LadyBug18's Personal Name List

ABEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: აბელ (Georgian), הֶבֶל, הָבֶל (Ancient Hebrew), Αβελ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: AY-bəl (English), ah-BEL (Spanish), ə-BEL (Portuguese)

Rating: 53% based on 4 votes

From the Hebrew name הֶבֶל (Hevel) or הָבֶל (Havel) which meant "breath". In the Old Testament he is the second son of Adam and Eve, murdered out of envy by his brother Cain. In England, this name came into use during the Middle Ages, and it was common during the Puritan era.

ADELAIDE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese

Pronounced: AD-ə-layd (English), ah-de-LIE-de (Italian), ə-də-LIED (Portuguese)

Rating: 25% based on 4 votes

From the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman Emperor Otto the Great. The name became common in Britain in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.

ADELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: a-də-LEEN (French), AD-ə-lien (English)

Rating: 30% based on 4 votes

Diminutive of ADÈLE

AIDAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, Scottish, English (Modern)

Pronounced: AY-dən

Rating: 25% based on 4 votes

Anglicized form of AODHÁN. In the latter part of the 20th century it became popular in America due to its sound, since it uses the same fashionable aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden and Hayden.

ALEC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AL-ək

Rating: 25% based on 4 votes

Short form of ALEXANDER

AMELIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: ə-MEE-lee-ə (English), ə-MEEL-yə (English), ah-ME-lyah (Italian), ah-ME-lee-ah (German)

Rating: 50% based on 4 votes

Variant of AMALIA, though it is sometimes confused with EMILIA, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of George II and George III. Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.

AMY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AY-mee

Rating: 50% based on 4 votes

English form of the Old French name Amée meaning "beloved" (modern French aimée), a vernacular form of the Latin Amata. As an English name, it was in use in the Middle Ages (though not common) and was revived in the 19th century.

ANNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Αννα (Greek), Анна (Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Bulgarian, Church Slavic)

Pronounced: AN-a (English), AHN-nah (Italian, Dutch, Polish), AH-nah (German, Russian)

Rating: 60% based on 4 votes

Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary. In the English-speaking world, this form came into general use in the 18th century, joining Ann and Anne.

The name was borne by several Russian royals, including an 18th-century empress of Russia. It was also the name of the main character in Leo Tolstoy's novel 'Anna Karenina' (1877), a woman forced to choose between her son and her lover.

ANNE (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Basque

Pronounced: AHN (French), AN (English), AH-nə (German), AHN-nə (Dutch)

Rating: 80% based on 4 votes

French form of ANNA. In the 13th-century it was imported to England, where it was also commonly spelled Ann. The name was borne by a 17th-century English queen and also by the second wife of Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn (the mother of Queen Elizabeth I), who was eventually beheaded in the Tower of London. This is also the name of the heroine in 'Anne of Green Gables' (1908) by Canadian author L. M. Montgomery.

ARABELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Rating: 23% based on 4 votes

Medieval Scottish name, probably a variant of ANNABEL. It has long been associated with Latin orabilis meaning "invokable".

ARTEMIS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Αρτεμις (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: AHR-tə-mis (English)

Rating: 48% based on 4 votes

Meaning unknown, possibly related either to Greek αρτεμης (artemes) "safe" or αρταμος (artamos) "a butcher". Artemis was the Greek goddess of the moon and hunting, the twin of Apollo and the daughter of Zeus and Leto. She was known as Diana to the Romans.

ARTHUR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: AHR-thər (English), ar-TUYR (French), AHR-toor (German), AHR-tur (Dutch)

Rating: 87% based on 3 votes

The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.

The name came into general use in England in the Middle Ages due to the prevalence of Arthurian romances, and it enjoyed a surge of popularity in the 19th century. Famous bearers include German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), mystery author and Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), and science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008).

ASA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: אָסָא (Hebrew)

Pronounced: AY-sə (English)

Rating: 33% based on 4 votes

Means "doctor" in Hebrew. This name was borne by a king of Judah in the Old Testament.

AURELIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Roman, Italian, Romanian, Polish

Pronounced: ow-RE-lyah (Italian), ow-REL-yah (Polish)

Rating: 75% based on 4 votes

Feminine form of AURELIUS

BARTHOLOMEW

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: bahr-THAHL-ə-myoo (English)

Rating: 68% based on 4 votes

From Βαρθολομαιος (Bartholomaios), which was the Greek form of an Aramaic name meaning "son of TALMAI". In the New Testament Bartholomew is the byname of an apostle also known as Nathaniel. Due to the popularity of this saint the name became common in England during the Middle Ages.

BEATRICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, English, Swedish

Pronounced: be-ah-TREE-che (Italian), BEE-ə-tris (English), BEE-tris (English), BE-ah-trees (Swedish), be-ah-TREES (Swedish)

Rating: 73% based on 4 votes

Italian form of BEATRIX. Beatrice Portinari was the woman who was loved by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. She served as Dante's guide through paradise in his epic poem 'The Divine Comedy' (1321). This was also the name of a character in Shakespeare's play 'Much Ado About Nothing' (1599).

BEATRIX

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Late Roman

Pronounced: BEE-ə-triks (English), BE-ah-triks (German), BAY-ah-triks (Dutch)

Rating: 100% based on 4 votes

Probably from Viatrix, a feminine form of the Late Latin name Viator which meant "voyager, traveller". It was a common name amongst early Christians, and the spelling was altered by association with Latin beatus "blessed". Viatrix or Beatrix was a 4th-century saint who was strangled to death during the persecutions of Diocletian. In England it became rare after the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the British author and illustrator Beatrix Potter (1866-1943), the creator of Peter Rabbit.

BEN (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch

Pronounced: BEN

Rating: 60% based on 4 votes

Short form of BENJAMIN or BENEDICT. A notable bearer was Ben Jonson (1572-1637), an English poet and playwright.

BENJAMIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Biblical

Other Scripts: בִּנְיָמִין (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: BEN-jə-min (English), ben-zha-MEN (French), BEN-yah-meen (German)

Rating: 78% based on 4 votes

From the Hebrew name בִּנְיָמִין (Binyamin) which means "son of the south" or "son of the right hand". Benjamin in the Old Testament is the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob and the founder of one of the southern tribes of the Hebrews. He was originally named בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oniy) meaning "son of my sorrow" by his mother Rachel, who died shortly after childbirth, but it was later changed by his father.

As an English name, Benjamin came into general use after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), an American statesman, inventor, scientist and philosopher.

BETHANY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: BETH-ə-nee (English)

Rating: 45% based on 2 votes

From the name of a biblical town, possibly derived from Hebrew בֵּית־תְּאֵנָה (beit-te'enah) meaning "house of figs". In the New Testament the town of Bethany was the home of Lazarus and his sisters Mary and Martha. It has been in use as a rare given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, used primarily by Catholics in honour of Mary of Bethany. In America it became moderately common after the 1950s.

CALLUM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish

Pronounced: KAL-um

Rating: 30% based on 4 votes

Variant of CALUM

CASEY

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English, Irish

Pronounced: KAY-see

Rating: 30% based on 2 votes

From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cathasaigh meaning "descendent of CATHASACH". This name can be given in honour of Casey Jones (1863-1900), a train engineer who sacrificed his life to save his passengers. In his case, Casey was a nickname acquired because he was raised in the town of Cayce, Kentucky.

CASPIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Literature

Pronounced: KAS-pee-ən (English)

Rating: 65% based on 4 votes

Used by author C. S. Lewis for a character in his 'Chronicles of Narnia' series, first appearing in 1950. Prince Caspian first appears in the fourth book, where he is the rightful king of Narnia driven into exile by his evil uncle Miraz. Lewis probably based the name on the Caspian Sea, which was named for the city of Qazvin, which was itself named for the ancient Cas tribe.

CASSANDRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Κασσανδρα (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: kə-SAN-drə (English), kə-SAHN-drə (English), kahs-SAHN-drah (Italian)

Rating: 28% based on 4 votes

From the Greek Κασσανδρα (Kassandra), which possibly meant "shining upon man", derived from κεκασμαι (kekasmai) "to shine" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek myth Cassandra was a Trojan princess, the daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but when she spurned his advances he cursed her so nobody would believe her prophecies.

In the Middle Ages this name was common in England due to the popularity of medieval tales about the Trojan War. It subsequently became rare, but was revived in the 20th century.

CATHERINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: ka-tə-REEN (French), ka-TREEN (French), KATH-ə-rin (English), KATH-rin (English)

Rating: 60% based on 4 votes

French form of KATHERINE, and also a common English variant.

CIANÁN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 50% based on 4 votes

Diminutive of CIAN. This was the name of a 5th-century Irish saint.

CIARÁN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: KEER-awn, KEE-ar-awn

Rating: 35% based on 4 votes

Diminutive of CIAR. This was the name of two Irish saints: Saint Ciarán the Elder, the patron of the Kingdom of Munster, and Saint Ciarán of Clonmacnoise, the founder of a monastery in the 6th century.

CLAIRE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: KLER

Rating: 78% based on 4 votes

French form of CLARA

CLARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, English, Late Roman

Pronounced: KLAH-rah (Italian, German, Spanish), KLER-ə (English), KLAR-ə (English)

Rating: 85% based on 4 votes

Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.

COLIN (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, Irish, English

Pronounced: KAHL-in (Scottish, Irish, English), KOL-in (English)

Rating: 45% based on 4 votes

Anglicized form of CAILEAN or COILEAN

COLIN (2)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KAHL-in

Rating: 43% based on 3 votes

Medieval diminutive of Col, a short form of NICHOLAS.

CORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German

Pronounced: KAWR-ə (English)

Rating: 43% based on 4 votes

Created by James Fenimore Cooper for his novel 'The Last of the Mohicans' (1826). He may have based it on KORË or CORINNA.

CRISPIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: KRIS-pin

Rating: 25% based on 4 votes

From the Roman cognomen Crispinus which was derived from the name CRISPUS. Saint Crispin was a 3rd-century Roman who was martyred with his twin brother Crispinian in Gaul. They are the patrons of shoemakers. They were popular saints in England during the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.

DAVID

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: דָּוִד (Hebrew), Давид (Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: DAY-vid (English), dah-VEED (Jewish), da-VEED (French), DAH-vit (German, Dutch), dah-VEET (Russian)

Rating: 93% based on 4 votes

From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was probably derived from Hebrew דוד (dwd) meaning "beloved". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.

This name has been used in Britain since the Middle Ages. It has been especially popular in Wales, where it is used in honour of the 5th-century patron saint of Wales (also called Dewi), as well as in Scotland, where it was borne by two kings. Famous bearers include empiricist philosopher David Hume (1711-1776), explorer David Livingstone (1813-1873) and soccer player David Beckham (1975-). This is also the name of the hero of Charles Dickens' semi-autobiographical novel 'David Copperfield' (1850).

DECLAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 78% based on 4 votes

Anglicized form of Irish Deaglán, which is of unknown meaning. Saint Declan was a 5th-century missionary to Ireland.

DELYTH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 28% based on 4 votes

From an elaboration of the Welsh element del "pretty".

DERMOT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 65% based on 4 votes

Anglicized form of DIARMAID

DIARMAID

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology

Pronounced: DEER-mid

Rating: 55% based on 4 votes

Perhaps means "without envy" in Irish. In Irish mythology this was the name of a warrior who became the lover of Gráinne. It was also the name of several ancient Irish kings.

DOUGLAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: DUG-ləs

Rating: 50% based on 4 votes

Anglicized form of the Scottish surname Dubhghlas, meaning "dark river" from Gaelic dubh "dark" and glais "water, river". Douglas was originally a river name, which then became a Scottish clan name (belonging to a powerful line of Scottish earls). It has been used as a given name since the 16th century.

EAMON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 38% based on 4 votes

Variant of ÉAMONN

EDMUND

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Polish

Pronounced: ED-mənd (English), ED-muwnt (German, Polish)

Rating: 98% based on 4 votes

Means "rich protector" from Old English ead "rich, blessed" and mund "protector". This was the name of two Anglo-Saxon kings of England. It was also borne by two saints, including a 9th-century king of East Anglia who, according to tradition, was shot to death with arrows after refusing to divide his Christian kingdom with an invading pagan Danish leader. This Old English name remained in use after the Norman conquest (even being used by king Henry III for one of his sons), though it became less common after the 15th century.

Famous bearers of the name include the English poet Edmund Spenser (1552-1599), the German-Czech philosopher Edmund Husserl (1859-1938) and New Zealand mountaineer Sir Edmund Hillary (1919-2008), the first person to climb Mount Everest.

ELEANOR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ə-nawr

Rating: 75% based on 4 votes

From the Old French form of the Occitan name Aliénor. It was first borne by the influential Eleanor of Aquitaine (12th century), who was the queen of Louis VII, the king of France, and later Henry II, the king of England. She was named Aenor after her mother, and was called by the Occitan phrase alia Aenor "the other AENOR" in order to distinguish her from her mother.

The popularity of the name Eleanor in England during the Middle Ages was due to the fame of Eleanor of Aquitaine, as well as two queens of the following century: Eleanor of Provence, the wife of Henry III, and Eleanor of Castile, the wife of Edward I. More recently, it was borne by first lady Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), the wife of American president Franklin Roosevelt.

ELENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Bulgarian, Romanian, Macedonian, Croatian, Slovene, Lithuanian, Russian, German, Medieval Slavic

Other Scripts: Елена (Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Church Slavic)

Pronounced: E-le-nah (Italian), e-LE-nah (Spanish), ye-LYE-nah (Russian), ee-LYE-nah (Russian)

Rating: 45% based on 4 votes

Cognate of HELEN, and a variant Russian transcription of YELENA.

ELIAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Ηλιας (Greek)

Pronounced: e-LEE-ahs (German), i-LIE-əs (English), ee-LIE-əs (English)

Rating: 50% based on 4 votes

Cognate of ELIJAH. This is the form used in the Greek New Testament.

ELINOR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ə-nawr

Rating: 48% based on 4 votes

Variant of ELEANOR

ELIZA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Polish

Pronounced: i-LIE-zə (English), e-LEE-zah (Polish)

Rating: 60% based on 2 votes

Short form of ELIZABETH. It was borne by the character Eliza Doolittle in George Bernard Shaw's play 'Pygmalion' (1913) and the subsequent musical adaptation 'My Fair Lady' (1956).

ELLA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ə

Rating: 53% based on 4 votes

Norman form of the Germanic name Alia, which was a short form of names containing the Germanic element ali meaning "other". It was introduced to England by the Normans and used until the 14th century, and it was later revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the American singer Ella Fitzgerald (1917-1996).

ELLIOTT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ee-ət

Rating: 15% based on 4 votes

From an English surname which was derived from a diminutive of the medieval name ELIAS.

ELOISE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-o-eez, el-o-EEZ

Rating: 75% based on 4 votes

From the Old French name Héloïse, which is probably from the Germanic name Helewidis, composed of the elements heil "hale, healthy" and wid "wide". It is sometimes associated with the Greek word ‘ηλιος (helios) "sun" or the name Louise, though there is not likely an etymological connection. This name was borne in the 12th century by Saint Eloise, the wife of the French theologian Peter Abelard. She became a nun after her husband was castrated by her uncle.

There was a medieval English form of this name, Helewis, though it died out after the 13th century. In the 19th century it was revived in the English-speaking world in the form Eloise.

EMILIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Finnish, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English

Pronounced: e-MEEL-yah (Italian, Spanish, Polish)

Rating: 90% based on 2 votes

Feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).

EMMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: EM-ə (English), E-mah (German)

Rating: 70% based on 4 votes

Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of king Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of king Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.

After the Norman conquest this name became common in England. It was revived in the 18th century, perhaps in part due to Matthew Prior's poem 'Henry and Emma' (1709). It was also used by Jane Austen for the central character, the matchmaker Emma Woodhouse, in her novel 'Emma' (1816).

EMMETT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EM-it

Rating: 60% based on 3 votes

From an English surname which was derived from a diminutive of the feminine given name EMMA.

ESTHER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Spanish, Dutch, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: אֶסְתֵר (Hebrew), Εσθηρ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ES-tər (English, Dutch), es-TER (French)

Rating: 73% based on 4 votes

Possibly means "star" in Persian. Alternatively it could be a derivative of the name of the Near Eastern goddess ISHTAR. The Book of Esther in the Old Testament tells the story of Queen Esther, the Jewish wife of the king of Persia who saved the Jews of the realm from extermination. Her original Hebrew name was Hadassah.

This name has been used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. In America it received a boost in popularity after the birth of Esther Cleveland (1893-1980), the daughter of president Grover Cleveland.

EUSTACE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: YOO-stəs

Rating: 63% based on 4 votes

English form of Eustachius, a Latin form of the Greek name Ευσταχυς (Eustachys) meaning "fruitful". Saint Eustace was a 2nd-century martyr, a Roman general who became a Christian after seeing a vision of a cross between the antlers of a stag he was hunting. He was burned to death for refusing to worship the Roman gods and is now regarded as the patron saint of hunters. Due to him, this name was common in England during the Middle Ages, though it is presently rare.

EVANGELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ə-VAN-jə-leen

Rating: 63% based on 4 votes

Means "good news" from Greek ευ "good" and αγγελμα (angelma) "news, message". It was (first?) used by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in his epic poem 'Evangeline' (1847).

EVE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Biblical

Other Scripts: חַוָּה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: EEV (English), EV (French)

Rating: 48% based on 4 votes

From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חוה (chawah) "to breathe" or the related word חיה (chayah) "to live". According to the Old Testament Book of Genesis, Eve and Adam were the first humans. She gave the forbidden fruit to Adam, causing their expulsion from the Garden of Eden. Despite this potentially negative association, the name was occasionally used during the Middle Ages. In the English-speaking world both Eve and the Latin form Eva were revived in the 19th century.

EWAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish

Rating: 25% based on 4 votes

Anglicized form of EOGHAN

EZEKIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English

Other Scripts: יְחֶזְקֵאל (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: i-ZEE-kee-əl (English), i-ZEE-kyəl (English)

Rating: 33% based on 4 votes

From the Hebrew name יְחֶזְקֵאל (Yechezqel) meaning "God strengthens". Ezekiel is a major prophet of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Ezekiel. He lived in Jerusalem until the Babylonian conquest and captivity of Israel, at which time he was taken to Babylon. The Book of Ezekiel describes his vivid symbolic visions that predict the restoration of the kingdom of Israel. As an English given name, Ezekiel has been used since the Protestant Reformation.

EZRA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew

Other Scripts: עֶזְרָא (Hebrew)

Pronounced: EZ-rə (English)

Rating: 33% based on 4 votes

Means "help" in Hebrew. Ezra is a prophet of the Old Testament and the author of the Book of Ezra. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. The American poet Ezra Pound (1885-1972) was a famous bearer.

FINBAR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: FIN-bar

Rating: 55% based on 4 votes

Variant of FIONNBHARR

FREDERICK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: FRED-ə-rik, FRED-rik

Rating: 65% based on 4 votes

English form of a Germanic name meaning "peaceful ruler", derived from frid "peace" and ric "ruler, power". This name has long been common in continental Germanic-speaking regions, being borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire, Germany, Austria, Scandinavia, and Prussia. Notables among these rulers include the 12th-century Holy Roman Emperor and crusader Frederick I Barbarossa, the 13th-century emperor and patron of the arts Frederick II, and the 18th-century Frederick II of Prussia, known as Frederick the Great.

The Normans brought the name to England in the 11th century but it quickly died out. It was reintroduced by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century. A famous bearer was Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), an American ex-slave who became a leading advocate of abolition.

GARETH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh, English (British), Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: GAR-əth (Welsh, English)

Rating: 30% based on 4 votes

Meaning unknown. It first appears in this form in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation of Arthurian legends 'Le Morte d'Arthur', in which Gareth was a Knight of the Round Table, the brother of Sir Gawain. Malory based the name on Gahariet, which was the name of a similar Arthurian character in French sources. It may ultimately have a Welsh origin, possibly related to gwaredd meaning "gentleness".

GARRETT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: GER-it, GAR-it

Rating: 30% based on 4 votes

From an English surname which was derived from the given name GERALD or GERARD. A famous bearer of the surname was Pat Garrett (1850-1908), the sheriff who shot Billy the Kid.

GETHIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 33% based on 4 votes

Means "dark-skinned, swarthy" in Welsh.

GIDEON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew

Other Scripts: גִּדְעוֹן (Hebrew)

Pronounced: GID-ee-ən (English)

Rating: 70% based on 4 votes

Means "feller" or "hewer" in Hebrew. Gideon was a hero of the Old Testament who led the Israelites against the Midianites. In the English-speaking world, Gideon has been used as a given name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans.

GRACE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: GRAYS

Rating: 60% based on 4 votes

From the English word grace, which ultimately derives from Latin gratia. This was one of the virtue names created in the 17th century by the Puritans. The actress Grace Kelly (1929-1982) was a famous bearer.

GWYNETH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh, English (Modern)

Rating: 35% based on 4 votes

Possibly a variant of GWYNEDD or a form of Welsh gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed". It has been common in Wales since the 19th century.

HELENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Finnish, Estonian, Slovene, Croatian, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: ‘Ελενη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: he-LE-nah (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish), hay-LAY-nah (Dutch)

Rating: 68% based on 4 votes

Latinate form of HELEN

HENRY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HEN-ree

Rating: 100% based on 4 votes

From the Germanic name Heimirich which meant "home ruler", composed of the elements heim "home" and ric "power, ruler". It was later commonly spelled Heinrich, with the spelling altered due to the influence of other Germanic names like Haganrich, in which the first element is hagan "enclosure".

Heinrich was popular among continental royalty, being the name of seven German kings, starting with the 10th-century Henry I the Fowler, and four French kings. In France it was rendered Henri from the Latin form Henricus.

The Normans introduced this name to England, and it was subsequently used by eight kings, ending with the infamous Henry VIII in the 16th century. During the Middle Ages it was generally rendered as Harry or Herry in English pronunciation. Notable bearers include arctic naval explorer Henry Hudson (1570-1611), British novelist Henry James (1843-1916), and American automobile manufacturer Henry Ford (1863-1947).

HUGH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HYOO

Rating: 70% based on 4 votes

From the Germanic element hug, meaning "heart, mind, spirit". It was common among Frankish and French nobility, being borne by Hugh Capet, a 10th-century king of France who founded the Capetian dynasty. The Normans brought the name to England and it became common there, even more so after the time of the 12th-century bishop Saint Hugh of Lincoln, who was known for his charity. This was also the name of kings of Cyprus and the crusader kingdom of Jerusalem. The name is used in Ireland and Scotland as the Anglicized form of Aodh and Ùisdean.

HUGO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)

Pronounced: OO-go (Spanish), HYOO-go (English), HUY-kho (Dutch), HOO-go (German)

Rating: 78% based on 4 votes

Latinized form of HUGH. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.

IAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: EE-ən (English)

Rating: 53% based on 4 votes

Modern Scottish form of JOHN

IRENE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Ειρηνη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ie-REEN (English), ie-REE-nee (English), ee-RE-ne (Italian), ee-RE-nu (German)

Rating: 70% based on 4 votes

From Greek Ειρηνη (Eirene), derived from a word meaning "peace". This was the name of the Greek goddess who personified peace, one of the ‘Ωραι (Horai). It was also borne by several early Christian saints. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, notably being borne by an 8th-century empress, who was the first woman to lead the empire. She originally served as regent for her son, but later had him killed and ruled alone.

This name has traditionally been more popular among Eastern Christians. In the English-speaking world it was not regularly used until the 19th century.

ISABELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Romanian

Pronounced: ee-zah-BEL-lah (Italian), iz-ə-BEL-ə (English)

Rating: 55% based on 4 votes

Latinate form of ISABEL. This name was borne by many medieval royals, including queen consorts of England, France, Portugal, the Holy Roman Empire and Hungary, as well as the powerful ruling queen Isabella of Castile (properly called Isabel).

ISLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish

Pronounced: IE-lə

Rating: 50% based on 2 votes

Variant of ISLAY, typically used as a feminine name.

ISOLDE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare), German, Celtic Mythology

Pronounced: i-ZOL-də (English), i-SOL-də (English), ee-ZAWL-du (German)

Rating: 28% based on 4 votes

The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, perhaps from a hypothetic name like Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice" and hild "battle".

In Arthurian legend she was an Irish princess betrothed to King Mark of Cornwall. She became the lover of his knight Tristan, which led to their tragic deaths. The story was popular during the Middle Ages and the name became relatively common in England at that time. It was rare by the 19th century, though some interest was generated by Richard Wagner's opera 'Tristan und Isolde' (1865).

JACK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JAK

Rating: 65% based on 4 votes

Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of JOHN. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as 'Jack and the Beanstalk', 'Little Jack Horner', and 'Jack Sprat'. American writers Jack London (1876-1916) and Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) were two famous bearers of this name. It is also borne by American actor Jack Nicholson (1937-).

JANE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JAYN

Rating: 100% based on 4 votes

Medieval English form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). This became the most common feminine form of John in the 17th century, surpassing Joan. Famous bearers include the uncrowned English queen Lady Jane Grey (1536-1554), who ruled for only 9 days, the British novelist Jane Austen (1775-1817), who wrote 'Sense and Sensibility' and 'Pride and Prejudice', and the British primatologist Jane Goodall (1934-). This was also the name of the central character in Charlotte Bronte's novel 'Jane Eyre' (1847).

JASPER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend

Pronounced: JAS-pər (English), YAHS-pər (Dutch)

Rating: 97% based on 3 votes

Means "treasurer" in Persian. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.

JEMIMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical, English

Other Scripts: יְמִימָה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: jə-MIE-mə (English)

Rating: 50% based on 2 votes

Means "dove" in Hebrew. This was the oldest of the three daughters of Job in the Old Testament. As an English name, Jemima first became common during the Puritan era.

JOCELYN

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: JAHS-lin (English), JAHS-ə-lin (English)

Rating: 25% based on 4 votes

From a Germanic masculine name, variously written as Gaudelenus, Gautselin, Gauzlin, along with many other spellings. It was derived from the Germanic element gaut, which was from the name of the Germanic tribe the Gauts, combined with a Latin diminutive suffix. The Normans brought this name to England in the form Goscelin or Joscelin, and it was common until the 14th century. It was revived in the 20th century primarily as a feminine name, perhaps an adaptation of the surname Jocelyn (a medieval derivative of the given name). In France this is a masculine name only.

JOSIAH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English

Other Scripts: יֹאשִׁיָהוּ (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: jo-SIE-ə (English)

Rating: 28% based on 4 votes

Means "YAHWEH supports" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a king of Judah famous for his religious reforms. He was killed fighting the Egyptians at Megiddo. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

JOSIAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Rating: 28% based on 4 votes

Latinized form of JOSIAH used in some English versions of the Old Testament.

JOYCE

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JOIS

Rating: 35% based on 4 votes

From the medieval masculine name Josse, which was derived from the earlier Iudocus, which was a Latinized form of the Breton name Judoc meaning "lord". The name belonged to a 7th-century Breton saint, and Breton settlers introduced it to England after the Norman conquest. It became rare after the 14th century, but was later revived as a feminine name, perhaps because of similarity to the Middle English word joise "to rejoice". This given name also formed the basis for a surname, as in the case of the Irish novelist James Joyce (1882-1941).

JUBAL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: יוּבָל (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: JOO-bəl (English)

Rating: 35% based on 4 votes

Means "stream" in Hebrew. This name is mentioned in Genesis in the Old Testament as belonging to the first person to be a musician.

JULIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Ancient Roman, Biblical

Pronounced: JOO-lee-ə (English), YOO-lee-ah (German), HOO-lyah (Spanish), YUWL-yah (Polish), YOO:-lee-ah (Ancient Roman)

Rating: 63% based on 4 votes

Feminine form of JULIUS. A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. Shakespeare used the name in his comedy 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594). It has been common as a given name in the English-speaking world only since the 18th century. A famous bearer is American actress Julia Roberts (1967-).

JULIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch, German, English, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: yuy-lee-AH-nah (Dutch), yoo-lee-AH-nah (German), joo-lee-AHN-ə (English)

Rating: 65% based on 4 votes

Feminine form of Iulianus (see JULIAN). This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr from Nicomedia, and also of the Blessed Juliana of Norwich, also called Julian, a 14th-century mystic and author. The name was also borne by a 20th-century queen of the Netherlands. In England, this form has been in use since the 18th century, alongside the older form Gillian.

JULIET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JOO-lee-et, JOOL-yət

Rating: 88% based on 4 votes

Anglicized form of JULIETTE or GIULIETTA. This spelling was first used by Shakespeare for the lover of Romeo in his play 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596).

KEEGAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English

Pronounced: KEE-gən

Rating: 25% based on 4 votes

From an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mac Aodhagáin, which means "descendent of Aodhagán". The given name Aodhagán is a double diminutive of AODH.

KEENAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 28% based on 4 votes

Anglicized form of CIANÁN

KENNETH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: KEN-ith (Scottish, English)

Rating: 43% based on 4 votes

Anglicized form of both COINNEACH and CINÁED. This name was borne by the Scottish king Kenneth (Cináed) mac Alpin, who united the Scots and Picts in the 9th century. It was popularized outside of Scotland by Sir Walter Scott, who used it for the hero in his novel 'The Talisman' (1825). A famous bearer was the British novelist Kenneth Grahame (1859-1932), who wrote 'The Wind in the Willows'.

KIERAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: KEER-awn, KEE-ar-awn

Rating: 50% based on 4 votes

Anglicized form of CIARÁN

KIRSTEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Danish, Norwegian, English

Pronounced: KEER-sten (Danish)

Rating: 30% based on 4 votes

Danish and Norwegian form of CHRISTINA

LAURA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Late Roman

Pronounced: LAWR-ə (English), LOW-rah (Spanish, Italian, Polish, German, Dutch)

Rating: 47% based on 3 votes

Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.

As an English name, Laura has been used since the 13th century. A famous bearer was Laura Secord (1775-1868), a Canadian heroine during the War of 1812.

LAURIE

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: LAWR-ee (English), LOW-ree (Dutch)

Rating: 53% based on 4 votes

Diminutive of LAURA or LAURENCE (1)

LENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Russian, English, Italian, Portuguese

Other Scripts: Лена (Russian)

Pronounced: LE-nah (German, Italian), LYE-nah (Russian), LEE-nə (English)

Rating: 60% based on 4 votes

Scandinavian, German and Polish short form of HELENA or MAGDALENA, and a Russian short form of YELENA.

LEVI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew, English, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: לֵוִי (Hebrew)

Pronounced: LEE-vie (English), LE:-vee (Dutch)

Rating: 60% based on 4 votes

Means "attached" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, Levi is the third son of Jacob and Leah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of the Israelites (the tribe that eventually became the priests of the Israelites). In the New Testament this is another name for the apostle Matthew. As an English Christian name, Levi came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

LIAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English

Pronounced: LEE-əm (English)

Rating: 83% based on 4 votes

Irish short form of WILLIAM

LILLIAS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish

Rating: 43% based on 4 votes

Scottish form of LILLIAN

LORNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Scottish

Pronounced: LAWR-nə

Rating: 50% based on 2 votes

Created by the novelist R. D. Blackmore for the title character in his novel 'Lorna Doone' (1869). He may have based it on the Scottish place name Lorne or on the title 'Marquis of Lorne' (see LORNE).

LOUIS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, English, Dutch

Pronounced: loo-EE (French), LOO-is (English)

Rating: 75% based on 4 votes

French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of 18 kings of France, starting with Louis I the son of Charlemagne, and including Louis IX (Saint Louis) who led two crusades and Louis XIV (the 'Sun King') who was the ruler of France during the height of its power, the builder of the Palace of Versailles, and the longest reigning monarch in the history of Europe.

Apart from among royalty, this name was only moderately popular in France during the Middle Ages. After the French Revolution, when Louis XVI was guillotined, it became less common. The Normans brought the name to England, where it was usually spelled Lewis, though the spelling Louis has been more common in America. Famous bearers include French scientist Louis Pasteur (1822-1895), Métis leader Louis Riel (1844-1885), who led a rebellion against Canada, and Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), who wrote 'Treasure Island' and 'Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde'.

LUCY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LOO-see

Rating: 80% based on 4 votes

English form of LUCIA, in use since the Middle Ages.

LUKE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: LOOK (English)

Rating: 65% based on 4 votes

English form of the Greek name Λουκας (Loukas) which meant "from Lucania", Lucania being a region in Italy. Saint Luke, the author of the third Gospel and Acts in the New Testament, was a doctor who travelled in the company of Saint Paul. Due to his renown, the name became common in the Christian world (in various spellings). As an English name, Luke has been in use since the 12th century. A famous fictional bearer was the hero Luke Skywalker from the 'Star Wars' movies.

LUMI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Finnish

Rating: 53% based on 3 votes

Means "snow" in Finnish.

LYDIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Finnish, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Λυδια (Ancient Greek), Лѷдіа (Church Slavic)

Pronounced: LID-ee-ə (English), LUY-dee-ah (German)

Rating: 75% based on 4 votes

Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. In the modern era the name has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

MAEVE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology

Pronounced: MAYV

Rating: 75% based on 4 votes

Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Medb meaning "intoxicating". In Irish legend this was the name of a warrior queen of Connacht. Her fight against Ulster and the hero Cúchulainn is told in the Irish epic 'The Cattle Raid of Cooley'.

MARGARET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAHR-grit, MAHR-gə-rit

Rating: 85% based on 4 votes

Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", probably ultimately a borrowing from Sanskrit मञ्यरी (manyari). Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.

Other saints by this name include a queen of Scotland and a princess of Hungary. It was also borne by Queen Margaret I of Denmark, who united Denmark, Sweden, and Norway in the 14th century. Famous literary bearers include American writer Margaret Mitchell (1900-1949), the author of 'Gone with the Wind', and Canadian writer Margaret Atwood (1939-).

MARGOT

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: mar-GO

Rating: 23% based on 4 votes

French short form of MARGARET

MARJORIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAHR-jə-ree

Rating: 30% based on 4 votes

Medieval variant of MARGERY, influenced by the name of the herb marjoram. After the Middle Ages this name was rare, but it was revived at the end of the 19th century.

MARY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: MER-ee (English), MAR-ee (English)

Rating: 70% based on 4 votes

Usual English form of Maria, which was the Latin form of the New Testament Greek names Μαριαμ (Mariam) and Μαρια (Maria) - the spellings are interchangeable - which were from the Hebrew name מִרְיָם (Miryam). The meaning is not known for certain, but there are several theories including "sea of bitterness", "rebelliousness", and "wished for child". However it was most likely originally an Egyptian name, perhaps derived in part from mry "beloved" or mr "love".

This is the name of several New Testament characters, most importantly Mary the virgin mother of Jesus, and Mary Magdalene. Due to the Virgin Mary this name has been very popular in the Christian world, though at certain times in some cultures it has been considered too holy for everyday use. In England it has been used since the 12th century, and it has been among the most common feminine names since the 16th century. The Latinized form Maria is also used in English as well as in several other languages.

This name has been borne by two queens of England, as well as a Queen of Scotland, Mary Queen of Scots. Another notable bearer was Mary Shelley (1797-1851), the author of 'Frankenstein'. A famous fictional character by this name was Mary Poppins, from the children's books by P. L. Travers.

MATTHIAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, French, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Ματθιας (Greek)

Pronounced: mah-TEE-ahs (German), mə-THIE-əs (English)

Rating: 65% based on 4 votes

Variant of Matthaios (see MATTHEW) which appears in the New Testament as the name of the apostle chosen to replace the traitor Judas Iscariot. This was also the name of kings of Hungary, including Matthias I who made important reforms to the kingdom in the 15th century.

MERCY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MUR-see

Rating: 20% based on 4 votes

From the English word mercy, ultimately from Latin merces "wages, reward", a derivative of merx "goods, wares". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.

MICHAEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: מִיכָאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Μιχαηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: MIE-kəl (English), MI-khah-el (German)

Rating: 75% based on 4 votes

From the Hebrew name מִיכָאֵל (Mikha'el) meaning "who is like God?". This is a rhetorical question, implying no person is like God. Michael is one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies, and thus is considered the patron saint of soldiers.

The popularity of the saint led to the name being used by nine Byzantine emperors, including Michael VIII Palaeologus who restored the empire in the 13th century. It has been common in Western Europe since the Middle Ages, and in England since the 12th century. It has been borne (in various spellings) by rulers of Russia (spelled Михаил), Romania (Mihai), Poland (Michał), and Portugal (Miguel). Other bearers of this name include the British chemist/physicist Michael Faraday (1791-1867), musician Michael Jackson (1958-2009), and basketball player Michael Jordan (1963-).

NATHAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: נָתָן (Ancient Hebrew), Ναθαν (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: NAY-thən (English), na-TAWN (French)

Rating: 55% based on 4 votes

Means "he gave" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of both a prophet and a son of King David. It has been used as a Christian given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation.

NATHANAEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: נְתַנְאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Ναθαναηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: nay-THAN-ee-əl (English), nay-THAN-yəl (English)

Rating: 68% based on 4 votes

From the Hebrew name נְתַנְאֵל (Netan'el) meaning "God has given". In the New Testament this is the name of an apostle also known as Bartholomew.

NATHANIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: nə-THAN-ee-əl (English), nə-THAN-yəl (English)

Rating: 83% based on 4 votes

Variant of NATHANAEL. It has been regularly used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. This has been the most popular spelling, even though the spelling Nathanael is found in most versions of the New Testament. The American writer Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864), author of 'The Scarlet Letter', was a famous bearer of this name.

NIALL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, Scottish

Pronounced: NEE-al, NIE-al

Rating: 43% based on 4 votes

Original Gaelic spelling of NEIL

NOÊMIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese

Rating: 45% based on 2 votes

Portuguese form of NAOMI (1)

NORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Italian

Pronounced: NAWR-ə (English), NO-rah (German)

Rating: 45% based on 4 votes

Short form of HONORA or ELEANOR. Henrik Ibsen used it for a character in his play 'A Doll's House' (1879).

OWEN (2)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 45% based on 4 votes

Anglicized form of EOGHAN

PEARCE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: PEERS

Rating: 13% based on 4 votes

Variant of PIERCE

PELEG

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, Hebrew

Other Scripts: פֶּלֶג (Hebrew)

Rating: 43% based on 4 votes

Means "division, channel" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the son of Eber.

PETRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Hungarian, English

Other Scripts: Πετρα (Greek), Петра (Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: PET-rə (English)

Rating: 53% based on 3 votes

Feminine form of PETER. This was also the name of an ancient city in the region that is now Jordan.

PHEBE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: FEE-bee (English)

Rating: 35% based on 4 votes

Variant of PHOEBE used in some translations of the New Testament.

PHOEBE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: Φοιβη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: FEE-bee (English)

Rating: 70% based on 4 votes

Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβη (Phoibe), which meant "bright, pure" from Greek φοιβος (phoibos). In Greek mythology Phoibe was a Titan associated with the moon. This was also an epithet of her granddaughter, the moon goddess Artemis. The name appears in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament, where it belongs to a female minister in the church at Cenchreae. In England, it began to be used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. A moon of Saturn bears this name (in honour of the Titan).

PRISCILLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical

Pronounced: pri-SIL-ə (English), pree-SHEEL-lah (Italian)

Rating: 60% based on 4 votes

Roman name, a diminutive of PRISCA. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lived with Priscilla and her husband Aquila in Corinth for a while. It has been used as an English given name since the Protestant Reformation, being popular with the Puritans. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow used it in his poem 'The Courtship of Miles Standish' (1858).

RHYS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Pronounced: HREES (Welsh), REES (English)

Rating: 65% based on 4 votes

Means "enthusiasm" in Welsh. Several Welsh rulers have borne this name.

ROSA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English

Pronounced: RO-sah (Spanish, Dutch), RAW-zah (Italian), RO-zə (English)

Rating: 90% based on 2 votes

Generally this can be considered a Latin form of ROSE, though originally it may have come from the Germanic name ROZA (2). This was the name of a 13th-century saint from Viterbo in Italy. In the English-speaking world it was first used in the 19th century. A famous bearer was civil rights activist Rosa Parks (1913-2005).

ROSE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: ROZ

Rating: 60% based on 4 votes

Originally a Norman form of a Germanic name, which was composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.

RUBY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ROO-bee

Rating: 58% based on 4 votes

Simply means "ruby" from the name of the precious stone (which ultimately derives from Latin ruber "red"), which is the birthstone of July. It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.

SADIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SAY-dee

Rating: 23% based on 3 votes

Diminutive of SARAH

SALLY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SAL-ee

Rating: 50% based on 4 votes

Diminutive of SARAH

SEBASTIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Finnish, Romanian

Pronounced: ze-BAHS-tee-ahn (German), sə-BAS-chən (English), se-BAHS-tyahn (Polish)

Rating: 58% based on 4 votes

From the Latin name Sebastianus which meant "from Sebaste". Sebaste was the name a town in Asia Minor, its name deriving from Greek σεβαστος (sebastos) "venerable" (a translation of Latin Augustus, the title of the Roman emperors). Saint Sebastian was a 3rd-century Roman soldier martyred by arrows after it was discovered he was a Christian. Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in medieval Europe, especially in Spain and France. It was also borne by a 16th-century king of Portugal who died in a crusade against Morocco.

SILAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Σιλας (Greek)

Pronounced: SIE-ləs (English)

Rating: 65% based on 4 votes

Short form of SILVANUS. This is the name of a companion of Saint Paul in the New Testament. It was not used as an English name until after the Protestant Reformation.

SIMON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Симон (Macedonian), სიმონ (Georgian), Σιμων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: SIE-mən (English), see-MAWN (French), ZEE-mawn (German), SEE-mawn (Dutch)

Rating: 83% based on 4 votes

From Σιμων (Simon), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name שִׁמְעוֹן (Shim'on) which meant "he has heard". This was the name of several biblical characters, including the man who carried the cross for Jesus. However, the most important person of this name in the New Testament was the apostle Simon, also known as Peter (a name given to him by Jesus). Because of him, this name has been common in the Christian world. In England it was popular during the Middle Ages, though it became rarer after the Protestant Reformation.

SOPHIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Σοφια (Greek)

Pronounced: so-FEE-ə (English), so-FIE-ə (British English), zo-FEE-ah (German)

Rating: 43% based on 4 votes

Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which was the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.

This name was common among continental European royalty during the Middle Ages, and it was popularized in Britain by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century. It was the name of characters in the novels 'Tom Jones' (1749) by Henry Fielding and 'The Vicar of Wakefield' (1766) by Oliver Goldsmith.

SOPHIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, German, Dutch

Pronounced: so-FEE (French), SO-fee (English), ZO-fee (German)

Rating: 38% based on 4 votes

French form of SOPHIA

SOPHY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: SO-fee

Rating: 28% based on 4 votes

Variant of SOPHIE or a diminutive of SOPHIA.

TEMPERANCE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Pronounced: TEM-prənts, TEM-pər-ənts

Rating: 30% based on 4 votes

From the English word meaning "moderation" or "restraint". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.

TIERNAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 50% based on 4 votes

Anglicized form of TIGHEARNÁN

TITUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Pronounced: TI-tuws (Ancient Roman), TIE-təs (English)

Rating: 45% based on 4 votes

Roman praenomen, or given name, which is of unknown meaning, possibly related to Latin titulus "title of honour". In the New Testament, Titus is a companion of Saint Paul. He became the first bishop of Crete and was the recipient of one of Paul's epistles. This name was also borne by a 1st-century Roman emperor. Shakespeare later used it for the main character in his tragedy 'Titus Andronicus' (1593). As an English name, Titus has been occasionally used since the Protestant Reformation.

VIOLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: vie-O-lə (English), vee-O-lə (English), VIE-ə-lə (English), VYO-lah (Italian)

Rating: 60% based on 4 votes

Means "violet" in Latin. This was the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's play 'Twelfth Night' (1602).

WILLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WIL-ə

Rating: 60% based on 2 votes

Feminine form of WILLIAM

WILLIAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WIL-ee-əm, WIL-yəm

Rating: 45% based on 4 votes

From the Germanic name Willahelm, which was composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". Saint William of Gellone was an 8th-century cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England. It was later borne by three other English kings, as well as rulers of Scotland, Sicily (of Norman origin), the Netherlands and Prussia.

Other famous bearers include William Wallace, a 13th-century Scottish hero, and William Tell, a legendary 14th-century Swiss hero. In the literary world it was borne by dramatist William Shakespeare (1564-1616), poet William Blake (1757-1827), poet William Wordsworth (1770-1850), dramatist William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), author William Faulkner (1897-1962), and author William S. Burroughs (1914-1997).

WILLOUGHBY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: WIL-ə-bee

Rating: 63% based on 4 votes

From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "willow town" in Old English.
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2014.