OceanStar719's Personal Name List

ADRIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Romanian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian
Other Scripts: Адриан (Russian)
Pronounced: AY-dree-ən (English), A-dryan (Polish), A-dree-an (German), u-dryi-AN (Russian)
Rating: 63% based on 14 votes
Form of Hadrianus (see HADRIAN). Several saints and six popes have borne this name, including the only English pope, Adrian IV, and the only Dutch pope, Adrian VI. As an English name, it has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it was not popular until modern times.

AMBROSE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AM-broz
Rating: 59% based on 15 votes
From the Late Latin name Ambrosius, which was derived from the Greek name Αμβροσιος (Ambrosios) meaning "immortal". Saint Ambrose was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Milan, who is considered a Doctor of the Church. Due to the saint, the name came into general use in Christian Europe, though it was never particularly common in England.

AMELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: ə-MEE-lee-ə (English), ə-MEEL-yə (English), a-ME-lya (Italian, Polish), a-ME-lee-a (German)
Rating: 65% based on 16 votes
Variant of AMALIA, though it is sometimes confused with EMILIA, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of George II and George III. Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.

ARES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αρης (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-RES (Classical Greek), ER-eez (English)
Perhaps from either Greek αρη (are) "bane, ruin" or αρσην (arsen) "male". Ares was the blood-thirsty god of war in Greek mythology, a son of Zeus and Hera.

ARIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AHR-ee-ə
Means "song" or "melody" in Italian (literally means "air"). An aria is an elaborate vocal solo, the type usually performed in operas. As an English name, it has only been in use since the 20th century. It is not common in Italy.

ARLO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Meaning uncertain. It was perhaps inspired by the fictional place name Arlo Hill from the poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590) by Edmund Spenser. Spenser probably got Arlo by altering the real Irish place name Aherlow, which is Gaelic meaning "between two highlands".

ASHER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: אָשֵׁר (Hebrew)
Pronounced: A-shər (English)
Rating: 68% based on 16 votes
Means "happy, blessed" in Hebrew. Asher in the Old Testament is a son of Jacob by Leah's handmaid Zilpah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. The meaning of his name is explained in Genesis 30:13.

ASPEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AS-pən
From the English word for the tree, derived from Old English æspe. It is also the name of a ski resort in Colorado.

AURORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Romanian, Finnish, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: ow-RO-ra (Spanish, Classical Latin), ə-RAWR-ə (English), OW-ro-rah (Finnish)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.

BAILEY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAY-lee
From a surname derived from Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", originally denoting one who was a bailiff.

CALVIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL-vin
Rating: 34% based on 9 votes
Derived from the French surname Cauvin, which was derived from chauve "bald". The surname was borne by Jean Cauvin (1509-1564), a theologian from France who was one of the leaders of the Protestant Reformation. His surname was Latinized as Calvinus (based on Latin calvus "bald") and he is known as John Calvin in English. It has been used as a given name in his honour since the 19th century.

CRUZ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: KROOTH (European Spanish), KROOS (Latin American Spanish, Brazilian Portuguese), KROOSH (European Portuguese), KROOYS (Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 35% based on 15 votes
Means "cross" in Spanish or Portuguese, referring to the cross of the crucifixion.

DALTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAWL-tən
From an English surname which was originally from a place name meaning "valley town" in Old English. A notable bearer of the surname was John Dalton (1766-1844), the English chemist and physicist who theorized about the existence of atoms.

DOMINIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAWM-i-nik
Rating: 63% based on 10 votes
From the Late Latin name Dominicus meaning "of the Lord". This name was traditionally given to a child born on Sunday. Several saints have borne this name, including the 13th-century founder of the Dominican order of friars. It was in this saint's honour that the name was first used in England, starting around the 13th century. It is primarily used by Catholics.

EASTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: EES-tən
From an English surname which was derived from place names meaning "east town" in Old English.

ELLIOTT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EL-ee-ət
Personal note: -
From an English surname which was derived from a diminutive of the medieval name ELIAS.

ÉMERIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EM-REEK
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
French form of EMMERICH.

EMERSON
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EM-ər-sən
From an English surname meaning "son of EMERY". The surname was borne by Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American writer and philosopher who wrote about transcendentalism.

ESTEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Jewish
Diminutive of ESTHER. A famous bearer was the American businesswoman Estée Lauder (1908-2004), founder of the cosmetics company that bears her name. Her birth name was Josephine Esther Mentzer. Apparently she added the accent to her name Estee in order to make it appear French.

EVERETT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EV-ə-rit, EV-rit
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
From a surname which was derived from the given name EVERARD.

EVERLEY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EV-ər-lee
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "wild boar wood" in Old English.

FELIX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: FE-liks (German, Swedish), FAY-liks (Dutch), FEE-liks (English)
Rating: 64% based on 17 votes
From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.

Due to its favourable meaning, this name was popular among early Christians, being borne by many early saints and four popes. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages, though it has been more popular in continental Europe. A notable bearer was the German composer Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847).

GRAHAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: GRAY-əm (English), GRAM (English)
Rating: 53% based on 14 votes
From a Scottish surname, originally derived from the English place name Grantham, which probably meant "gravelly homestead" in Old English. The surname was first taken to Scotland in the 12th century by the Norman baron William de Graham. A famous bearer was Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor who devised the telephone.

GRAYSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: GRAY-sən
From an English surname meaning "son of the steward", derived from Middle English greyve "steward".

GREYSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: GRAY-sən
Variant of GRAYSON.

GRIFFIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GRIF-in
Rating: 44% based on 14 votes
Latinized form of GRUFFUDD. This name can also be inspired by the English word griffin, a creature with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle, ultimately from Greek γρυψ (gryps).

ISLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: IE-lə
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Variant of ISLAY, typically used as a feminine name.

JASPER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: JAS-pər (English), YAHS-pər (Dutch)
Rating: 73% based on 15 votes
Means "treasurer" in Persian. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.

JONAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹנָה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-nə (English)
Rating: 61% based on 14 votes
From the Hebrew name יוֹנָה (Yonah) meaning "dove". This was the name of a prophet swallowed by a fish, as told in the Old Testament Book of Jonah. Jonah was commanded by God to preach in Nineveh, but instead fled by boat. After being caught in a storm, the other sailors threw Jonah overboard, at which point he was swallowed. He emerged from the fish alive and repentant three days later.

Jonah's story was popular in the Middle Ages, and the Hellenized form Jonas was occasionally used in England. The form Jonah did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation.

JUDE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JOOD (English)
Rating: 50% based on 13 votes
Variant of JUDAS. It is used in many English versions of the New Testament to denote the second apostle named Judas, in order to distinguish him from Judas Iscariot. He was supposedly the author of the Epistle of Jude. In the English-speaking world, Jude has occasionally been used as a given name since the time of the Protestant Reformation.

KAI (3)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hawaiian
Rating: 46% based on 15 votes
Means "sea" in Hawaiian.

KENZIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEN-zee
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Short form of MACKENZIE.

KIERAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KEER-awn, KEE-ar-awn
Rating: 53% based on 13 votes
Anglicized form of CIARÁN.

KYLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIE-lee
This name arose in Australia, where it is said to mean "boomerang" in an Australian Aboriginal language. It is more likely a feminine form of KYLE, and it is in this capacity that it began to be used in America in the 1970s. A famous bearer is the Australian singer Kylie Minogue (1968-).

LAYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, English
Other Scripts: ليلى (Arabic)
Pronounced: LAY-lə (English)
Rating: 48% based on 14 votes
Means "night" in Arabic. This was the name of the object of romantic poems written by the 7th-century poet known as Qays. The story of Qays and Layla became a popular romance in medieval Arabia and Persia. The name became used in the English-speaking world after the 1970 release of the song 'Layla' by Derek and the Dominos, the title of which was inspired by the medieval story.

LEO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Pronounced: LE-o (German, Danish, Finnish), LAY-o (Dutch), LEE-o (English)
Rating: 61% based on 15 votes
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.

LIAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: LEE-əm (English)
Rating: 60% based on 15 votes
Irish short form of WILLIAM.

LUCIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: loo-CHEE-a (Italian), loo-TSEE-a (German), LOO-tsya (German), LOO-shə (English), loo-SEE-ə (English), LOO-chya (Romanian), LOO-kee-a (Classical Latin)
Rating: 74% based on 16 votes
Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus she is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.

LUCY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LOO-see
Rating: 74% based on 16 votes
English form of LUCIA, in use since the Middle Ages.

LYRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: LIE-rə (English)
The name of the constellation in the northern sky containing the star Vega. It is said to be shaped after the lyre of Orpheus.

MADELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: MAD-ə-lin (English), MAD-ə-lien (English), MAD-LEEN (French)
Rating: 67% based on 9 votes
English form of MAGDALENE. This is the name of the heroine in a series of children's books by Ludwig Bemelmans, first published 1939.

MAISIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: MAY-zee
Rating: 46% based on 14 votes
Diminutive of MAIREAD.

MALACHI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: מַלְאָכִי (Hebrew)
Pronounced: MAL-ə-kie (English)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
From the Hebrew מַלְאָכִי (Mal'akhiy) meaning "my messenger" or "my angel". This is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Malachi, which some claim foretells the coming of Christ. In England the name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

MALCOLM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: MAL-kəm
From Scottish Máel Coluim which means "disciple of Saint COLUMBA". This was the name of four kings of Scotland starting in the 10th century, including Malcolm III, who became king after killing Macbeth, the usurper who had murdered his father. The character Malcolm in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Macbeth' (1606) is based on him. Another famous bearer was Malcolm X (1925-1965), an American civil rights leader.

MATILDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Finnish
Pronounced: mə-TIL-də (English), MAH-teel-dah (Finnish)
Rating: 70% based on 11 votes
From the Germanic name Mahthildis meaning "strength in battle", from the elements maht "might, strength" and hild "battle". Saint Matilda was the wife of the 10th-century German king Henry I the Fowler. The name was common in many branches of European royalty in the Middle Ages. It was brought to England by the Normans, being borne by the wife of William the Conqueror himself. Another notable royal by this name was a 12th-century daughter of Henry I of England, known as the Empress Matilda because of her first marriage to the Holy Roman Emperor Henry V. She later invaded England, laying the foundations for the reign of her son Henry II.

The name was popular until the 15th century in England, usually in the vernacular form Maud. Both forms were revived by the 19th century. This name appears in the popular Australian folk song 'Waltzing Matilda', written in 1895.

MERRITT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MER-it
From an English surname, originally from a place name, which meant "boundary gate" in Old English.

MIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Pronounced: MEE-ah (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch), MEE-a (German), MEE-ə (English)
Rating: 51% based on 14 votes
Scandinavian, Dutch and German diminutive of MARIA. It coincides with the Italian word mia meaning "mine".

MILO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: MIE-lo (English)
Rating: 62% based on 13 votes
Old Germanic form of MILES, as well as the Latinized form. This form of the name was used in official documents during the Middle Ages, and it has been used independently since the 19th century.

NOLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: NO-lan
Rating: 49% based on 14 votes
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Nualláin meaning "descendant of NUALLÁN". The baseball player Nolan Ryan (1947-) is a famous bearer of this name.

OLIVER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
Other Scripts: Оливер (Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: AWL-ə-vər (English), O-lee-vu (German), O-lee-ver (Finnish)
Rating: 69% based on 15 votes
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.

In England Oliver was a common medieval name, however it became rare after the 17th century because of the military commander Oliver Cromwell, who ruled the country following the civil war. The name was revived in the 19th century, perhaps in part due to the title character in Charles Dickens' novel 'Oliver Twist' (1838), which was about a poor orphan living on the streets of London.

OWEN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: O-in (English)
Rating: 61% based on 14 votes
Modern form of OWAIN.

QUINN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KWIN
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cuinn meaning "descendant of CONN".

RAMONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Romanian, English
Pronounced: ra-MO-na (Spanish), rə-MON-ə (English)
Rating: 45% based on 11 votes
Feminine form of RAMÓN. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Helen Hunt Jackson's novel 'Ramona' (1884), as well as several subsequent movies based on the book.

REECE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Anglicized form of RHYS.

ROMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German
Other Scripts: Роман (Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: ru-MAN (Russian), RAW-man (Polish)
From the Late Latin name Romanus which meant "Roman".

ROWAN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: RO-ən (English)
Rating: 48% based on 13 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.

SAWYER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SOI-ər, SAW-yər
Rating: 43% based on 12 votes
From a surname meaning "sawer of wood" in Middle English. Mark Twain used it for the hero in his novel 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer' (1876).

SEBASTIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Finnish, Romanian
Pronounced: ze-BAS-tyan (German), sə-BAS-chən (English), se-BAS-tyan (Polish), SE-bahs-tee-ahn (Finnish)
Rating: 81% based on 16 votes
From the Latin name Sebastianus which meant "from Sebaste". Sebaste was the name a town in Asia Minor, its name deriving from Greek σεβαστος (sebastos) "venerable" (a translation of Latin Augustus, the title of the Roman emperors). According to Christian tradition, Saint Sebastian was a 3rd-century Roman soldier martyred during the persecutions of the emperor Diocletian. After he was discovered to be a Christian, he was tied to a stake and shot with arrows. This however did not kill him. Saint Irene of Rome healed him and he returned to personally admonish Diocletian, whereupon the emperor had him beaten to death.

Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in medieval Europe, especially in Spain and France. It was also borne by a 16th-century king of Portugal who died in a crusade against Morocco.

SETH (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: שֵׁת (Ancient Hebrew), Σηθ (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SETH (English)
Rating: 52% based on 9 votes
Means "placed" or "appointed" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the third named son of Adam and Eve. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

SHILOH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: שִׁלוֹ, שִׁילֹה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: SHIE-lo (English)
Rating: 38% based on 13 votes
From an Old Testament place name possibly meaning "tranquil" in Hebrew. It is also used prophetically in the Old Testament to refer to a person, often understood to be the Messiah (see Genesis 49:10). This may in fact be a mistranslation. This name was brought to public attention after Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie gave it to their daughter in 2006.

SILAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Σιλας (Greek)
Pronounced: SIE-ləs (English)
Rating: 55% based on 10 votes
Probably a short form of SILVANUS. This is the name of a companion of Saint Paul in the New Testament. Paul refers to him as Silvanus in his epistles, though it is possible that Silas was in fact a Greek form of the Hebrew name SAUL (via Aramaic).

As an English name it was not used until after the Protestant Reformation. It was utilized by George Eliot for the title character in her novel 'Silas Marner' (1861).

SØREN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish, Norwegian
Pronounced: SUU-ren
Rating: 20% based on 5 votes
Danish form of SEVERINUS. Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) was a Danish philosopher who is regarded as a precursor of existentialism.

STELLA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Dutch, German
Pronounced: STEL-ə (English)
Rating: 54% based on 11 votes
Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets 'Astrophel and Stella'. It was a nickname of a lover of Jonathan Swift, real name Esther Johnson (1681-1728), though it was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play 'A Streetcar Named Desire' (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.

SULLIVAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SUL-i-vən
Rating: 35% based on 12 votes
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Súilleabháin meaning "descendant of Súilleabhán". The name Súilleabhán means "little dark eye" in Irish.

TAYLOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAY-lər
Rating: 33% based on 12 votes
From an English surname which originally denoted someone who was a tailor, from Norman French tailleur, ultimately from Latin taliare "to cut". Its modern use as a feminine name may have been influenced by British author Taylor Caldwell (1900-1985).

TRISTAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English, French, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: TRIS-tən (English), TREES-TAHN (French)
Rating: 59% based on 14 votes
Old French form of the Pictish name Drustan, a diminutive of DRUST. The spelling was altered by association with Latin tristis "sad". Tristan is a character in medieval French tales, probably inspired by older Celtic legends, and ultimately merged into Arthurian legend. According to the story Tristan was sent to Ireland in order to fetch Isolde, who was to be the bride of King Mark of Cornwall. On the way back, Tristan and Isolde accidentally drink a potion which makes them fall in love. Their tragic story was very popular in the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.

WYATT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIE-ət
Rating: 56% based on 13 votes
From an English surname which was derived from the medieval given name WYOT. Wyatt Earp (1848-1929) was an American lawman and gunfighter involved in the famous shootout at the OK Corral.

ZOE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ζωη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ZO-ee (English), DZO-e (Italian)
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Means "life" in Greek. From early times it was adopted by Hellenized Jews as a translation of EVE. It was borne by two early Christian saints, one martyred under emperor Hadrian, the other martyred under Diocletian. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by a ruling empress of the 11th century. As an English name, Zoe has only been in use since the 19th century. It has generally been more common among Eastern Christians (in various spellings).
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2017.