Keladry's Personal Name List

ADELINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Romanian, German, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)

Pronounced: ah-de-LEE-nah (Italian), ah-dhe-LEE-nah (Spanish)

Latinate diminutive of ADELA

AGNES

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: ‘Αγνη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: AG-nəs (English), AHK-nes (German), AHKH-nəs (Dutch), AHNG-nes (Swedish)

Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Αγνη (Hagne), derived from Greek ‘αγνος (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe, being especially popular in England in the Middle Ages.

ALESSANDRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: ahl-e-SAHN-drah

Italian form of ALEXANDRA

ALICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Italian

Pronounced: AL-is (English), a-LEES (French), ah-LEE-che (Italian)

Personal note: Mum approves

From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).

AMÁLIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hungarian, Portuguese, Slovak

Hungarian, Portuguese and Slovak form of AMALIA

AMALIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch, German, Finnish, Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)

Pronounced: ah-MAH-lee-ah (Dutch, German)

Latinized form of the Germanic name Amala, a short form of names beginning with the element amal meaning "work".

ANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Slovene, Bulgarian, Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian

Other Scripts: Ана (Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian), ანა (Georgian)

Pronounced: AH-nah (Spanish)

Personal note: Grace approves

Form of ANNA

ANOUK

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch, French

Personal note: Grace & Mum approve

Dutch and French diminutive of ANNA

APOLLINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

French form of APOLLONIA

ARABELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Medieval Scottish name, probably a variant of ANNABEL. It has long been associated with Latin orabilis meaning "invokable".

ARTHUR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: AHR-thər (English), ar-TUYR (French), AHR-toor (German), AHR-tur (Dutch)

Personal note: Grace approves

The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.

The name came into general use in England in the Middle Ages due to the prevalence of Arthurian romances, and it enjoyed a surge of popularity in the 19th century. Famous bearers include German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), mystery author and Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), and science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008).

AUGUST

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Catalan, English

Pronounced: OW-guwst (German, Polish), AW-gəst (English)

Personal note: Grace approves

German, Polish, Scandinavian and Catalan form of AUGUSTUS

AURELIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Roman, Italian, Romanian, Polish

Pronounced: ow-RE-lyah (Italian), ow-REL-yah (Polish)

Feminine form of AURELIUS

BEATRICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, English, Swedish

Pronounced: be-ah-TREE-che (Italian), BEE-ə-tris (English), BEE-tris (English), BE-ah-trees (Swedish), be-ah-TREES (Swedish)

Italian form of BEATRIX. Beatrice Portinari was the woman who was loved by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. She served as Dante's guide through paradise in his epic poem 'The Divine Comedy' (1321). This was also the name of a character in Shakespeare's play 'Much Ado About Nothing' (1599).

BIRGITTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish

Pronounced: bir-YIT-tah (Swedish), bir-GIT-tah (Swedish)

Most likely a Scandinavian form of BRIDGET via the Latinized form Brigitta. Alternatively it could be a feminine derivative of BIRGER. This is the name of the patron saint of Europe, Birgitta of Sweden, the 14th-century founder of the Bridgettine nuns. Her father's name was Birger.

CECILY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SES-i-lee

English form of CECILIA. This was the usual English form during the Middle Ages.

CLARICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Possibly from a medieval French form of Claritia, a derivative of CLARA. It was brought to England in the Middle Ages.

CLAUDIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman

Pronounced: KLAW-dee-əs (English)

From a Roman family name which was derived from Latin claudus meaning "lame, crippled". This was the family name of several Roman emperors of the 1st century, including the emperor known simply as Claudius. He was poisoned by his wife Agrippina in order to bring her son Nero (Claudius's stepson) to power. The name was later borne by several early saints, including a 7th-century bishop of Besançon.

CLOELIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Roman

Feminine form of CLOELIUS. In Roman legend Cloelia was a maiden who was given to an Etruscan invader as a hostage. She managed to escape by swimming across the Tiber, at the same time helping some of the other captives to safety.

DELPHINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: del-FEEN

French form of DELPHINA

DESPINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Δεσποινα (Greek), Деспина (Macedonian)

Variant transcription of DESPOINA, as well as the Macedonian form.

ELI (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: עֵלִי (Hebrew), Ηλι (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: EE-lie (English)

Personal note: Grace and Mum approve

Means "ascension" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the high priest of Israel and the teacher of Samuel. In England, Eli has been used as a Christian given name since the Protestant Reformation.

ELKE (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch, German, Frisian

Pronounced: EL-kə (Dutch)

Frisian diminutive of ADELHEID

ELLIOT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ee-ət

From a surname which was a variant of ELLIOTT.

ELOISE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-o-eez, el-o-EEZ

Personal note: Mum approves

From the Old French name Héloïse, which is probably from the Germanic name Helewidis, composed of the elements heil "hale, healthy" and wid "wide". It is sometimes associated with the Greek word ‘ηλιος (helios) "sun" or the name Louise, though there is not likely an etymological connection. This name was borne in the 12th century by Saint Eloise, the wife of the French theologian Peter Abelard. She became a nun after her husband was castrated by her uncle.

There was a medieval English form of this name, Helewis, though it died out after the 13th century. In the 19th century it was revived in the English-speaking world in the form Eloise.

ESTELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: es-TEL-ə

Latinate form of ESTELLE. This was the name of the heroine, Estella Havisham, in Charles Dickens' novel 'Great Expectations' (1860).

EUFÊMIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese

Portuguese form of EUPHEMIA

EUGÉNIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: uu-zhay-NEE

French form of EUGENIA. This was the name of the wife of Napoleon III.

EVIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EE-vee, EV-ee

Diminutive of EVE or EVELYN

FRANCESCA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Catalan

Pronounced: frahn-CHES-kah (Italian)

Italian and Catalan feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).

GEORGE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Romanian

Pronounced: JORJ (English)

Personal note: Grace approves

From the Greek name Γεωργιος (Georgios) which was derived from the Greek word γεωργος (georgos) meaning "farmer, earthworker", itself derived from the elements γη (ge) "earth" and εργον (ergon) "work". Saint George was a 3rd-century Roman soldier from Palestine who was martyred during the persecutions of emperor Diocletian. Later legends describe his defeat of a dragon, with which he was often depicted in medieval art.

Initially Saint George was primarily revered by Eastern Christians, but returning crusaders brought stories of him to Western Europe and he became the patron of England, Portugal, Catalonia and Aragon. The name was rarely used in England until the German-born George I came to the British throne in the 18th century. Five subsequent British kings have borne the name.

Other famous bearers include two kings of Greece, the composer George Frideric Handel (1685-1759), the first president of the United States, George Washington (1732-1797), and the Pacific explorer George Vancouver (1757-1798). This was also the pen name of authors George Eliot (1819-1880) and George Orwell (1903-1950), real names Mary Anne Evans and Eric Arthur Blair respectively.

GIDEON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew

Other Scripts: גִּדְעוֹן (Hebrew)

Pronounced: GID-ee-ən (English)

Means "feller" or "hewer" in Hebrew. Gideon was a hero of the Old Testament who led the Israelites against the Midianites. In the English-speaking world, Gideon has been used as a given name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans.

HAZEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HAY-zəl

Personal note: Grace approves

From the English word hazel for the tree or the light brown colour, derived ultimately from Old English hæsel. It was coined as a given name in the 19th century.

HENRIETTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: hen-ree-ET-ə (English)

English form of HENRIETTE. It was introduced to England by Henriette Marie, the wife of the 17th-century English king Charles I. The name Henriette was also Anglicized as Harriet, a form which was initially more popular.

HESTIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: ‘Εστια (Ancient Greek)

Derived from Greek ‘εστια (hestia) "hearth, fireside". In Greek mythology Hestia was the goddess of the hearth and domestic activity.

HONORIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Late Roman

Feminine form of HONORIUS

HUGH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HYOO

Personal note: Mum approves

From the Germanic element hug, meaning "heart, mind, spirit". It was common among Frankish and French nobility, being borne by Hugh Capet, a 10th-century king of France who founded the Capetian dynasty. The Normans brought the name to England and it became common there, even more so after the time of the 12th-century bishop Saint Hugh of Lincoln, who was known for his charity. This was also the name of kings of Cyprus and the crusader kingdom of Jerusalem. The name is used in Ireland and Scotland as the Anglicized form of Aodh and Ùisdean.

HUGO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)

Pronounced: OO-go (Spanish), HYOO-go (English), HUY-kho (Dutch), HOO-go (German)

Personal note: Grace and Mum approve

Latinized form of HUGH. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.

IMELDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish

Pronounced: ee-MEL-dah

Italian and Spanish form of IRMHILD. The Blessed Imelda was a young 14th-century nun from Bologna.

INÊS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese

Portuguese form of AGNES

INGRID

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German

Pronounced: ING-rid (Swedish), ING-ree (Norwegian), ING-grit (German)

From the Old Norse name Ingríðr meaning "Ing is beautiful", derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with fríðr "beautiful". A famous bearer was the Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman (1915-1982).

INNES

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Scottish

Anglicized form of AONGHUS, also used as a feminine name.

IONE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, English

Other Scripts: Ιονη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ie-O-nee (English), IE-o-nee (English), ie-ON (English)

From Greek ιον (ion) meaning "violet flower". This was the name of a sea nymph in Greek mythology. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, though perhaps based on the Greek place name Ionia, a region on the west coast of Asia Minor.

ISKANDAR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Arabic, Indonesian

Other Scripts: إسكندر (Arabic)

Arabic and Indonesian form of ALEXANDER

ISLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish

Pronounced: IE-lə

Personal note: Grace approves

Variant of ISLAY, typically used as a feminine name.

ISRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: إسراء (Arabic)

Means "nocturnal journey", derived from Arabic سرى (sara) "to travel at night".

JACQUES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

Pronounced: ZHAHK

Personal note: Grace and Mum approve

French form of JACOB (or JAMES).

JOSEPHINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German

Pronounced: JO-sə-feen (English), yo-ze-FEE-nə (German)

English and German form of JOSÉPHINE

LETTICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Medieval form of LETITIA

LILY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LIL-ee

Personal note: Mum approves

From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.

LUCA (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, Romanian, German

Pronounced: LOO-kah (Italian)

Personal note: Grace approves

Italian and Romanian form of LUKE. This name was borne by Luca della Robbia, a Renaissance sculptor from Florence.

LUCIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: loo-CHEE-ah (Italian), LOO-tsee-ah (German), LOO-shə (English), loo-SEE-ə (English)

Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th-century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.

LUCY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LOO-see

English form of LUCIA, in use since the Middle Ages.

MAFALDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Portuguese

Italian and Portuguese form of MATILDA

MAUD

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: MAWD (English)

Usual medieval form of MATILDA. Though it became rare after the 14th century, it was revived and once more grew popular in the 19th century, perhaps due to Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem 'Maud' (1855).

MIGUEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese

Pronounced: mee-GEL

Spanish and Portuguese form of MICHAEL. A notable bearer of this name was Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra (1547-1616), the Spanish novelist and poet who wrote 'Don Quixote'.

MILO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: MIE-lo (English)

Old Germanic form of MILES, as well as the Latinized form. This form of the name was used in official documents during the Middle Ages, and it has been used independently since the 19th century.

MIREILLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: mee-RAY

From the Occitan name Mirèio, which was first used by the poet Frédéric Mistral for the main character in his poem 'Mirèio' (1859). He probably derived it from the Occitan word mirar meaning "to admire".

MONA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish, English

Pronounced: MO-nə (English)

Anglicized form of MUADHNAIT. It is also associated with Greek monos "one" and Leonardo da Vinci's painting the 'Mona Lisa' (in which case it is a contraction of Italian ma donna meaning "my lady").

OLIVER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak

Other Scripts: Оливер (Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: AHL-ə-vər (English), AW-lee-ver (German)

Personal note: Grace and Mum approve

From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.

In England Oliver was a common medieval name, however it became rare after the 17th century because of the military commander Oliver Cromwell, who ruled the country following the civil war. The name was revived in the 19th century, perhaps in part due to the title character in Charles Dickens' novel 'Oliver Twist' (1838), which was about a poor orphan living on the streets of London.

OLIVIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: ə-LIV-ee-ə (English), o-LEE-vee-ah (German)

This name was first used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy 'Twelfth Night' (1602). Shakespeare may have based it on OLIVER or OLIVA, or perhaps directly on the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.

The name has been used in the English-speaking world since the 18th century, though it did not become overly popular until the last half of the 20th century. Its rise in popularity in America was precipitated by a character on the 1970s television series 'The Waltons'.

OPHELIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Literature

Pronounced: o-FEEL-yə (English)

Derived from Greek οφελος (ophelos) meaning "help". This name was probably created by the 15th-century poet Jacopo Sannazaro for a character in his poem 'Arcadia'. It was borrowed by Shakespeare for his play 'Hamlet' (1600), in which it belongs to Hamlet's lover who eventually goes insane and drowns herself. In spite of this, the name has been used since the 19th century.

OSCAR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Irish Mythology

Pronounced: AHS-kər (English)

Personal note: Grace and Mum approve

Possibly means "deer lover", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "lover". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.

This name was popularized in continental Europe by the works of the 18th-century Scottish poet James Macpherson. Napoleon was an admirer of Macpherson, and he suggested Oscar as the second middle name of his godson, who eventually became king of Sweden as Oscar I. Another notable bearer was the Irish writer and humourist Oscar Wilde (1854-1900).

PALOMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: pah-LO-mah

Means "dove, pigeon" in Spanish.

PENELOPE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, English

Other Scripts: Πηνελοπη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: pə-NEL-ə-pee (English)

Possibly derived from Greek πηνελοψ (penelops), a type of duck. Alternatively it could be from πηνη (pene) "threads, weft" and ωψ (ops) "face, eye". In Homer's epic the 'Odyssey' this is the name of the wife of Odysseus, forced to fend off suitors while her husband is away fighting at Troy. It has occasionally been used as an English given name since the 16th century.

PERCY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: PUR-see

Personal note: Grace approves

From an English surname which was derived from the name of a Norman town Perci, which was itself perhaps derived from a Gaulish given name which was Latinized as Persius. The surname was borne by a noble English family, and it first used as a given name in their honour. A famous bearer was Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), an English romantic poet whose works include 'Adonais' and 'Ozymandias'. This name can also be used as a short form of PERCIVAL.

PEREGRINE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: PER-ə-grin, PER-ə-green

From the Late Latin name Peregrinus, which meant "traveller". This was the name of several early saints.

PTOLEMY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: History

Other Scripts: Πτολεμαιος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: TAHL-ə-mee (English)

From the Greek name Πτολεμαιος (Ptolemaios), derived from Greek πολεμηιος (polemeios) meaning "aggressive" or "warlike". Ptolemy was the name of several Greco-Egyptian rulers of Egypt, all descendents of Ptolemy I, one of the generals of Alexander the Great. This was also the name of a Greek astronomer.

ROMANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Late Roman

Feminine form of Romanus (see ROMAN).

ROSAMUND

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: ROZ-ə-mund

Derived from the Germanic elements hros "horse" and mund "protection". The Normans introduced this name to England. It was subsequently influenced by the Latin phrase rosa munda "pure rose". This was the name of the mistress of Henry II, the king of England in the 12th century. She was possibly murdered by his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine.

SABINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, German

Pronounced: sa-BEEN (French), za-BEE-nə (German)

French and German form of SABINA

SALOME

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Σαλωμη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: sə-LO-mee (English), SAH-lə-may (English)

From an Aramaic name which was related to the Hebrew word שָׁלוֹם (shalom) meaning "peace". According to the historian Josephus this was the name of the daughter of Herodias (the consort of Herod Antipas, the tetrarch of Galilee). In the New Testament, though a specific name is not given, it was a daughter of Herodias who danced for Herod and was rewarded with the head of John the Baptist, and thus Salome and the dancer have traditionally been equated.

As a Christian given name, Salome has been in occasional use since the Protestant Reformation. This was due to a second person of this name in the New Testament: one of the women who witnessed the crucifixion and later discovered that Jesus' tomb was empty.

SASKIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch, German

Pronounced: SAHS-kee-ah: (Dutch), ZAHS-kee-ah (German)

Personal note: Grace approves

From the Germanic element sachs "Saxon". The Saxons were a Germanic tribe, their name ultimately deriving from the Germanic word sahs meaning "knife".

SERAPHINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare), German (Rare), Late Roman

Feminine form of the Late Latin name Seraphinus, derived from the biblical word seraphim which was Hebrew in origin and meant "fiery ones". The seraphim were an order of angels, described by Isaiah in the Bible as having six wings each. This was the name of a 13th-century Italian saint who made clothes for the poor. As an English name, it has never been common.

SÉVÉRINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

French feminine form of SEVERINUS

SVETLANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian, Slovak, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Светлана (Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: svyet-LAH-nah (Russian), sveet-LAH-nah (Russian)

Derived from the Slavic element svet meaning "light, world". It was popularized by the poem 'Svetlana' (1813) by the Russian poet Vasily Zhukovsky. It is sometimes used as a translation of Photine.

SYBELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: si-BEL-ə

Variant of SIBYLLA

THEA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, English

Pronounced: TE-ah (German), THEE-ə (English)

Short form of DOROTHEA or THEODORA

THEODORE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: THEE-ə-dawr

From the Greek name Θεοδωρος (Theodoros), which meant "gift of god" from Greek θεος (theos) "god" and δωρον (doron) "gift". This was the name of several saints, including Theodore of Amasea, a 4th-century Greek soldier; Theodore of Tarsus, a 7th-century archbishop of Canterbury; and Theodore the Studite, a 9th-century Byzantine monk. It was also borne by two popes.

This was a common name in classical Greece, and, due to both the saints who carried it and the favourable meaning, it came into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was however rare in Britain before the 19th century. Famous bearers include three tsars of Russia (in the Russian form Fyodor) and American president Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919).

TIBERIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman

Pronounced: ti-BE-ri-uws

Roman praenomen, or given name, meaning "of the Tiber" in Latin. The Tiber is the river that runs through Rome. Tiberius was the second Roman emperor, the stepson of emperor Augustus.

VIOLET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: VIE-lət, VIE-ə-lət

Personal note: Mum approves

From the English word violet for the purple flower, ultimately derived from Latin viola. It was common in Scotland from the 16th century, and it came into general use as an English given name during the 19th century.

WILLOW

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: WIL-o

From the name of the tree, which is ultimately derived from Old English welig.

YOLANDE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

French form of YOLANDA. A notable bearer of the 15th century was Yolande of Aragon, who acted as regent for the French king Charles VII, her son-in-law. She was a supporter of Joan of Arc.
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2014.