Laura W's Personal Name List

ACACIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-KAY-shə
Rating: 43% based on 6 votes
From the name of a type of tree, ultimately deriving from Greek ακη (ake) "thorn, point".

ALASTAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 62% based on 5 votes
Irish form of ALEXANDER.

ALLEGRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-LEG-rə (English), al-LE-gra (Italian)
Rating: 40% based on 6 votes
Means "cheerful, lively" in Italian. It is not a traditional Italian name. It was borne by a short-lived illegitimate daughter of Lord Byron.

AMELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: ə-MEE-lee-ə (English), ə-MEEL-yə (English), a-ME-lya (Italian, Polish), a-ME-lee-a (German)
Rating: 69% based on 7 votes
Variant of AMALIA, though it is sometimes confused with EMILIA, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of George II and George III. Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.

AMELIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: A-me-lee, a-me-LEE
Rating: 63% based on 7 votes
German variant of AMELIA.

ANGELICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Romanian, Literature
Pronounced: an-JEL-i-kə (English), an-JE-lee-ka (Italian)
Rating: 65% based on 6 votes
Derived from Latin angelicus meaning "angelic", ultimately related to Greek αγγελος (angelos) "messenger". The poets Boiardo and Ariosto used this name in their 'Orlando' poems (1495 and 1532), where it belongs to Orlando's love interest. It has been used as a given name since the 18th century.

ANGELINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English, Russian, German, Dutch, Polish, Spanish, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Ангелина (Russian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: an-je-LEE-na (Italian), an-jə-LEEN-ə (English), un-gyi-LYEE-nə (Russian), an-ge-LEE-na (Polish)
Rating: 52% based on 6 votes
Latinate diminutive of ANGELA. A famous bearer is American actress Angelina Jolie (1975-).

ANTHONY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AN-thə-nee (American English), AN-tə-nee (British English)
Rating: 74% based on 5 votes
English form of the Roman family name Antonius, which is of unknown Etruscan origin. The most notable member of the Roman family was the general Marcus Antonius (called Mark Antony in English), who for a period in the 1st century BC ruled the Roman Empire jointly with Augustus. When their relationship turned sour, he and his mistress Cleopatra were attacked and forced to commit suicide, as related in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Antony and Cleopatra' (1606).

The name became regularly used in the Christian world due to the fame of Saint Anthony the Great, a 4th-century Egyptian hermit who founded Christian monasticism. Its popularity was reinforced in the Middle Ages by the 13th-century Saint Anthony of Padua, the patron saint of Portugal. It has been commonly (but incorrectly) associated with Greek ανθος (anthos) "flower", which resulted in the addition of the h to this spelling in the 17th century.

ANTONIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Polish, Romanian, Greek, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Αντωνια (Greek)
Pronounced: an-TO-nya (Italian, Spanish, German), an-TO-nee-ə (English), ahn-TO-nee-ah (Dutch), an-TAW-nya (Polish)
Rating: 52% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).

APOLLO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Απολλων (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ə-PAW-lo (English)
Rating: 60% based on 5 votes
From Greek Απολλων (Apollon), which is of unknown meaning, though perhaps related to Indo-European *apelo "strength". Another theory states that Apollo can be equated with Appaliunas, an Anatolian god whose name possibly means "father lion" or "father light". The Greeks later associated Apollo's name with the Greek verb απολλυμι (apollymi) meaning "to destroy". In Greek mythology Apollo was the son of Zeus and Leto and the twin of Artemis. He was the god of prophecy, medicine, music, art, law, beauty, and wisdom. Later he also became the god of the sun and light.

ARCADIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: ahr-KAY-dee-ə (English)
Rating: 48% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of ARCADIUS. This is the name of a region on the Greek Peloponnese, long idealized for its natural beauty.

ARIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AHR-ee-ə
Rating: 80% based on 5 votes
Means "song" or "melody" in Italian (literally means "air"). An aria is an elaborate vocal solo, the type usually performed in operas. As an English name, it has only been in use since the 20th century. It is not common in Italy.

AUDRA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AWD-rə
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
Variant of AUDREY, used since the 19th century.

BETHANY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: BETH-ə-nee (English)
Rating: 60% based on 5 votes
From the name of a biblical town, possibly derived from Hebrew בֵּית־תְּאֵנָה (beit-te'enah) meaning "house of figs". In the New Testament the town of Bethany was the home of Lazarus and his sisters Mary and Martha. It has been in use as a rare given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, used primarily by Catholics in honour of Mary of Bethany. In America it became moderately common after the 1950s.

BLAINE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BLAYN
Rating: 20% based on 5 votes
From a Scottish surname which was derived from the given name Bláán, which meant "yellow" in Gaelic. Saint Bláán was a 6th-century missionary to the Picts.

BLAISE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: BLEZ
Rating: 22% based on 5 votes
From the Roman name Blasius which meant "lisping" from Latin blaesus. A famous bearer was the French mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal (1623-1662).

BLAKE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BLAYK
Rating: 54% based on 5 votes
From a surname which was derived from Old English blæc "black" or blac "pale". A famous bearer of the surname was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).

BRADEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: BRAY-dən (English)
Personal note: My son's name.
Rating: 22% based on 5 votes
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Bradáin meaning "descendant of BRADÁN".

BRIAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BRIE-ər
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
From the English word for the thorny plant.

BRIDGER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRIJ-ər
Rating: 15% based on 4 votes
From an English surname which originally indicated a person who lived near or worked on a bridge.

BRIONY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BRIE-ən-ee
Rating: 30% based on 5 votes
Variant of BRYONY.

BRYONY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BRIE-ə-nee
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
From the name of a type of Eurasian vine, formerly used as medicine. It ultimately derives from Greek βρυω (bryo) "to swell".

CADENCE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-dənts
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
From an English word meaning "rhythm, flow". It has been in use only since the 20th century.

CÁEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish Mythology
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
From Gaelic caol "slender". In Irish legend Cáel was a warrior of the Fianna and the lover of Créd.

CAI (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
Welsh form of KAY (2).

CAITLIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KAHT-leen (Irish), KAYT-lin (English)
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Anglicized form of CAITLÍN.

CALE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAYL
Rating: 10% based on 4 votes
Short form of CALEB.

CALLUM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: KAL-um
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Variant of CALUM.

CALVIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL-vin
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Derived from the French surname Cauvin, which was derived from chauve "bald". The surname was borne by Jean Cauvin (1509-1564), a theologian from France who was one of the leaders of the Protestant Reformation. His surname was Latinized as Calvinus (based on Latin calvus "bald") and he is known as John Calvin in English. It has been used as a given name in his honour since the 19th century.

CAMILLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KA-MEE (French), kə-MEEL (English)
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
French feminine and masculine form of CAMILLA. It is also used in the English-speaking world, where it is generally only feminine.

CAPRICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 28% based on 5 votes
From the English word meaning "impulse", ultimately (via French) from Italian capriccio.

CAROLINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: KA-RAW-LEEN (French), KER-ə-lien (English), KER-ə-lin (English), KAR-ə-lien (English), KAR-ə-lin (English), ka-ro-LEE-nə (German)
Rating: 73% based on 4 votes
French feminine form of CAROLUS.

CARSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: KAHR-sən
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
From a Scottish surname of uncertain meaning. A famous bearer of the surname was the American scout Kit Carson (1809-1868).

CARTER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAHR-tər
Rating: 46% based on 5 votes
From an English surname which meant "one who uses a cart".

CASEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: KAY-see (English)
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cathasaigh meaning "descendant of CATHASACH". This name can be given in honour of Casey Jones (1863-1900), a train engineer who sacrificed his life to save his passengers. In his case, Casey was a nickname acquired because he was raised in the town of Cayce, Kentucky.

CASPIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: KAS-pee-ən (English)
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
Used by author C. S. Lewis for a character in his 'Chronicles of Narnia' series, first appearing in 1950. Prince Caspian first appears in the fourth book, where he is the rightful king of Narnia driven into exile by his evil uncle Miraz. Lewis probably based the name on the Caspian Sea, which was named for the city of Qazvin, which was itself named for the ancient Cas tribe.

CASSIDY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAS-i-dee
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Caiside meaning "descendant of CAISIDE".

CATALINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ka-ta-LEE-na
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Spanish form of KATHERINE.

CATERINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan
Pronounced: ka-te-REE-na (Italian), kə-tə-REE-nə (Catalan)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Italian and Catalan form of KATHERINE.

CHANDLER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHAND-lər
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
From an occupational surname which meant "candle seller" in Middle English, ultimately from Old French.

CHARLOTTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: SHAR-LAWT (French), SHAHR-lət (English), shar-LAW-tə (German), shah-LOT (Swedish), shahr-LAWT-tə (Dutch)
Rating: 78% based on 5 votes
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.

CHELSEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHEL-see
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
From the name of a district in London, originally derived from Old English and meaning "landing place for chalk or limestone". It has been in general use as an English given name since the 1970s.

CHLOE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Χλοη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KLO-ee (English)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Means "green shoot" in Greek, referring to new plant growth in the spring. This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Demeter. The name is also mentioned by Paul in one of his epistles in the New Testament. As an English name, Chloe has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

CIARÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KEER-awn, KEE-ar-awn
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of CIAR. This was the name of two Irish saints: Saint Ciarán the Elder, the patron of the Kingdom of Munster, and Saint Ciarán of Clonmacnoise, the founder of a monastery in the 6th century.

CLARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: KLA-ra (Italian, German, Spanish), KLA-ru (Portuguese), KLER-ə (American English), KLAR-ə (American English), KLAH-rə (British English)
Rating: 72% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.

COLE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KOL
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
From a surname which was originally derived from the Old English byname COLA.

COOPER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KOOP-ər, KUWP-ər
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
From a surname meaning "barrel maker" in Middle English.

CORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κορη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KAWR-ə (English), KO-ra (German)
Rating: 63% based on 4 votes
Latinized form of KORE. It was not used as a given name in the English-speaking world until after it was employed by James Fenimore Cooper for a character in his novel 'The Last of the Mohicans' (1826). In some cases it may be a short form of CORDULA, CORINNA or other names beginning with a similar sound.

CORAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish
Pronounced: KAWR-əl (English)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
From the English and Spanish word coral for the underwater skeletal deposits which can form reefs. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κοραλλιον (korallion).

CORALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KAW-RA-LEE
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Either a French form of KORALIA, or a derivative of Latin corallium "coral" (see CORAL).

CORBIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAWR-bin
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
From a French surname which was derived from corbeau "raven", originally denoting a person who had dark hair. The name was probably popularized in America by actor Corbin Bernsen (1954-).

CORDELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kawr-DEE-lee-ə, kawr-DEEL-yə
Rating: 78% based on 4 votes
From Cordeilla, possibly a Celtic name of unknown meaning. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Cordeilla was the youngest of the three daughters of King Lear and the only one to remain loyal to her father. When adapting the character for his play 'King Lear' (1606), Shakespeare altered the spelling to Cordelia.

CORINNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KAW-REEN (French), kə-REEN (English), kə-RIN (English)
Rating: 13% based on 4 votes
French form of CORINNA. The French-Swiss author Madame de Staël used it for her novel 'Corinne' (1807).

CORNELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Romanian, Italian, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: kawr-NE-lya (German), kor-NE-lya (Italian), kawr-NAY-lee-ah (Dutch), kər-NEE-lee-ə (English), kər-NEEL-yə (English)
Rating: 83% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of CORNELIUS. In the 2nd century BC it was borne by Cornelia Scipionis Africana (the daughter of the military hero Scipio Africanus), the mother of the two reformers known as the Gracchi. After her death she was regarded as an example of the ideal Roman woman. The name was revived in the 18th century.

COURTNEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAWRT-nee
Rating: 24% based on 5 votes
From an aristocratic English surname which was derived either from the French place name Courtenay (originally a derivative of the personal name Curtenus, itself derived from Latin curtus "short") or else from a Norman nickname meaning "short nose". As a feminine name in America, it first became popular during the 1970s.

DAWSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAW-sən
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
From a surname meaning "son of DAVID". This name was popularized in the late 1990s by the television drama 'Dawson's Creek'.

DELIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Δηλια (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DEE-lee-ə (English), DEL-ya (Italian, Spanish)
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
Means "of Delos" in Greek. This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Artemis, given because she and her twin brother Apollo were born on the island of Delos. The name appeared in several poems of the 16th and 17th centuries, and it has occasionally been used as a given name since that time.

DILLON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DIL-ən
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
Variant of DYLAN based on the spelling of the surname Dillon, which has an unrelated origin.

DIMITRI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, French
Other Scripts: Димитрий (Russian)
Pronounced: dyi-MYEE-tryee (Russian), DEE-MEE-TREE (French)
Rating: 78% based on 4 votes
Variant of DMITRIY, using the Church Slavic spelling.

DONALD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: DAHN-əld (English)
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
From the Gaelic name Domhnall which means "ruler of the world", composed of the old Celtic elements dumno "world" and val "rule". This was the name of two 9th-century kings of the Scots and Picts. It has traditionally been very popular in Scotland, and during the 20th century it became common in the rest of the English-speaking world. This is the name of one of Walt Disney's most popular cartoon characters, Donald Duck. It was also borne by Australian cricket player Donald Bradman (1908-2001).

EDEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, English (Modern)
Other Scripts: עֵדֶן (Hebrew)
Pronounced: EE-dən (English)
Rating: 63% based on 4 votes
Means "place of pleasure" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament the Garden of Eden was the place where the first people, Adam and Eve, lived before they were expelled.

ELISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Dutch, English
Pronounced: e-LEE-zə (German), e-LEE-se (Norwegian, Danish, Swedish), i-LEES (English), i-LEEZ (English)
Rating: 52% based on 5 votes
Short form of ELIZABETH.

ELIZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Polish, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Pronounced: i-LIE-zə (English), e-LYEE-za (Polish)
Rating: 78% based on 4 votes
Short form of ELIZABETH. It was borne by the character Eliza Doolittle in George Bernard Shaw's play 'Pygmalion' (1913) and the subsequent musical adaptation 'My Fair Lady' (1956).

ELIZABETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: i-LIZ-ə-bəth (English)
Rating: 94% based on 5 votes
From Ελισαβετ (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath" or perhaps "my God is abundance". The Hebrew form appears in the Old Testament where Elisheba is the wife of Aaron, while the Greek form appears in the New Testament where Elizabeth is the mother of John the Baptist.

Among Christians, this name was originally more common in Eastern Europe. It was borne in the 12th century by Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, a daughter of King Andrew II who used her wealth to help the poor. In medieval England it was occasionally used in honour of the saint, though the form Isabel (from Occitan and Spanish) was more common. It has been very popular in England since the reign of Queen Elizabeth I in the 16th century. It has also been borne (in various spellings) by many other European royals, including a ruling empress of Russia in the 18th century. Famous modern bearers include the British queen Elizabeth II (1926-) and actress Elizabeth Taylor (1932-2011).

ELOISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: e-lo-EE-za
Rating: 63% based on 4 votes
Italian form of ELOISE.

ELOISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EL-o-eez, el-o-EEZ
Rating: 83% based on 4 votes
From the Old French name Héloïse, which is probably from the Germanic name Helewidis, composed of the elements heil "hale, healthy" and wid "wide". It is sometimes associated with the Greek word ‘ηλιος (helios) "sun" or the name Louise, though there is not likely an etymological connection. This name was borne in the 12th century by Saint Eloise, the wife of the French theologian Peter Abelard. She became a nun after her husband was castrated by her uncle.

There was a medieval English form of this name, Helewis, though it died out after the 13th century. In the 19th century it was revived in the English-speaking world in the form Eloise.

EVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: חַוָּה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: EEV (English)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חוה (chawah) "to breathe" or the related word חיה (chayah) "to live". According to the Old Testament Book of Genesis, Eve and Adam were the first humans. God created her from one of Adam's ribs to be his companion. At the urging of a serpent she ate the forbidden fruit and shared some with Adam, causing their expulsion from the Garden of Eden.

Despite this potentially negative association, the name was occasionally used by Christians during the Middle Ages. In the English-speaking world both Eve and the Latin form Eva were revived in the 19th century.

FINN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish Mythology, Irish
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Older Irish form of FIONN. This is also the usual Anglicized spelling of the name. As a surname it is borne by Huckleberry Finn, a character in Mark Twain's novels.

FREYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norse Mythology, English (British, Modern), German
Pronounced: FRAY-ə (English), FRE-ya (German)
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
From Old Norse Freyja meaning "lady". This was the name of the goddess of love, beauty, war and death in Norse mythology. She claimed half of the heroes who were slain in battle and brought them to her realm of Fólkvangr. Along with her brother Freyr and father Njord, she was one of the Vanir (as opposed to the Æsir). Some scholars connect her with the goddess Frigg.

This is not the usual spelling in any of the Scandinavian languages (in Sweden and Denmark it is Freja and in Norway it is Frøja) but it is the common spelling of the goddess's name in English. In the 2000s it became popular in Britain.

GAVIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: GAV-in (English)
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Medieval form of GAWAIN. Though it died out in England, it was reintroduced from Scotland in the 20th century.

GENEVIEVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JEN-ə-veev
Rating: 58% based on 5 votes
English form of GENEVIÈVE.

GERMAINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHER-MEN
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
French feminine form of GERMAIN. Saint Germaine was a 16th-century peasant girl from France.

GIANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Greek
Other Scripts: Γιαννα (Greek)
Pronounced: JAN-na (Italian), YA-na (Greek)
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
Italian short form of GIOVANNA and a modern Greek variant of IOANNA.

GILLIAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JIL-ee-ən, GIL-ee-ən
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Medieval English feminine form of JULIAN. This spelling has been in use since the 13th century, though it was not declared a distinct name from Julian until the 17th century.

GINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: JEE-na (Italian), JEE-nə (English)
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Short form of GEORGINA, REGINA, LUIGINA, and other names ending in gina. It can also be used as a diminutive of VIRGINIA or EUGENIA. It was popularized in the 1950s by Italian actress Gina Lollobrigida (1927-), whose birth name was Luigina.

GLENN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: GLEN (English)
Personal note: My son's middle name
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
From a Scottish surname which was derived from Gaelic gleann "valley". A famous bearer of the surname is American astronaut John Glenn (1921-).

HARRIET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HER-ee-ət, HAR-ee-ət
Rating: 80% based on 4 votes
English form of HENRIETTE, and thus a feminine form of HARRY. It was first used in the 17th century, becoming very common in the English-speaking world by the 18th century. A famous bearer was Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896), the American author who wrote 'Uncle Tom's Cabin'.

HUDSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HUD-sən
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
From an English surname which meant "son of HUDDE". A famous bearer of the surname was the English explorer Henry Hudson (1570-1611).

IRIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish
Other Scripts: Ιρις (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: IE-ris (English), EE-ris (German, Dutch), EE-rees (Finnish, Spanish), EE-REES (French)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the name of the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.

ISIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Other Scripts: Ισις (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: IE-sis (English)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Greek form of Egyptian Ist (reconstructed as Iset or Ueset), which possibly meant "the throne". In Egyptian mythology Isis was the goddess of the sky and nature, the wife of Osiris and the mother of Horus. She was originally depicted wearing a throne-shaped headdress, but in later times she was conflated with the goddess Hathor and depicted having the horns of a cow on her head. She was also worshipped by people outside of Egypt, such as the Greeks and Romans.

ISLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: IE-lə
Rating: 83% based on 4 votes
Variant of ISLAY, typically used as a feminine name.

IVY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: IE-vee
Personal note: My daughter's name
Rating: 68% based on 6 votes
From the English word for the climbing plant that has small yellow flowers. It is ultimately derived from Old English ifig.

JANA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Dutch, German, Slovene, Catalan
Pronounced: YAH-nah (Dutch), YA-na (German), ZHA-nə (Catalan)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of JAN (1).

JANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAYN
Personal note: My daughter's middle name
Rating: 64% based on 5 votes
Medieval English form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). This became the most common feminine form of John in the 17th century, surpassing Joan.

Famous bearers include the uncrowned English queen Lady Jane Grey (1536-1554), who ruled for only 9 days, the British novelist Jane Austen (1775-1817), who wrote 'Sense and Sensibility' and 'Pride and Prejudice', and the British primatologist Jane Goodall (1934-). This is also the name of the central character in Charlotte Brontë's novel 'Jane Eyre' (1847), which tells of her sad childhood and her relationship with Edward Rochester.

JETT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JET
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
From the English word jet, which denotes either a jet aircraft or an intense black colour (the words derive from different sources).

JOLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JO-lee (English), ZHAW-LEE (French)
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
Means "pretty" in French. This name was popularized by American actress Angelina Jolie (1975-), whose surname was originally her middle name. It is not used as a given name in France.

JONAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹנָה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-nə (English)
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
From the Hebrew name יוֹנָה (Yonah) meaning "dove". This was the name of a prophet swallowed by a fish, as told in the Old Testament Book of Jonah. Jonah was commanded by God to preach in Nineveh, but instead fled by boat. After being caught in a storm, the other sailors threw Jonah overboard, at which point he was swallowed. He emerged from the fish alive and repentant three days later.

Jonah's story was popular in the Middle Ages, and the Hellenized form Jonas was occasionally used in England. The form Jonah did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation.

JONAS (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Lithuanian
Pronounced: YO-nus
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Lithuanian form of JOHN.

JOSEPH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹסֵף (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-səf (English), ZHO-ZEF (French), YO-zef (German)
Personal note: My son's middle name
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
From Ioseph, the Latin form of Greek Ιωσηφ (Ioseph), which was from the Hebrew name יוֹסֵף (Yosef) meaning "he will add". In the Old Testament Joseph is the eleventh son of Jacob and the first with his wife Rachel. Because he was the favourite of his father, his older brothers sent him to Egypt and told their father that he had died. In Egypt, Joseph became an advisor to the pharaoh, and was eventually reconciled with his brothers when they came to Egypt during a famine. This name also occurs in the New Testament, belonging to Saint Joseph the husband of Mary, and to Joseph of Arimathea.

In the Middle Ages, Joseph was a common Jewish name, being less frequent among Christians. In the late Middle Ages Saint Joseph became more highly revered, and the name became popular in Spain and Italy. In England it became common after the Protestant Reformation. This name was borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Portugal. Other notable bearers include Polish-British author Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) and the Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin (1878-1953).

JULIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Polish, German
Pronounced: JOO-lee-ən (English), JOOL-yən (English), YOO-lyan (Polish, German)
Rating: 73% based on 4 votes
From the Roman name Iulianus, which was derived from JULIUS. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints, including the legendary Saint Julian the Hospitaller. This name has been used in England since the Middle Ages, at which time it was also a feminine name (from Juliana, eventually becoming Gillian).

KARSTEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Low German, Danish, Norwegian
Pronounced: KAHR-sten (Low German)
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
Low German form of CHRISTIAN.

KATE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Croatian
Pronounced: KAYT (English)
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of KATHERINE, often used independently. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages. This was the name of the woman who Petruchio marries and tries to tame in Shakespeare's comedy 'Taming of the Shrew' (1593). A famous bearer is the British actress Kate Winslet (1975-).

KATELYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAYT-lin
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Variant of CAITLIN.

KEIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Variant of KIRA (2). This spelling was popularized by British actress Keira Knightley (1985-).

KEIRAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
Variant of KIERAN.

KELSEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEL-see
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
From an English surname which is derived from town names in Lincolnshire. It may mean "Cenel's island", from the Old English name Cenel "fierce" in combination with eg "island".

KIAN (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Variant of CIAN.

KIARAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Anglicized form of CIARÁN.

KIERAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KEER-awn, KEE-ar-awn
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
Anglicized form of CIARÁN.

LACHLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Australian)
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Originally a Scottish nickname for a person who was from Norway. In Scotland, Norway was known as the "land of the lochs", or Lochlann.

LAILA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, English
Other Scripts: ليلى (Arabic)
Pronounced: LAY-lə (English), LIE-lə (English)
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
Variant of LAYLA.

LAINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Estonian
Pronounced: LIE-ne
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
Means "wave" in Estonian.

LAKE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LAYK
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
From the English word lake, for the inland body of water. It is ultimately derived from Latin lacus.

LAUREL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWR-əl
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
From the name of the laurel tree, ultimately from Latin laurus.

LAVINIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Romanian
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Meaning unknown, probably of Etruscan origin. In Roman legend Lavinia was the daughter of King Latinus, the wife of Aeneas, and the ancestor of the Roman people. According to the legend Aeneas named the town of Lavinium in honour of his wife.

LEILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Persian, English, Georgian
Other Scripts: ليلى (Arabic), لیلا (Persian), ლეილა (Georgian)
Pronounced: LAY-lə (English), LEE-lə (English), LIE-lə (English)
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
Variant of LAYLA. This spelling was used by Lord Byron for characters in 'The Giaour' (1813) and 'Don Juan' (1819), and it is through him that the name was introduced to the English-speaking world.

LEO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Pronounced: LE-o (German, Danish, Finnish), LAY-o (Dutch), LEE-o (English)
Rating: 52% based on 5 votes
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.

LEWIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LOO-is
Rating: 78% based on 4 votes
Medieval English form of LOUIS. A famous bearer was Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), the author of 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'. This was also the surname of C. S. Lewis (1898-1963), the author of the 'Chronicles of Narnia'.

LILA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: लीला (Hindi)
Rating: 60% based on 5 votes
Means "play, amusement" in Sanskrit.

LINNÉA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: lin-NE-ah
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
From the name of a flower, also known as the twinflower. The Swedish botanist Carolus Linnaeus named it after himself, it being his favourite flower.

LINUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized), German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Other Scripts: Λινος (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LIE-nəs (English), LEE-nuws (German, Swedish)
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
From the Greek name Λινος (Linos) meaning "flax". In Greek legend he was the son of the god Apollo, who accidentally killed him in a contest. Another son of Apollo by this name was the music teacher of Herakles. The name was also borne by the second pope, serving after Saint Peter in the 1st century. In modern times this was the name of a character in Charles Schulz's comic strip 'Peanuts'.

LORELEI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Germanic Mythology
Pronounced: LAWR-ə-lie (English)
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
From a Germanic name meaning "luring rock". This is the name of a rock headland on the Rhine River. Legends say that a maiden named the Lorelei lives on the rock and lures fishermen to their death with her song.

LOUIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English, Dutch
Pronounced: LWEE (French), LOO-is (English), LOO-ee (English), loo-EE (Dutch)
Rating: 88% based on 5 votes
French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of 18 kings of France, starting with Louis I the son of Charlemagne. Others include Louis IX (Saint Louis) who led two crusades and Louis XIV (called the Sun King) who was the ruler of France during the height of its power, the builder of the Palace of Versailles, and the longest reigning monarch in the history of Europe. It was also borne by kings of Germany (as Ludwig), Hungary (as Lajos), and other places.

Apart from royalty, this name was only moderately popular in France during the Middle Ages. After the French Revolution, when Louis XVI was guillotined, it became less common.

The Normans brought the name to England, where it was usually spelled Lewis, though the spelling Louis has been more common in America. Famous bearers include French scientist Louis Pasteur (1822-1895), Métis leader Louis Riel (1844-1885), who led a rebellion against Canada, Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), who wrote 'Treasure Island' and 'Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde', and American jazz musician Louis Armstrong (1901-1971).

LOUISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: loo-EEZ-ə (English), loo-EES-ə (English), loo-EE-za (German)
Rating: 60% based on 5 votes
Latinate feminine form of LOUIS. A famous bearer was the American novelist Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888), the author of 'Little Women'.

LOUISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Danish, Swedish, Dutch, German
Pronounced: LWEEZ (French), loo-EEZ (English), loo-EE-se (Danish), loo-EE-zə (German)
Rating: 68% based on 5 votes
French feminine form of LOUIS.

LUC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LUYK
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
French form of LUKE.

LUCA (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Romanian, German
Pronounced: LOO-ka (Italian, German)
Rating: 83% based on 4 votes
Italian and Romanian form of LUKE. This name was borne by Luca della Robbia, a Renaissance sculptor from Florence.

LUCIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: loo-CHEE-a (Italian), loo-TSEE-a (German), LOO-tsya (German), LOO-shə (English), loo-SEE-ə (English), LOO-chya (Romanian), LOO-kee-a (Classical Latin)
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus she is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.

LUCIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian, English
Pronounced: LOO-chyan (Romanian), LOO-shən (English)
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Romanian and English form of LUCIANUS. Lucian is the usual name of Lucianus of Samosata in English.

LUCINDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Portuguese, Literature
Pronounced: loo-SIN-də (English)
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
An elaboration of LUCIA created by Cervantes for his novel 'Don Quixote' (1605). It was subsequently used by Molière in his play 'The Doctor in Spite of Himself' (1666).

LUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Rating: 46% based on 5 votes
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.

LYDIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Λυδια (Ancient Greek), Лѷдіа (Church Slavic)
Pronounced: LID-ee-ə (English), LUY-dya (German)
Rating: 100% based on 4 votes
Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor, said to be named for the legendary king LYDOS. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. In the modern era the name has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

LYRIC
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: LIR-ik
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
Means simply "lyric, songlike" from the English word, ultimately derived from Greek λυρικος (lyrikos).

MABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY-bəl
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Medieval feminine form of AMABILIS. This spelling and Amabel were common during the Middle Ages, though they became rare after the 15th century. It was revived in the 19th century after the publication of C. M. Yonge's novel 'The Heir of Redclyffe' (1854), which featured a character named Mabel (as well as one named Amabel).

MADELEINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Swedish
Pronounced: MAD-LEN (French), MAD-ə-lin (English), MAD-ə-lien (English), mahd-e-LEN (Swedish)
Rating: 60% based on 5 votes
French form of MAGDALENE.

MADELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: MAD-ə-lin (English), MAD-ə-lien (English), MAD-LEEN (French)
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
English form of MAGDALENE. This is the name of the heroine in a series of children's books by Ludwig Bemelmans, first published 1939.

MAE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
Variant of MAY. A famous bearer was American actress Mae West (1893-1980), whose birth name was Mary.

MAEVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: MAYV (Irish)
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Medb meaning "intoxicating". In Irish legend this was the name of a warrior queen of Connacht. Her fight against Ulster and the hero Cúchulainn is told in the Irish epic 'The Cattle Raid of Cooley'.

MAIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Roman Mythology, Portuguese, Georgian
Other Scripts: Μαια (Ancient Greek), მაია (Georgian)
Pronounced: MIE-A (Classical Greek), MAY-ə (English), MIE-ə (English)
Rating: 54% based on 5 votes
Meaning unknown. In Greek and Roman mythology she was the eldest of the Pleiades, the group of seven stars in the constellation Taurus, who were the daughters of Atlas and Pleione. Her son by Zeus was Hermes.

MARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Romanian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Georgian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Μαρινα (Greek), Марина (Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian), მარინა (Georgian)
Pronounced: ma-REE-na (Italian, Spanish, German), mə-REEN-ə (English), mu-RYEE-nə (Russian)
Rating: 90% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of MARINUS.

MATEO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Croatian
Pronounced: ma-TE-o (Spanish)
Rating: 68% based on 4 votes
Spanish form of MATTHEW. This form is also sometimes used in Croatia, from the Italian form MATTEO.

MAURA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English
Pronounced: MAWR-ə
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Anglicized form of MÁIRE. It has also been associated with Gaelic mór meaning "great". This was the name of an obscure 5th-century Irish or Scottish martyr.

MAVERICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAV-ə-rik
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Derived from the English word maverick meaning "independent". The word itself is derived from the surname of a 19th-century Texas rancher who did not brand his calves.

MAYBELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
Variant of MABEL.

MEGAERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Μεγαιρα (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Latinized form of Greek Μεγαιρα (Megaira) which was derived from μεγαιρω (megairo) "to grudge". This was the name of one of the Furies or Ερινυες (Erinyes) in Greek mythology. The name is used as a word in several European languages to denote a shrewish, ill-tempered woman (for example, French mégère and Italian megera).

MELANIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: MEL-ə-nee (English), ME-la-nee (German), me-la-NEE (German)
Rating: 62% based on 5 votes
From Mélanie, the French form of the Latin name Melania, derived from Greek μελαινα (melaina) meaning "black, dark". This was the name of a Roman saint who gave all her wealth to charity in the 5th century. Her grandmother was also a saint with the same name.

The name was common in France during the Middle Ages, and was it introduced from there to England, though it eventually became rare. Interest in it was revived by the character Melanie Wilkes from the novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1939).

MICAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: מִיכָה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: MIE-kə (English)
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Contracted form of MICAIAH. Micah is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament. He authored the Book of Micah, which alternates between prophesies of doom and prophesies of restoration. It was occasionally used as an English given name by the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation, but it did not become common until the end of the 20th century.

MILO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: MIE-lo (English)
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Old Germanic form of MILES, as well as the Latinized form. This form of the name was used in official documents during the Middle Ages, and it has been used independently since the 19th century.

MIRANDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: mə-RAN-də (English)
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
Derived from Latin mirandus meaning "admirable, wonderful". The name was created by Shakespeare for the heroine in his play 'The Tempest' (1611), about a father and daughter stranded on an island. It did not become a common English given name until the 20th century. This is also the name of one of the moons of Uranus, named after the Shakespearian character.

MOIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English
Pronounced: MOI-ra
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Anglicized form of MÁIRE. It also coincides with Greek Μοιρα (Moira) meaning "fate, destiny", the singular of Μοιραι, the Greek name for the Fates. They were the three female personifications of destiny in Greek mythology.

MOLLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHL-ee
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
Variant of MOLLY.

MOLLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHL-ee
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of MARY. It developed from Malle and Molle, other medieval diminutives. James Joyce used this name in his novel 'Ulysses' (1920), where it belongs to Molly Bloom, the wife of the main character.

MORGAN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English, French
Pronounced: MAWR-gən (English), MAWR-GAN (French)
Rating: 68% based on 4 votes
From the Old Welsh masculine name Morcant, which was possibly derived from Welsh mor "sea" and cant "circle". Since the 1980s in America Morgan has been more common for girls than boys, perhaps due to stories of Morgan le Fay or the fame of actress Morgan Fairchild (1950-).

MORGAN (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
Modern form of Morgen, which was used by Geoffrey of Monmouth in the 12th century for the Arthurian sorceress Morgan le Fay, who was unnamed in earlier stories. Geoffrey probably did not derive it from the Welsh masculine name Morgan, which would have been spelled Morcant in his time. He may have based it on the Irish name MUIRGEN.

NELLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NEL-ee
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of NELL.

NELLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NEL-ee
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of NELL.

OCÉANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-SE-AN
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
Derived from French océan meaning "ocean".

PARKER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAHR-kər
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
From an English occupational surname which meant "keeper of the park".

PEARL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PURL
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
From the English word pearl for the concretions formed in the shells of some mollusks, ultimately from Late Latin perla. Like other gemstone names, it has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. The pearl is the birthstone for June, and it supposedly imparts health and wealth.

PERCIVAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arthurian Romance, English
Pronounced: PUR-si-vəl (English)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Created by the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes for his poem 'Perceval, the Story of the Grail'. In the poem Perceval was one of King Arthur's Knights of the Round Table who was given a glimpse of the Holy Grail. The character (and probably the name) of Perceval was based on that of the Welsh hero PEREDUR. The spelling was perhaps altered under the influence of Old French percer val "to pierce the valley".

PHOEBE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Φοιβη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: FEE-bee (English)
Rating: 56% based on 5 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβη (Phoibe), which meant "bright, pure" from Greek φοιβος (phoibos). In Greek mythology Phoibe was a Titan associated with the moon. This was also an epithet of her granddaughter, the moon goddess Artemis. The name appears in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament, where it belongs to a female minister in the church at Cenchreae. In England, it began to be used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. A moon of Saturn bears this name (in honour of the Titan).

PIPER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: PIE-pər
Rating: 42% based on 5 votes
From a surname which was originally given to a person who played on a pipe (a flute). It was popularized as a given name by a character from the television series 'Charmed', which debuted in 1998.

PRESTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PRES-tən
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
From an English surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "priest town" (Old English preost and tun).

PRIMROSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PRIM-roz
Rating: 93% based on 3 votes
From the English word for the flower, ultimately deriving from Latin prima rosa "first rose".

RAFAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, German, Hungarian, Slovene, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Рафаел (Macedonian)
Pronounced: ra-fa-EL (Spanish), RA-fa-el (German)
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
Form of RAPHAEL.

RAPHAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: רָפָאֵל, רְפָאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Ραφαηλ (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: RA-fa-el (German), ra-fie-EL (English), ra-fee-EL (English)
Rating: 64% based on 5 votes
From the Hebrew name רָפָאֵל (Rafa'el) which meant "God has healed". In Hebrew tradition Raphael was the name of one of the seven archangels. He appears in the Book of Tobit, in which he disguises himself as a man named Azarias and accompanies Tobias on his journey to Media, aiding him along the way. In the end he cures Tobias's father Tobit of his blindness. He is not mentioned in the New Testament, though tradition identifies him with the angel troubling the water in John 5:4.

This name has never been common in the English-speaking world, though it has been well-used elsewhere in Europe. A famous bearer was the 16th-century Renaissance master Raphael Sanzio (1483-1520), usually known simply as Raphael.

REGINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: rə-JEEN-ə (English), rə-GEEN-ə (English), rə-JIEN-ə (English), re-GEE-na (German), re-JEE-na (Italian), re-KHEE-na (Spanish), re-GYEE-na (Polish), RE-gee-naw (Hungarian)
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Means "queen" in Latin (or Italian). It was in use as a Christian name from early times, and was borne by a 2nd-century saint. In England it was used during the Middle Ages in honour of the Virgin Mary, and it was later revived in the 19th century. A city in Canada bears this name, in honour of Queen Victoria.

REGINALD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: REJ-i-nəld
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
From Reginaldus, a Latinized form of REYNOLD.

RILEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RIE-lee
Personal note: My son's name
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
From a surname which comes from two distinct sources. As an Irish surname it is a variant of REILLY. As an English surname it is derived from a place name meaning "rye clearing" in Old English.

RIVER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: RIV-ər
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
From the English word that denotes a flowing body of water. The word is ultimately derived (via Old French) from Latin ripa "riverbank".

ROMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German
Other Scripts: Роман (Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: ru-MAN (Russian), RAW-man (Polish)
Rating: 46% based on 5 votes
From the Late Latin name Romanus which meant "Roman".

RÓNÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: RON-awn
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
Means "little seal", derived from Irish rón "seal" combined with a diminutive suffix.

ROSALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German, Dutch, English
Pronounced: RAW-ZA-LEE (French), ro-za-LEE (German), RO-zə-lee (English)
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
French, German and Dutch form of ROSALIA. In the English-speaking this name received a boost after the release of the movie 'Rosalie' (1938), which was based on an earlier musical.

ROSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: ROZ
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
Originally a Norman form of a Germanic name, which was composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.

RUTH (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: רוּת (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ROOTH (English), ROOT (German)
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
From a Hebrew name which was derived from the Hebrew word רְעוּת (re'ut) meaning "friend". This is the name of the central character in the Book of Ruth in the Old Testament. She was a Moabite woman who accompanied her mother-in-law Naomi back to Bethlehem after Ruth's husband died. There she met and married Boaz. She was an ancestor of King David.

As a Christian name, Ruth has been in use since the Protestant Reformation. It became very popular in America following the birth of "Baby" Ruth Cleveland (1891-1904), the daughter of President Grover Cleveland.

SADIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SAY-dee
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of SARAH.

SAGE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SAYJ
Rating: 68% based on 4 votes
From the English word sage, which denotes either a type of spice or else a wise person.

SAWYER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SOI-ər, SAW-yər
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
From a surname meaning "sawer of wood" in Middle English. Mark Twain used it for the hero in his novel 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer' (1876).

SCOTT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: SKAHT (American English), SKAWT (British English)
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
From an English and Scottish surname which referred to a person from Scotland or a person who spoke Scottish Gaelic. It is derived from Latin Scoti meaning "Gaelic speaker", with the ultimate origin uncertain.

SHELBY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHEL-bee
Rating: 13% based on 4 votes
From a surname, which was possibly a variant of SELBY. Though previously in use as a rare masculine name, it was popularized as a feminine name by the main character in the movie 'The Woman in Red' (1935). It was later reinforced by the movie 'Steel Magnolias' (1989) in which Julia Roberts played a character by this name.

SHILOH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: שִׁלוֹ, שִׁילֹה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: SHIE-lo (English)
Rating: 40% based on 5 votes
From an Old Testament place name possibly meaning "tranquil" in Hebrew. It is also used prophetically in the Old Testament to refer to a person, often understood to be the Messiah (see Genesis 49:10). This may in fact be a mistranslation. This name was brought to public attention after Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie gave it to their daughter in 2006.

SIERRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: see-ER-ə
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Means "mountain range" in Spanish, referring specifically to a mountain range with jagged peaks.

SIMON (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Симон (Macedonian), სიმონ (Georgian), Σιμων (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SIE-mən (English), SEE-MAWN (French), ZEE-mawn (German), SEE-mawn (Dutch), SHEE-mon (Hungarian)
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
From Σιμων (Simon), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name שִׁמְעוֹן (Shim'on) which meant "he has heard". This name is spelled Simeon, based on Greek Συμεων, in many translations of the Old Testament, where it is borne by the second son of Jacob. The New Testament spelling may show influence from the otherwise unrelated Greek name SIMON (2).

In the New Testament Simon is the name of several characters, including the man who carried the cross for Jesus. Most importantly however it was borne by the leading apostle Simon, also known as Peter (a name given to him by Jesus).

Because of the apostle, this name has been common in the Christian world. In England it was popular during the Middle Ages, though it became rarer after the Protestant Reformation.

SKYE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SKIE
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
From the name of the Isle of Skye off the west coast of Scotland. It is sometimes considered a variant of SKY.

STELLA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Dutch, German
Pronounced: STEL-ə (English)
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets 'Astrophel and Stella'. It was a nickname of a lover of Jonathan Swift, real name Esther Johnson (1681-1728), though it was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play 'A Streetcar Named Desire' (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.

STELLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
Meaning unknown, perhaps related to Old Norse stilling "calm", or perhaps of German origin.

STERLING
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STUR-ling
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
From a Scottish surname which was derived from city of Stirling, which is itself of unknown meaning. The name can also be given in reference to the English word sterling meaning "excellent". In this case, the word derives from sterling silver, which was so named because of the emblem that some Norman coins bore, from Old English meaning "little star".

TIERNAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Anglicized form of TIGHEARNÁN.

TOBIAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Τωβιας (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: to-BEE-as (German), tə-BIE-əs (English)
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Greek form of TOBIAH. This is the name of the hero of the apocryphal Book of Tobit, which appears in many English versions of the Old Testament. It relates how Tobit's son Tobias, with the help of the angel Raphael, is able to drive away a demon who has plagued Sarah, who subsequently becomes his wife. This story was popular in the Middle Ages, and the name came into occasional use in parts of Europe at that time. In England it became common after the Protestant Reformation.

TRENT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TRENT
Rating: 63% based on 4 votes
From a surname which originally denoted someone who lived by the River Trent in England. Trent is also a city in Italy, though the etymology is unrelated.

TRENTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TREN-tən
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
From the name of a New Jersey city established in the 17th century by William Trent. It means "TRENT's town".

TREY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TRAY
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
From an English nickname meaning "three".

VALERIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Czech
Pronounced: VAL-ə-ree (English), VA-lə-ree (German)
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
English and German form of VALERIA and Czech variant of VALÉRIE.

VAUGHN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: VAWN
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
From a Welsh surname which was derived from Welsh bychan meaning "little".

VERONICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Romanian, Late Roman
Pronounced: və-RAHN-i-kə (American English), və-RAWN-i-kə (British English)
Rating: 75% based on 4 votes
Latin alteration of BERENICE, the spelling influenced by the ecclesiastical Latin phrase vera icon meaning "true image". This was the name of a legendary saint who wiped Jesus' face with a towel and then found his image imprinted upon it. Due to popular stories about her, the name was occasionally used in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. It was borne by the 17th-century Italian saint and mystic Veronica Giuliani. As an English name, it was not common until the 19th century, when it was imported from France and Scotland.

VINCENT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak
Pronounced: VIN-sənt (English), VEN-SAHN (French)
Rating: 68% based on 5 votes
From the Roman name Vincentius, which was from Latin vincere "to conquer". This name was popular among early Christians, and it was borne by many saints. As an English name, Vincent has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 19th century. Famous bearers include the French priest Saint Vincent de Paul (1581-1660) and the post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890).

VIOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Czech
Pronounced: vie-O-lə (English), vi-O-lə (English), VIE-ə-lə (English), VYAW-la (Italian), VYO-la (German), VEE-o-law (Hungarian)
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Means "violet" in Latin. This was the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's play 'Twelfth Night' (1602).

VIOLET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VIE-lit, VIE-ə-lit
Rating: 93% based on 4 votes
From the English word violet for the purple flower, ultimately derived from Latin viola. It was common in Scotland from the 16th century, and it came into general use as an English given name during the 19th century.

VIVIAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: VIV-ee-ən (English)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
From the Latin name Vivianus which was derived from Latin vivus "alive". Saint Vivian was a French bishop who provided protection during the Visigoth invasion of the 5th century. It has been occasionally used as an English (masculine) name since the Middle Ages. In modern times it is also used as a feminine name, in which case it is either an Anglicized form of BÉBINN or a variant of VIVIEN (2).

VIVIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Late Roman
Pronounced: vee-VYA-na (Italian)
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Vivianus (see VIVIAN). Saint Viviana (also known as Bibiana) was a Roman saint and martyr of the 4th century.

VIVIEN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: VEE-VYEN
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
French form of Vivianus (see VIVIAN).

VIVIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: VEE-VYEN
Rating: 73% based on 4 votes
French form of VIVIANA.

WESLEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WES-lee, WEZ-lee
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "west meadow" in Old English. It has been sometimes given in honour of John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism.

WESTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WES-tən
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "west town" in Old English.

WILHELMINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, German, English
Pronounced: vil-hel-MEE-nah (Dutch), vil-hel-MEE-na (German)
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
Dutch and German feminine form of WILHELM. This name was borne by a queen of the Netherlands (1880-1962).

WYATT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIE-ət
Rating: 36% based on 5 votes
From an English surname which was derived from the medieval given name WYOT. Wyatt Earp (1848-1929) was an American lawman and gunfighter involved in the famous shootout at the OK Corral.

ZAIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: زين (Arabic)
Rating: 13% based on 4 votes
Variant transcription of ZAYN.

ZANE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ZAYN
Rating: 26% based on 5 votes
From an English surname of unknown meaning. It was introduced as a given name by American author Zane Grey (1872-1939). Zane was in fact his middle name - it had been his mother's maiden name.
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2017.