

Pronounced: FRANGK (English), FRAHNK (German, Dutch), FRAWNK (French)

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

From a Germanic name which referred to a member of the Germanic tribe, the Franks. The Franks settled in the regions now called France and the Netherlands in the 3rd and 4th century. They derived their tribal name from the name of a type of spear that they used. The name was brought to England by the Normans. Notable bearers include author L. Frank Baum (1856-1919), architect Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959), and singer Frank Sinatra (1915-1998).

FRANKLIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: FRANGK-lin

Rating: 60% based on 1 vote

From an English surname which was derived from Middle English frankelin "freeman". A famous bearer of the surname was Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), an American statesman, inventor, scientist and philosopher. The name has commonly been given in his honour in the United States. It also received a boost during the term of American president Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882-1945).

FREDERICK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: FRED-ə-rik, FRED-rik

English form of a Germanic name meaning "peaceful ruler", derived from frid "peace" and ric "ruler, power". This name has long been common in continental Germanic-speaking regions, being borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire, Germany, Austria, Scandinavia, and Prussia. Notables among these rulers include the 12th-century Holy Roman Emperor and crusader Frederick I Barbarossa, the 13th-century emperor and patron of the arts Frederick II, and the 18th-century Frederick II of Prussia, known as Frederick the Great.

The Normans brought the name to England in the 11th century but it quickly died out. It was reintroduced by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century. A famous bearer was Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), an American ex-slave who became a leading advocate of abolition.

GABRIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: גַּבְרִיאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Γαβριηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ga-bree-EL (French), GAHP-ree-el (German), GAH-bryel (Spanish), GAY-bree-əl (English), GAHP-ryel (Polish)

Rating: 80% based on 1 vote

From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "strong man of God". Gabriel was one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition. He appears in both the Old Testament and the New Testament, where he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Qur'an to Muhammad.

This name has been used occasionally in England since the 12th century. It was not common in the English-speaking world until the end of the 20th century.

GARRETT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: GER-it, GAR-it

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

From an English surname which was derived from the given name GERALD or GERARD. A famous bearer of the surname was Pat Garrett (1850-1908), the sheriff who shot Billy the Kid.

GENEVIEVE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JEN-ə-veev

Rating: 10% based on 2 votes

English form of GENEVIÈVE

GEORGE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Romanian

Pronounced: JORJ (English)

Rating: 30% based on 2 votes

From the Greek name Γεωργιος (Georgios) which was derived from the Greek word γεωργος (georgos) meaning "farmer, earthworker", itself derived from the elements γη (ge) "earth" and εργον (ergon) "work". Saint George was a 3rd-century Roman soldier from Palestine who was martyred during the persecutions of emperor Diocletian. Later legends describe his defeat of a dragon, with which he was often depicted in medieval art.

Initially Saint George was primarily revered by Eastern Christians, but returning crusaders brought stories of him to Western Europe and he became the patron of England, Portugal, Catalonia and Aragon. The name was rarely used in England until the German-born George I came to the British throne in the 18th century. Five subsequent British kings have borne the name.

Other famous bearers include two kings of Greece, the composer George Frideric Handel (1685-1759), the first president of the United States, George Washington (1732-1797), and the Pacific explorer George Vancouver (1757-1798). This was also the pen name of authors George Eliot (1819-1880) and George Orwell (1903-1950), real names Mary Anne Evans and Eric Arthur Blair respectively.

GEORGIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Greek

Other Scripts: Γεωργια (Greek)

Pronounced: JOR-jə (English)

Rating: 65% based on 2 votes

Latinate feminine form of GEORGE. This is the name of an American state, which was named after the British king George II. A famous bearer was the American painter Georgia O'Keeffe (1887-1986).

GRACE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: GRAYS

Rating: 30% based on 2 votes

From the English word grace, which ultimately derives from Latin gratia. This was one of the virtue names created in the 17th century by the Puritans. The actress Grace Kelly (1929-1982) was a famous bearer.

GRANT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Scottish

Pronounced: GRANT

Rating: 100% based on 1 vote

From an English and Scottish surname which was derived from Norman French grand meaning "great, large". A famous bearer of the surname was Ulysses Grant (1822-1885), the commander of the Union forces during the American Civil War who later served as president. In America the name has often been given in his honour.

GWEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh, English

Pronounced: GWEN

Rating: 60% based on 1 vote

From Welsh gwen, the feminine form of gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed". It can also be a short form of GWENDOLEN, GWENLLIAN, and other names beginning with Gwen.

HARRY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HER-ee, HAR-ee

Rating: 35% based on 2 votes

Medieval English form of HENRY. In modern times it is used as a diminutive of both Henry and HAROLD. A famous bearer was American president Harry S. Truman (1884-1972). It is also the name of the boy wizard in J. K. Rowling's 'Harry Potter' series of books, first released in 1997.

HAZEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HAY-zəl

Rating: 15% based on 2 votes

From the English word hazel for the tree or the light brown colour, derived ultimately from Old English hæsel. It was coined as a given name in the 19th century.

HELENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Finnish, Estonian, Slovene, Croatian, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: ‘Ελενη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: he-LE-nah (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish), hay-LAY-nah (Dutch)

Rating: 90% based on 1 vote

Latinate form of HELEN

HENRY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HEN-ree

Rating: 55% based on 2 votes

From the Germanic name Heimirich which meant "home ruler", composed of the elements heim "home" and ric "power, ruler". It was later commonly spelled Heinrich, with the spelling altered due to the influence of other Germanic names like Haganrich, in which the first element is hagan "enclosure".

Heinrich was popular among continental royalty, being the name of seven German kings, starting with the 10th-century Henry I the Fowler, and four French kings. In France it was rendered Henri from the Latin form Henricus.

The Normans introduced this name to England, and it was subsequently used by eight kings, ending with the infamous Henry VIII in the 16th century. During the Middle Ages it was generally rendered as Harry or Herry in English pronunciation. Notable bearers include arctic naval explorer Henry Hudson (1570-1611), British novelist Henry James (1843-1916), and American automobile manufacturer Henry Ford (1863-1947).

HUGO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)

Pronounced: OO-go (Spanish), HYOO-go (English), HUY-kho (Dutch), HOO-go (German)

Rating: 55% based on 2 votes

Latinized form of HUGH. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.

IRIS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish

Other Scripts: Ιρις (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: IE-ris (English), EE-ris (German, Dutch)

Rating: 80% based on 2 votes

Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow. This name can also be given in reference to the English word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the name of the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.

ISAAC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: יִצְחָק (Hebrew)

Pronounced: IE-zək (English)

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

From the Hebrew name יִצְחָק (Yitzchaq) which meant "he laughs". Isaac in the Old Testament is the son of Abraham and the father of Esau and Jacob. As recounted in Genesis, God tested Abraham's faith by ordering him to sacrifice his son, though an angel prevented the act at the last moment.

As an English Christian name, Isaac was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, though it was more common among Jews. It became more widespread after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers include the physicist and mathematician Sir Isaac Newton (1643-1727) and the science-fiction writer Isaac Asimov (1920-1992).

ISABEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, French, German

Pronounced: ee-sah-BEL (Spanish), IZ-ə-bel (English), ee-za-BEL (French), ee-zah-BEL (German)

Rating: 0% based on 1 vote

Medieval Occitan form of ELIZABETH. It spread throughout Spain, Portugal and France, becoming common among the royalty by the 12th century. It grew popular in England in the 13th century after Isabella of Angoulême married the English king John, and it was subsequently bolstered when Isabella of France married Edward II the following century.

This is the usual form of the name Elizabeth in Spain and Portugal, though elsewhere it is considered a parallel name, such as in France where it is used alongside Élisabeth. The name was borne by two Spanish ruling queens, including Isabel of Castile, who sponsored the explorations of Christopher Columbus.

IVAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovene, Macedonian, English

Other Scripts: Иван (Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian), Іван (Ukrainian)

Pronounced: ee-VAHN (Russian, Ukrainian), IE-vən (English)

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

Newer form of the old Slavic name Іѡаннъ (Ioannu), which was derived from Greek Ioannes (see JOHN). This was the name of six Russian rulers, including the 15th-century Ivan III the Great and 16th-century Ivan IV the Terrible, the first tsar of Russia. It was also borne by nine emperors of Bulgaria. Other notable bearers include the Russian author Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883), who wrote 'Fathers and Sons', and the Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), who is best known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex.

IVY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: IE-vee

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

From the English word for the climbing plant that has small yellow flowers. It is ultimately derived from Old English ifig.

JACK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JAK

Rating: 35% based on 2 votes

Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of JOHN. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as 'Jack and the Beanstalk', 'Little Jack Horner', and 'Jack Sprat'. American writers Jack London (1876-1916) and Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) were two famous bearers of this name. It is also borne by American actor Jack Nicholson (1937-).

JACOB

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical

Other Scripts: יַעֲקֹב (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: JAY-kəb (English), YAH-kawp (Dutch)

Rating: 25% based on 2 votes

From the Latin Iacobus, which was from the Greek Ιακωβος (Iakobos), which was from the Hebrew name יַעֲקֹב (Ya'aqov). In the Old Testament, Jacob (later called Israel) is the son of Isaac and Rebecca and the father of the twelve founders of the twelve tribes of Israel. He was born holding his twin brother Esau's heel, and his name is explained as meaning "holder of the heel" or "supplanter". Other theories claim that it is in fact derived from a hypothetical name like יַעֲקֹבְאֵל (Ya'aqov'el) meaning "may God protect".

The English names Jacob and James derive from the same source, with James coming from Latin Iacomus, a later variant of Iacobus. Unlike English, many languages do not have separate spellings for the two names.

In England, Jacob was mainly regarded as a Jewish name during the Middle Ages, though the variant James was used among Christians. Jacob came into general use as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Jacob Grimm (1785-1863), the German linguist and writer who was, with his brother Wilhelm, the author of 'Grimm's Fairy Tales'.

JAMES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: JAYMZ (English)

Rating: 55% based on 2 votes

English form of the Late Latin name Iacomus which was derived from Ιακωβος (Iakobos), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name Ya'aqov (see JACOB). This was the name of two apostles in the New Testament. The first was Saint James the Greater, the apostle John's brother, who was beheaded under Herod Agrippa in the Book of Acts. The second was James the Lesser, son of Alphaeus. Another James (known as James the Just) is also mentioned in the Bible as being the brother of Jesus.

Since the 13th century this form of the name has been used in England, though it became more common in Scotland, where it was borne by several kings. In the 17th century the Scottish king James VI inherited the English throne, becoming the first ruler of all Britain, and the name grew much more popular. Famous bearers include the explorer Captain James Cook (1728-1779), the inventor James Watt (1736-1819), and the novelist and poet James Joyce (1882-1941). This name has also been borne by six American presidents. A notable fictional bearer is the British spy James Bond, created by author Ian Fleming.

JANE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JAYN

Rating: 90% based on 1 vote

Medieval English form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). This became the most common feminine form of John in the 17th century, surpassing Joan. Famous bearers include the uncrowned English queen Lady Jane Grey (1536-1554), who ruled for only 9 days, the British novelist Jane Austen (1775-1817), who wrote 'Sense and Sensibility' and 'Pride and Prejudice', and the British primatologist Jane Goodall (1934-). This was also the name of the central character in Charlotte Bronte's novel 'Jane Eyre' (1847).

JASON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Greek Mythology (Anglicized), Biblical

Other Scripts: Ιασων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: JAY-sən (English)

Rating: 30% based on 2 votes

From the Greek name Ιασων (Iason), which was derived from Greek ιασθαι (iasthai) "to heal". In Greek mythology Jason was the leader of the Argonauts. After his uncle Pelias overthrew his father as king of Iolcos, Jason went in search of the Golden Fleece in order to win back the throne. During his journeys he married the sorceress Medea, who helped him gain the fleece and kill his uncle, but who later turned against him when he fell in love with another woman.

This name also appears in the New Testament, belonging to man who sheltered Paul and Silas. In his case, it may represent a Hellenized form of a Hebrew name. It was not used in England until after the Protestant Reformation.

JASPER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend

Pronounced: JAS-pər (English), YAHS-pər (Dutch)

Rating: 75% based on 2 votes

Means "treasurer" in Persian. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.

JESSE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch, Biblical

Other Scripts: יִשַׁי (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: JES-ee (English), YES-sə (Dutch)

Rating: 80% based on 1 vote

From the Hebrew name יִשַׁי (Yishay) which possibly means "gift". Jesse is the father of King David in the Old Testament. It began to be used as an English given name after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer of this name was Jesse James (1847-1882), an American outlaw who held up banks and stagecoaches. He was eventually shot by a fellow gang member for a reward. Another famous bearer was the American athlete Jesse Owens (1913-1980), whose real name was James Cleveland (or J. C.) Owens.

JOEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Swedish, Finnish, Biblical

Other Scripts: יוֹאֵל (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: JOL (English), JO-əl (English)

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

From the Hebrew name יוֹאֵל (Yo'el) meaning "YAHWEH is God". Joel is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Joel. In England, it was first used as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation.

JOHN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: JAHN (English)

Rating: 35% based on 2 votes

English form of Iohannes, the Latin form of the Greek name Ιωαννης (Ioannes), itself derived from the Hebrew name יוֹחָנָן (Yochanan) meaning "YAHWEH is gracious". This name owes its popularity to two New Testament characters, both highly revered saints. The first is John the Baptist, a Jewish ascetic who was considered the forerunner of Jesus Christ. The second is the apostle John, who is also traditionally regarded as the author of the fourth Gospel and Revelation.

This name was initially more common among Eastern Christians in the Byzantine Empire, but it flourished in Western Europe after the First Crusade. In England it became extremely popular: during the later Middle Ages it was given to approximately a fifth of all English boys.

The name (in various spellings) has been borne by 21 popes and eight Byzantine emperors, as well as rulers of England, France, Sweden, Denmark, Poland, Portugal, Bulgaria, Russia and Hungary. It was also borne by the poet John Milton (1608-1674), philosopher John Locke (1632-1704), American founding father and president John Adams (1735-1826), and poet John Keats (1795-1821). Famous bearers of the 20th century include author John Steinbeck (1902-1968), assassinated American president John F. Kennedy (1917-1963), and musician John Lennon (1940-1980).

JONAS (2)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Biblical

Pronounced: YO-nahs (German), JO-nəs (English)

From Ιωνας (Ionas), the Greek form of JONAH. This spelling is used in some English translations of the New Testament.

JOSEPH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Biblical

Other Scripts: יוֹסֵף (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: JO-səf (English), zho-ZEF (French), YO-zef (German)

Rating: 40% based on 2 votes

From Ioseph, the Latin form of Greek Ιωσηφ (Ioseph), which was from the Hebrew name יוֹסֵף (Yosef) meaning "he will add". In the Old Testament, Joseph is the eleventh son of Jacob. Because he was the favourite of his father, his older brothers sent him to Egypt and told their father that he had died. In Egypt, Joseph became an advisor to the pharaoh, and was eventually reconciled with his brothers when they came to Egypt during a famine. This name also occurs in the New Testament, belonging to Saint Joseph the husband of Mary and Joseph of Arimathea.

In the Middle Ages, Joseph was a common Jewish name, being less frequent among Christians. In the late Middle Ages Saint Joseph became more highly revered, and the name became popular in Spain and Italy. In England it became common after the Protestant Reformation. This name was borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Portugal. Other notable bearers include Polish-British author Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) and the Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin (1878-1953).

JOSIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JO-zee

Rating: 30% based on 1 vote

Short form of JOSEPHINE

JULIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Ancient Roman, Biblical

Pronounced: JOO-lee-ə (English), YOO-lee-ah (German), HOO-lyah (Spanish), YUWL-yah (Polish), YOO:-lee-ah (Ancient Roman)

Rating: 80% based on 1 vote

Feminine form of JULIUS. A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. Shakespeare used the name in his comedy 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594). It has been common as a given name in the English-speaking world only since the 18th century. A famous bearer is American actress Julia Roberts (1967-).

JUNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JOON

From the name of the month, which was originally derived from the name of the Roman goddess Juno. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.

KATE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Croatian

Pronounced: KAYT (English)

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

Diminutive of KATHERINE, often used independently. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages. This was the name of the woman who Petruchio marries and tries to tame in Shakespeare's comedy 'Taming of the Shrew' (1593). A famous bearer is the British actress Kate Winslet (1975-).

KATHERINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KATH-ə-rin, KATH-rin

Rating: 60% based on 1 vote

From the Greek name Αικατερινη (Aikaterine). The etymology is debated: it could derive from the earlier Greek name ‘Εκατερινη (Hekaterine), which came from ‘εκατερος (hekateros) "each of the two"; it could derive from the name of the goddess HECATE; it could be related to Greek αικια (aikia) "torture"; or it could be from a Coptic name meaning "my consecration of your name". In the early Christian era it became associated with Greek καθαρος (katharos) "pure", and the Latin spelling was changed from Katerina to Katharina to reflect this.

The name was borne by a semi-legendary 4th-century saint and martyr from Alexandria who was tortured on a spiked wheel. The saint was initially venerated in Syria, and returning crusaders introduced the name to Western Europe. It has been common in England since the 12th century in many different spellings, with Katherine and Catherine becoming standard in the later Middle Ages.

Famous bearers of the name include Catherine of Siena, a 14th-century mystic, and Catherine de' Medici, a 16th-century French queen. It was also borne by three of Henry VIII's wives, including Katherine of Aragon, and by two empresses of Russia, including Catherine the Great.

LAURA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Late Roman

Pronounced: LAWR-ə (English), LOW-rah (Spanish, Italian, Polish, German, Dutch)

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.

As an English name, Laura has been used since the 13th century. A famous bearer was Laura Secord (1775-1868), a Canadian heroine during the War of 1812.

LAWRENCE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LAWR-ənts

Variant of LAURENCE (1). This spelling of the name is now more common than Laurence in the English-speaking world, probably because Lawrence is the usual spelling of the surname. The surname was borne by the author and poet D. H. Lawrence (1885-1930), as well as the revolutionary T. E. Lawrence (1888-1935), who was known as Lawrence of Arabia.

LEAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: לֵאָה (Hebrew)

Pronounced: LEE-ə (English)

Rating: 60% based on 1 vote

From the Hebrew name לֵאָה (Le'ah) which was probably derived from the Hebrew word לְאָה (le'ah) meaning "weary". Alternatively it might derive from a Chaldean name meaning "mistress" or "ruler" in Akkadian. In the Old Testament, Leah is the first wife of Jacob and the mother of seven of his children. Although this name was used by Jews in the Middle Ages, it was not typical as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation, being common among the Puritans.

LENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Russian, English, Italian, Portuguese

Other Scripts: Лена (Russian)

Pronounced: LE-nah (German, Italian), LYE-nah (Russian), LEE-nə (English)

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

Scandinavian, German and Polish short form of HELENA or MAGDALENA, and a Russian short form of YELENA.

LENORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Short form of ELENORA

LEO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman

Pronounced: LE-o (German), LAY-o (Dutch), LEE-o (English)

Rating: 70% based on 1 vote

Derived from Latin leo "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.

LEWIS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LOO-is

Rating: 70% based on 1 vote

Medieval English form of LOUIS. A famous bearer was Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), the author of 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'. This was also the surname of C. S. Lewis (1898-1963), the author of the 'Chronicles of Narnia'.

LILLIAN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LIL-ee-ən

Rating: 70% based on 1 vote

Probably originally a diminutive of ELIZABETH. It may also be considered an elaborated form of LILY, from the Latin word for "lily" lilium. This name has been used in England since the 16th century.

LILLIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LIL-ee

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

Variant of LILY

LINUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized), German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Other Scripts: Λινος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: LIE-nəs (English), LEE-nuws (German)

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

From the Greek name Λινος (Linos) meaning "flax". In Greek legend he was the son of the god Apollo, who accidentally killed him in a contest. Another son of Apollo by this name was the music teacher of Herakles. The name was also borne by the second pope, serving after Saint Peter in the 1st century. In modern times it was the name of a character in Charles Schulz's comic strip 'Peanuts'.

LOLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, English

Pronounced: LO-lah (Spanish), LO-lə (English)

Rating: 25% based on 2 votes

Diminutive of DOLORES

LORENZO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, Spanish

Pronounced: lo-REN-tso (Italian), lo-REN-tho (Spanish), lo-REN-so (Latin American Spanish)

Rating: 30% based on 1 vote

Italian and Spanish form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)). Lorenzo de' Medici, known as the Magnificent, was a ruler of Florence during the Renaissance. He was also a great patron of the arts who employed Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Botticelli and other famous artists.

LOUIS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, English, Dutch

Pronounced: loo-EE (French), LOO-is (English)

French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of 18 kings of France, starting with Louis I the son of Charlemagne, and including Louis IX (Saint Louis) who led two crusades and Louis XIV (the 'Sun King') who was the ruler of France during the height of its power, the builder of the Palace of Versailles, and the longest reigning monarch in the history of Europe.

Apart from among royalty, this name was only moderately popular in France during the Middle Ages. After the French Revolution, when Louis XVI was guillotined, it became less common. The Normans brought the name to England, where it was usually spelled Lewis, though the spelling Louis has been more common in America. Famous bearers include French scientist Louis Pasteur (1822-1895), Métis leader Louis Riel (1844-1885), who led a rebellion against Canada, and Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), who wrote 'Treasure Island' and 'Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde'.

LOUISA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Dutch

Pronounced: loo-EEZ-ə (English), loo-EES-ə (English)

Rating: 100% based on 1 vote

Latinate feminine form of LOUIS

LOUISE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, Dutch

Pronounced: loo-EEZ (French, English)

Rating: 100% based on 1 vote

French feminine form of LOUIS

LUCIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: loo-CHEE-ah (Italian), LOO-tsee-ah (German), LOO-shə (English), loo-SEE-ə (English)

Rating: 60% based on 1 vote

Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th-century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.

LUCILLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: loo-SEEL

Rating: 35% based on 2 votes

French form of LUCILLA. A famous bearer was American comedienne Lucille Ball (1911-1989).

LUCY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LOO-see

Rating: 80% based on 1 vote

English form of LUCIA, in use since the Middle Ages.

LYDIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Finnish, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Λυδια (Ancient Greek), Лѷдіа (Church Slavic)

Pronounced: LID-ee-ə (English), LUY-dee-ah (German)

Rating: 45% based on 2 votes

Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. In the modern era the name has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

LYLE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LIE-əl, LIEL

Rating: 25% based on 2 votes

From an English surname which was derived from Norman French l'isle "island".

MABEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAY-bəl

Rating: 45% based on 2 votes

Medieval feminine form of AMABILIS. This spelling and Amabel were common during the Middle Ages, though they became rare after the 15th century. It was revived in the 19th century after the publication of C. M. Yonge's novel 'The Heir of Redclyffe' (1854), which featured a character named Mabel (as well as one named Amabel).

MADELEINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: ma-də-LEN (French), mad-LEN (French), MAD-ə-lin (English), MAD-ə-lien (English)

Personal note: Madeleine ("mad-a-lin") Alice

Rating: 90% based on 1 vote

French form of MAGDALENE

MADELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: MAD-ə-lin (English), MAD-ə-lien (English), ma-də-LEEN (French), mad-LEEN (French)

Rating: 70% based on 1 vote

English form of MAGDALENE. This is the name of the heroine in a series of children's books by Ludwig Bemelmans, first published 1939.

MALCOLM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: MAL-kəm

Personal note: Malcolm Arthur, Malcolm Ezra, or Malcolm John

Rating: 60% based on 1 vote

From Scottish Máel Coluim which means "disciple of Saint COLUMBA". This was the name of four kings of Scotland starting in the 10th century, including Malcolm III, who became king after killing Macbeth, the usurper who had murdered his father. The character Malcolm in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Macbeth' (1606) is based on him. Another famous bearer was Malcolm X (1925-1965), an American civil rights leader.

MARGARET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAHR-grit, MAHR-gə-rit

Personal note: Margaret Olive "Mollie"

Rating: 55% based on 2 votes

Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", probably ultimately a borrowing from Sanskrit मञ्यरी (manyari). Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.

Other saints by this name include a queen of Scotland and a princess of Hungary. It was also borne by Queen Margaret I of Denmark, who united Denmark, Sweden, and Norway in the 14th century. Famous literary bearers include American writer Margaret Mitchell (1900-1949), the author of 'Gone with the Wind', and Canadian writer Margaret Atwood (1939-).

MARIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Icelandic, Corsican, Basque, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic

Other Scripts: Μαρια (Greek), Маріа (Church Slavic)

Pronounced: mah-REE-ah (Italian, German, Dutch), mə-REE-ə (Catalan, English), MAHR-yah (Polish)

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.

This was the name of two ruling queens of Portugal. It was also borne by the Habsburg queen Maria Theresa (1717-1780), whose inheritance of the domains of her father, the Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI, began the War of the Austrian Succession.

MARIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, Czech, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: ma-REE (French), mah-REE (German)

Personal note: Marie Rose

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

French and Czech form of MARIA. A notable bearer of this name was Marie Antoinette, a queen of France who was executed by guillotine during the French Revolution. Another was Marie Curie (1867-1934), a physicist and chemist who studied radioactivity with her husband Pierre.

MARILYN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MER-ə-lin, MER-lin, MAR-ə-lin, MAR-lin

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

Combination of MARY and lyn. It has been used since the start of the 20th century. A famous bearer was the American actress Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962).

MARINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Greek, Russian, Romanian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian, Ancient Roman

Other Scripts: Μαρινα (Greek), Марина (Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian), მარინა (Georgian)

Pronounced: mah-REE-nah (Italian, Spanish, German, Russian)

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

Feminine form of MARINUS

MARIO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Croatian

Pronounced: MAH-ryo (Italian, Spanish)

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

Italian and Spanish form of MARIUS. Famous bearers include American race car driver Mario Andretti (1940-) and Canadian hockey player Mario Lemieux (1965-).

MARISSA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: mə-RIS-ə

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

Variant of MARISA

MARK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical

Other Scripts: Марк (Russian)

Pronounced: MAHRK (English, Russian)

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

Form of MARCUS. Saint Mark was the author of the second Gospel in the New Testament. He is the patron saint of Venice, where he is supposedly buried. Though in use during the Middle Ages, Mark was not common in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when it began to be used alongside the classical form Marcus.

In the Celtic legend of Tristan and Isolde this was the name of a king of Cornwall. It was also borne by the American author Mark Twain (1835-1910), real name Samuel Clemens, the author of 'Tom Sawyer' and 'Huckleberry Finn'. He actually took his pen name from a call used by riverboat workers on the Mississippi River to indicate a depth of two fathoms. This is also the usual English spelling of the name of the 1st-century BC Roman triumvir Marcus Antonius (Mark Antony).

MARTIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish

Other Scripts: Мартин (Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: MAHR-tən (English), mar-TEN (French), MAHR-teen (German), MAHR-tin (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish), MAWR-teen (Hungarian), mahr-TIN (Bulgarian)

Personal note: Martin Charles (honoring)

Rating: 100% based on 1 vote

From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god MARS. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.

An influential bearer of the name was Martin Luther (1483-1546), the theologian who began the Protestant Reformation. The name was also borne by five popes (two of them more commonly known as Marinus). Other more recent bearers include the German philosopher Martin Heidegger (1889-1976), the American civil rights leader Martin Luther King (1929-1968), and the American filmmaker Martin Scorsese (1942-).

MATILDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Swedish, Finnish, Slovak

Pronounced: mə-TIL-də (English)

Personal note: Matilda Josephine (honoring)

From the Germanic name Mahthildis meaning "strength in battle", from the elements maht "might, strength" and hild "battle". Saint Matilda was the wife of the 10th-century German king Henry I the Fowler. The name was brought to England by the Normans, being borne by the wife of William the Conqueror himself. It was popular until the 15th century in England, usually in the vernacular form Maud. Both forms were revived by the 19th century. This name appears in the popular Australian folk song 'Waltzing Matilda', written in 1895.

MATTHEW

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: MATH-yoo (English)

Rating: 70% based on 1 vote

English form of Ματθαιος (Matthaios), which was a Greek form of the Hebrew name מַתִּתְיָהוּ (Mattityahu) meaning "gift of YAHWEH". Saint Matthew, also called Levi, was one of the twelve apostles. He was a tax collector, and supposedly the author of the first Gospel in the New Testament. As an English name, Matthew has been in use since the Middle Ages.

MAX

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Pronounced: MAHKS (German), MAKS (English)

Rating: 25% based on 2 votes

Short form of MAXIMILIAN (or sometimes of MAXWELL in English).

MAXWELL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAKS-wel

Personal note: Maxwell Thomas "Max"

Rating: 15% based on 2 votes

From a Scottish surname meaning "Mack's stream", from the name Mack, a short form of the Scandinavian name MAGNUS, combined with Old English wella "stream". A famous bearer of the surname was James Maxwell (1831-1879), a Scottish physicist who studied gases and electromagnetism.

MICHAEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: מִיכָאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Μιχαηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: MIE-kəl (English), MI-khah-el (German)

Rating: 30% based on 2 votes

From the Hebrew name מִיכָאֵל (Mikha'el) meaning "who is like God?". This is a rhetorical question, implying no person is like God. Michael is one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies, and thus is considered the patron saint of soldiers.

The popularity of the saint led to the name being used by nine Byzantine emperors, including Michael VIII Palaeologus who restored the empire in the 13th century. It has been common in Western Europe since the Middle Ages, and in England since the 12th century. It has been borne (in various spellings) by rulers of Russia (spelled Михаил), Romania (Mihai), Poland (Michał), and Portugal (Miguel). Other bearers of this name include the British chemist/physicist Michael Faraday (1791-1867), musician Michael Jackson (1958-2009), and basketball player Michael Jordan (1963-).

MILES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MIELZ, MIE-əlz

Personal note: Miles Henry

Rating: 30% based on 2 votes

From the Germanic name Milo, introduced by the Normans to England in the form Miles. The meaning is not known for certain. It is possibly connected to the Slavic name element mil meaning "gracious". From an early date it was associated with Latin miles "soldier".

MILO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: MIE-lo (English)

Rating: 65% based on 2 votes

Old Germanic form of MILES, as well as the Latinized form. This form of the name was used in official documents during the Middle Ages, and it has been used independently since the 19th century.

MOLLIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAHL-ee

Personal note: As a nickname for Margaret Olive

Rating: 70% based on 1 vote

Variant of MOLLY

MOLLY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAHL-ee

Personal note: As a nickname for Margaret Olive

Rating: 80% based on 1 vote

Diminutive of MARY. It developed from Malle and Molle, other medieval diminutives. James Joyce used this name in his novel 'Ulysses' (1920), where it belongs to Molly Bloom, the wife of the main character.

NAOMI (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical

Other Scripts: נָעֳמִי (Hebrew)

Pronounced: nay-O-mee (English), nie-O-mee (English)

Rating: 25% based on 2 votes

From the Hebrew name נָעֳמִי (Na'omiy) meaning "pleasantness". In the Old Testament this is the name of the mother-in-law of Ruth. After the death of her husband, Naomi took the name Mara (see Ruth 1:20). Though previously common as a Jewish name, Naomi was not typically used as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation.

NATALIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, German

Pronounced: nat-a-LEE (French), NAD-ə-lee (English), NAH-tah-lee (German)

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

From the Late Latin name Natalia, which meant "Christmas Day" from Latin natale domini. This was the name of the wife of the 4th-century martyr Saint Adrian of Nicomedia. She is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church, and the name has traditionally been more common among Eastern Christians than those in the West. It was popularized in America by actress Natalie Wood (1938-1981), who was born to Russian immigrants.

NATHAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: נָתָן (Ancient Hebrew), Ναθαν (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: NAY-thən (English), na-TAWN (French)

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

Means "he gave" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of both a prophet and a son of King David. It has been used as a Christian given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation.

NELLIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: NEL-ee

Rating: 60% based on 1 vote

Diminutive of NELL

NICHOLAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: NIK-ə-ləs (English), nee-ko-LAH (French)

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

From the Greek name Νικολαος (Nikolaos) which meant "victory of the people" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and λαος (laos) "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, as well as Greece and Russia. He formed the basis for the figure known as Santa Claus (created in the 19th century from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents.

Due to the renown of the saint, this name has been widely used in the Christian world. It has been common in England since the 12th century, though it became a bit less popular after the Protestant Reformation. The name has been borne by five popes and two czars of Russia.

NILES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: NIELZ, NIE-əlz

Rating: 25% based on 2 votes

From a surname which was derived from the given name NEIL.

NILS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian

Rating: 25% based on 2 votes

Swedish and Norwegian form of NICHOLAS

NINA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian, Italian, English, German, French, Polish, Slovene, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian

Other Scripts: Нина (Russian, Serbian)

Pronounced: NEE-nah (Russian, Italian, German, Polish), NEE-nə (English)

Rating: 60% based on 1 vote

Short form of names that end in nina, such as ANTONINA or GIANNINA. It was imported to Western Europe from Russia and Italy in the 19th century. This name also coincides with the Spanish word niña meaning "little girl".

NORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Italian

Pronounced: NAWR-ə (English), NO-rah (German)

Rating: 80% based on 2 votes

Short form of HONORA or ELEANOR. Henrik Ibsen used it for a character in his play 'A Doll's House' (1879).

OLIVE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AHL-iv

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

From the English word for the type of tree, ultimately derived from Latin oliva.

OLIVER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak

Other Scripts: Оливер (Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: AHL-ə-vər (English), AW-lee-ver (German)

Rating: 100% based on 2 votes

From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.

In England Oliver was a common medieval name, however it became rare after the 17th century because of the military commander Oliver Cromwell, who ruled the country following the civil war. The name was revived in the 19th century, perhaps in part due to the title character in Charles Dickens' novel 'Oliver Twist' (1838), which was about a poor orphan living on the streets of London.

OWEN (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh, English

Pronounced: O-ən (English)

Rating: 40% based on 2 votes

Modern form of OWAIN

PATRICK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English, French, German

Pronounced: PAT-rik (English), pat-REEK (French), PAHT-rik (German)

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

From the Latin name Patricius, which meant "nobleman". This name was adopted in the 5th-century by Saint Patrick, whose birth name was Sucat. He was a Romanized Briton who was captured and enslaved in his youth by Irish raiders. After six years of servitude he escaped home, but he eventually became a bishop and went back to Ireland as a missionary. He is traditionally credited with Christianizing the island, and is regarded as Ireland's patron saint.

In England and elsewhere in Europe during the Middle Ages this name was used in honour of the saint. However, it was not generally given in Ireland before the 17th century because it was considered too sacred for everyday use. It has since become very common there.

PAUL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Biblical

Pronounced: PAWL (English), POL (French), POWL (German)

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

From the Roman family name Paulus, which meant "small" or "humble" in Latin. Saint Paul was an important leader of the early Christian church, his story told in Acts in the New Testament. His original Hebrew name was Saul. Most of the epistles in the New Testament were authored by him.

Due to the renown of Saint Paul the name became common among early Christians. It was borne by a number of other early saints and six popes. In England it was relatively rare during the Middle Ages, but became more frequent beginning in the 17th century. A notable bearer was the American Revolutionary War figure Paul Revere (1735-1818), who warned of the advance of the British army. Famous bearers in the art world include the French impressionists Paul Cezanne (1839-1906) and Paul Gauguin (1848-1903), and the Swiss expressionist Paul Klee (1879-1940). It is borne by British musician Paul McCartney (1942-). This is also the name of the legendary American lumberjack Paul Bunyan.

PETER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Slovak, Biblical

Pronounced: PEE-tər (English), PE-ter (German, Slovak), PAY-tər (Dutch)

Derived from the Greek Πετρος (Petros) meaning "stone". This is a translation used in most versions of the New Testament of the name Cephas, meaning "stone" in Aramaic, which was given to the apostle Simon by Jesus (compare Matthew 16:18 and John 1:42). Simon Peter was the most prominent of the apostles during Jesus' ministry and is often considered the first pope.

Due to the renown of the apostle, this name became common throughout the Christian world (in various spellings). In England the Normans introduced it in the Old French form Piers, which was gradually replaced by the spelling Peter starting in the 15th century.

Besides the apostle, other saints by this name include the 11th-century reformer Saint Peter Damian and the 13th-century preacher Saint Peter Martyr. It was also borne by rulers of Aragon, Portugal, and Russia, including the Russian tsar Peter the Great (1672-1725), who defeated Sweden in the Great Northern War. Famous fictional bearers include Peter Rabbit from Beatrix Potter's children's books, and Peter Pan, the boy who refused to grow up in J. M. Barrie's 1904 play.

PRISCILLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical

Pronounced: pri-SIL-ə (English), pree-SHEEL-lah (Italian)

Rating: 70% based on 1 vote

Roman name, a diminutive of PRISCA. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lived with Priscilla and her husband Aquila in Corinth for a while. It has been used as an English given name since the Protestant Reformation, being popular with the Puritans. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow used it in his poem 'The Courtship of Miles Standish' (1858).

PRUDENCE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: PROO-dənts (English)

Medieval English form of Prudentia, the feminine form of PRUDENTIUS. In France it is both the feminine form and a rare masculine form. In England it was used during the Middle Ages and was revived in the 17th century by the Puritans, in part from the English word prudence, ultimately of the same source.

REED

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: REED

Rating: 30% based on 2 votes

From an English surname which comes from multiple sources, including Old English read meaning "red" (originally a nickname given to a person with red hair or a ruddy complexion) and Old English ried meaning "clearing" (given to a person who lived in a clearing in the woods).

RENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

Latinate feminine form of RENÉ

RENÉE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, Dutch

Pronounced: rə-NAY (French)

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

French feminine form of RENÉ

ROBIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch, Swedish

Pronounced: RAH-bin (English)

Rating: 75% based on 2 votes

Medieval diminutive of ROBERT. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor. In modern times it has also been used as a feminine name, and it may sometimes be given in reference to the red-breasted bird.

ROSA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English

Pronounced: RO-sah (Spanish, Dutch), RAW-zah (Italian), RO-zə (English)

Generally this can be considered a Latin form of ROSE, though originally it may have come from the Germanic name ROZA (2). This was the name of a 13th-century saint from Viterbo in Italy. In the English-speaking world it was first used in the 19th century. A famous bearer was civil rights activist Rosa Parks (1913-2005).

ROSALIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, German, English

Pronounced: ro-za-LEE (French), RO-zə-lee (English)

Rating: 45% based on 2 votes

French and German form of ROSALIA. In the English-speaking this name received a boost after the release of the movie 'Rosalie' (1938), which was based on an earlier musical.

ROSALIND

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ROZ-ə-lind

Rating: 40% based on 2 votes

Derived from the Germanic elements hros "horse" and linde "soft, tender". The Normans introduced this name to England, though it was not common. During the Middle Ages its spelling was influenced by the Latin phrase rosa linda "beautiful rose". The name was popularized by Edmund Spencer, who used it in his poetry, and by William Shakespeare, who used it for the heroine in his comedy 'As You Like It' (1599).

ROSE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: ROZ

Rating: 55% based on 2 votes

Originally a Norman form of a Germanic name, which was composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.

ROSEMARY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ROZ-mə-ree

Rating: 45% based on 2 votes

Combination of ROSE and MARY. This name can also be given in reference to the herb, which gets its name from Latin ros marinus meaning "dew of the sea". It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.

ROYCE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ROIS

Rating: 20% based on 2 votes

From a surname which was derived from the medieval given name Royse, a variant of ROSE.

RUBY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ROO-bee

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

Simply means "ruby" from the name of the precious stone (which ultimately derives from Latin ruber "red"), which is the birthstone of July. It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.

RUTH (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: רוּת (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: ROOTH (English), ROOT (German)

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

From a Hebrew name which was derived from the Hebrew word רְעוּת (re'ut) meaning "friend". This is the name of the central character in the Book of Ruth in the Old Testament, a Moabite woman who was the ancestor of King David. As a Christian name, Ruth has been in use since the Protestant Reformation. It became very popular in America following the birth of "Baby" Ruth Cleveland (1891-1904), the daughter of President Grover Cleveland.

SALLY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SAL-ee

Rating: 70% based on 2 votes

Diminutive of SARAH

SAMUEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Biblical

Other Scripts: שְׁמוּאֵל (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: SAM-yoo-əl (English), SAM-yəl (English)

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

From the Hebrew name שְׁמוּאֵל (Shemu'el) which could mean either "name of God" or "God has heard". Samuel was the last of the ruling judges in the Old Testament. He anointed Saul to be the first king of Israel, and later anointed David.

As a Christian name, Samuel came into common use after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers include American inventor Samuel Morse (1791-1872), Irish writer Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), and American author Samuel Clemens (1835-1910), who wrote under the pen name Mark Twain.

SARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Polish, English, Arabic, Iranian, Bosnian

Other Scripts: Σαρα (Greek), Сара (Serbian, Macedonian), سارة (Arabic), سارا (Persian)

Pronounced: SAH-rah (Spanish, Dutch, Polish), ZAH-rah (German), SER-ə (English), SAR-ə (English)

Form of SARAH

SARAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, German, Hebrew, Arabic, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: שָׂרָה (Hebrew), سارة (Arabic)

Pronounced: SER-ə (English), SAR-ə (English), ZAH-rah (German)

Rating: 45% based on 2 votes

Means "lady" or "princess" in Hebrew. This is the name of the wife of Abraham in the Old Testament. She became the mother of Isaac at the age of 90. Her name was originally Sarai, but God changed it (see Genesis 17:15). In England, Sarah came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

SERENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Late Roman

Pronounced: sə-REEN-ə (English), se-RE-nah (Italian)

Rating: 80% based on 1 vote

From a Late Latin name which was derived from Latin serenus meaning "clear, tranquil, serene". This name was borne by an obscure early saint. Edmund Spenser also used it in his poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590).

SETH (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: שֵׁת (Ancient Hebrew), Σηθ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: SETH (English)

Rating: 30% based on 2 votes

Means "placed" or "appointed" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the third named son of Adam and Eve. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

SIMON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Симон (Macedonian), სიმონ (Georgian), Σιμων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: SIE-mən (English), see-MAWN (French), ZEE-mawn (German), SEE-mawn (Dutch)

Rating: 35% based on 2 votes

From Σιμων (Simon), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name שִׁמְעוֹן (Shim'on) which meant "he has heard". This was the name of several biblical characters, including the man who carried the cross for Jesus. However, the most important person of this name in the New Testament was the apostle Simon, also known as Peter (a name given to him by Jesus). Because of him, this name has been common in the Christian world. In England it was popular during the Middle Ages, though it became rarer after the Protestant Reformation.

SOPHIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Σοφια (Greek)

Pronounced: so-FEE-ə (English), so-FIE-ə (British English), zo-FEE-ah (German)

Rating: 40% based on 2 votes

Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which was the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.

This name was common among continental European royalty during the Middle Ages, and it was popularized in Britain by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century. It was the name of characters in the novels 'Tom Jones' (1749) by Henry Fielding and 'The Vicar of Wakefield' (1766) by Oliver Goldsmith.

SPENCER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SPEN-sər

Rating: 15% based on 2 votes

From a surname which meant "dispenser of provisions" in Middle English. A famous bearer was American actor Spencer Tracy (1900-1967). It was also the surname of Princess Diana (1961-1997).

STELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian

Pronounced: STEL-ə (English)

Rating: 80% based on 2 votes

Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets 'Astrophel and Stella'. It was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play 'A Streetcar Named Desire' (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.

STEPHEN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: STEEV-ən (English), STEF-ən (English)

Rating: 30% based on 2 votes

From the Greek name Στεφανος (Stephanos) meaning "crown". Saint Stephen was a deacon who was stoned to death, as told in Acts in the New Testament, and he is regarded as the first Christian martyr. Due to him, the name became common in the Christian world. It was popularized in England by the Normans.

This was the name of kings of England, Serbia, and Poland, as well as ten popes. It was also borne by the first Christian king of Hungary (10th century), who is regarded as the patron saint of that country. More recent bearers include British physicist Stephen Hawking (1942-) and the American author Stephen King (1947-).

STEVEN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: STEEV-ən (English), STAY-vən (Dutch)

Rating: 30% based on 2 votes

Medieval English variant of STEPHEN, and a Dutch variant of STEFAN. The filmmaker Steven Spielberg (1946-), director of 'E.T.' and 'Indiana Jones', is a famous bearer of this name.

SYLVIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German

Pronounced: SIL-vee-ə (English)

Rating: 45% based on 2 votes

Variant of SILVIA. This has been the most common English spelling since the 19th century.

TAYLOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: TAY-lər

Rating: 30% based on 2 votes

From an English surname which originally denoted someone who was a tailor, from Norman French tailleur, ultimately from Latin taliare "to cut". British author Taylor Caldwell (1900-1985) may have been an influence on its modern use as a feminine name.

THEODORE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: THEE-ə-dawr

Rating: 100% based on 1 vote

From the Greek name Θεοδωρος (Theodoros), which meant "gift of god" from Greek θεος (theos) "god" and δωρον (doron) "gift". This was the name of several saints, including Theodore of Amasea, a 4th-century Greek soldier; Theodore of Tarsus, a 7th-century archbishop of Canterbury; and Theodore the Studite, a 9th-century Byzantine monk. It was also borne by two popes.

This was a common name in classical Greece, and, due to both the saints who carried it and the favourable meaning, it came into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was however rare in Britain before the 19th century. Famous bearers include three tsars of Russia (in the Russian form Fyodor) and American president Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919).

THOMAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Θωμας (Greek)

Pronounced: TAHM-əs (English), TOM-əs (English), to-MAH (French), TO-mahs (German, Dutch), tho-MAHS (Greek)

Rating: 100% based on 1 vote

Greek form of the Aramaic name תָּאוֹמָא (Ta'oma') which meant "twin". In the New Testament this is the name of the apostle who initially doubts the resurrected Jesus. According to tradition he was martyred in India. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world.

In England the name was introduced by the Normans and became very popular due to Saint Thomas Becket, a 12th-century archbishop of Canterbury and martyr. Another notable saint by this name was the 13th-century Italian philosopher and theologian Thomas Aquinas, who is regarded as a Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include philosopher Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), American president Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), novelist Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), and inventor Thomas Edison (1847-1931).

VALERIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Czech

Pronounced: VAL-ə-ree (English), VAH-le-ree (German)

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

English and German form of VALERIA and Czech variant of VALÉRIE.

VANCE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: VANTS

Rating: 35% based on 2 votes

From an English surname which was derived from Old English fenn meaning "marsh, fen".

VERA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Portuguese

Other Scripts: Вера (Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: VYE-rah (Russian), VEER-ə (English), VER-ə (English)

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.

VERONICA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Romanian, Late Roman

Pronounced: və-RAHN-i-kə (English)

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

Latin alteration of BERENICE, the spelling influenced by the ecclesiastical Latin phrase vera icon meaning "true image". This was the name of a legendary saint who wiped Jesus' face with a towel and then found his image imprinted upon it. Due to popular stories about her, the name was occasionally used in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. It was borne by the 17th-century Italian saint and mystic Veronica Giuliani. As an English name, it was not common until the 19th century, when it was imported from France and Scotland.

VICTORIA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, Late Roman

Pronounced: vik-TAWR-ee-ə (English)

Rating: 100% based on 1 vote

Feminine form of VICTORIUS, though later it was regarded as coming directly from Latin victoria meaning "victory". It was borne by a 4th-century saint and martyr from North Africa. Though in use elsewhere in Europe, the name was very rare in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when Queen Victoria began her long rule of Britain. She was named after her mother, who was of German royalty. Many geographic areas are named after the queen, including an Australian state and a Canadian city.

VINCENT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak

Pronounced: VIN-sənt (English), ven-SAWN (French)

Rating: 90% based on 1 vote

From the Roman name Vincentius, which was from Latin vincere "to conquer". This name was popular among early Christians, and it was borne by many saints. As an English name, Vincent has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 19th century. Famous bearers include the French priest Saint Vincent de Paul (1581-1660) and the post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890).

VIOLET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: VIE-lət, VIE-ə-lət

Rating: 30% based on 1 vote

From the English word violet for the purple flower, ultimately derived from Latin viola. It was common in Scotland from the 16th century, and it came into general use as an English given name during the 19th century.

VIVIAN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: VIV-ee-ən (English)

Rating: 30% based on 2 votes

From the Latin name Vivianus which was derived from Latin vivus "alive". Saint Vivian was a French bishop who provided protection during the Visigoth invasion of the 5th century. It has been occasionally used as an English (masculine) name since the Middle Ages. In modern times it is also used as a feminine name, in which case it is either an Anglicized form of BÉBINN or a variant of VIVIEN (2).

WALTER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Italian, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: WAWL-tər (English), VAHL-ter (German, Polish, Italian)

Rating: 40% based on 2 votes

From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the army", composed of the elements wald "rule" and hari "army". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Wealdhere. A famous bearer of the name was Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), a Scottish novelist who wrote 'Ivanhoe' and other notable works.

WARREN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WAWR-ən

Rating: 35% based on 2 votes

From an English surname which was derived either from Norman French warrene meaning "animal enclosure", or else from the town of La Varenne in Normandy. This name was borne by the American president Warren G. Harding (1865-1923).

WESLEY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WES-lee

Rating: 70% based on 1 vote

From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "west meadow" in Old English. It has been sometimes given in honour of John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism.

WILEY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WIE-lee

Rating: 20% based on 2 votes

From a surname which was derived either from a place name meaning "temple clearing" in Old English or from a nickname meaning "wily, tricky" in Middle English.

WILLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WIL-ə

Rating: 15% based on 2 votes

Feminine form of WILLIAM

WILLIAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WIL-ee-əm, WIL-yəm

Rating: 25% based on 2 votes

From the Germanic name Willahelm, which was composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". Saint William of Gellone was an 8th-century cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England. It was later borne by three other English kings, as well as rulers of Scotland, Sicily (of Norman origin), the Netherlands and Prussia.

Other famous bearers include William Wallace, a 13th-century Scottish hero, and William Tell, a legendary 14th-century Swiss hero. In the literary world it was borne by dramatist William Shakespeare (1564-1616), poet William Blake (1757-1827), poet William Wordsworth (1770-1850), dramatist William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), author William Faulkner (1897-1962), and author William S. Burroughs (1914-1997).

WINONA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Native American, Sioux

Pronounced: wi-NON-ə (English)

Means "firstborn daughter" in the Dakota language. This was the name of the daughter of the Sioux Dakota chief Wapasha III.

WYNONA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: wi-NON-ə

Variant of WINONA
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2014.