Caprice's Personal Name List

ABENI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Western African, Yoruba
Personal note: I like this name because it has such a cute meaning
Rating: 47% based on 58 votes
Means "we asked for her, and behold, we got her" in Yoruba.

ADAIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-DER
Rating: 50% based on 53 votes
From an English surname which was derived from the given name EDGAR.

ADASTRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Personal note: "Towards the stars"...so beautiful!
Rating: 59% based on 48 votes
From the Latin phrase ad astra "to the stars". It may have been inspired by the similar name Adrasta (see Adrasteia).

ADELAIDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese
Pronounced: A-də-layd (English), a-de-LIE-de (Italian), ə-də-LIED (Portuguese)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman emperor Otto the Great. The name became common in Britain in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.

ADELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: A-DU-LEEN (French), AD-ə-lien (English)
Rating: 73% based on 57 votes
French and English form of ADELINA.

ADORESTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Acadian), Louisiana Creole
Rating: 46% based on 27 votes

ADRASTEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αδραστεια (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 60% based on 18 votes
Latinized form of ADRASTEIA. One of Jupiter's moons bears this name.

ADRASTÉE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
French form of Adrasteia.

ALASDAIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 68% based on 53 votes
Scottish form of ALEXANDER.

ALETHEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: al-ə-THEE-ə, ə-LEE-thee-ə
Rating: 60% based on 39 votes
Derived from Greek αληθεια (aletheia) meaning "truth". This name was coined in the 16th century.

ALEXANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: a-lig-ZAN-dər (English), a-le-KSAN-du (German), ah-lək-SAHN-dər (Dutch), AW-lek-sawn-der (Hungarian)
Rating: 63% based on 6 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, king of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ALGERNON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AL-jər-nahn
Rating: 42% based on 47 votes
Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from aux gernons "having a moustache", which was applied to William de Percy, a companion of William the Conqueror. It was first used a given name in the 15th century (for a descendant of William de Percy).

ALIZÉE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Modern)
Pronounced: ah-lee-ZAY
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Modern French name derived from the word alizé meaning "trade wind".
It was brought to public attention by Corsican singer Alizée Jacotey (1984-)

ALLEGRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English (Rare)
Pronounced: al-LE-gra (Italian), ə-LEG-rə (English)
Rating: 54% based on 54 votes
Means "cheerful, lively" in Italian. It was borne by a short-lived illegitimate daughter of Lord Byron (1817-1822).

ALMA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Dutch
Pronounced: AL-mə (English)
Personal note: Such a soft and sweet name
Rating: 56% based on 29 votes
This name became popular after the Battle of Alma (1854), which took place near the River Alma in Crimea and ended in a victory for Britain and France. However, the name was in rare use before the battle; it was probably inspired by Latin almus "nourishing". It also coincides with the Spanish word meaning "the soul".

ALMEDINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bosnian
Pronounced: ahl-med-EEN-ah
Rating: 42% based on 32 votes
Derived from Arabic al "the" and medina "city".

ALTALUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Italian
Rating: 63% based on 12 votes
Derived from Italian alta, the feminine form of the adjective alto, meaning "high; deep; big; towering; elevated" and, when used in a poetic context, "grand; sublime; noble" and luna "moon".

A known bearer of this name was Altaluna della Scala, daughter of Mastino II della Scala, a 14th-cenutry lord of Verona, sister of Viridis and wife of Louis V, Duke of Bavaria.

Whether Altalune, the name Uma Thurman gave her daughter born in 2012, is a medieval variant of this name, is still debated.

ALTHEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αλθαια (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 68% based on 10 votes
From the Greek name Αλθαια (Althaia), perhaps related to Greek αλθος (althos) "healing". In Greek myth she was the mother of Meleager. Soon after her son was born she was told that he would die as soon as a piece of wood that was burning on her fire was fully consumed. She immediately extinguished the piece of wood and sealed it in a chest, but in a fit of rage many years later she took it out and set it alight, thereby killing her son.

AMALTHEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αμαλθεια (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 73% based on 7 votes
From the Greek Αμαλθεια (Amaltheia), derived from μαλθασσω (malthasso) meaning "to soften, to soothe". In Greek myth she was a goat who nursed the infant Zeus.

AMANDINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-MAHN-DEEN
Rating: 51% based on 28 votes
French diminutive of AMANDA.

AMANI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: أماني (Arabic)
Rating: 40% based on 43 votes
Means "wishes" in Arabic.

AMARANTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Rating: 41% based on 38 votes
French form of AMARANTHA.

AMARANTHINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: ah-mə-AHNTH-een
Rating: 45% based on 22 votes
Diminutive or elaboration of Amarantha.

AMARYLLIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: am-ə-RIL-is (English)
Rating: 60% based on 46 votes
Derived from Greek αμαρυσσω (amarysso) "to sparkle". This was the name of a heroine in Virgil's epic poem 'Eclogues'. The amaryllis flower is named for her.

AMBROSE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AM-broz
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From the Late Latin name Ambrosius, which was derived from the Greek name Αμβροσιος (Ambrosios) meaning "immortal". Saint Ambrose was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Milan, who is considered a Doctor of the Church. Due to the saint, the name came into general use in Christian Europe, though it was never particularly common in England.

AMINTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 55% based on 14 votes
Form of AMYNTAS used by the Italian poet Torquato Tasso for his play 'Aminta' (1573). In the play Aminta is a shepherd who falls in love with a nymph.

AMPHITRITE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αμφιτριτη
Personal note: Pronounced am-phee-TREE-teh
Rating: 44% based on 30 votes
Possibly from Greek amphis "surrounding" and tris "third" ("the third" apparently refers to the sea). In Greek mythology Amphitrite was the goddess of saltwater, wife of Poseidon and mother of Triton; her offspring also included seals and dolphins. She is variously given as the daughter of Oceanus and Tethys (and thus an oceanid) or of Nereus and Doris (and thus a nereid). Her Roman equivalent is Salacia.

ANDROMEDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ανδρομεδα, Ανδρομεδη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AN-DRO-ME-DA (Classical Greek), an-DRAH-mi-də (English)
Rating: 70% based on 45 votes
Means "to be mindful of a man" from the Greek element ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος) combined with μεδομαι (medomai) "to be mindful of". In Greek mythology Andromeda was an Ethiopian princess rescued from sacrifice by the hero Perseus. A constellation in the northern sky is named for her. This is also the name of a nearby galaxy, given because it resides (from our point of view) within the constellation.

ANSEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AN-səl
Rating: 66% based on 5 votes
From a surname which was derived from the given name ANSELM. A famous bearer was American photographer Ansel Adams (1902-1984).

ANTARES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Astronomy
Other Scripts: Άντάρης (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: an-TAHR-ees
Rating: 64% based on 5 votes
Name of a giant red star, which happens to be the brightest in the constellation Scorpio.

ANTHEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ανθεια (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AN-thee-ə (English)
Rating: 59% based on 9 votes
From the Greek Ανθεια (Antheia), derived from ανθος (anthos) meaning "flower, blossom". This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Hera.

ARAMINTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 67% based on 15 votes
Meaning unknown. This name was (first?) used by William Congreve in his comedy 'The Old Bachelor' (1693) and later by Sir John Vanbrugh in his comedy 'The Confederacy' (1705). This was the real name of abolitionist Harriet Tubman (1820-1913), who was born Araminta Ross.

ARIADNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Catalan, Russian, Polish
Other Scripts: Ариадна (Russian)
Pronounced: a-RYAD-na (Spanish, Polish)
Rating: 72% based on 5 votes
Spanish, Catalan, Russian and Polish form of ARIADNE.

ARIADNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αριαδνη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-REE-AD-NE (Classical Greek), ar-ee-AD-nee (English)
Rating: 73% based on 16 votes
Means "most holy", composed of the Cretan Greek elements αρι (ari) "most" and αδνος (adnos) "holy". In Greek mythology, Ariadne was the daughter of King Minos. She fell in love with Theseus and helped him to escape the Labyrinth and the Minotaur, but was later abandoned by him. Eventually she married the god Dionysus.

ARIANWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: ah-RYAHN-wen, a-ree-AN-wen
Rating: 53% based on 39 votes
Derived from the Welsh element arian "silver" combined with gwen "white, fair, blessed". This was the name of an early saint.

ARISTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: ə-RIS-tə (English)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Means "ear of corn" in Latin. This is the name of a star, also known as Spica, in the constellation Virgo.

ARLO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 45% based on 50 votes
Meaning uncertain. It was perhaps inspired by the fictional place name Arlo Hill from the poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590) by Edmund Spenser. Spenser probably got Arlo by altering the real Irish place name Aherlow, which is Gaelic meaning "between two highlands".

ARMELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AR-MEL
Rating: 34% based on 38 votes
Feminine form of ARMEL.

ARMIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Rating: 49% based on 12 votes
Probably created by the 16th-century Italian poet Torquato Tasso for his epic poem 'Jerusalem Delivered' (1580). In the poem Armida is a beautiful enchantress who bewitches many of the crusaders.

ARTEMIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Greek
Other Scripts: Αρτεμις (Greek)
Pronounced: AR-TE-MEES (Classical Greek), AHR-tə-mis (English)
Rating: 76% based on 16 votes
Meaning unknown, possibly related either to Greek αρτεμης (artemes) "safe" or αρταμος (artamos) "a butcher". Artemis was the Greek goddess of the moon and hunting, the twin of Apollo and the daughter of Zeus and Leto. She was known as Diana to the Romans.

ARTEMISIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αρτεμισια (Ancient Greek)
Personal note: After Italian painter Artemisia Gentileschi
Rating: 66% based on 46 votes
Feminine form of ARTEMISIOS. This was the name of the 4th-century BC builder of the Mausoleum, one of the seven wonders of the world. She built it in memory of her husband, the Carian prince Mausolus.

ASTRAEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αστραια (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 59% based on 41 votes
Latinized form of the Greek Αστραια (Astraia), derived from Greek αστηρ (aster) meaning "star". Astraea was a Greek goddess of justice and innocence. After wickedness took root in the world she left the earth and became the constellation Virgo.

ÁSTRÓS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic
Rating: 43% based on 31 votes
Derived from Icelandic ást meaning "affection, love, devotion" and rós "rose". This is a modern coinage, perhaps inspired by the similar name Ástríður (the Icelandic form of Ástríðr), in which the first element is a form of Old Norse áss "god", which in proper names becomes Ást- when it precedes the liquid r (this according to the Viking Answer Lady).

ATHÉNAÏS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-TE-NA-EES
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
French form of ATHENAIS.

AUDELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: o-də-LEEN
Rating: 73% based on 7 votes
French diminutive of Aude.

AURORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Romanian, Finnish, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: ow-RO-ra (Spanish, Classical Latin), ə-RAWR-ə (English), OW-ro-rah (Finnish)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.

AZUCENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-thoo-THE-na (European Spanish), a-soo-SE-na (Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 41% based on 35 votes
Means "madonna lily" in Spanish.

BARNABY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Pronounced: BAHR-nə-bee
Rating: 46% based on 42 votes
Medieval English form of BARNABAS.

BASTIEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: BAS-TYEN
Rating: 60% based on 13 votes
Short form of SÉBASTIEN.

BERNADETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: BER-NA-DET (French)
Rating: 51% based on 42 votes
French feminine form of BERNARD. Saint Bernadette was a young woman from Lourdes in France who claimed to have seen visions of the Virgin Mary.

BRAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: BRAHM
Personal note: After Bram Stoker
Rating: 56% based on 41 votes
Short form of ABRAHAM. This name was borne by Bram Stoker (1847-1912), the Irish author who wrote 'Dracula'.

BRANWELL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 44% based on 23 votes
Variant of BRAMWELL. A famous namesake is Patrick Branwell Brontë, brother of the famous Brontë sisters.

BRANWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: BRAN-wen (Welsh)
Rating: 52% based on 39 votes
Means "beautiful raven" from Welsh bran "raven" and gwen "fair, white, blessed". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is the sister of the British king Bran and the wife of the Irish king Matholwch.

BRIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Modern, Rare), Popular Culture, Literature
Rating: 52% based on 22 votes
Variant of Brianne. This is the name of a character in George R. R. Martin's 'A Song of Ice and Fire' series, as well as the TV show based on the books 'Game of Thrones'.

BURGUNDY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BUR-gən-dee
Rating: 36% based on 28 votes
This name can refer either to the region in France, the wine (which derives from the name of the region), or the colour (which derives from the name of the wine).

CADENZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Rare)
Rating: 44% based on 26 votes
Means "conclusion of a movement in music" in Italian (literally "a falling"). A cadenza is an ornamental passage near the close of a song or solo, as in an opera. This is sometimes seen as an Italianate variant of Cadence. The name can also be recalled from the character in the 2017 Disney movie "Beauty and the Beast" in which he is transformed into a harpsichord.

CALEDONIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Canadian, Rare)
Pronounced: kal-ə-DO-nee-ə
Rating: 56% based on 24 votes
From the Latin name of Scotland, which may be derived from Caledones, the Latin name of a tribe that inhabited the region during the Roman era, which is of unknown origin, though some Celtic roots have been suggested; it is possible that the exonym means "tough person" from Brythonic caled "hard, tough" and a suffix (unknown to me) meaning either "great" or "person". The name Caledonia has been applied poetically to Scotland since the 18th century.

CALLIOPE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Καλλιοπη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kə-LIE-ə-pee (English)
Rating: 55% based on 42 votes
Latinized form of KALLIOPE.

CALYPSO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Καλυψω (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kə-LIP-so (English)
Rating: 55% based on 40 votes
From Greek Καλυψω (Kalypso) which probably meant "she that conceals", derived from καλυπτω (kalypto) "to cover, to conceal". In Greek myth this was the name of the nymph who fell in love with Odysseus after he was shipwrecked on her island of Ogygia. When he refused to stay with her she detained him for seven years until Zeus ordered her to release him.

CARIDAD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ka-ree-DHADH
Rating: 38% based on 33 votes
Spanish cognate of CHARITY.

CARLOTTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: kar-LOT-ta
Personal note: Diva from "The Phantom of the Opera"
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Italian form of CHARLOTTE.

CARMEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English, Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: KAR-men (Spanish), KAHR-mən (English)
Rating: 56% based on 38 votes
Medieval Spanish form of CARMEL influenced by the Latin word carmen "song". This was the name of the main character in George Bizet's opera 'Carmen' (1875).

CARMILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Personal note: From Sheridan Le Fanu's vampire novel
Rating: 50% based on 24 votes
Used by Irish writer Sheridan Le Fanu for the title character of his Gothic novella 'Carmilla' (1872), about a lesbian vampire. Le Fanu probably based the name on Carmella.

CÉCILE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Dutch
Pronounced: SE-SEEL (French)
Rating: 65% based on 22 votes
French form of CECILIA.

CELANDINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SEL-ən-deen
Rating: 57% based on 23 votes
From the name of the flower, which derives from Greek χελιδων (chelidon) "swallow (bird)".

CELESTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SEL-əs-teen
Rating: 72% based on 26 votes
English form of CAELESTINUS. It is more commonly used as a feminine name, from the French feminine form Célestine.

CHRISTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: KREES-TEEN (French), kris-TEEN (English), kris-TEE-nə (German, Dutch)
Personal note: Heroine from "The Phantom of the Opera"
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
French form of CHRISTINA, as well as a variant in other languages.

CHRISTOPHINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German (Rare, Archaic)
Pronounced: KRIS-to-FEE-nə (German)
Rating: 48% based on 17 votes
Feminine form of Christophe.

CHRYSANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Χρυσανθη (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 63% based on 8 votes
Feminine form of CHRYSANTHOS.

CINNAMON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American
Pronounced: SIN-ə-mən
Rating: 35% based on 30 votes
Simply from the English word cinnamon for the spice. It derives from Latin cinnamum, cinnamomum "cinnamon", which was used as a term of endearment.

CINZIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 90% based on 3 votes
Italian form of CYNTHIA.

CITLALI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Native American, Nahuatl
Rating: 35% based on 34 votes
Means "star" in Nahuatl.

CITLALMINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Nahuatl
Pronounced: sit-lal-MEE-na (guess)
Rating: 43% based on 16 votes
Means "arrow stars (meteorites)" in Nahuatl.

CORALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KAW-RA-LEE
Rating: 72% based on 23 votes
Either a French form of KORALIA, or a derivative of Latin corallium "coral" (see CORAL).

CORALINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Literature, Theatre
Personal note: From Neil Gaiman's novel
Rating: 74% based on 30 votes
Of debated origin, though likely coined by Adolphe Adam for a character in his opera Le toréador.

Some academics argue that this name is most likely an elaboration of Cora while others theorize that a derivation from Coralie, using a traditional French diminutive form, is the most probable source.

Coraline is the name of the main character in the children's novel Coraline by English author Neil Gaiman, who stated that in the case of his heroine the name started out as a typo of Caroline.

CORAZÓN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Filipino
Pronounced: ko-ra-SON (Latin American Spanish), ko-ra-THON (European Spanish) (Spanish)
Rating: 44% based on 25 votes
Means "heart" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Inmaculado Corazón de María, meaning "Immaculate Heart of Mary".

CORDELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kawr-DEE-lee-ə, kawr-DEEL-yə
Rating: 71% based on 42 votes
From Cordeilla, possibly a Celtic name of unknown meaning. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Cordeilla was the youngest of the three daughters of King Lear and the only one to remain loyal to her father. When adapting the character for his play 'King Lear' (1606), Shakespeare altered the spelling to Cordelia.

CORINNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KAW-REEN (French), kə-REEN (English), kə-RIN (English)
Rating: 59% based on 30 votes
French form of CORINNA. The French-Swiss author Madame de Staël used it for her novel 'Corinne' (1807).

CORISANDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, French
Rating: 63% based on 9 votes
Meaning uncertain, from the name of a character in medieval legend, possibly first recorded by Spanish writer Garci Rodríguez de Montalvo. Perhaps it was derived from an older form of Spanish corazón "heart" (e.g., Old Spanish coraçon; ultimately from Latin cor "heart", with the hypothetic Vulgar Latin root *coratione, *coraceone) or the Greek name Chrysanthe. As a nickname it was used by a mistress of King Henry IV of France: Diane d'Andoins (1554-1620), la Belle Corisande. Some usage may be generated by Jean-Baptiste Lully's opera 'Amadis' (1684; based on Garci Rodríguez de Montalvo), in which it belongs to the lover of the prince Florestan. The name was also used by Benjamin Disraeli for a character in his play 'Lothair' (1870).

COSIMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 58% based on 36 votes
Italian feminine form of COSIMO.

COSMINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian
Rating: 50% based on 34 votes
Feminine form of COSMIN.

DECEMBER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: dis-EM-bər, DEE-səm-bər
Rating: 42% based on 28 votes
Derived from the Latin word decem, meaning "ten". December is the twelfth month on the Georgian calendar. This name is used regularly in America, mostly on females.

DORIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: DAWR-ee-ən (English), DAW-RYAHN (French)
Personal note: From Oscar Wilde's "The picture of Dorian Gray"
Rating: 67% based on 50 votes
The name was first used by Oscar Wilde in his novel 'The Picture of Dorian Gray' (1891), which tells the story of a man whose portrait ages while he stays young. Wilde may have taken it from the name of the ancient Greek tribe the Dorians, or from the surname DORAN.

EDELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, French, English, Various
Pronounced: ED-ə-lien, ed-ə-LEEN, ED-ə-lin (German, French, English)
Rating: 58% based on 5 votes
Cognate of Adeline. It was borne by Edeline Thweng, a 14th-century heiress of Ripley Castle in North Yorkshire, England. Allegedly it was not popular as an English name before 1830, until then primarily German and French in usage. The Edeline Islands of Western Australia are named for Lady Edeline Sackville-West (1870–1918), the wife of Gerald Strickland, 1st Baron Strickland.

EDURNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Rating: 37% based on 33 votes
Feminine form of EDUR.

EDWARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Polish
Pronounced: ED-wərd (English), ED-vart (Polish)
Rating: 79% based on 20 votes
Means "rich guard", derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and weard "guard". This was the name of several Anglo-Saxon kings, the last being Saint Edward the Confessor shortly before the Norman conquest in the 11th century. He was known as a just ruler, and because of his popularity his name remained in use after the conquest when most other Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. The 13th-century Plantagenet king Henry III named his son and successor after the saint, and seven subsequent kings of England were also named Edward.

This is one of the few Old English names to be used throughout Europe (in various spellings). A famous bearer was the British composer Edward Elgar (1857-1934). It was also used by author Charlotte Brontë for the character Edward Rochester, the main love interest of the title character in her novel 'Jane Eyre' (1847).

EIRWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 54% based on 36 votes
Means "white snow" from the Welsh elements eira "snow" and gwen "white, blessed".

ELERI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 54% based on 37 votes
Meaning unknown. In Welsh legend she was the daughter of the chieftain Brychan.

ELLENTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish (Modern)
Rating: 48% based on 12 votes
Variant of Ellentina.

ÉLODIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: E-LAW-DEE
Rating: 86% based on 19 votes
French form of ALODIA.

ELOWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Cornish
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Means "elm tree" in Cornish. This is a recently coined Cornish name.

ELSINORE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, English
Pronounced: EL-si-nawr (Literature)
Rating: 63% based on 19 votes
The name of Hamlet's castle, which is an anglicized form of Helsingør, a Danish place name meaning "neck, narrow strait". Any modern use of this as a feminine name is due to its similarity to Eleanor and Elsa.

ELUNED
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: el-IN-ed, el-EEN-ed
Rating: 48% based on 44 votes
Derived from Welsh eilun "image, idol". This was the name of a 5th-century Welsh saint.

ELUNEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Native American, Mapuche, Spanish
Pronounced: Eh-Loo-NAY (Native American)
Rating: 43% based on 15 votes
Unisex name of Mapuche origin. Means "gift"

EMERALD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: EM-ə-rəld
Rating: 50% based on 36 votes
From the word for the green precious stone, which is the birthstone of May. The emerald supposedly imparts love to the bearer. The word is ultimately from Greek σμαραγδος (smaragdos).

ÉMILE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: E-MEEL
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
French form of Aemilius (see EMIL). This name was borne by French author Émile Zola (1840-1902).

EMILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EM-ə-lee
Personal note: It's common, but it's just so soft and sweet!
Rating: 59% based on 27 votes
English feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL). In the English-speaking world it was not common until after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century; the princess Amelia Sophia (1711-1786) was commonly known as Emily in English, even though Amelia is an unrelated name.

Famous bearers include the British author Emily Brontë (1818-1848), who wrote 'Wuthering Heights', and the American poet Emily Dickinson (1830-1886).

EMMELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EM-ə-leen, EM-ə-lien
Rating: 72% based on 37 votes
From an Old French form of the Germanic name Amelina, originally a diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element amal meaning "work". The Normans introduced this name to England.

EMMY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: EM-ee (English)
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of EMMA or EMILY.

ENDELLION
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Cornish
Rating: 50% based on 23 votes
English form of Endelienta. Known bearers include English artist Endellion Lycett Green (1969-) and Florence Rose Endellion Cameron (2010-), British Prime Minister David Cameron's fourth child, whose second middle name was given in honour of the Cornish village of St Endellion.

EOS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ηως (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: E-AWS (Classical Greek), EE-aws (English)
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Means "dawn" in Greek. This was the name of the Greek goddess of the dawn.

EPONINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: EP-ə-neen (English)
Personal note: A favorite character from "Les Misérables"
Rating: 47% based on 38 votes
Meaning unknown. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel 'Les Misérables' (1862) for a daughter of the Thénardiers. Her mother got her name from a romance novel.

ERIANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: ?
Rating: 54% based on 25 votes
Popularly claimed to mean "lover of flowers" (apparently due to association with Greek eran "to love, to be in love with"), it may actually mean "woolly-haired flower" from the botanical name eriantha, ultimately from Greek ἔριον (erion) "wool" and ανθος (anthos) "flower".

ERZSÉBET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: ER-zhe-bet
Rating: 39% based on 23 votes
Hungarian form of ELIZABETH. This is the native name of Saint Elizabeth of Hungary. It was also borne by the infamous Erzsébet Báthory, a 16th-century countess and murderer.

ESMERALDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, Literature
Pronounced: es-me-RAL-da (Spanish), esh-mə-RAL-də (Portuguese), ez-mə-RAHL-də (English)
Rating: 56% based on 38 votes
Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since that time.

ESPERANZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: es-pe-RAN-tha (European Spanish), es-pe-RAN-sa (Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 47% based on 33 votes
Spanish form of the Late Latin name Sperantia which was derived from sperare "to hope".

EUROPA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ευρωπη (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 30% based on 36 votes
Latinized form of Greek Ευρωπη (Europe), which meant "wide face" from ευρυς (eurys) "wide" and ωψ (ops) "face, eye". In Greek mythology Europa was a Phoenician princess who was abducted and taken to Crete by Zeus in the guise of a bull. She became the first queen of Crete, and later fathered Minos by Zeus. The continent of Europe is named for her. This is also the name of a moon of Jupiter.

EVANGELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ə-VAN-jə-leen
Personal note: From a song by Scottish musician Karen Matheson
Rating: 72% based on 44 votes
Means "good news" from Greek ευ (eu) "good" and αγγελμα (angelma) "news, message". It was (first?) used by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in his epic poem 'Evangeline' (1847). It also appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) as the full name of the character Eva.

FANTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Personal note: A favorite character from "Les Misérables"
Rating: 45% based on 35 votes
This name was used by Victor Hugo for the mother of Cosette in his novel 'Les Misérables' (1862). The name was given to her by a passerby who found the young orphan on the street. Hugo may have intended it to be a derivative of the French word enfant "child".

FE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Personal note: "Faith" in Spanish, "fairy" in Swedish and also short for iron (ferrum)
Rating: 31% based on 26 votes
Means "faith" in Spanish, the Spanish form of Fides. (Cf. Fede, Foy.)

FEIDLIMID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology
Personal note: I pronounce this FE-li-mi!
Rating: 28% based on 34 votes
Possibly means "beauty" or "ever good" in Irish Gaelic. This was the name of three early kings of Munster.

FEMI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Western African, Yoruba
Personal note: I prefer this as a girls' name meaning "love me"!
Rating: 32% based on 13 votes
Short form of OLUFEMI.

FERELITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish (Rare), English (British, Rare)
Rating: 41% based on 17 votes
Anglicized form of Forbflaith.

FERN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FURN
Rating: 56% based on 39 votes
From the English word for the plant, ultimately from Old English fearn. It has been used as a given name since the late 19th century.

FERNANDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Pronounced: fer-NAN-da (Spanish)
Rating: 34% based on 37 votes
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian feminine form of FERDINAND.

FIDELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Rare)
Rating: 47% based on 35 votes
Feminine form of FIDEL.

FLAVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: FLA-vya (Italian), FLA-bya (Spanish)
Rating: 70% based on 11 votes
Feminine form of FLAVIUS.

FLEURDELYS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Cajun, Rare)
Pronounced: FLOR-da-lees (English)
Rating: 33% based on 18 votes
Symbol of a flower bearing the same name used by the French Empire to represent the King until the French Revolution of 1789, still used in New Orleans, LA.

FLORENTIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 58% based on 11 votes
Original feminine form of FLORENCE.

FLORENTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Late Roman
Rating: 64% based on 20 votes
Feminine form of FLORENTINUS.

FRIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Personal note: After my heroine, Mexican painter Frida Kahlo!
Rating: 49% based on 39 votes
Germanic name, originally a short form of other feminine names containing the Germanic element frid meaning "peace". This is also the Scandinavian equivalent, from the Old Norse cognate Fríða. A famous bearer was Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907-1954).

GABRIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: גַּבְרִיאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Γαβριηλ (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: GA-BREE-YEL (French), ga-BRYEL (Spanish), GA-bree-el (German, Classical Latin), GAHB-ree-el (Finnish), GAY-bree-əl (English), GAB-ryel (Polish)
Rating: 74% based on 39 votes
From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "God is my strong man", derived from גֶּבֶר (gever) meaning "strong man, hero" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Gabriel is an archangel in Hebrew tradition, often appearing as a messenger of God. In the Old Testament he is sent to interpret the visions of the prophet Daniel, while in the New Testament he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Qur'an to Muhammad.

This name has been used occasionally in England since the 12th century. It was not common in the English-speaking world until the end of the 20th century.

GAIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Italian
Other Scripts: Γαια (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: GIE-A (Classical Greek), GIE-ə (English), GAY-ə (English), GA-ya (Italian)
Rating: 63% based on 39 votes
From the Greek word γαια (gaia), a parallel form of γη (ge) meaning "earth". In Greek mythology Gaia was the mother goddess who presided over the earth. She was the mate of Uranus and the mother of the Titans and the Cyclopes.

GALATEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Γαλατεια
Pronounced: gal-ə-TAY-ə, gal-ə-TEE-ə
Rating: 60% based on 23 votes
From the Greek Γαλατεια (Galateia), possibly meaning either "goddess of calm seas", from γαλήνη (galene) "calm, gentle (sea)", or "milk-white", from γάλα (gala) "milk". In Greek mythology she was the statue carved by Pygmalion and made into a woman by Aphrodite.

GARNET (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GAHR-nət
Personal note: Despite the fact that this actually means "the yarn" in Swedish....
Rating: 57% based on 39 votes
From the English word garnet for the precious stone, the birthstone of January. The word is derived from Middle English gernet meaning "dark red".

GELSOMINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jel-so-MEE-na
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Italian form of JASMINE.

GEMINI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: GE-mee-nee (Classical Latin), JEM-i-nie (English)
Personal note: I prefer this on a girl
Rating: 33% based on 36 votes
Means "twins" in Latin. This is the name of the third sign of the zodiac. The two brightest stars in the constellation, Castor and Pollux, are named for the mythological twin sons of Leda.

GEMMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan, English (British), Dutch
Pronounced: JEM-ma (Italian), ZHEM-mə (Catalan), JEM-ə (English), KHE-mah (Dutch)
Rating: 64% based on 39 votes
Medieval Italian nickname meaning "gem, precious stone". It was borne by the wife of the 13th-century Italian poet Dante Alighieri.

GISELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English (Modern)
Pronounced: ZHEE-ZEL (French), ji-ZEL (English)
Rating: 61% based on 42 votes
Derived from the Germanic word gisil meaning "hostage, pledge". This name may have originally been a descriptive nickname for a child given as a pledge to a foreign court. It was borne by a daughter of the French king Charles III who married the Norman leader Rollo in the 10th century. The name was popular in France during the Middle Ages (the more common French form is Gisèle). Though it became known in the English-speaking world due to Adolphe Adam's ballet 'Giselle' (1841), it was not regularly used until the 20th century.

GIUDITTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: joo-DEET-ta
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Italian form of JUDITH.

GWYNEIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 98% based on 4 votes
Means "white snow" from the Welsh element gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with eira meaning "snow".

HANNES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Swedish, Dutch, Finnish
Pronounced: HA-nəs (German), HAHN-nes (Swedish, Finnish), HAHN-nəs (Dutch)
Rating: 50% based on 12 votes
Short form of JOHANNES.

HELEDD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: HEL-edh
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Meaning unknown. This was the name of a semi-legendary 7th-century Welsh princess.

HESPER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Dutch (Rare)
Pronounced: HES-pər (English)
Rating: 48% based on 25 votes
Variant of Hesperia.

ILDIKÓ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: EEL-dee-ko
Rating: 35% based on 33 votes
Possibly a form of HILDA. This name was borne by the last wife of Attila the Hun.

INDIGO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: IN-di-go
Personal note: A friend of mine has a daughter called Indigo
Rating: 50% based on 38 votes
From the English word indigo for the purplish-blue dye or the colour. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ινδικον (Indikon) "Indic, from India".

INEZ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Personal note: My maternal grandmother was called Inez
Rating: 46% based on 39 votes
English form of INÉS.

INIGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: IN-i-go
Rating: 43% based on 31 votes
English form of ÍÑIGO. It became well-known in Britain due to the 17th-century English architect Inigo Jones. He was named after his father, a Catholic who was named for Saint Ignatius of Loyola.

ISABETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ee-zah-BET-tah
Rating: 55% based on 22 votes
Truncated form of Elisabetta.

ISOLDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-ZOL-də (English), i-SOL-də (English), ee-ZAWL-də (German)
Rating: 71% based on 40 votes
The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, perhaps from a hypothetic name like Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice, iron" and hild "battle".

In medieval Arthurian legend Isolde was an Irish princess betrothed to King Mark of Cornwall. After accidentally drinking a love potion, she became the lover of his knight Tristan, which led to their tragic deaths. The story was popular during the Middle Ages and the name became relatively common in England at that time. It was rare by the 19th century, though some interest was generated by Richard Wagner's opera 'Tristan und Isolde' (1865).

ISOTTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ee-ZOT-ta
Rating: 53% based on 22 votes
Italian form of ISOLDE.

JACOMYNTJE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Rating: 25% based on 24 votes
Dutch diminutive of Jacomina.

JAMESINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 46% based on 36 votes
Feminine form of JAMES.

JANUARY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish (Rare)
Rating: 40% based on 23 votes
Polish form of Januarius. Exclusively masculine in Poland.
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JAPONICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American, Modern, Rare)
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
japonica is a Neo-Latin word meaning "japanese". As such, it is part of the name of several cultivated plants (e.g., Pieris japonica, Camellia japonica, or Skimmia japonica).

JASPER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: JAS-pər (English), YAHS-pər (Dutch)
Rating: 78% based on 21 votes
From Latin Gaspar, perhaps from the biblical Hebrew word גִּזְבָּר (gizbar) meaning "treasurer", derived from Persian ganzabara. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.

JASPERINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch (Rare), English (Rare)
Pronounced: yahs-pə-REE-nə, yahs-pə-REEN (Dutch)
Rating: 48% based on 14 votes
Variant form of Jasperina.

JEMIMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: יְמִימָה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: jə-MIE-mə (English)
Personal note: One of my favorite characters from "CATS"
Rating: 48% based on 42 votes
Means "dove" in Hebrew. This was the oldest of the three daughters of Job in the Old Testament. As an English name, Jemima first became common during the Puritan era.

JONI (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JO-nee
Diminutive of JOAN (1).

JONQUIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: JAHN-kwil
Rating: 33% based on 32 votes
From the English word for the type of flower, derived ultimately from Latin iuncus "reed".

JUNIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Other Scripts: Junie
Pronounced: JOO-nee
Personal note: I like the movie "Tell me that you love me, Junie Moon" very much
Rating: 40% based on 23 votes
Pet form of June and other names beginning in Jun-.

JUNIPER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JOON-ə-pər
Rating: 61% based on 44 votes
From the English word for the type of tree, derived ultimately from Latin iuniperus.

KASTEHELMI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Rating: 69% based on 8 votes
Kastehelmi is Finnish and means "dewdrop" Nameday for Kastehelmi is May 7th.

KEREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: קֶרֶן (Hebrew)
Rating: 43% based on 34 votes
Means "horn" or "ray of light" in Hebrew.

KINNERET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: כִּנֶּרֶת (Hebrew)
Rating: 39% based on 17 votes
From the name of the large lake in northern Israel, usually called the Sea of Galilee in English. Its name is derived from Hebrew כִּנּוֹר (kinnor) meaning "harp" because of its shape.

KRISTVIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Icelandic
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Icelandic name with the combination of Kristján and vinr "friend".

LAETITIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, French
Pronounced: LE-TEE-SYA (French)
Rating: 49% based on 36 votes
Original form of LETITIA, as well as the French form.

LARK
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LAHRK
Rating: 52% based on 37 votes
From the English word for the type of songbird.

LAVENDER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 62% based on 40 votes
From the English word for the aromatic flower or the pale purple colour.

LEONIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Astronomy
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
The brightest star in the constellation Leo and one of the brightest stars in the night sky, lying approximately 79 light years from Earth.

LEONTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Late Roman
Rating: 54% based on 33 votes
Feminine form of LEONTIUS.

LEV (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Лев (Russian)
Pronounced: LYEF
Rating: 48% based on 31 votes
Means "lion" in Russian, functioning as a vernacular form of Leo. This was the real Russian name of both author Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910) and revolutionary Leon Trotsky (1879-1940).

LINNET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: li-NET, LIN-ət
Rating: 49% based on 38 votes
Either a variant of LYNETTE or else from the name of the small bird, a type of finch.

LISANDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American), English (Modern, Rare), Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian (Archaic)
Pronounced: lee-SAHN-drah (English)
Rating: 59% based on 27 votes
Cognate of Lysandra.

LIV (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: LEEV
Rating: 65% based on 39 votes
Derived from the Old Norse name Hlíf meaning "protection". Its use has been influenced by the modern Scandinavian word liv meaning "life".

LUCIEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LUY-SYEN
Rating: 66% based on 35 votes
French form of LUCIANUS.

LUCIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LUY-SYEN
Rating: 75% based on 11 votes
Feminine form of LUCIEN.

LUCINDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Portuguese, Literature
Pronounced: loo-SIN-də (English)
Rating: 65% based on 21 votes
An elaboration of LUCIA created by Cervantes for his novel 'Don Quixote' (1605). It was subsequently used by Molière in his play 'The Doctor in Spite of Himself' (1666).

LUMI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: LOO-mee
Rating: 52% based on 36 votes
Means "snow" in Finnish.

LUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Rating: 72% based on 37 votes
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.

LUNED
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: LIN-ed (Welsh)
Rating: 50% based on 33 votes
Variant of ELUNED. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is a servant of the Lady of the Fountain who rescues the knight Owain.

LYS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Frisian
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Frisian diminutive of ELISABETH. It also coincides with the French word for "lily".

LYSSA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIS-ə
Rating: 48% based on 35 votes
Short form of ALYSSA.

MAGNUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: MAHNG-nus (Swedish), MAHNG-noos (Norwegian), MAG-nəs (English)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Late Latin name meaning "great". It was borne by a 7th-century saint who was a missionary in Germany. It became popular in Scandinavia after the time of the 11th-century Norwegian king Magnus I, who was said to have been named after Charlemagne, or Carolus Magnus in Latin (however there was also a Norse name Magni). The name was borne by six subsequent kings of Norway as well as three kings of Sweden. It was imported to Scotland and Ireland during the Middle Ages.

MARGUERITE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MAR-GU-REET
Personal note: From a song by Swedish singer Karin Renberg
Rating: 66% based on 38 votes
French form of MARGARET. This is also the French word for the daisy flower (species Leucanthemum vulgare).

MARIANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Μαριανθη
Rating: 52% based on 14 votes
Meaning unknown, probably a combination of Maria and Anthe.

MARLOTTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Rating: 47% based on 17 votes
This name is a blend of the names Maria and Lotte.

MARLOWE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MAHR-lo
Personal note: Strangely enough, I like this for a girl...
Rating: 35% based on 23 votes
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "remnants of a lake" in Old English.

MARTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Slovene, Hungarian, English, Swedish, Dutch, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: mar-TEE-na (German, Italian, Spanish), mər-TEE-nə (Catalan), mahr-TEEN-ə (English), mahr-TEE-nah (Dutch)
Rating: 56% based on 13 votes
Feminine form of Martinus (see MARTIN). Saint Martina was a 3rd-century martyr who is one of the patron saints of Rome.

MEADOWLARK
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: med-o-LAHRK
Rating: 52% based on 6 votes
From the name of the bird.

MEG
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEG
Personal note: Cute character from "The Phantom of the Opera"
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Medieval diminutive of MARGARET.

MÉLISANDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Rating: 54% based on 44 votes
French form of MILLICENT used by Maurice Maeterlinck in his play 'Pelléas et Mélisande' (1893). The play was later adapted by Claude Debussy into an opera (1902).

MIDORI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: , etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: MEE-DO-REE
Rating: 72% based on 9 votes
From Japanese (midori) meaning "green", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations which have the same pronunciation.

MILLARAY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Native American, Mapuche
Rating: 38% based on 34 votes
Means "golden flower" in Mapuche.

MINERVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, English
Pronounced: mi-NUR-və (English)
Rating: 68% based on 41 votes
Possibly derived from Latin mens meaning "intellect", but more likely of Etruscan origin. Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom and war, approximately equivalent to the Greek goddess Athena. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since after the Renaissance.

MIRANDINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 63% based on 9 votes
Elaboration of Miranda, using the suffix -dine.

MIRÈIO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Occitan
Personal note: I'm writing a story in which Mirèio is the disfigured heroine
Rating: 49% based on 36 votes
Original Occitan form of MIREILLE.

MIRSADA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bosnian
Rating: 36% based on 32 votes
Feminine form of MIRSAD.

MIYUKI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: â€Ã¼Âá, 美雪, 美幸, etc.
Pronounced: mee-yuu-kee
Personal note: Means "deep snow", meant to invoke a picture of a peaceful landscape
Rating: 54% based on 23 votes
From Japanese 美 (mi) meaning "beautiful" combined with 幸 (yuki) meaning "happiness, good luck" or 雪 (yuki) meaning "snow". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.

MOMOKO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 百子, 桃子, etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: MO-MO-KO
Rating: 49% based on 18 votes
From Japanese (momo) meaning "hundred" or (momo) meaning "peach" combined with (ko) meaning "child". This name can be constructed from other kanji combinations as well.

NALINI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil, Hindi
Other Scripts: ನಳಿನಿ (Kannada), നളിനി (Malayalam), நளினி (Tamil), नलिनी (Hindi)
Rating: 95% based on 4 votes
Means "lotus" in Sanskrit.

NAYELI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Native American, Zapotec
Personal note: It has such a wonderful meaning!
Rating: 48% based on 35 votes
Means "I love you" in Zapotec.

NELL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NEL
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Medieval diminutive of names beginning with El, such as ELEANOR, ELLEN (1) or HELEN. It may have arisen from the medieval affectionate phrase mine El, which was later reinterpreted as my Nel.

NIEVES
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: NYE-bes
Rating: 39% based on 34 votes
Means "snows" in Spanish, derived from the title of the Virgin Mary Nuestra Señora de las Nieves meaning "Our Lady of the Snows".

NIMUE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: NIM-oo-ay (English)
Rating: 54% based on 34 votes
Meaning unknown. In Arthurian legends this is the name of a sorceress, also known as the Lady of the Lake, Vivien, or Niniane. Various versions of the tales have Merlin falling in love with her and becoming imprisoned by her magic. She first appears in the medieval French 'Lancelot-Grail' cycle.

NOELIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Louisiana Creole (Rare), German (Swiss, Rare)
Rating: 57% based on 6 votes
Variant of French Noélie.

NOLWENN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Breton
Personal note: Taken from French singer Nolwenn Leroy
Rating: 43% based on 35 votes
From the Breton phrase Noyal Gwenn meaning "holy one from Noyal". This was the epithet of a 6th-century saint and martyr from Brittany.

NORN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote

NYMPHAEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: nim-FAY-ə
Rating: 47% based on 14 votes
Latin for "water lily"

OCEAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: O-shən
Rating: 38% based on 34 votes
Simply from the English word ocean for a large body of water. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ωκεανος (Okeanos), the name of the body of water thought to surround the Earth.

ODETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-DET
Rating: 61% based on 26 votes
French diminutive of ODA or ODILIA. This is the name of a princess who has been transformed into a swan in the ballet 'Swan Lake' (1877) by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.

OLWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Means "white footprint" from Welsh ol "footprint, track" and gwen "white, fair, blessed". In Welsh legend Olwen was a beautiful maiden, the lover of Culhwch and the daughter of the giant Yspaddaden. Her father insisted that Culhwch complete several seemingly impossible tasks before he would allow them to marry, and Culhwch was successful with all of them.

OPHELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Literature
Pronounced: o-FEEL-yə (English), o-FEEL-ee-ə (English)
Rating: 79% based on 15 votes
Derived from Greek οφελος (ophelos) meaning "help". This name was probably created by the 15th-century poet Jacopo Sannazaro for a character in his poem 'Arcadia'. It was borrowed by Shakespeare for his play 'Hamlet' (1600), in which it belongs to Hamlet's lover who eventually goes insane and drowns herself. In spite of this, the name has been used since the 19th century.

ORIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: o-RYA-na
Rating: 51% based on 35 votes
Possibly derived from Latin aurum "gold" or from its derivatives, Spanish oro or French or. In medieval legend Oriana was the daughter of a king of England who married the knight Amadis.

ORIANTHI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek (Rare)
Other Scripts: Οριάνθη
Rating: 63% based on 6 votes
Probably derived from the Greek noun ὄρος (oros) meaning "mountain, hill" (compare Orestes) combined with the Greek noun ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower". Also compare the similar-looking name Orinthia, which can even be an anagram of Orianthi, if you move the letters around a bit.

This name is best known for being the name of the Australian singer-songwriter Orianthi Panagaris (b. 1985), who is of Greek descent.

OSCAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: AHS-kər (English), AWS-KAR (French)
Rating: 65% based on 37 votes
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.

This name was popularized in continental Europe by the works of the 18th-century Scottish poet James Macpherson. Napoleon was an admirer of Macpherson, and he suggested Oscar as the second middle name of his godson, who eventually became king of Sweden as Oscar I. Another notable bearer was the Irish writer and humourist Oscar Wilde (1854-1900).

PADMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Tamil, Kannada, Telugu
Other Scripts: पद्म, पद्मा (Sanskrit, Hindi), பத்மா (Tamil), ಪದ್ಮಾ (Kannada), పద్మా (Telugu)
Rating: 48% based on 33 votes
Means "lotus" in Sanskrit. This is a transcription of both the feminine form पद्मा and the masculine form पद्म. According to Hindu tradition a lotus holding the god Brahma arose from the navel of the god Vishnu. The name Padma is used in Hindu texts to refer to several characters, including the goddess Lakshmi and the hero Rama.

PADMINI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Kannada, Tamil, Telugu
Other Scripts: ಪದ್ಮಿನಿ (Kannada), பத்மினி (Tamil), పద్మిని (Telugu)
Rating: 43% based on 36 votes
Means "a multitude of lotuses", a derivative of Sanskrit पद्म (padma) meaning "lotus".

PAZ (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: PATH (European Spanish), PAS (Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 33% based on 35 votes
Means "peace" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de la Paz, meaning "Our Lady of Peace".

PÉLAGIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Louisiana Creole
Rating: 46% based on 9 votes
French form of Pelagia.

PERONEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Personal note: Makes me think of pear trees
Rating: 35% based on 33 votes
Contracted form of PETRONEL.

PHILOMÈNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: FEE-LAW-MEN
Rating: 56% based on 34 votes
French form of PHILOMENA.

POMELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: POM-ə-leen, pom-ə-LEEN
Rating: 60% based on 23 votes
Variant form of Pomelline. This name is best known for being one of the middle names of Charlotte Casiraghi (b. 1986), who is the daughter of Princess Caroline of Hanover (formerly of Monaco). She was given this middle name in honour of her ancestor Pomellina Fregoso (c. 1387-1468), a Genovese noblewoman who was the wife of Jean I of Monaco (c. 1382-1454). Her name had been gallicized to Pomelline in Monaco, as it was (and still is) predominantly a French-speaking country.

PRAIRIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Rare)
Rating: 44% based on 24 votes
From the English word for a flat treeless grassland, taken from French prairie "meadow". This was used by Thomas Pynchon for a character in his novel 'Vineland' (1990).

PRIMROSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PRIM-roz
Rating: 61% based on 40 votes
From the English word for the flower, ultimately deriving from Latin prima rosa "first rose".

PROSPERO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: PRAW-spe-ro
Rating: 37% based on 34 votes
Italian form of PROSPER. This was the name of the shipwrecked magician in 'The Tempest' (1611) by Shakespeare.

QUINTESSENCE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kwin-TES-əns
Rating: 45% based on 17 votes
This name comes from the word that can mean "a thing that is the most perfect example of its type" or, in its literal sense, "fifth essence." The word is derived from Middle French quinte essence, which is, ultimately originated from Medieval Latin quinta essentia, a combination of Latin quinta, the feminine equivalent of quintus meaning "five," and essentia meaning "essence."

REMÉNYKE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian
Rating: 31% based on 25 votes
Derived from Hungarian remény meaning "hope". (Cf. Remény.)

REVERIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: REV-ə-ree
Rating: 39% based on 27 votes
As a noun, it has been used since 1325 and is Middle English meaning "daydream" or, more literally, "fanciful musing", from Old French reverie which was derived from rever meaning "to speak wildly." As a name, there are some instances of usage in the mid to late 1800s, but it is still relatively rare, with 7 babies named Reverie in 2012.

ROMOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: RO-mo-la
Rating: 53% based on 12 votes
Italian feminine form of ROMULUS.

ROSABETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Filipino (Rare)
Rating: 68% based on 12 votes
Combination of Rosa and Beth.

ROSINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ro-ZEE-na
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Italian diminutive of ROSA (1). This is the name of a character in Rossini's opera 'The Barber of Seville' (1816).

SACHEVERELL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: sə-SHEV-ər-əl
Rating: 31% based on 34 votes
From a surname which was derived from a Norman place name. It was occasionally given in honour of preacher Henry Sacheverell (1674-1724).

SAFFRON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SAF-rən
Rating: 53% based on 38 votes
From the English word which refers either to a spice, the crocus flower from which it is harvested, or the yellow-orange colour of the spice. It is derived via Old French from Arabic زعفران (za'faran), itself probably from Persian meaning "gold leaves".

SANCHIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Rating: 39% based on 35 votes
Feminine form of SANCHO.

SANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
Pronounced: SAHN-dər (Dutch)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Dutch, Danish and Norwegian short form of ALEXANDER.

SANDRINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SAHN-DREEN
Rating: 51% based on 34 votes
Elaborated form of SANDRA.

SANTOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: SAN-tos
Rating: 42% based on 33 votes
Means "saints" in Spanish.

SARAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, German, Hebrew, Arabic, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: שָׂרָה (Hebrew), سارة (Arabic)
Pronounced: SER-ə (English), SAR-ə (English), SA-RA (French), ZA-ra (German), SA:-ra (Arabic)
Personal note: I like Sarah Brightman....
Rating: 58% based on 37 votes
Means "lady, princess, noblewoman" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of Abraham's wife, considered the matriarch of the Jewish people. She was barren until she unexpectedly became the pregnant with Isaac at the age of 90. Her name was originally Sarai, but God changed it at the same time Abraham's name was changed (see Genesis 17:15).

In England, Sarah came into use after the Protestant Reformation. A notable bearer was Sarah Churchill (1660-1744), an influential British duchess and a close friend of Queen Anne.

SARAPHINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 61% based on 23 votes
Variant of Seraphina.

SASKIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, German
Pronounced: SAHS-kee-a: (Dutch), ZAS-kya (German)
Rating: 57% based on 38 votes
From the Germanic element Sahs "Saxon". The Saxons were a Germanic tribe, their name ultimately deriving from the Germanic word sahs meaning "knife".

SEÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SHAHN
Rating: 57% based on 31 votes
Irish form of JOHN.

SEBASTIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Finnish, Romanian
Pronounced: ze-BAS-tyan (German), sə-BAS-chən (English), se-BAS-tyan (Polish), SE-bahs-tee-ahn (Finnish)
Rating: 79% based on 7 votes
From the Latin name Sebastianus which meant "from Sebaste". Sebaste was the name a town in Asia Minor, its name deriving from Greek σεβαστος (sebastos) "venerable" (a translation of Latin Augustus, the title of the Roman emperors). According to Christian tradition, Saint Sebastian was a 3rd-century Roman soldier martyred during the persecutions of the emperor Diocletian. After he was discovered to be a Christian, he was tied to a stake and shot with arrows. This however did not kill him. Saint Irene of Rome healed him and he returned to personally admonish Diocletian, whereupon the emperor had him beaten to death.

Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in medieval Europe, especially in Spain and France. It was also borne by a 16th-century king of Portugal who died in a crusade against Morocco.

SELYSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 44% based on 12 votes
Used in GRR. Martin's "A song of ice and fire". Selyse Baratheon, born Selyse Florent, is Stannis Baratheon's wife and she is the mother of Shireen.
Her name may come from Elise and Selene.

SEMIRAMIDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 51% based on 8 votes
Italian form of Semiramis.

SERAPHINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: ser-ə-FEEN-ə (English), ze-ra-FEE-na (German)
Rating: 72% based on 41 votes
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Seraphinus, derived from the biblical word seraphim which was Hebrew in origin and meant "fiery ones". The seraphim were an order of angels, described by Isaiah in the Bible as having six wings each. This was the name of a 13th-century Italian saint who made clothes for the poor. As an English name, it has never been common.

SÉRAPHINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SE-RA-FEEN
Rating: 70% based on 36 votes
French form of SERAPHINA.

SEREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: SE-ren
Rating: 54% based on 39 votes
Means "star" in Welsh.

SERENDIPITY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: sɛ.rɛn.ˈdɪp.ə.ti
Rating: 36% based on 29 votes
From the English word serendipity.

SIGALIT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: סִיגָלִית (Hebrew)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Means "violet flower" in Hebrew.

SIMONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Czech, Slovak, Romanian, Lithuanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Симона (Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Rating: 50% based on 36 votes
Feminine form of SIMON (1).

SISEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish
Other Scripts: סִיסְל (Yiddish)
Rating: 54% based on 11 votes
Means "sweet" in Yiddish. This name is also used as a Yiddish form of CECILIA.

SIXTEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish
Personal note: My cat is called Zixten!
Rating: 38% based on 36 votes
From the Old Norse name Sigsteinn, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and steinn "stone".

SOPHRONIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, Late Greek
Other Scripts: Σωφρονια (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 55% based on 38 votes
Feminine form of SOPHRONIUS. Torquato Tasso used it in his epic poem 'Jerusalem Delivered' (1580), in which it is borne by the lover of Olindo.

SPRING
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SPRING
Rating: 31% based on 38 votes
From the name of the season, ultimately from Old English springan "to leap, to burst forth".

STELARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: ste-LA-ra
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Means "like a constellation" in Esperanto.

SVAJONĖ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian
Rating: 32% based on 33 votes
Means "dream" in Lithuanian.

TANAQUIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Etruscan (Latinized), Ancient Roman
Rating: 29% based on 26 votes
Latinized form of the Etruscan name Thanchvil which meant "gift of Thana", presumably from the name of a lost Etruscan goddess Thana combined with Etruscan cvil. This was the name of the wife of Lucius Tarquinius Priscus, the fifth king of Rome in the 7th century BC. Edmund Spenser also used it (in the form Tanaquill) in his poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590), where it belongs to a daughter of Oberon who becomes the fairy queen Gloriana. In modern times it was borne by prima ballerina Tanaquil LeClercq (1929-2000).

TANITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology
Rating: 56% based on 7 votes
Derived from Semitic roots meaning "serpent lady". This was the name of the Phoenician goddess of love, fertility, the moon and the stars. She was particularly associated with the city of Carthage, being the consort of Ba'al Hammon.

TEGAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 41% based on 13 votes
Derived from Welsh teg "fair".

TESNI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 45% based on 23 votes
Means "warmth from the sun" in Welsh.

THAIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Θαις (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 46% based on 34 votes
Variant transcription of THAÏS.

THELONIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Various
Personal note: From a Swedish children's show I liked when I was little
Rating: 43% based on 35 votes
Latinized form of Tielo (see TILO). A famous bearer was jazz musician Thelonious Monk (1917-1982).

THEODATE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Rare, Archaic)
Rating: 34% based on 11 votes
Apparently coined as a feminine form of Theodatus.

TIGRIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: History, Judeo-Christian Legend
Rating: 55% based on 23 votes
Saint Tigris of Britain is traditionally recorded as a sister of Saint Patrick.
The origin and meaning of her name are unknown; however, Saint Patrick (and thus his family, too) is thought to be of either Breton or Welsh heritage and so it has been suggested that Saint Tigris's name might be of Celtic origin. One theory tries to connect her name to Celtic *tigir which may or may not be related to Gaelic tigern "lord".
Things are further complicated by the existence of 10th-century Spanish saint Tigrida or Tigridia with whom she is sometimes confused. Concerning her name, early 20th-century Irish historian and language scholar Helena Concannon theorized that it suggests a Gallic origin.

TIM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Slovene, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: TIM (English, German, Dutch, Slovene)
Rating: 54% based on 13 votes
Short form of TIMOTHY. It was borne by the fictional character Tiny Tim, the ill son of Bob Cratchit in Charles Dickens' novel 'A Christmas Carol' (1843).

TIMOTHEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, Greek
Other Scripts: Τιμοθεα (Greek)
Rating: 54% based on 24 votes
Feminine form of TIMOTHY.

TOLTSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish
Rating: 46% based on 9 votes
Yiddish form of Dolça.

TOSCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, Theatre
Rating: 50% based on 16 votes
This name was popularized by Puccini's opera "Tosca" (1900) and its main character Floria Tosca.
The name is said to be derived from the Late Roman byname Tusca, the feminine form of Tuscus, meaning "from Tuscia" or "Etruscan". Nowadays, however, it is often interpreted to mean "from Tuscany", although historical Tuscia comprised a much larger area, including a great part of Umbria and the northern parts of Lazio.

There is also an obscure Saint Tosca who is claimed to have been a virign hermit from Verona. Her feast day is May 5.

TRISTRAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (British)
Rating: 53% based on 19 votes
Medieval English form of TRISTAN.

TUA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Danish
Personal note: My absolute favourite
Rating: 44% based on 27 votes
Origin uncertain, possibly a feminine form of Tue or a short form of Perpetua. Alternatively it may be derived from Latin tua "yours" or Danish tue "small hill" (from Old Norse þúfa "mound, knoll", which coincides with the name Þúfa). In Sweden its earliest document use is 1835.

TUIJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: TOOY-yah
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Means "cedar" in Finnish.

UMEKO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 梅子, etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: OO-ME-KO
Rating: 41% based on 34 votes
From Japanese (ume) meaning "apricot, plum" (referring to the species Prunus mume) and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.

VALENTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Russian, Croatian, Macedonian, Slovene, Romanian, Spanish, Greek, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Валентина (Russian, Macedonian), Βαλεντινα (Greek)
Pronounced: va-len-TEE-na (Italian), və-lyin-TYEE-nə (Russian)
Rating: 61% based on 42 votes
Feminine form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)). A famous bearer was the Soviet cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova (1937-), who in 1963 became the first woman to visit space.

VASHTI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: וַשְׁתִּי (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: VASH-tee (English)
Rating: 37% based on 34 votes
Possibly means "thread" in Hebrew, but it is most likely of Persian origin. In the Old Testament this is the name of the first wife of King Ahasuerus of Persia before he marries Esther.

VEGA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Personal note: See Indigo! This is her little sister's name
Rating: 52% based on 23 votes
The name of a star in the constellation Lyra. Its name is from Arabic الواقع (al-Waqi') meaning "the swooping (eagle)".

VICTORIQUE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Quebec, Rare, Archaic)
Personal note: From a manga, "Gosick"
Rating: 39% based on 24 votes
When borne by a female, this name is the French form of Victorica, which is the original feminine form of Victoricus. When borne by a male, this name is a variant spelling of Victoric.

VIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: VYEN
Rating: 48% based on 33 votes
From the French name of the capital city of Austria, known in English as Vienna.

VILDANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bosnian
Pronounced: veel-DAH-nah
Rating: 80% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Vildan.

WILLIAMINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 73% based on 6 votes
Scottish feminine form of William. A known bearer of this name was Williamina Fleming (1857-1911), a Scottish astronomer.

WINTER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: WIN-tər
Rating: 62% based on 39 votes
From the English word for the season, derived from Old English winter.

WOLFGANG
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: VAWLF-gang (German), WUWLF-gang (English)
Personal note: Mozart!
Rating: 64% based on 40 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements wulf meaning "wolf" and gang "path". Two famous bearers of this name were Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) and German novelist and poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832).

WREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: REN
Rating: 57% based on 44 votes
From the English word for the small songbird. It is ultimately derived from Old English wrenna.

YNÈS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ee-NES
Rating: 44% based on 26 votes
Variant of Inès.

YSABET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Catalan
Rating: 74% based on 7 votes
Variant of Isabet, recorded in 15th-century Valencia.

YSANNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Rare)
Pronounced: EE-sahn, EEz-ahn, iss-AHN, iz-AHN
Rating: 43% based on 24 votes
A form of Isabel or Ysabel, and therefore connected to Elizabeth.

YVAINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, Various
Pronounced: ee-VAYN (Literature)
Personal note: From Neil Gaiman's novel "Stardust"
Rating: 48% based on 26 votes
It is most probable that it is the feminine form of the name Yvain. Though, it is commonly thought of as a combination of Yvonne and Elaine.

The name is most popularly recognized as the name of the fallen star in Neil Gaiman's novella 'Stardust'.

ZÉPHYRINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Rating: 56% based on 26 votes
French feminine form of Zephyrinus (see ZEFERINO).
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2017.