Clippy's Personal Name List

AARON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: אַהֲרֹן (Ancient Hebrew), Ααρων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: AR-ən (English), ER-ən (English)

Rating: 50% based on 5 votes

From the Hebrew name אַהֲרֹן ('Aharon) which is most likely of unknown Egyptian origin. Other theories claim a Hebrew derivation, and suggest meanings such as "high mountain" or "exalted". In the Old Testament this name is borne by the older brother of Moses and the first high priest of the Israelites. He acted as a spokesman for his brother, and carried a miraculous rod. As an English name, Aaron has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

ABIGAIL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: אֲבִיגַיִל (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: AB-i-gayl (English), AH-bee-giel (German)

Rating: 58% based on 5 votes

From the Hebrew name אֲבִיגָיִל ('Avigayil) meaning "my father is joy". In the Old Testament this is the name of Nabal's wife. After Nabal's death she became the third wife of King David.

As an English name, Abigail first became common after the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans. Some time after the release of the play 'The Scornful Lady' (1616), which featured a character named Abigail, the name became a slang term for a servant, and it grew less common. It was revived in the 20th century.

ABRAHAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: אַבְרָהָם (Hebrew)

Pronounced: AY-brə-ham (English), AH-brah-hahm (Dutch)

Rating: 67% based on 7 votes

This name may be viewed either as meaning "father of many" in Hebrew or else as a contraction of ABRAM (1) and הָמוֹן (hamon) "many, multitude". The biblical Abraham was originally named Abram but God changed his name (see Genesis 17:5). He led his followers from Ur into Canaan, and is regarded by the Jews as being the founder of the Hebrews through his son Isaac and by the Muslims as being the founder of the Arabs through his son Ishmael.

As an English Christian name, Abraham became common after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), the American president during the Civil War.

ABRAM (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Other Scripts: אַבְרָם (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: AY-brəm (English)

Rating: 56% based on 5 votes

Means "high father" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament God changed Abram's name to Abraham (see Genesis 17:5).

ACHILLES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Αχιλλευς (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ə-KIL-eez (English)

Rating: 53% based on 4 votes

From the Greek Αχιλλευς (Achilleus) which is of unknown meaning, perhaps derived from Greek αχος (achos) "pain" or else from the name of the Achelous River. This was the name of a warrior in Greek legend, one of the central characters in Homer's 'Iliad'. The bravest of the Greek heroes in the war against the Trojans, he was eventually killed by an arrow to his heel, the only vulnerable part of his body.

ADDISON

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AD-i-sən

Rating: 37% based on 7 votes

From an English surname meaning "son of ADAM". Its recent popularity as a feminine name stems from its similarity in sound to Madison.

ADELAIDE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese

Pronounced: AD-ə-layd (English), ah-de-LIE-de (Italian), ə-də-LIED (Portuguese)

Rating: 91% based on 7 votes

From the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman Emperor Otto the Great. The name became common in Britain in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.

AGAMEMNON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Αγαμεμνων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ag-ə-MEM-nahn (English)

Rating: 46% based on 5 votes

Possibly meaning "very steadfast" in Greek. In Greek mythology he was the brother of Menelaus. He led the Greek expedition to Troy to recover his brother's wife Helen. After the Trojan War Agamemnon was killed by his wife Clytemnestra.

AGATHA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Αγαθη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: AG-ə-thə (English)

Rating: 57% based on 6 votes

Latinized form of the Greek name Αγαθη (Agathe), derived from Greek αγαθος (agathos) meaning "good". Saint Agatha was a 3rd-century martyr from Sicily who was tortured and killed after spurning the advances of a Roman official. The saint was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). The mystery writer Agatha Christie (1890-1976) was a famous modern bearer of this name.

AGNES

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: ‘Αγνη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: AG-nəs (English), AHK-nes (German), AHKH-nəs (Dutch), AHNG-nes (Swedish)

Rating: 54% based on 5 votes

Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Αγνη (Hagne), derived from Greek ‘αγνος (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe, being especially popular in England in the Middle Ages.

ALECTO

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Αληκτω (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 46% based on 5 votes

Latinized form of Greek Αληκτω (Alekto) which was derived from αληκτος (alektos) "unceasing". This was the name of one of the Furies or Ερινυες (Erinyes) in Greek mythology.

ALEXANDER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: al-əg-ZAN-dər (English), ah-lek-SAHN-der (German), ah-lək-SAHN-dər (Dutch)

Rating: 83% based on 7 votes

Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ALFIE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AL-fee

Rating: 50% based on 5 votes

Diminutive of ALFRED

ALGERNON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AL-jər-nahn

Rating: 48% based on 5 votes

Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from aux gernons "having a moustache", which was applied to William de Percy, a companion of William the Conqueror. It was first used a given name in the 15th century (for a descendent of William de Percy).

ALICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Italian

Pronounced: AL-is (English), a-LEES (French), ah-LEE-che (Italian)

Rating: 80% based on 5 votes

From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).

ALIX

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Rating: 44% based on 5 votes

Medieval French variant of ALICE

AMIR (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Arabic, Iranian

Other Scripts: أمير (Arabic), امیر (Persian)

Rating: 50% based on 5 votes

Means "commander, prince" in Arabic. This was originally a title, which has come into English as the Arabic loanword emir.

ANTIGONE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Αντιγονη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: an-TIG-ə-nee (English)

Rating: 42% based on 6 votes

Means "against birth" from Greek αντι (anti) "against" and γονη (gone) "birth, offspring". In Greek legend Antigone was the daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta. King Creon of Thebes declared that her slain brother Polynices was to remain unburied, a great dishonour. She disobeyed and gave him a proper burial, and for this she was sealed alive in a cave.

APOLLINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Rating: 40% based on 5 votes

French form of APOLLONIA

APOLLO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Απολλων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ə-PAW-lo (English)

Rating: 52% based on 5 votes

From Greek Απολλων (Apollon), which is of unknown meaning, though perhaps related to Indo-European *apelo "strength". Another theory states that Apollo can be equated with Appaliunas, an Anatolian god whose name possibly means "father lion" or "father light". The Greeks later associated Apollo's name with the Greek verb απολλυμι (apollymi) meaning "to destroy". In Greek mythology Apollo was the son of Zeus and Leto and the twin of Artemis. He was the god of prophecy, medicine, music, art, law, beauty, and wisdom. Later he also became the god of the sun and light.

APRIL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AY-pril

Rating: 50% based on 6 votes

From the name of the month, probably originally derived from Latin aperire "to open", referring to the opening of flowers. It has only been commonly used as a given name since the 1940s.

ARAMINTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Rating: 42% based on 5 votes

Meaning unknown. This name was (first?) used by William Congreve in his comedy 'The Old Bachelor' (1693) and later by Sir John Vanbrugh in his comedy 'The Confederacy' (1705). This was the real name of abolitionist Harriet Tubman (1820-1913), who was born Araminta Ross.

ARCHIE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: AHR-chee

Rating: 46% based on 5 votes

Diminutive of ARCHIBALD. This name is borne by Archie Andrews, an American comic-book character created in 1941.

ARGYROS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Αργυρος (Ancient Greek)

Means "silver" in Greek.

ARTHUR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: AHR-thər (English), ar-TUYR (French), AHR-toor (German), AHR-tur (Dutch)

Rating: 74% based on 5 votes

The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.

The name came into general use in England in the Middle Ages due to the prevalence of Arthurian romances, and it enjoyed a surge of popularity in the 19th century. Famous bearers include German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), mystery author and Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), and science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008).

ASA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: אָסָא (Hebrew)

Pronounced: AY-sə (English)

Rating: 62% based on 5 votes

Means "doctor" in Hebrew. This name was borne by a king of Judah in the Old Testament.

ASHLEY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ASH-lee

Rating: 62% based on 6 votes

From an English surname which was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from Old English æsc and leah. Until the 1960s it was more commonly given to boys in the United States, but it is now most often used on girls.

ASTRID

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French

Pronounced: AH-strid (Swedish), AH-stree (Norwegian), AHS-trit (German)

Rating: 71% based on 7 votes

Modern form of ÁSTRÍÐR. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of 'Pippi Longstocking'.

ATTICUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Literature

Rating: 60% based on 6 votes

From a Roman name meaning "from Attica" in Latin. Attica is the region surrounding Athens in Greece. The author Harper Lee used this name in her novel 'To Kill a Mockingbird' (1960).

AUBREY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AWB-ree

Rating: 48% based on 5 votes

Norman French form of the Germanic name ALBERICH. As an English masculine name it was common in the Middle Ages, and was revived in the 19th century. Since the mid-1970s it has more frequently been given to girls, probably because of its similarity to Audrey.

AUDREY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AWD-ree

Rating: 70% based on 5 votes

Medieval diminutive of ÆÐELÞRYÐ. This was the name of a 7th-century saint, a princess of East Anglia who founded a monastery at Ely. It was also borne by a character in Shakespeare's comedy 'As You Like It' (1599). At the end of the Middle Ages the name became rare due to association with the word tawdry (which was derived from St. Audrey, the name of a fair where cheap lace was sold), but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was British actress Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).

AUGUST

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Catalan, English

Pronounced: OW-guwst (German, Polish), AW-gəst (English)

Rating: 94% based on 5 votes

German, Polish, Scandinavian and Catalan form of AUGUSTUS

AUGUSTINE (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AW-gəs-teen, ə-GUS-tin

Rating: 55% based on 6 votes

From the Roman name Augustinus, itself derived from the Roman name AUGUSTUS. Saint Augustine of Hippo was a 5th-century Christian theologian and author from North Africa. For his contributions to Christian philosophy he is known as a Doctor of the Church. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world. It became popular in England in the Middle Ages partly because of a second saint by this name, Augustine of Canterbury, a 6th-century Italian monk sent to England to convert the Anglo-Saxons.

AUSTEN

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: AWS-tən

Rating: 68% based on 6 votes

Variant of AUSTIN

AUTUMN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AW-təm

Rating: 54% based on 5 votes

From the name of the season, ultimately from Latin autumnus. This name has been in general use since the 1960s.

AVIVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: אֲבִיבָה (Hebrew)

Pronounced: ah-VEEV-ah

Rating: 55% based on 4 votes

Feminine variant of AVIV

BALTHAZAR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend

Rating: 63% based on 4 votes

Variant of BELSHAZZAR. Baltazar is the name traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who visited the newborn Jesus.

BARACK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: باراك (Arabic)

Rating: 52% based on 5 votes

Variant transcription of BARAK (2)

BARNABY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Pronounced: BAHR-nə-bee

Rating: 38% based on 5 votes

Medieval English form of BARNABAS

BARNEY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BAHR-nee

Rating: 46% based on 5 votes

Diminutive of BARNABAS, BERNARD or BARNABY

BASIL (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BAZ-əl

Rating: 40% based on 4 votes

From the Greek name Βασιλειος (Basileios) which was derived from βασιλευς (basileus) meaning "king". Saint Basil the Great was a 4th-century bishop of Caesarea and one of the fathers of the early Christian church. Due to him, the name (in various spellings) has come into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors.

BATHSHEBA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: בַּת־שֶׁבַע (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: bath-SHEE-bə (English)

Rating: 52% based on 5 votes

Means "daughter of the oath" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is the woman who marries King David after he has her husband killed in battle. She was the mother of Solomon.

BEATRICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, English, Swedish

Pronounced: be-ah-TREE-che (Italian), BEE-ə-tris (English), BEE-tris (English), BE-ah-trees (Swedish), be-ah-TREES (Swedish)

Rating: 50% based on 5 votes

Italian form of BEATRIX. Beatrice Portinari was the woman who was loved by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. She served as Dante's guide through paradise in his epic poem 'The Divine Comedy' (1321). This was also the name of a character in Shakespeare's play 'Much Ado About Nothing' (1599).

BEATRIX

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Late Roman

Pronounced: BEE-ə-triks (English), BE-ah-triks (German), BAY-ah-triks (Dutch)

Rating: 48% based on 5 votes

Probably from Viatrix, a feminine form of the Late Latin name Viator which meant "voyager, traveller". It was a common name amongst early Christians, and the spelling was altered by association with Latin beatus "blessed". Viatrix or Beatrix was a 4th-century saint who was strangled to death during the persecutions of Diocletian. In England it became rare after the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the British author and illustrator Beatrix Potter (1866-1943), the creator of Peter Rabbit.

BÉLA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hungarian

Pronounced: BAY-law

Rating: 46% based on 5 votes

The meaning of this name is not known for certain. It could be derived from a Slavic word meaning "white" or a Hungarian word meaning "within". This was the name of four Hungarian kings.

BENEDICT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BEN-ə-dikt

Rating: 43% based on 6 votes

From the Late Latin name Benedictus which meant "blessed". Saint Benedict was an Italian monk who founded the Benedictines in the 6th century. After his time the name was common among Christians, being used by 16 popes. In England it did not come into use until the 12th century, at which point it became very popular. This name was also borne by the American defector Benedict Arnold (1741-1801).

BERNADETTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: ber-na-DET (French)

Rating: 36% based on 5 votes

French feminine form of BERNARD. Saint Bernadette was a young woman from Lourdes in France who claimed to have seen visions of the Virgin Mary.

BERNARD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Polish, Croatian, Slovene, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: bər-NAHRD (English), BUR-nərd (English), ber-NAHR (French), BER-nahrt (Polish, Croatian)

Rating: 58% based on 4 votes

Derived from the Germanic element bern "bear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Beornheard. This was the name of several saints, including Saint Bernard of Menthon who built hospices in the Swiss Alps in the 10th century, and Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, a 12th-century theologian and Doctor of the Church. Another famous bearer was George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), an Irish playwright and essayist.

BERTRAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: BUR-trəm (English), BER-trahm (German)

Rating: 58% based on 4 votes

Means "bright raven", derived from the Germanic element beraht "bright" combined with hramn "raven". The Normans introduced this name to England. Shakespeare used it in his play 'All's Well That Ends Well' (1603).

BETHANY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: BETH-ə-nee (English)

Rating: 53% based on 6 votes

From the name of a biblical town, possibly derived from Hebrew בֵּית־תְּאֵנָה (beit-te'enah) meaning "house of figs". In the New Testament the town of Bethany was the home of Lazarus and his sisters Mary and Martha. It has been in use as a rare given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, used primarily by Catholics in honour of Mary of Bethany. In America it became moderately common after the 1950s.

BIANCA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Romanian

Pronounced: BYAHN-kah (Romanian)

Rating: 48% based on 4 votes

Italian cognate of BLANCHE. Shakespeare used characters named Bianca in 'Taming of the Shrew' (1593) and 'Othello' (1603).

BIJOU

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Various

Rating: 50% based on 5 votes

Means "jewel" in French.

BLAISE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

Pronounced: BLEZ

Rating: 26% based on 5 votes

From the Roman name Blasius which meant "lisping" from Latin blaesus. A famous bearer was the French mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal (1623-1662).

BLYTHE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: BLIEDH

Rating: 53% based on 6 votes

From a surname which meant "cheerful" in Old English.

BOAZ

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: בֹּעַז (Hebrew)

Pronounced: BO-az (English)

Rating: 45% based on 6 votes

Means "swiftness" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of the husband of Ruth.

BRAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: BRAHM

Rating: 87% based on 6 votes

Short form of ABRAHAM. This name was borne by Bram Stoker (1847-1912), the Irish author who wrote 'Dracula'.

CAITLIN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish, English

Pronounced: KAHT-leen (Irish), KAYT-lin (English)

Rating: 50% based on 5 votes

Anglicized form of CAITLÍN

CALLIOPE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Καλλιοπη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: kə-LIE-ə-pee (English)

Rating: 54% based on 7 votes

Latinized form of KALLIOPE

CALYPSO

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Καλυψω (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: kə-LIP-so (English)

Rating: 60% based on 5 votes

From Greek Καλυψω (Kalypso) which probably meant "she that conceals", derived from καλυπτω (kalypto) "to cover, to conceal". In Greek myth this was the name of the nymph who fell in love with Odysseus after he was shipwrecked on her island of Ogygia. When he refused to stay with her she detained him for seven years until Zeus ordered her to release him.

CANUTE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: History

Pronounced: kə-NOOT (English), kə-NYOOT (English)

Rating: 50% based on 5 votes

Anglicized form of KNUT

CAROLINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Pronounced: ka-ro-LEEN (French), KER-ə-lien (English), KER-ə-lin (English), KAR-ə-lien (English), KAR-ə-lin (English)

Rating: 80% based on 6 votes

French feminine form of CAROLUS

CASIMIR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: KAZ-i-meer (English)

Rating: 70% based on 6 votes

English form of the Polish name Kazimierz, derived from the Slavic element kazic "to destroy" combined with mer "great" or mir "peace". Four kings of Poland have borne this name, including Casimir III the Great, who greatly strengthened the Polish state in the 14th century. It was also borne Saint Casimir, a 15th-century Polish prince and a patron saint of Poland and Lithuania. The name was imported into Western Europe via Germany, where it was borne by some royalty.

CASSANDRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Κασσανδρα (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: kə-SAN-drə (English), kə-SAHN-drə (English), kahs-SAHN-drah (Italian)

Rating: 50% based on 4 votes

From the Greek Κασσανδρα (Kassandra), which possibly meant "shining upon man", derived from κεκασμαι (kekasmai) "to shine" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek myth Cassandra was a Trojan princess, the daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but when she spurned his advances he cursed her so nobody would believe her prophecies.

In the Middle Ages this name was common in England due to the popularity of medieval tales about the Trojan War. It subsequently became rare, but was revived in the 20th century.

CATALINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: kah-tah-LEE-nah

Rating: 68% based on 6 votes

Spanish form of KATHERINE

CATHERINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: ka-tə-REEN (French), ka-TREEN (French), KATH-ə-rin (English), KATH-rin (English)

Rating: 62% based on 6 votes

French form of KATHERINE, and also a common English variant.

CEDRIC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SED-rik

Rating: 55% based on 6 votes

Invented by Sir Walter Scott for a character in his novel 'Ivanhoe' (1819). Apparently he based it on the actual name Cerdic, the name of the semi-legendary founder of the kingdom of Wessex in the 6th-century. The meaning of Cerdic is uncertain, but it does not appear to be Old English in origin. It could be connected to the Brythonic name CARATACOS. The name was also used by Frances Hodgson Burnett for the main character in her novel 'Little Lord Fauntleroy' (1886).

CELESTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, English

Pronounced: che-LE-ste (Italian), sə-LEST (English)

Rating: 40% based on 5 votes

Italian feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS. It is also the English feminine form.

CHARLOTTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Pronounced: shar-LOT (French), SHAHR-lət (English), shahr-LAW-tə (German), shahr-LAWT-tə (Dutch)

Rating: 72% based on 5 votes

French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Bronte (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Bronte sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.

CHRISTINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Pronounced: kris-TEEN-ə (English), kris-TEE-nah (German, Dutch)

Rating: 38% based on 5 votes

From Christiana, the Latin feminine form of CHRISTIAN. This was the name of an early, possibly legendary, saint who was tormented by her pagan father. It was also borne by a 17th-century Swedish queen and patron the arts who gave up her crown in order to become a Roman Catholic.

CHRISTMAS

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: KRIS-məs

From the name of the holiday, which means "Christ festival".

CLARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, English, Late Roman

Pronounced: KLAH-rah (Italian, German, Spanish), KLER-ə (English), KLAR-ə (English)

Rating: 78% based on 6 votes

Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.

CLAUDIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Biblical, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: KLAW-dee-ə (English), KLOW-dee-ah (German, Dutch), KLOW-dyah (Italian, Spanish)

Rating: 70% based on 5 votes

Feminine form of CLAUDIUS. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament. As a Christian name it was very rare until the 16th century.

CLEMENTINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: klə-mawn-TEEN

Rating: 77% based on 6 votes

French feminine form of CLEMENT

CLEO

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KLEE-o

Rating: 23% based on 6 votes

Short form of CLEOPATRA

CLEOPATRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Κλεοπατρα (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: klee-ə-PAT-rə (English)

Rating: 42% based on 5 votes

From the Greek name Κλεοπατρα (Kleopatra) which meant "glory of the father", derived from κλεος (kleos) "glory" combined with πατρος (patros) "of the father". This was the name of queens of Egypt from the Ptolemaic royal family, including Cleopatra VII, the mistress of both Julius Caesar and Mark Antony. After being defeated by Augustus she committed suicide by allowing herself to be bitten by an asp. Shakespeare's tragedy 'Antony and Cleopatra' (1606) is based on her.

CONSTANCE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: KAHN-stənts (English), kawn-STAWNS (French)

Rating: 58% based on 6 votes

Medieval form of CONSTANTIA. The Normans introduced this name to England (it was the name of a daughter of William the Conqueror).

CONSTANTINE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: History

Pronounced: KAHN-stən-teen (English)

Rating: 73% based on 6 votes

From the Latin name Constantinus, a derivative of CONSTANS. Constantine the Great (272-337) was the first Roman emperor to adopt Christianity. He moved the capital of the empire from Rome to Byzantium, which he renamed Constantinople (modern Istanbul).

CORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German

Pronounced: KAWR-ə (English)

Rating: 56% based on 5 votes

Created by James Fenimore Cooper for his novel 'The Last of the Mohicans' (1826). He may have based it on KORË or CORINNA.

CORAL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KAWR-əl

Rating: 42% based on 5 votes

From the English word coral for the underwater skeletal deposits which can form reefs. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κοραλλιον (korallion).

DALLAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DAL-əs

Rating: 46% based on 7 votes

From a surname which was originally taken from a Scottish place name meaning "meadow dwelling". A city in Texas bears this name, probably in honour of American Vice President George Mifflin Dallas.

DAPHNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, English, Dutch

Other Scripts: Δαφνη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: DAF-nee (English), DAHF-nə (Dutch)

Rating: 78% based on 5 votes

Means "laurel" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was a nymph turned into a laurel tree by her father in order that she might escape the pursuit of Apollo. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the end of the 19th century.

DASHIELL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Rating: 48% based on 6 votes

In the case of American author Dashiell Hammett (1894-1961), it is an Anglicized form of his mother's surname De Chiel, which is of unknown meaning.

DAVID

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: דָּוִד (Hebrew), Давид (Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: DAY-vid (English), dah-VEED (Jewish), da-VEED (French), DAH-vit (German, Dutch), dah-VEET (Russian)

Rating: 63% based on 6 votes

From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was probably derived from Hebrew דוד (dwd) meaning "beloved". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.

This name has been used in Britain since the Middle Ages. It has been especially popular in Wales, where it is used in honour of the 5th-century patron saint of Wales (also called Dewi), as well as in Scotland, where it was borne by two kings. Famous bearers include empiricist philosopher David Hume (1711-1776), explorer David Livingstone (1813-1873) and soccer player David Beckham (1975-). This is also the name of the hero of Charles Dickens' semi-autobiographical novel 'David Copperfield' (1850).

DELILAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English

Other Scripts: דְּלִילָה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: di-LIE-lə (English)

Rating: 75% based on 6 votes

Means "delicate, weak, languishing" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is the lover of Samson, whom she betrays to the Philistines by cutting his hair, which is the source of his power. Despite her character flaws, the name began to be used by the Puritans in the 17th century. It has been used occasionally in the English-speaking world since that time.

DELPHINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: del-FEEN

Rating: 46% based on 5 votes

French form of DELPHINA

DEMETER (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Δημητηρ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: di-MEET-ər (English)

Rating: 43% based on 4 votes

Means "earth mother", derived from Greek δε (de) "earth" and μητηρ (meter) "mother". In Greek mythology Demeter was the goddess of agriculture, the daughter of Cronus, the sister of Zeus, and the mother of Persephone.

DESDEMONA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Pronounced: dez-də-MON-ə (English)

Rating: 55% based on 6 votes

Derived from Greek δυσδαιμων (dysdaimon) meaning "ill-fated". This was the name of the murdered wife of Othello in Shakespeare's play 'Othello' (1603).

DESMOND

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Irish

Pronounced: DEZ-mənd

Rating: 48% based on 4 votes

From an Irish surname which was derived from Deasmhumhain meaning "South Munster", originally indicating a person who came from that region in Ireland.

DEXTER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DEKS-tər

Rating: 60% based on 6 votes

From an occupational surname meaning "one who dyes" in Old English. It also coincides with the Latin word dexter meaning "right-handed, skilled".

DIETER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German

Pronounced: DEE-ter

Rating: 36% based on 5 votes

Means "warrior of the people", derived from the Germanic elements þeud "people" and hari "army".

DOLORES

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, English

Pronounced: do-LO-res (Spanish), də-LAWR-is (English)

Rating: 68% based on 5 votes

Means "sorrows", taken from the Spanish title of the Virgin Mary María de los Dolores, meaning "Mary of Sorrows". It has been used in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, becoming especially popular in America during the 1920s and 30s.

DORIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: DAWR-ee-ən (English)

Rating: 53% based on 4 votes

The name was first used by Oscar Wilde in his novel 'The Picture of Dorian Gray' (1891), which tells the story of a man whose portrait ages while he stays young. Wilde probably took it from the name of the ancient Greek tribe the Dorians.

DOROTHY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DAWR-ə-thee, DAWR-thee

Rating: 78% based on 6 votes

Usual English form of DOROTHEA. It has been in use since the 16th century. The author L. Frank Baum used it for the central character in his fantasy novel 'The Wonderful Wizard of Oz' (1900).

EASTER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EES-tər

From the English name of the Christian festival celebrating the resurrection of Jesus. It was ultimately named for the Germanic spring goddess Eostre. It was traditionally given to children born on Easter, though it is rare in modern times.

ECHO

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Ηχω (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: E-ko (English)

Rating: 76% based on 5 votes

Means "echo" from the word for the repeating reflected sound, which derives from Greek ηχη (eche) "sound". In Greek mythology Echo was a nymph given a speech impediment by Hera, so that she could only repeat what others said. She fell in love with Narcissus, but her love was not returned, and she pined away until nothing remained of her except her voice.

EDMUND

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Polish

Pronounced: ED-mənd (English), ED-muwnt (German, Polish)

Rating: 52% based on 5 votes

Means "rich protector" from Old English ead "rich, blessed" and mund "protector". This was the name of two Anglo-Saxon kings of England. It was also borne by two saints, including a 9th-century king of East Anglia who, according to tradition, was shot to death with arrows after refusing to divide his Christian kingdom with an invading pagan Danish leader. This Old English name remained in use after the Norman conquest (even being used by king Henry III for one of his sons), though it became less common after the 15th century.

Famous bearers of the name include the English poet Edmund Spenser (1552-1599), the German-Czech philosopher Edmund Husserl (1859-1938) and New Zealand mountaineer Sir Edmund Hillary (1919-2008), the first person to climb Mount Everest.

EDWARD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Polish

Pronounced: ED-wərd (English), ED-vahrt (Polish)

Rating: 70% based on 5 votes

Means "rich guard", derived from the Old English elements ead "rich, blessed" and weard "guard". Saint Edward the Confessor was the king of England shortly before the Norman conquest. He was known as a just ruler, and because of his popularity this name remained in use after the conquest when most other Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. The 13th-century king Henry III named his son and successor after the saint, and seven subsequent kings of England were also named Edward. This is one of the few Old English names to be used throughout Europe (in various spellings).

EFFIE (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Pronounced: EF-ee

Rating: 60% based on 6 votes

Diminutive of EUPHEMIA

ELEANOR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ə-nawr

Rating: 68% based on 6 votes

From the Old French form of the Occitan name Aliénor. It was first borne by the influential Eleanor of Aquitaine (12th century), who was the queen of Louis VII, the king of France, and later Henry II, the king of England. She was named Aenor after her mother, and was called by the Occitan phrase alia Aenor "the other AENOR" in order to distinguish her from her mother.

The popularity of the name Eleanor in England during the Middle Ages was due to the fame of Eleanor of Aquitaine, as well as two queens of the following century: Eleanor of Provence, the wife of Henry III, and Eleanor of Castile, the wife of Edward I. More recently, it was borne by first lady Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), the wife of American president Franklin Roosevelt.

ELECTRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Ηλεκτρα (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ə-LEKT-rə (English)

Rating: 48% based on 5 votes

Latinized form of Greek Ηλεκτρα (Elektra), derived from ηλεκτρον (elektron) meaning "amber". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra and the sister of Orestes. She helped her brother kill their mother and her lover Aegisthus in vengeance for Agamemnon's murder.

ELIZABETH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: i-LIZ-ə-bəth (English)

Rating: 77% based on 6 votes

From Ελισαβετ (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath" or perhaps "my God is abundance". The Hebrew form appears in the Old Testament where Elisheba is the wife of Aaron, while the Greek form appears in the New Testament where Elizabeth is the mother of John the Baptist.

Among Christians, this name was originally more common in Eastern Europe. It was borne in the 12th century by Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, a daughter of King Andrew II who used her wealth to help the poor. In medieval England it was occasionally used in honour of the saint, though the form Isabel (from Occitan and Spanish) was more common. It has been very popular in England since the reign of Queen Elizabeth I in the 16th century. Famous modern bearers include the British queen Elizabeth II (1926-) and actress Elizabeth Taylor (1932-2011).

ELOISE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-o-eez, el-o-EEZ

Rating: 72% based on 6 votes

From the Old French name Héloïse, which is probably from the Germanic name Helewidis, composed of the elements heil "hale, healthy" and wid "wide". It is sometimes associated with the Greek word ‘ηλιος (helios) "sun" or the name Louise, though there is not likely an etymological connection. This name was borne in the 12th century by Saint Eloise, the wife of the French theologian Peter Abelard. She became a nun after her husband was castrated by her uncle.

There was a medieval English form of this name, Helewis, though it died out after the 13th century. In the 19th century it was revived in the English-speaking world in the form Eloise.

ELOY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: e-LOI

Rating: 38% based on 4 votes

Spanish form of ELIGIUS

EPONA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Celtic Mythology

Rating: 43% based on 4 votes

Derived from Gaulish epos meaning "horse". This was the name of the Celtic goddess of horses.

ERIK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, German, Dutch, English

Pronounced: E-rik (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German), I-rik (Dutch), ER-ik (English)

Rating: 46% based on 7 votes

Form of ERIC. This was the name of kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway. King Erik IX of Sweden (12th century) is the patron saint of that country.

ERROL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ER-əl

Rating: 62% based on 5 votes

From a surname which was originally derived from a Scottish place name. It was popularized as a given name by the Australian actor Errol Flynn (1909-1959).

ERSKINE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, Irish, English (Rare)

Pronounced: UR-skien

Rating: 17% based on 3 votes

From a surname which was originally derived from the name of a Scottish town meaning "projecting height" in Gaelic. A famous bearer of the name was the Irish novelist and nationalist Erskine Childers (1870-1922).

ESMERALDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English

Pronounced: es-me-RAHL-dah (Spanish), ez-mə-RAHL-də (English)

Rating: 70% based on 4 votes

Means "emerald" in Spanish. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since that time.

ESTELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: es-TEL

Rating: 58% based on 5 votes

From an Old French name which was derived from Latin stella, meaning "star". It was rare in the English-speaking world in the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due to the character Estella Havisham in Charles Dickens' novel 'Great Expectations' (1860).

ESTHER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Spanish, Dutch, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: אֶסְתֵר (Hebrew), Εσθηρ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ES-tər (English, Dutch), es-TER (French)

Rating: 54% based on 5 votes

Possibly means "star" in Persian. Alternatively it could be a derivative of the name of the Near Eastern goddess ISHTAR. The Book of Esther in the Old Testament tells the story of Queen Esther, the Jewish wife of the king of Persia who saved the Jews of the realm from extermination. Her original Hebrew name was Hadassah.

This name has been used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. In America it received a boost in popularity after the birth of Esther Cleveland (1893-1980), the daughter of president Grover Cleveland.

ETHAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Jewish, French, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: אֵיתָן (Hebrew)

Pronounced: EE-thən (English)

Rating: 68% based on 5 votes

Means "solid, enduring" in Hebrew. This is the name of a wise man in the Old Testament. After the Protestant Reformation it was occasionally used as a given name in the English-speaking world, and it became somewhat common in America due to the fame of the revolutionary Ethan Allen (1738-1789). It only became popular towards the end of the 20th century. This was the name of the main character in Edith Wharton's novel 'Ethan Frome' (1911).

EVE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Biblical

Other Scripts: חַוָּה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: EEV (English), EV (French)

Rating: 66% based on 5 votes

From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חוה (chawah) "to breathe" or the related word חיה (chayah) "to live". According to the Old Testament Book of Genesis, Eve and Adam were the first humans. She gave the forbidden fruit to Adam, causing their expulsion from the Garden of Eden. Despite this potentially negative association, the name was occasionally used during the Middle Ages. In the English-speaking world both Eve and the Latin form Eva were revived in the 19th century.

EZRA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew

Other Scripts: עֶזְרָא (Hebrew)

Pronounced: EZ-rə (English)

Rating: 48% based on 6 votes

Means "help" in Hebrew. Ezra is a prophet of the Old Testament and the author of the Book of Ezra. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. The American poet Ezra Pound (1885-1972) was a famous bearer.

FARAMUND

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Germanic

Rating: 35% based on 4 votes

Derived from the Germanic elements fara "journey" and mund "protection". This was the name of a semi-legendary 5th-century king of the Franks.

FAY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: FAY

Rating: 40% based on 3 votes

Derived from Middle English faie meaning "fairy". It appears in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Arthurian legends in the name of Morgan le Fay. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century. In some cases it may be used as a short form of FAITH.

FAYE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: FAY

Rating: 37% based on 3 votes

Variant of FAY

FERN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: FURN

Rating: 63% based on 6 votes

From the English word for the plant, ultimately from Old English fearn. It has been used as a given name since the late 19th century.

FLEUR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, Dutch, English (Rare)

Pronounced: FLUUR (French, Dutch), FLUR (English)

Rating: 58% based on 5 votes

Means "flower" in French. This was the name of a character in John Galsworthy's novels 'The Forsyte Saga' (1922).

FLORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Italian, Roman Mythology

Pronounced: FLAWR-ə (English), FLO-rah (German)

Rating: 46% based on 5 votes

Derived from Latin flos meaning "flower". Flora was the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, the wife of Zephyr the west wind. It has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, starting in France. In Scotland it was sometimes used as an Anglicized form of Fionnghuala.

FRANCES

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: FRANT-səs

Rating: 75% based on 6 votes

Feminine form of FRANCIS. The distinction between Francis as a masculine name and Frances as a feminine name did not arise until the 17th century. A notable bearer was Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini (1850-1917), a social worker and the first American to be canonized.

FRANCESCA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Catalan

Pronounced: frahn-CHES-kah (Italian)

Rating: 60% based on 5 votes

Italian and Catalan feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).

FREYA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Norse Mythology, English (British, Modern)

Pronounced: FRAY-ah (Norse Mythology), FRAY-ə (English)

Rating: 68% based on 6 votes

From Old Norse Freyja meaning "lady". This is the name of the goddess of love, beauty, war and death in Norse mythology. She claimed half of the heroes who were slain in battle and brought them to her realm in Asgard. Some scholars connect her with the goddess Frigg.

This is not the usual spelling in any of the Scandinavian languages (in Sweden and Denmark it is Freja and in Norway it is Frøja) but it is the common spelling of the goddess's name in English. In the 2000s it became popular in Britain.

GABBY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: GAB-ee

Rating: 30% based on 5 votes

Diminutive of GABRIEL or GABRIELLE

GABRIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: גַּבְרִיאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Γαβριηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ga-bree-EL (French), GAHP-ree-el (German), GAH-bryel (Spanish), GAY-bree-əl (English), GAHP-ryel (Polish)

Rating: 88% based on 5 votes

From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "strong man of God". Gabriel was one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition. He appears in both the Old Testament and the New Testament, where he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Qur'an to Muhammad.

This name has been used occasionally in England since the 12th century. It was not common in the English-speaking world until the end of the 20th century.

GARNET (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: GAHR-nət

Rating: 46% based on 5 votes

From the English word garnet for the precious stone, the birthstone of January. The word is derived from Middle English gernet meaning "dark red".

GEORGE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Romanian

Pronounced: JORJ (English)

Rating: 66% based on 5 votes

From the Greek name Γεωργιος (Georgios) which was derived from the Greek word γεωργος (georgos) meaning "farmer, earthworker", itself derived from the elements γη (ge) "earth" and εργον (ergon) "work". Saint George was a 3rd-century Roman soldier from Palestine who was martyred during the persecutions of emperor Diocletian. Later legends describe his defeat of a dragon, with which he was often depicted in medieval art.

Initially Saint George was primarily revered by Eastern Christians, but returning crusaders brought stories of him to Western Europe and he became the patron of England, Portugal, Catalonia and Aragon. The name was rarely used in England until the German-born George I came to the British throne in the 18th century. Five subsequent British kings have borne the name.

Other famous bearers include two kings of Greece, the composer George Frideric Handel (1685-1759), the first president of the United States, George Washington (1732-1797), and the Pacific explorer George Vancouver (1757-1798). This was also the pen name of authors George Eliot (1819-1880) and George Orwell (1903-1950), real names Mary Anne Evans and Eric Arthur Blair respectively.

GEORGIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: jor-JYAH-nə, jor-JAY-nə

Rating: 68% based on 5 votes

Feminine form of GEORGE. This form of the name has been in use since the 18th century.

GIDEON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew

Other Scripts: גִּדְעוֹן (Hebrew)

Pronounced: GID-ee-ən (English)

Rating: 60% based on 5 votes

Means "feller" or "hewer" in Hebrew. Gideon was a hero of the Old Testament who led the Israelites against the Midianites. In the English-speaking world, Gideon has been used as a given name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans.

GINGER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JIN-jər

Rating: 46% based on 5 votes

From the English word ginger for the spice or the reddish-brown colour. It can also be a diminutive of VIRGINIA, as in the case of actress and dancer Ginger Rogers (1911-1995), by whom the name was popularized.

GINNY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JIN-ee

Rating: 56% based on 5 votes

Diminutive of VIRGINIA

GLEN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: GLEN

Rating: 24% based on 5 votes

Variant of GLENN

GOLDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Yiddish

Other Scripts: גוֹלְדָא (Yiddish)

Rating: 28% based on 4 votes

Means "gold" in Yiddish.

GREER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish, English (Rare)

Pronounced: GREER

Rating: 60% based on 5 votes

From a Scottish surname which was derived from the given name GREGOR.

GWENDOLEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Pronounced: GWEN-də-lin (English)

Rating: 53% based on 7 votes

Means "white ring", derived from the Welsh elements gwen "white, fair, blessed" and dolen "ring". This was the name of a mythical queen of the Britons who defeated her husband in battle, as told by Geoffrey of Monmouth.

HAMISH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish

Pronounced: HAY-mish

Rating: 62% based on 6 votes

Anglicized form of a Sheumais, the vocative case of SEUMAS.

HANNAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Biblical

Other Scripts: חַנָּה (Hebrew)

Pronounced: HAN-ə (English), HAH-nah (German)

Rating: 60% based on 7 votes

From the Hebrew name חַנָּה (Channah) meaning "favour" or "grace". Hannah is the mother of the prophet Samuel in the Old Testament. As an English name, Hannah was not regularly used until after the Protestant Reformation. The Greek and Latin version Anna is used in the New Testament; this form has traditionally been more widely used as a Christian name.

HARRY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HER-ee, HAR-ee

Rating: 63% based on 4 votes

Medieval English form of HENRY. In modern times it is used as a diminutive of both Henry and HAROLD. A famous bearer was American president Harry S. Truman (1884-1972). It is also the name of the boy wizard in J. K. Rowling's 'Harry Potter' series of books, first released in 1997.

HECATE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: ‘Εκατη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: HEK-ə-tee (English)

Rating: 46% based on 5 votes

From the Greek ‘Εκατη (Hekate), possibly derived from ‘εκας (hekas) meaning "far off". In Greek mythology Hecate was a goddess associated with witchcraft, crossroads, tombs, demons and the underworld.

HEDWIG

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: HED-vikh

Rating: 53% based on 7 votes

From the Germanic name Hadewig, derived from the Germanic elements hadu "battle, combat" and wig "war". This was the name of a 13th-century German saint, the wife of the Polish duke Henry the Bearded. It was subsequently borne by a 14th-century Polish queen (usually known by her Polish name Jadwiga) who is now also regarded as a saint.

HELENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Finnish, Estonian, Slovene, Croatian, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: ‘Ελενη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: he-LE-nah (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish), hay-LAY-nah (Dutch)

Rating: 70% based on 6 votes

Latinate form of HELEN

HENGIST

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Germanic

Rating: 35% based on 4 votes

Means "stallion" in Germanic. Hengist and his brother Horsa were the leaders of the first Germanic settlers in Britain. Hengist established a kingdom in Kent in the 5th century.

HERMIONE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: ‘Ερμιονη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: hər-MIE-ə-nee (English)

Rating: 61% based on 7 votes

Derived from the name of the Greek messenger god HERMES. In Greek myth Hermione was the daughter of Menelaus and Helen. This is also the name of the wife of Leontes in Shakespeare's play 'The Winter's Tale' (1610). It is now closely associated with the character Hermione Granger from the Harry Potter series of books, first released in 1997.

HERO (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: ‘Ηρω (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: HEER-o (English)

Rating: 53% based on 7 votes

Derived from Greek ‘ηρως (heros) meaning "hero". In Greek legend she was the lover of Leander, who would swim across the Hellespont each night to meet her. He was killed on one such occasion when he got caught in a storm while in the water, and when Hero saw his dead body she drowned herself. This is also the name of a character in Shakespeare's play 'Much Ado About Nothing' (1599).

HESTER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Biblical Latin

Pronounced: HES-tər (English)

Rating: 46% based on 5 votes

Latin form of ESTHER. Like Esther, it has been used in England since the Protestant Reformation. Nathaniel Hawthorne used it for the heroine of his novel 'The Scarlet Letter' (1850), Hester Prynne.

HESTIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: ‘Εστια (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 38% based on 5 votes

Derived from Greek ‘εστια (hestia) "hearth, fireside". In Greek mythology Hestia was the goddess of the hearth and domestic activity.

HIRAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English

Other Scripts: חִירָם (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: HIE-rəm (English)

Rating: 45% based on 4 votes

Probably of Phoenician origin, though it could be from Hebrew meaning "exalted brother". This was the name of a king of Tyre in the Old Testament. As an English given name, Hiram came into use after the Protestant Reformation. In the 17th century the Puritans brought it to America, where it gained some currency.

HOLDEN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: HOL-dən

Rating: 33% based on 4 votes

From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "deep valley" in Old English. This is the name of the main character in J. D. Salinger's novel 'The Catcher in the Rye' (1951), Holden Caufield.

HORATIO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: hə-RAY-shee-o, hə-RAY-sho

Rating: 47% based on 6 votes

Variant of HORATIUS. It was borne by the British admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805), famous for his defeat of Napoleon's forces in the Battle of Trafalgar, in which he was himself killed. Since his time the name has been occasionally used in his honour.

HOTARU

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Japanese

Other Scripts: (Japanese)

Rating: 34% based on 5 votes

Means "firefly" in Japanese.

HUGO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)

Pronounced: OO-go (Spanish), HYOO-go (English), HUY-kho (Dutch), HOO-go (German)

Rating: 52% based on 6 votes

Latinized form of HUGH. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.

HUMPHREY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HUM-free

Rating: 38% based on 5 votes

Means "peaceful warrior" from the Germanic elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and frid "peace". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hunfrið, and it was regularly used through the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the American actor Humphrey Bogart (1899-1957), who starred in 'The Maltese Falcon' and 'Casablanca'.

IAGO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh, Galician, Portuguese (Rare)

Pronounced: ee-AH-go (English), ee-A-gaw (Galician)

Rating: 45% based on 4 votes

Welsh and Galician form of JACOB. This is the name of the villain in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Othello' (1603).

IGNATIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Late Roman

Pronounced: ig-NAY-shəs (English)

Rating: 82% based on 5 votes

From the Roman family name Egnatius, meaning unknown, of Etruscan origin. The spelling was later altered to resemble Latin ignis "fire". This was the name of several saints, including the third bishop of Antioch who was thrown to wild beasts by emperor Trajan, and by Saint Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556), founder of the Jesuits, whose real birth name was in fact Íñigo.

INDIGO

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: IN-di-go

Rating: 38% based on 5 votes

From the English word indigo for the purplish-blue dye or the colour. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ινδικον (Indikon) "Indic, from India".

IRA (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew

Other Scripts: עִירָא (Hebrew)

Pronounced: IE-rə (English)

Rating: 46% based on 5 votes

Means "watchful" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of King David's priest. As an English Christian given name, Ira began to be used after the Protestant Reformation. In the 17th century the Puritans brought it to America, where remained moderately common into the 20th century.

IRIS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish

Other Scripts: Ιρις (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: IE-ris (English), EE-ris (German, Dutch)

Rating: 68% based on 6 votes

Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow. This name can also be given in reference to the English word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the name of the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.

ISAAC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: יִצְחָק (Hebrew)

Pronounced: IE-zək (English)

Rating: 54% based on 5 votes

From the Hebrew name יִצְחָק (Yitzchaq) which meant "he laughs". Isaac in the Old Testament is the son of Abraham and the father of Esau and Jacob. As recounted in Genesis, God tested Abraham's faith by ordering him to sacrifice his son, though an angel prevented the act at the last moment.

As an English Christian name, Isaac was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, though it was more common among Jews. It became more widespread after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers include the physicist and mathematician Sir Isaac Newton (1643-1727) and the science-fiction writer Isaac Asimov (1920-1992).

ISIS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)

Other Scripts: Ισις (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: IE-sis (English)

Rating: 44% based on 5 votes

Greek form of Egyptian Ist (reconstructed as Iset or Ueset), which possibly meant "the throne". In Egyptian mythology Isis was the goddess of the sky and nature, the wife of Osiris and the mother of Horus. She was originally depicted wearing a throne-shaped headdress, but in later times she was conflated with the goddess Hathor and depicted having the horns of a cow on her head. She was also worshipped by people outside of Egypt, such as the Greeks and Romans.

IVY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: IE-vee

Rating: 63% based on 4 votes

From the English word for the climbing plant that has small yellow flowers. It is ultimately derived from Old English ifig.

JACQUELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: zha-kə-LEEN (French), zhak-LEEN (French), JAK-ə-leen (English), JAK-ə-lin (English)

Rating: 24% based on 5 votes

French feminine form of JACQUES, also commonly used in the English-speaking world.

JANE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JAYN

Rating: 87% based on 6 votes

Medieval English form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). This became the most common feminine form of John in the 17th century, surpassing Joan. Famous bearers include the uncrowned English queen Lady Jane Grey (1536-1554), who ruled for only 9 days, the British novelist Jane Austen (1775-1817), who wrote 'Sense and Sensibility' and 'Pride and Prejudice', and the British primatologist Jane Goodall (1934-). This was also the name of the central character in Charlotte Bronte's novel 'Jane Eyre' (1847).

JARETH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Popular Culture

Pronounced: JER-əth (English), JAR-əth (English)

Rating: 24% based on 5 votes

Probably a blend of JARED and GARETH. This was the name of the Goblin King, played by David Bowie, in the movie 'Labyrinth' (1986).

JASON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Greek Mythology (Anglicized), Biblical

Other Scripts: Ιασων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: JAY-sən (English)

Rating: 30% based on 4 votes

From the Greek name Ιασων (Iason), which was derived from Greek ιασθαι (iasthai) "to heal". In Greek mythology Jason was the leader of the Argonauts. After his uncle Pelias overthrew his father as king of Iolcos, Jason went in search of the Golden Fleece in order to win back the throne. During his journeys he married the sorceress Medea, who helped him gain the fleece and kill his uncle, but who later turned against him when he fell in love with another woman.

This name also appears in the New Testament, belonging to man who sheltered Paul and Silas. In his case, it may represent a Hellenized form of a Hebrew name. It was not used in England until after the Protestant Reformation.

JASPER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend

Pronounced: JAS-pər (English), YAHS-pər (Dutch)

Rating: 75% based on 6 votes

Means "treasurer" in Persian. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.

JEAN (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Scottish

Pronounced: JEEN

Rating: 62% based on 6 votes

Medieval English variant of Jehanne (see JANE). It was common in England and Scotland during the Middle Ages, but eventually became rare in England. It was reintroduced to the English-speaking world from Scotland in the 19th century.

JEM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Pronounced: JEM

Rating: 43% based on 4 votes

Medieval form of JAMES

JEMIMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical, English

Other Scripts: יְמִימָה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: jə-MIE-mə (English)

Rating: 43% based on 6 votes

Means "dove" in Hebrew. This was the oldest of the three daughters of Job in the Old Testament. As an English name, Jemima first became common during the Puritan era.

JEROME

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: jə-ROM

Rating: 38% based on 4 votes

From the Greek name ‘Ιερωνυμος (Hieronymos) meaning "sacred name". Saint Jerome was responsible for the creation of the Vulgate, the Latin translation of the Bible, in the 5th century. He is regarded as a Doctor of the Church. The name was used in his honour in the Middle Ages, especially in Italy and France, and has been used in England since the 12th century.

JERUSHA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: יְרוּשָׁה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: jə-ROO-shə (English)

Rating: 40% based on 4 votes

Means "possession" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is the wife of King Uzziah of Judah and the mother of Jotham.

JOAQUÍN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish

Rating: 48% based on 4 votes

Spanish form of JOACHIM

JOCELYN

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: JAHS-lin (English), JAHS-ə-lin (English)

Rating: 72% based on 6 votes

From a Germanic masculine name, variously written as Gaudelenus, Gautselin, Gauzlin, along with many other spellings. It was derived from the Germanic element gaut, which was from the name of the Germanic tribe the Gauts, combined with a Latin diminutive suffix. The Normans brought this name to England in the form Goscelin or Joscelin, and it was common until the 14th century. It was revived in the 20th century primarily as a feminine name, perhaps an adaptation of the surname Jocelyn (a medieval derivative of the given name). In France this is a masculine name only.

JOEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Swedish, Finnish, Biblical

Other Scripts: יוֹאֵל (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: JOL (English), JO-əl (English)

Rating: 62% based on 5 votes

From the Hebrew name יוֹאֵל (Yo'el) meaning "YAHWEH is God". Joel is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Joel. In England, it was first used as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation.

JOHN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: JAHN (English)

Rating: 78% based on 5 votes

English form of Iohannes, the Latin form of the Greek name Ιωαννης (Ioannes), itself derived from the Hebrew name יוֹחָנָן (Yochanan) meaning "YAHWEH is gracious". This name owes its popularity to two New Testament characters, both highly revered saints. The first is John the Baptist, a Jewish ascetic who was considered the forerunner of Jesus Christ. The second is the apostle John, who is also traditionally regarded as the author of the fourth Gospel and Revelation.

This name was initially more common among Eastern Christians in the Byzantine Empire, but it flourished in Western Europe after the First Crusade. In England it became extremely popular: during the later Middle Ages it was given to approximately a fifth of all English boys.

The name (in various spellings) has been borne by 21 popes and eight Byzantine emperors, as well as rulers of England, France, Sweden, Denmark, Poland, Portugal, Bulgaria, Russia and Hungary. It was also borne by the poet John Milton (1608-1674), philosopher John Locke (1632-1704), American founding father and president John Adams (1735-1826), and poet John Keats (1795-1821). Famous bearers of the 20th century include author John Steinbeck (1902-1968), assassinated American president John F. Kennedy (1917-1963), and musician John Lennon (1940-1980).

JOSCELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: JAHS-lin, JAHS-ə-lin

Rating: 42% based on 5 votes

Variant of JOCELYN

JOSIAH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English

Other Scripts: יֹאשִׁיָהוּ (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: jo-SIE-ə (English)

Rating: 77% based on 6 votes

Means "YAHWEH supports" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a king of Judah famous for his religious reforms. He was killed fighting the Egyptians at Megiddo. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

JOSIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JO-zee

Rating: 64% based on 5 votes

Short form of JOSEPHINE

JOY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JOI

Rating: 53% based on 6 votes

Simply from the English word joy, ultimately derived from Norman French joie, Latin gaudia. Is has been regularly used as a given name since the late 19th century.

JUDD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Medieval English

Pronounced: JUD (English)

Medieval diminutive of JORDAN. Modern use of this name is inspired by the surname that was derived from the medieval name.

JUDE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: JOOD (English)

Rating: 69% based on 7 votes

Variant of JUDAS. It is used in many English versions of the New Testament to denote the second apostle named Judas, in order to distinguish him from Judas Iscariot. He was supposedly the author of the Epistle of Jude. In the English-speaking world, Jude has occasionally been used as a given name since the time of the Protestant Reformation.

JULIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman, English, German

Pronounced: YOO:-li-uws (Ancient Roman), JOO-lee-əs (English), YOO-lee-uws (German)

Rating: 48% based on 6 votes

From a Roman family name which was possibly derived from Greek ιουλος (ioulos) "downy-bearded". Alternatively, it could be related to the name of the Roman god JUPITER. This was a prominent patrician family of Rome, who claimed descent from the mythological Julus, son of Aeneas. Its most notable member was Gaius Julius Caesar, who is known for his clever conquest of Gaul. After a civil war he became the dictator of the Roman Republic, but was eventually stabbed to death in the senate.

Although this name was borne by several early saints, including a pope, it was rare during the Middle Ages. It was revived in Italy and France during the Renaissance, and was subsequently imported to England.

JUNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JOON

Rating: 75% based on 6 votes

From the name of the month, which was originally derived from the name of the Roman goddess Juno. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.

JUNIPER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: JOON-ə-pər

Rating: 71% based on 7 votes

From the English word for the type of tree, derived ultimately from Latin iuniperus.

KALLIOPE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Καλλιοπη (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 42% based on 6 votes

Means "beautiful voice" from Greek καλλος (kallos) "beauty" and οψ (ops) "voice". In Greek mythology she was a goddess of epic poetry and eloquence, one of the nine Muses.

KALLISTO

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Καλλιστω (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 53% based on 4 votes

Derived from Greek καλλιστος (kallistos) meaning "most beautiful". In Greek mythology Kallisto was a nymph who was loved by Zeus. She was changed into a she-bear by Hera, and subsequently became the Great Bear constellation. This was also an ancient Greek personal name.

KATHARINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German

Pronounced: KATH-ə-rin (English), KATH-rin (English), kah-tah-REE-nə (German)

Rating: 45% based on 4 votes

English variant of KATHERINE and German variant of KATHARINA. A famous bearer was American actress Katharine Hepburn (1907-2003).

KESTREL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: KES-trəl

Rating: 54% based on 5 votes

From the name of the bird of prey, ultimately derived from Old French crecelle "rattle", which refers to the sound of its cry.

KETURAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: קְטוּרָה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: ki-TOOR-ə (English), kee-TYOOR-ə (English)

Rating: 40% based on 5 votes

Means "incense" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is Abraham's wife after Sarah dies.

KIYOKO

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Japanese

Other Scripts: 清子 (Japanese)

Rating: 30% based on 3 votes

From Japanese 清 (kiyo) "pure, clean" and 子 (ko) "child".

KLAUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish

Pronounced: KLOWS (German)

Rating: 50% based on 5 votes

German short form of NICHOLAS

LARK

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: LAHRK

Rating: 44% based on 5 votes

From the English word for the type of songbird.

LAURA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Late Roman

Pronounced: LAWR-ə (English), LOW-rah (Spanish, Italian, Polish, German, Dutch)

Rating: 50% based on 4 votes

Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.

As an English name, Laura has been used since the 13th century. A famous bearer was Laura Secord (1775-1868), a Canadian heroine during the War of 1812.

LAWRENCE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LAWR-ənts

Rating: 48% based on 4 votes

Variant of LAURENCE (1). This spelling of the name is now more common than Laurence in the English-speaking world, probably because Lawrence is the usual spelling of the surname. The surname was borne by the author and poet D. H. Lawrence (1885-1930), as well as the revolutionary T. E. Lawrence (1888-1935), who was known as Lawrence of Arabia.

LAZARUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: Λαζαρος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: LAZ-ər-əs (English)

Rating: 52% based on 5 votes

Latinized form of Λαζαρος (Lazaros), a Greek form of ELEAZAR used in the New Testament. Lazarus was a man from Bethany, the brother of Mary and Martha, who was restored to life by Jesus.

LEAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: לֵאָה (Hebrew)

Pronounced: LEE-ə (English)

Rating: 43% based on 4 votes

From the Hebrew name לֵאָה (Le'ah) which was probably derived from the Hebrew word לְאָה (le'ah) meaning "weary". Alternatively it might derive from a Chaldean name meaning "mistress" or "ruler" in Akkadian. In the Old Testament, Leah is the first wife of Jacob and the mother of seven of his children. Although this name was used by Jews in the Middle Ages, it was not typical as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation, being common among the Puritans.

LEIF

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: LAYF

Rating: 52% based on 6 votes

From the Old Norse name Leifr meaning "descendent, heir". Leif Eriksson was a Norse explorer who reached North America in the early 11th century. He was the son of Erik the Red.

LENORE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: lə-NAWR

Rating: 45% based on 6 votes

Short form of ELEANOR. This was the name of the departed love of the narrator in Edgar Allan Poe's poem 'The Raven' (1845).

LEO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman

Pronounced: LE-o (German), LAY-o (Dutch), LEE-o (English)

Rating: 60% based on 5 votes

Derived from Latin leo "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.

LEON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Λεων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: LEE-awn (English), LE-awn (German, Polish)

Rating: 58% based on 5 votes

Derived from Greek λεων (leon) meaning "lion". During the Christian era this Greek name was merged with the Latin cognate Leo, with the result that the two forms are used somewhat interchangeably across European languages. In England during the Middle Ages this was a common name among Jews. A famous bearer was Leon Trotsky (1879-1940), a Russian Communist revolutionary.

LEONIDAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Λεωνιδας (Greek)

Rating: 47% based on 6 votes

From Greek λεων (leon) "lion". Leonidas was a Spartan king of the 5th century BC who sacrificed his life defending the pass of Thermopylae from the Persians. This was also the name of a 3rd-century saint and martyr, the father of Origen, from Alexandria.

LEOPOLD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Dutch, English, Slovene, Polish

Pronounced: LE-o-pawlt (German), LAY-o-pawlt (Dutch), LEE-ə-pold (English), le-AW-pawlt (Polish)

Rating: 68% based on 5 votes

Derived from the Germanic elements leud "people" and bald "bold". The spelling was altered due to association with Latin leo "lion". This name was common among German royalty, first with the Babenbergs and then the Habsburgs. Saint Leopold was a 12th-century Babenberg margrave of Austria, who is now considered the patron of that country. It was also borne by two Habsburg Holy Roman Emperors, as well as three kings of Belgium. Since the 19th century this name has been occasionally used in England, originally in honour of Queen Victoria's uncle, a king of Belgium, after whom she named one of her sons. It was later used by James Joyce for the main character, Leopold Bloom, in his novel 'Ulysses' (1920).

LEWIS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LOO-is

Rating: 58% based on 5 votes

Medieval English form of LOUIS. A famous bearer was Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), the author of 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'. This was also the surname of C. S. Lewis (1898-1963), the author of the 'Chronicles of Narnia'.

LÍADAN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: LEE-din

Rating: 90% based on 1 vote

Means "grey lady" in Irish Gaelic. In Irish legend she was a poetess who became a nun, but then missed her lover Cuirithir so much that she died of grief.

LILAC

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: LIE-lək

Rating: 52% based on 5 votes

From the name of the shrub with purple or white flowers. It is derived via Arabic from Persian.

LORELEI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Germanic Mythology

Pronounced: lawr-e-LIE, LAWR-e-lie

Rating: 73% based on 4 votes

From a Germanic name meaning "luring rock". This is the name of a rock headland on the Rhine River. Legends say that a maiden named the Lorelei lives on the rock and lures fishermen to their death with her song.

LORNE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LAWRN

Rating: 40% based on 4 votes

From the title 'Marquis of Lorne', which was based on the Scottish place name Lorne, of unknown meaning. This was the title of the first Governor General of Canada, where it has since been most frequently used as a given name. A famous bearer was the Canadian actor Lorne Greene (1915-1987).

LOTUS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: LO-təs

Rating: 46% based on 5 votes

From the name of the lotus flower or the fruit which comes from the lotus tree. They are ultimately derived from Greek λωτος (lotos).

LUCASTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Rating: 53% based on 4 votes

This name was first used by the poet Richard Lovelace for a collection of poems called 'Lucasta' (1649). The poems were dedicated to Lucasta, a nickname for the woman he loved Lucy Sacheverel, who he called lux casta "pure light".

LUTHER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LOO-thər

Rating: 56% based on 5 votes

From a German surname, itself from the Germanic given name LEUTHAR. The surname was borne by Martin Luther, a 16th-century monk and theologian, who started the Protestant Reformation by nailing his famous 95 theses to a church door. It has since been used as a given name in his honour, especially among Protestants. A notable bearer from the modern era was the American civil rights leader Martin Luther King (1929-1968).

LUX

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Various

Pronounced: LUKS (English)

Rating: 62% based on 5 votes

Derived from Latin lux meaning "light".

LYDIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Finnish, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Λυδια (Ancient Greek), Лѷдіа (Church Slavic)

Pronounced: LID-ee-ə (English), LUY-dee-ah (German)

Rating: 53% based on 6 votes

Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. In the modern era the name has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

LYLE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LIE-əl, LIEL

Rating: 48% based on 4 votes

From an English surname which was derived from Norman French l'isle "island".

LYSANDER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Λυσανδρος (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 70% based on 6 votes

From the Greek name Λυσανδρος (Lysandros) which meant "a release of a man" from Greek λυσις (lysis) "a release" and ανδρος (andros) "of a man". This was the name of a Spartan general and naval commander.

MADELEINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: ma-də-LEN (French), mad-LEN (French), MAD-ə-lin (English), MAD-ə-lien (English)

Rating: 62% based on 6 votes

French form of MAGDALENE

MADELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: MAD-ə-lin (English), MAD-ə-lien (English), ma-də-LEEN (French), mad-LEEN (French)

Rating: 37% based on 6 votes

English form of MAGDALENE. This is the name of the heroine in a series of children's books by Ludwig Bemelmans, first published 1939.

MADELYN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAD-ə-lin

Rating: 17% based on 7 votes

Variant of MADELINE

MAE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAY

Rating: 72% based on 6 votes

Variant of MAY. A famous bearer was American actress Mae West (1893-1980), whose birth name was Mary.

MAEVE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology

Pronounced: MAYV

Rating: 38% based on 5 votes

Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Medb meaning "intoxicating". In Irish legend this was the name of a warrior queen of Connacht. Her fight against Ulster and the hero Cúchulainn is told in the Irish epic 'The Cattle Raid of Cooley'.

MAGDALENE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Danish, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Μαγδαληνη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: mahk-dah-LE-nə (German), MAG-də-lən (English), MAG-də-leen (English)

Rating: 72% based on 6 votes

From a title which meant "of Magdala". Mary Magdalene, a character in the New Testament, was named thus because she was from Magdala - a village on the Sea of Galilee whose name meant "tower" in Hebrew. She was cleaned of evil spirits by Jesus and then remained with him during his ministry, witnessing the crucifixion and the resurrection. She was a popular saint in the Middle Ages, and the name became common then. In England it is traditionally rendered Madeline, while Magdalene or Magdalen is the learned form.

MAGNUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman

Pronounced: MAG-nəs (English)

Rating: 42% based on 5 votes

Late Latin name meaning "great". It was borne by 7th-century saint who was a missionary in Germany. It became popular in Scandinavia after the time of the 11th-century Norwegian king Magnus I, who was said to have been named after Charlemagne, or Carolus Magnus in Latin. The name was borne by six subsequent kings of Norway as well as three kings of Sweden. It was imported to Scotland and Ireland during the Middle Ages.

MALACHI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: מַלְאָכִי (Hebrew)

Pronounced: MAL-ə-kie (English)

Rating: 68% based on 5 votes

From the Hebrew name מַלְאָכִי (Mal'akhiy) meaning "my messenger" or "my angel". This is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Malachi, which some claim foretells the coming of Christ. In England the name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

MARGARET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAHR-grit, MAHR-gə-rit

Rating: 80% based on 6 votes

Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", probably ultimately a borrowing from Sanskrit मञ्यरी (manyari). Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.

Other saints by this name include a queen of Scotland and a princess of Hungary. It was also borne by Queen Margaret I of Denmark, who united Denmark, Sweden, and Norway in the 14th century. Famous literary bearers include American writer Margaret Mitchell (1900-1949), the author of 'Gone with the Wind', and Canadian writer Margaret Atwood (1939-).

MARTHA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Μαρθα (Greek), Марѳа (Church Slavic)

Pronounced: MAHR-thə (English)

Rating: 44% based on 5 votes

From Aramaic מרתא (marta') meaning "lady, mistress". In the New Testament this is the name of the sister of Lazarus and Mary of Bethany. It was not used in England until after the Protestant Reformation. A notable bearer was Martha Washington (1731-1802), the wife of the first American president George Washington.

MATILDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Swedish, Finnish, Slovak

Pronounced: mə-TIL-də (English)

Rating: 94% based on 7 votes

From the Germanic name Mahthildis meaning "strength in battle", from the elements maht "might, strength" and hild "battle". Saint Matilda was the wife of the 10th-century German king Henry I the Fowler. The name was brought to England by the Normans, being borne by the wife of William the Conqueror himself. It was popular until the 15th century in England, usually in the vernacular form Maud. Both forms were revived by the 19th century. This name appears in the popular Australian folk song 'Waltzing Matilda', written in 1895.

MAUD

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: MAWD (English)

Rating: 45% based on 4 votes

Usual medieval form of MATILDA. Though it became rare after the 14th century, it was revived and once more grew popular in the 19th century, perhaps due to Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem 'Maud' (1855).

MAXINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: mak-SEEN

Rating: 58% based on 5 votes

Feminine form of MAX. It has been commonly used only since the beginning of the 20th century.

MAY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAY

Rating: 78% based on 4 votes

Derived from the name of the month of May, which derives from Maia, the name of a Roman goddess. May is also another name of the hawthorn flower. It is also used as a diminutive of MARY, MARGARET or MABEL.

MERCURY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Roman Mythology (Anglicized)

Pronounced: MURK-yə-ree (English)

Rating: 53% based on 4 votes

From the Latin Mercurius, probably derived from Latin mercari "to trade" or merces "wages". This was the name of the Roman god of trade, merchants, and travellers, later equated with the Greek god Hermes. This is also the name of the first planet in the solar system.

MERCY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MUR-see

Rating: 75% based on 6 votes

From the English word mercy, ultimately from Latin merces "wages, reward", a derivative of merx "goods, wares". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.

MEREDITH

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Welsh, English

Pronounced: MER-ə-dith (English)

Rating: 58% based on 6 votes

From the Welsh name Maredudd or Meredydd, possibly meaning "great lord" or "sea lord". Since the mid-1920s it has been used more often for girls than for boys in English-speaking countries, though it is still a masculine name in Wales. A famous bearer of this name as surname was the English novelist and poet George Meredith (1828-1909).

MERYL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MERL, MER-əl

Rating: 42% based on 5 votes

Variant of MURIEL, perhaps influenced by the spelling of the name CHERYL. A famous bearer is American actress Meryl Streep (1949-), whose real name is Mary Louise Streep.

MIDORI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Japanese

Other Scripts: (Japanese)

Rating: 50% based on 5 votes

Means "green" in Japanese.

MILES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MIELZ, MIE-əlz

Rating: 82% based on 5 votes

From the Germanic name Milo, introduced by the Normans to England in the form Miles. The meaning is not known for certain. It is possibly connected to the Slavic name element mil meaning "gracious". From an early date it was associated with Latin miles "soldier".

MINERVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Roman Mythology, English

Pronounced: mi-NUR-və (English)

Rating: 58% based on 5 votes

Possibly derived from Latin mens meaning "intellect", but more likely of Etruscan origin. Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom and war, approximately equivalent to the Greek goddess Athena. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since after the Renaissance.

MIRANDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: mə-RAN-də

Rating: 68% based on 5 votes

Derived from Latin mirandus meaning "admirable, wonderful". The name was created by Shakespeare for the heroine in his play 'The Tempest' (1611). It did not become a common English given name until the 20th century. This is also the name of one of the moons of Uranus.

MIRIAM

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew, English, German, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: מִרְיָם (Hebrew)

Pronounced: MIR-ee-əm (English)

Rating: 63% based on 4 votes

Original Hebrew form of MARY. It is used in the Old Testament, where it belongs to the elder sister of Moses and Aaron. It has long been popular among Jews, and it has been used as an English Christian name since the Protestant Reformation.

MOHINDER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Punjabi

Rating: 44% based on 5 votes

Punjabi form of MAHENDRA

MONTSERRAT

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Catalan

Pronounced: moon-sə-RAHT

From the name of a mountain near Barcelona, the site of a monastery founded in the 10th century. The mountain gets its name from Latin mons serratus meaning "jagged mountain".

MORDECAI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Hebrew

Other Scripts: מָרְדֳּכַי (Hebrew)

Pronounced: MAWR-də-kie (English)

Rating: 58% based on 5 votes

Means "servant of MARDUK" in Persian. In the Old Testament, Mordecai is the cousin and foster father of Esther.

MORTIMER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAWR-ti-mər

Rating: 40% based on 5 votes

From an English surname which was derived from a place name meaning "still water" in Old French.

MOSES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: מֹשֶׁה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: MOZ-əs (English)

Rating: 62% based on 6 votes

From the Hebrew name מֹשֶׁה (Mosheh) which is most likely derived from Egyptian mes meaning "son", but could also possibly mean "deliver" in Hebrew. The meaning suggested in the Old Testament of "drew out" from Hebrew משה (mashah) is probably an invented etymology. The biblical Moses was drawn out of the Nile by the pharaoh's daughter. He led the Jews out of captivity in Egypt and received the Ten Commandments from God.

In England, this name has been commonly used by Christians since the Protestant Reformation, though it had long been popular among Jews.

NAOMI (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical

Other Scripts: נָעֳמִי (Hebrew)

Pronounced: nay-O-mee (English), nie-O-mee (English)

Rating: 56% based on 5 votes

From the Hebrew name נָעֳמִי (Na'omiy) meaning "pleasantness". In the Old Testament this is the name of the mother-in-law of Ruth. After the death of her husband, Naomi took the name Mara (see Ruth 1:20). Though previously common as a Jewish name, Naomi was not typically used as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation.

NATHAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: נָתָן (Ancient Hebrew), Ναθαν (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: NAY-thən (English), na-TAWN (French)

Rating: 55% based on 6 votes

Means "he gave" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of both a prophet and a son of King David. It has been used as a Christian given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation.

NATHANIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: nə-THAN-ee-əl (English), nə-THAN-yəl (English)

Rating: 54% based on 5 votes

Variant of NATHANAEL. It has been regularly used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. This has been the most popular spelling, even though the spelling Nathanael is found in most versions of the New Testament. The American writer Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864), author of 'The Scarlet Letter', was a famous bearer of this name.

NEIL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, Scottish, English

Pronounced: NEEL (English)

Rating: 58% based on 5 votes

From the Gaelic name Niall, which is of disputed origin, possibly meaning "champion" or "cloud". This was the name of a semi-legendary 4th-century Irish king, Niall of the Nine Hostages.

In the early Middle Ages the name was adopted by Viking raiders and settlers in Ireland in the form Njal. The Vikings transmitted it to England and Scotland, as well as bringing it back to Scandinavia. It was also in use among the Normans, who were of Scandinavian origin. A famous bearer of this name was American astronaut Neil Armstrong (1930-2012), the first person to walk on the moon.

NELL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: NEL

Rating: 33% based on 6 votes

Medieval diminutive of ELEANOR, ELLEN (1) or HELEN. It may have arisen from the medieval affectionate phrase mine El, which was later reinterpreted as my Nel.

NEPTUNE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Roman Mythology (Anglicized)

Pronounced: NEP-toon (English), NEP-tyoon (English), NEP-choon (English)

Rating: 43% based on 4 votes

From the Latin Neptunus, which is of unknown meaning, possibly related to the Indo-European root *nebh "wet, damp, clouds". Neptune was the god of the sea in Roman mythology, approximately equivalent to the Greek god Poseidon. This is also the name of the eighth planet in the solar system.

NIAMH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology

Pronounced: NEEV

Rating: 57% based on 6 votes

Means "bright" in Irish. She was the daughter of the sea god in Irish legends. She fell in love with the poet Oisín, son of Fionn.

NILES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: NIELZ, NIE-əlz

Rating: 53% based on 4 votes

From a surname which was derived from the given name NEIL.

NOA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew, Biblical

Other Scripts: נוֹעָה (Hebrew)

Rating: 75% based on 6 votes

Hebrew form of NOAH (2)

NOBLE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: NO-bəl

Rating: 42% based on 5 votes

From an English surname meaning "noble, notable". The name can also be given in direct reference to the English word noble.

NOEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: NOL, no-EL

Rating: 70% based on 6 votes

English form of NOËL

NOOR (1)

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Arabic, Pakistani, Urdu

Other Scripts: نور (Arabic, Urdu)

Rating: 62% based on 5 votes

Variant transcription of NUR

OCTAVIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: ahk-TAYV-ee-ə (English)

Rating: 62% based on 5 votes

Feminine form of OCTAVIUS. Octavia was the wife of Mark Antony and the sister of Roman emperor Augustus. In 19th-century England it was sometimes given to the eighth-born child.

OLIVE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AHL-iv

Rating: 44% based on 5 votes

From the English word for the type of tree, ultimately derived from Latin oliva.

OLIVER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak

Other Scripts: Оливер (Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: AHL-ə-vər (English), AW-lee-ver (German)

Rating: 72% based on 6 votes

From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.

In England Oliver was a common medieval name, however it became rare after the 17th century because of the military commander Oliver Cromwell, who ruled the country following the civil war. The name was revived in the 19th century, perhaps in part due to the title character in Charles Dickens' novel 'Oliver Twist' (1838), which was about a poor orphan living on the streets of London.

OLIVIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: ə-LIV-ee-ə (English), o-LEE-vee-ah (German)

Rating: 52% based on 5 votes

This name was first used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy 'Twelfth Night' (1602). Shakespeare may have based it on OLIVER or OLIVA, or perhaps directly on the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.

The name has been used in the English-speaking world since the 18th century, though it did not become overly popular until the last half of the 20th century. Its rise in popularity in America was precipitated by a character on the 1970s television series 'The Waltons'.

OLIVIER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, Dutch

Pronounced: o-lee-VYAY (French), O-lee-veer (Dutch)

Rating: 64% based on 5 votes

French and Dutch form of OLIVER

OLYMPIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek, Slovak

Other Scripts: Ολυμπια (Greek)

Rating: 42% based on 5 votes

Feminine form of OLYMPOS

OPAL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: O-pəl

Rating: 46% based on 5 votes

From the English word opal for the iridescent gemstone, the birthstone of October. The word ultimately derives from Sanskrit उपल (upala) meaning "jewel".

OPHELIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Literature

Pronounced: o-FEEL-yə (English)

Rating: 55% based on 6 votes

Derived from Greek οφελος (ophelos) meaning "help". This name was probably created by the 15th-century poet Jacopo Sannazaro for a character in his poem 'Arcadia'. It was borrowed by Shakespeare for his play 'Hamlet' (1600), in which it belongs to Hamlet's lover who eventually goes insane and drowns herself. In spite of this, the name has been used since the 19th century.

ORLANDO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: or-LAHN-do

Rating: 58% based on 5 votes

Italian form of ROLAND. A city in Florida bears this name, as does a character in Shakespeare's play 'As You like It' (1599).

ORNELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

Created by the Italian author Gabriele d'Annunzio for his novel 'La Figlia di Jorio' (1904). It is derived from Tuscan Italian ornello meaning "flowering ash tree".

ORSINO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Rating: 40% based on 2 votes

Italian form of the Roman name Ursinus, itself derived from Ursus (see URS). This is the name of a character in Shakespeare's play 'Twelfth Night' (1602).

PANDORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Πανδωρα (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: pan-DAWR-ə (English)

Rating: 64% based on 5 votes

Means "all gifts", derived from a combination of Greek παν (pan) "all" and δωρον (doron) "gift". In Greek mythology Pandora was the first mortal woman. Zeus gave her a jar containing all of the troubles and ills that mankind now knows, and told her not to open it. Unfortunately her curiosity got the best of her and she opened it, unleashing the evil spirits into the world.

PATRICK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English, French, German

Pronounced: PAT-rik (English), pat-REEK (French), PAHT-rik (German)

Rating: 58% based on 5 votes

From the Latin name Patricius, which meant "nobleman". This name was adopted in the 5th-century by Saint Patrick, whose birth name was Sucat. He was a Romanized Briton who was captured and enslaved in his youth by Irish raiders. After six years of servitude he escaped home, but he eventually became a bishop and went back to Ireland as a missionary. He is traditionally credited with Christianizing the island, and is regarded as Ireland's patron saint.

In England and elsewhere in Europe during the Middle Ages this name was used in honour of the saint. However, it was not generally given in Ireland before the 17th century because it was considered too sacred for everyday use. It has since become very common there.

PAUL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Biblical

Pronounced: PAWL (English), POL (French), POWL (German)

Rating: 65% based on 4 votes

From the Roman family name Paulus, which meant "small" or "humble" in Latin. Saint Paul was an important leader of the early Christian church, his story told in Acts in the New Testament. His original Hebrew name was Saul. Most of the epistles in the New Testament were authored by him.

Due to the renown of Saint Paul the name became common among early Christians. It was borne by a number of other early saints and six popes. In England it was relatively rare during the Middle Ages, but became more frequent beginning in the 17th century. A notable bearer was the American Revolutionary War figure Paul Revere (1735-1818), who warned of the advance of the British army. Famous bearers in the art world include the French impressionists Paul Cezanne (1839-1906) and Paul Gauguin (1848-1903), and the Swiss expressionist Paul Klee (1879-1940). It is borne by British musician Paul McCartney (1942-). This is also the name of the legendary American lumberjack Paul Bunyan.

PAULA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, English, Finnish, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Hungarian, Polish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: POW-lah (German, Spanish, Polish, Croatian), PAWL-ə (English), POW-lə (Portuguese)

Rating: 50% based on 4 votes

Feminine form of Paulus (see PAUL). This was the name of a 4th-century Roman saint who was a companion of Saint Jerome.

PENELOPE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, English

Other Scripts: Πηνελοπη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: pə-NEL-ə-pee (English)

Rating: 84% based on 5 votes

Possibly derived from Greek πηνελοψ (penelops), a type of duck. Alternatively it could be from πηνη (pene) "threads, weft" and ωψ (ops) "face, eye". In Homer's epic the 'Odyssey' this is the name of the wife of Odysseus, forced to fend off suitors while her husband is away fighting at Troy. It has occasionally been used as an English given name since the 16th century.

PERDITA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Rating: 42% based on 5 votes

Derived from Latin perditus meaning "lost". Shakespeare created this name for the daughter of Hermione in his play 'The Winter's Tale' (1610).

PERSEPHONE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Περσεφονη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: pər-SEF-ə-nee (English)

Rating: 48% based on 5 votes

Meaning unknown, perhaps related to Greek περθω (pertho) "to destroy" and φονη (phone) "murder". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus. She was abducted to the underworld by Hades, but was eventually allowed to return to the surface for part of the year. The result of her comings and goings is the changing of the seasons.

PETER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Slovak, Biblical

Pronounced: PEE-tər (English), PE-ter (German, Slovak), PAY-tər (Dutch)

Rating: 55% based on 6 votes

Derived from the Greek Πετρος (Petros) meaning "stone". This is a translation used in most versions of the New Testament of the name Cephas, meaning "stone" in Aramaic, which was given to the apostle Simon by Jesus (compare Matthew 16:18 and John 1:42). Simon Peter was the most prominent of the apostles during Jesus' ministry and is often considered the first pope.

Due to the renown of the apostle, this name became common throughout the Christian world (in various spellings). In England the Normans introduced it in the Old French form Piers, which was gradually replaced by the spelling Peter starting in the 15th century.

Besides the apostle, other saints by this name include the 11th-century reformer Saint Peter Damian and the 13th-century preacher Saint Peter Martyr. It was also borne by rulers of Aragon, Portugal, and Russia, including the Russian tsar Peter the Great (1672-1725), who defeated Sweden in the Great Northern War. Famous fictional bearers include Peter Rabbit from Beatrix Potter's children's books, and Peter Pan, the boy who refused to grow up in J. M. Barrie's 1904 play.

PHILIP

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Biblical

Pronounced: FIL-ip (English), FEE-lip (Dutch)

Rating: 44% based on 5 votes

From the Greek name Φιλιππος (Philippos) which means "friend of horses", composed of the elements φιλος (philos) "friend, lover" and ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse". This was the name of five kings of Macedon, including Philip II the father of Alexander the Great. The name appears in the New Testament belonging to two people who are regarded as saints. First, one of the twelve apostles, and second, an early figure in the Christian church known as Philip the Deacon.

This name was initially more common among Eastern Christians, though it came to the West by the Middle Ages. It was borne by six kings of France and five kings of Spain. It was regularly used in England during the Middle Ages, although the Spanish king Philip II, who attempted an invasion of England, helped make it less common by the 17th-century. It was revived in the English-speaking world in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the Elizabethan courtier and poet Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586).

PHILIPPA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (British), German

Pronounced: FIL-i-pə (English), fi-LIP-ə (English)

Rating: 67% based on 6 votes

Latinate feminine form of PHILIP

PILAR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: pee-LAHR

Rating: 62% based on 5 votes

Means "pillar" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, María del Pilar, meaning "Mary of the Pillar". According to legend, when Saint James the Greater was in Saragossa in Spain, the Virgin Mary appeared on a pillar.

PIPPA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: PIP-ə

Rating: 44% based on 5 votes

Diminutive of PHILIPPA

PLUTO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology

Other Scripts: Πλουτων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: PLOO-to (English)

Rating: 42% based on 5 votes

Latinized form of Greek Πλουτων (Plouton), derived from πλουτος (ploutos) meaning "wealth". This was an alternate name of Hades, the god of the underworld. This is also the name of a dwarf planet (formerly designated the ninth planet) in the solar system.

POMONA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Roman Mythology

Rating: 40% based on 5 votes

From Latin pomus "fruit tree". This was the name of the Roman goddess of fruit trees.

POPPY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (British)

Pronounced: PAH-pee

Rating: 58% based on 4 votes

From the word for the red flower, derived from Old English popæg.

POSIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: PO-zee

Rating: 50% based on 4 votes

Variant of POSY

PRIMROSE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: PRIM-roz

Rating: 58% based on 5 votes

From the English word for the flower, ultimately deriving from Latin prima rosa "first rose".

PROSERPINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Roman Mythology

Rating: 42% based on 5 votes

Means "to emerge" in Latin. She was the Roman equivalent of the Greek goddess Persephone.

PROSPER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: pro-SPER (French), PRAHS-pər (English)

Rating: 46% based on 5 votes

From the Latin name Prosperus, which meant "fortunate, successful". This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a supporter of Saint Augustine. It has never been common as an English name, though the Puritans used it, partly because it is identical to the English word prosper.

RAFA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: RAH-fah

Spanish short form of RAFAEL

RALPH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German

Pronounced: RALF (English), RAYF (English), RAHLF (German)

Rating: 40% based on 4 votes

Contracted form of the Old Norse name RÁÐÚLFR (or its Norman form Radulf). Scandinavian settlers introduced it to England before the Norman conquest, though afterwards it was bolstered by Norman influence. In the Middle Ages it was usually spelled Ralf, but by the 17th century it was most commonly Rafe, reflecting the normal pronunciation. The Ralph spelling appeared in the 18th century. A famous bearer of the name was Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American poet and author who wrote on transcendentalism.

RAMONA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Romanian, English

Pronounced: rah-MO-nah (Spanish), rə-MON-ə (English)

Rating: 68% based on 5 votes

Feminine form of RAMÓN. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Helen Hunt Jackson's novel 'Ramona' (1884), as well as several subsequent movies based on the book.

RAPHAEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, French, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: רָפָאֵל, רְפָאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Ραφαηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ra-fa-EL (French), RAF-ee-el (English), RAY-fee-əl (English)

Rating: 80% based on 6 votes

From the Hebrew name רָפָאֵל (Rafa'el) which meant "God has healed". In Hebrew tradition Raphael was the name of one of the seven archangels. He appears in the Old Testament in the Book of Tobit, where it is told how he aided Tobias. This name has never been common in the English-speaking world, though it has been well-used elsewhere in Europe. A famous bearer was the 16th-century Renaissance master Raphael Sanzio (usually known simply as Raphael).

RHYS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Pronounced: HREES (Welsh), REES (English)

Rating: 77% based on 6 votes

Means "enthusiasm" in Welsh. Several Welsh rulers have borne this name.

ROHESIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Medieval English (Latinized)

Rating: 44% based on 5 votes

Latinized form of the medieval name Rohese (see ROSE).

ROLLO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: RAHL-o

Rating: 34% based on 5 votes

Latinized form of Roul, the Old French form of ROLF. Rollo (or Rolf) the Ganger was an exiled Viking who, in the 10th century, became the first Duke of Normandy. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century.

ROMAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German

Other Scripts: Роман (Russian, Ukrainian)

Pronounced: rah-MAHN (Russian), RAW-mahn (Polish)

Rating: 75% based on 6 votes

From the Late Latin name Romanus which meant "Roman".

RÓNÁN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: RON-awn

Rating: 80% based on 7 votes

Means "little seal", derived from Irish rón "seal" combined with a diminutive suffix.

ROSA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English

Pronounced: RO-sah (Spanish, Dutch), RAW-zah (Italian), RO-zə (English)

Rating: 33% based on 6 votes

Generally this can be considered a Latin form of ROSE, though originally it may have come from the Germanic name ROZA (2). This was the name of a 13th-century saint from Viterbo in Italy. In the English-speaking world it was first used in the 19th century. A famous bearer was civil rights activist Rosa Parks (1913-2005).

ROSALIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, German, English

Pronounced: ro-za-LEE (French), RO-zə-lee (English)

Rating: 63% based on 6 votes

French and German form of ROSALIA. In the English-speaking this name received a boost after the release of the movie 'Rosalie' (1938), which was based on an earlier musical.

ROSAMUND

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: ROZ-ə-mund

Rating: 68% based on 6 votes

Derived from the Germanic elements hros "horse" and mund "protection". The Normans introduced this name to England. It was subsequently influenced by the Latin phrase rosa munda "pure rose". This was the name of the mistress of Henry II, the king of England in the 12th century. She was possibly murdered by his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine.

ROSARIO

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Italian

Pronounced: ro-SAH-ryo (Spanish), ro-ZAH-ryo (Italian)

Rating: 42% based on 5 votes

Means "rosary", and is taken from the Spanish title of the Virgin Mary Nuestra Señora del Rosario meaning "Our Lady of the Rosary". This name is feminine in Spanish and masculine in Italian.

ROSE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: ROZ

Rating: 77% based on 6 votes

Originally a Norman form of a Germanic name, which was composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.

ROSEMARY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ROZ-mə-ree

Rating: 62% based on 5 votes

Combination of ROSE and MARY. This name can also be given in reference to the herb, which gets its name from Latin ros marinus meaning "dew of the sea". It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.

ROSWITHA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Rating: 43% based on 3 votes

Means "famous strength" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and swinþ "strength". This was the name of a 10th-century nun from Saxony who wrote several notable poems.

ROWENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ro-EE-nə

Rating: 55% based on 4 votes

Meaning uncertain, possibly a Latinized form of a Germanic name derived from the elements hrod "fame" and wynn "joy". According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, this was the name of a daughter of the Saxon chief Hengist. It was popularized by Sir Walter Scott, who used it for a character in his novel 'Ivanhoe' (1819).

RUBY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ROO-bee

Rating: 43% based on 3 votes

Simply means "ruby" from the name of the precious stone (which ultimately derives from Latin ruber "red"), which is the birthstone of July. It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.

RUE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ROO

Rating: 70% based on 1 vote

From the name of the bitter medicinal herb, ultimately deriving from Greek ‘ρυτη (rhyte). This is also sometimes used as a short form of RUTH (1).

RUFUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman, English, Biblical

Pronounced: ROO-fəs (English)

Rating: 72% based on 5 votes

Roman cognomen which meant "red-haired" in Latin. Several early saints had this name, including one mentioned in one of Paul's epistles in the New Testament. As a nickname it was used by William II Rufus, a king of England, because of his red hair. It came into general use in the English-speaking world after the Protestant Reformation.

RUPERT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Low German, Dutch, English, Polish

Pronounced: RUY-pərt (Dutch), ROO-pərt (English), RUW-pert (Polish)

Rating: 83% based on 4 votes

Low German form of ROBERT. The military commander Prince Rupert of the Rhine, a nephew of Charles I, introduced this name to England in the 17th century.

RUPINDER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Punjabi

Rating: 43% based on 4 votes

Means "greatest beauty" from Sanskrit रूप (rupa) "beauty" combined with the name of the Hindu god INDRA, used here to mean "greatest".

RUTH (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: רוּת (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: ROOTH (English), ROOT (German)

Rating: 60% based on 5 votes

From a Hebrew name which was derived from the Hebrew word רְעוּת (re'ut) meaning "friend". This is the name of the central character in the Book of Ruth in the Old Testament, a Moabite woman who was the ancestor of King David. As a Christian name, Ruth has been in use since the Protestant Reformation. It became very popular in America following the birth of "Baby" Ruth Cleveland (1891-1904), the daughter of President Grover Cleveland.

SANTIAGO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese

Pronounced: sahn-TYAH-go (Spanish)

Rating: 68% based on 4 votes

Means "Saint James", derived from Spanish santo "saint" combined with Yago, an old Spanish form of JAMES, the patron saint of Spain. Cities in Chile and Spain bear this name.

SARAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, German, Hebrew, Arabic, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: שָׂרָה (Hebrew), سارة (Arabic)

Pronounced: SER-ə (English), SAR-ə (English), ZAH-rah (German)

Rating: 76% based on 5 votes

Means "lady" or "princess" in Hebrew. This is the name of the wife of Abraham in the Old Testament. She became the mother of Isaac at the age of 90. Her name was originally Sarai, but God changed it (see Genesis 17:15). In England, Sarah came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

SATURN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Roman Mythology (Anglicized)

Pronounced: SA-tərn (English)

Rating: 43% based on 3 votes

From the Latin Saturnus, which is of unknown meaning. In Roman mythology he was the father of Jupiter, Juno and others, and was also the god of agriculture. This is also the name of the ringed sixth planet in the solar system.

SCHEHERAZADE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Rating: 64% based on 5 votes

Anglicized form of SHAHRAZAD

SERENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Late Roman

Pronounced: sə-REEN-ə (English), se-RE-nah (Italian)

Rating: 47% based on 3 votes

From a Late Latin name which was derived from Latin serenus meaning "clear, tranquil, serene". This name was borne by an obscure early saint. Edmund Spenser also used it in his poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590).

SETH (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: שֵׁת (Ancient Hebrew), Σηθ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: SETH (English)

Rating: 75% based on 4 votes

Means "placed" or "appointed" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the third named son of Adam and Eve. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

SEYMOUR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SEE-mawr

Rating: 50% based on 3 votes

From a Norman surname which originally belonged to a person coming from the French town of Saint Maur (which means "Saint MAURUS").

SHEBA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: שְׁבָא (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: SHEE-bə (English)

Rating: 35% based on 4 votes

Means "oath" in Hebrew. This is the name of several characters in the Old Testament. Also in the Bible, this is a place name, referring to a region in Ethiopia. The queen of Sheba visited Solomon after hearing of his wisdom.

SHEM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: שֵׁם (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: SHEM (English)

Rating: 38% based on 4 votes

Means "name" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, Shem is one of Noah's three sons (along with Japheth and Ham) and the ancestor of the Semitic peoples.

SIGRID

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish

Rating: 63% based on 4 votes

From the Old Norse name Sigríðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and fríðr "beautiful, fair".

SILVESTER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, English, Slovene, Slovak, Late Roman

Pronounced: sil-VES-tər (English)

Rating: 57% based on 3 votes

From a Roman name meaning "of the forest" from Latin silva "wood, forest". This was the name of three popes, including Saint Silvester I who supposedly baptized the first Christian Roman emperor, Constantine the Great. As an English name, Silvester (or Sylvester) has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it became less common after the Protestant Reformation.

SILVIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, English, German, Late Roman, Roman Mythology

Pronounced: SEEL-vyah (Italian), SEEL-byah (Spanish)

Rating: 43% based on 3 votes

Feminine form of SILVIUS. Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome. This was also the name of a 6th-century saint, the mother of the pope Gregory the Great. It has been a common name in Italy since the Middle Ages. It was introduced to England by Shakespeare, who used it for a character in his play 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594).

SINJIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Rating: 47% based on 3 votes

Variant of the name St. John (see JOHN).

SOLEDAD

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: so-le-DHAHD

Rating: 50% based on 3 votes

Means "solitude" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, María de Soledad, meaning "Mary of Solitude".

SOLOMON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English, Jewish

Other Scripts: שְׁלֹמֹה (Hebrew)

Pronounced: SAHL-ə-mən (English)

Rating: 48% based on 4 votes

From the Hebrew name שְׁלֹמֹה (Shelomoh) which was derived from Hebrew שָׁלוֹם (shalom) "peace". Solomon was a king of Israel, the son of David, renowned for his wisdom. Supposedly, he wrote the Book of Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and the Song of Solomon in the Old Testament. This name has never been overly common in the Christian world, and it is considered typically Jewish.

SONJA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Соња (Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: ZAWN-yah (German)

Rating: 40% based on 3 votes

Form of SONYA

STEPHEN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: STEEV-ən (English), STEF-ən (English)

Rating: 50% based on 3 votes

From the Greek name Στεφανος (Stephanos) meaning "crown". Saint Stephen was a deacon who was stoned to death, as told in Acts in the New Testament, and he is regarded as the first Christian martyr. Due to him, the name became common in the Christian world. It was popularized in England by the Normans.

This was the name of kings of England, Serbia, and Poland, as well as ten popes. It was also borne by the first Christian king of Hungary (10th century), who is regarded as the patron saint of that country. More recent bearers include British physicist Stephen Hawking (1942-) and the American author Stephen King (1947-).

SUMMER

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SUM-ər

Rating: 70% based on 4 votes

From the name of the season, ultimately from Old English sumor. It has been in use as a given name since the 1970s.

SUSANNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Swedish, Finnish, Russian, Dutch, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic

Other Scripts: Сусанна (Russian), שׁוֹשַׁנָּה (Ancient Hebrew), Сѹсанна (Church Slavic)

Pronounced: soo-ZAHN-nah (Italian), soo-ZAN-ə (English)

Rating: 73% based on 3 votes

From Σουσαννα (Sousanna), the Greek form of the Hebrew name שׁוֹשַׁנָּה (Shoshannah). This was derived from the Hebrew word שׁוֹשָׁן (shoshan) meaning "lily" (in modern Hebrew this also means "rose"), perhaps ultimately from Egyptian sšn "lotus". In the Old Testament Apocrypha this is the name of a woman falsely accused of adultery. The prophet Daniel clears her name by tricking her accusers, who end up being condemned themselves. It also occurs in the New Testament belonging to a woman who ministered to Christ.

As an English name, it was occasionally used during the Middle Ages in honour of the Old Testament heroine. It did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation, at which time it was often spelled Susan.

SYLVIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German

Pronounced: SIL-vee-ə (English)

Rating: 47% based on 3 votes

Variant of SILVIA. This has been the most common English spelling since the 19th century.

TADHG

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, Scottish

Pronounced: TIEG

Rating: 48% based on 4 votes

Means "poet" in Irish. This was the name of an 11th-century king of Connacht.

TAMSIN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (British)

Pronounced: TAM-sin

Rating: 60% based on 5 votes

Contracted form of THOMASINA. It was traditionally used in Cornwall.

TATIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian, Slovak, Bulgarian, Romanian, Polish, Greek, Georgian, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman

Other Scripts: Татьяна (Russian), Татяна (Bulgarian), Τατιανα (Greek), ტატიანა (Georgian)

Pronounced: tah-TYAH-nah (Russian, Polish, Spanish, Italian), ta-tee-AN-ə (English), ta-TYAN-ə (English)

Rating: 58% based on 4 votes

Feminine form of the Roman name Tatianus, a derivative of the Roman name TATIUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint who was martyred in Rome under the emperor Alexander Severus. She was especially venerated in Orthodox Christianity, and the name has been common in Russia and Eastern Europe. It was not regularly used in the English-speaking world until the 1980s.

TAVISH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish

Rating: 58% based on 4 votes

Anglicized form of Thàmhais, vocative case of TÀMHAS. Alternatively it could be taken from the Scottish surname MacTavish, Anglicized form of Mac Tàmhais, meaning "son of Thomas".

TEMPERANCE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Pronounced: TEM-prənts, TEM-pər-ənts

Rating: 56% based on 5 votes

From the English word meaning "moderation" or "restraint". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.

TERESA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Finnish, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English

Pronounced: te-RE-sah (Spanish, Polish), te-RE-zah (Italian, German), tə-REE-sə (English), tə-REE-zə (English)

Rating: 63% based on 3 votes

Cognate of THERESA. Saint Teresa of Ávila was a 16th-century Spanish nun who reformed the Carmelite monasteries and wrote several spiritual books. It was also borne by the beatified Albanian missionary Mother Teresa (1910-1997), who worked with the poor in Calcutta. She adopted the name in honour of the French saint Thérèse de Lisieux, who is the patron of missionaries.

THEKLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Greek, Late Greek

Other Scripts: Θεκλα (Greek)

Rating: 72% based on 5 votes

From the ancient Greek name Θεοκλεια (Theokleia), which meant "glory of God" from the Greek elements θεος (theos) meaning "god" and κλεος (kleos) meaning "glory". The 1st-century Saint Thekla was supposedly the first female martyr. She appears (as Θεκλα) in the apocryphal 'Acts of Paul and Thecla' from the 2nd century.

THEODORE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: THEE-ə-dawr

Rating: 74% based on 5 votes

From the Greek name Θεοδωρος (Theodoros), which meant "gift of god" from Greek θεος (theos) "god" and δωρον (doron) "gift". This was the name of several saints, including Theodore of Amasea, a 4th-century Greek soldier; Theodore of Tarsus, a 7th-century archbishop of Canterbury; and Theodore the Studite, a 9th-century Byzantine monk. It was also borne by two popes.

This was a common name in classical Greece, and, due to both the saints who carried it and the favourable meaning, it came into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was however rare in Britain before the 19th century. Famous bearers include three tsars of Russia (in the Russian form Fyodor) and American president Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919).

THERESA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: tə-REE-sə (English), tə-RAY-zə (English), te-RE-zah (German)

Rating: 75% based on 4 votes

From the Spanish and Portuguese name Teresa. It was first recorded as Therasia, being borne by the Spanish wife of Saint Paulinus of Nola in the 4th century. The meaning is uncertain, but it could be derived from Greek θερος (theros) "summer", from Greek θεριζω (therizo) "to harvest", or from the name of the Greek island of Therasia (the western island of Santorini).

The name was mainly confined to Spain and Portugal during the Middle Ages. After the 16th century it was spread to other parts of the Christian world, due to the fame of the Spanish nun and reformer Saint Teresa of Ávila. Another famous bearer was the Austrian Habsburg queen Maria Theresa (1717-1780), who inherited the domains of her father, the Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI, beginning the War of the Austrian Succession.

THOMAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Θωμας (Greek)

Pronounced: TAHM-əs (English), TOM-əs (English), to-MAH (French), TO-mahs (German, Dutch), tho-MAHS (Greek)

Rating: 87% based on 3 votes

Greek form of the Aramaic name תָּאוֹמָא (Ta'oma') which meant "twin". In the New Testament this is the name of the apostle who initially doubts the resurrected Jesus. According to tradition he was martyred in India. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world.

In England the name was introduced by the Normans and became very popular due to Saint Thomas Becket, a 12th-century archbishop of Canterbury and martyr. Another notable saint by this name was the 13th-century Italian philosopher and theologian Thomas Aquinas, who is regarded as a Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include philosopher Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), American president Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), novelist Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), and inventor Thomas Edison (1847-1931).

TIAGO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Portuguese

Rating: 58% based on 4 votes

Portuguese form of JAMES, derived from SANTIAGO.

TOMER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: תּוֹמֶר (Hebrew)

Rating: 47% based on 3 votes

Means "palm tree" in Hebrew.

TYBALT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Literature

Rating: 43% based on 3 votes

Medieval form of THEOBALD. This is the name of a cousin of Juliet killed by Romeo in Shakespeare's drama 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596).

TYCHO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Τυχων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: TIE-ko (English)

Rating: 45% based on 4 votes

From the Greek name Τυχων (Tychon) meaning "hitting the mark". This was the name of a Greek saint. It was also borne by the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe (1546-1601).

TYRONE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: tie-RON

Rating: 23% based on 4 votes

From the name of a county in Northern Ireland which is derived from Irish Gaelic Tir Eoghain meaning "land of EOGHAN". This name was popularized by American actor Tyrone Power (1914-1958), who was named after his great-grandfather, an Irish actor.

TZIPORAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: צִפּוֹרָה (Hebrew)

Rating: 37% based on 3 votes

Hebrew form of ZIPPORAH

ULYSSES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Roman Mythology, English

Pronounced: yoo-LIS-eez (English)

Rating: 43% based on 3 votes

Latin form of ODYSSEUS. It was borne by Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), the commander of the Union forces during the American Civil War, who went on to become an American president. Irish author James Joyce used it as the title of his book 'Ulysses' (1920), which loosely parallels Homer's epic the 'Odyssey'.

URSULA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, Late Roman

Pronounced: UR-sə-lə (English), UR-syə-lə (English)

Rating: 45% based on 4 votes

Means "little bear", derived from a diminutive form of the Latin word ursa "she-bear". Saint Ursula was a legendary virgin princess of the 4th century who was martyred by the Huns while returning from a pilgrimage. In England the saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and the name came into general use at that time.

VALENTINE (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: VAL-ən-tien

Rating: 58% based on 5 votes

From the Roman cognomen Valentinus which was itself from the name Valens meaning "strong, vigourous, healthy" in Latin. Saint Valentine was a 3rd-century martyr. His feast day was the same as the Roman fertility festival of Lupercalia, which resulted in the association between Valentine's day and love. As an English name, it has been used occasionally since the 12th century.

VANESSA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese, German, Dutch

Pronounced: və-NES-ə (English)

Rating: 63% based on 4 votes

Invented by author Jonathan Swift for his poem 'Cadenus and Vanessa' (1726). He arrived at it by rearranging the initial syllables of the first name and surname of Esther Vanhomrigh, his close friend. Vanessa was later used as the name of a genus of butterfly. It was a rare given name until the mid-20th century, at which point it became fairly popular.

VERONICA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Romanian, Late Roman

Pronounced: və-RAHN-i-kə (English)

Rating: 50% based on 4 votes

Latin alteration of BERENICE, the spelling influenced by the ecclesiastical Latin phrase vera icon meaning "true image". This was the name of a legendary saint who wiped Jesus' face with a towel and then found his image imprinted upon it. Due to popular stories about her, the name was occasionally used in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. It was borne by the 17th-century Italian saint and mystic Veronica Giuliani. As an English name, it was not common until the 19th century, when it was imported from France and Scotland.

VESPERA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Esperanto

Pronounced: ve-SPE-rah

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

Means "of the evening" in Esperanto.

VICTOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Romanian, Late Roman

Pronounced: VIK-tər (English), veek-TOR (French)

Rating: 53% based on 3 votes

Roman name meaning "victor" in Latin. It was common among early Christians, and was borne by several early saints and three popes. It was rare as an English name during the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the French writer Victor Hugo (1802-1885), who wrote 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.

VINCENT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak

Pronounced: VIN-sənt (English), ven-SAWN (French)

Rating: 70% based on 4 votes

From the Roman name Vincentius, which was from Latin vincere "to conquer". This name was popular among early Christians, and it was borne by many saints. As an English name, Vincent has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 19th century. Famous bearers include the French priest Saint Vincent de Paul (1581-1660) and the post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890).

VIOLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: vie-O-lə (English), vee-O-lə (English), VIE-ə-lə (English), VYO-lah (Italian)

Rating: 54% based on 5 votes

Means "violet" in Latin. This was the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's play 'Twelfth Night' (1602).

VIRGINIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Romanian, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: vər-JIN-yə (English), veer-JEE-nyah (Italian), beer-KHEE-nyah (Spanish)

Rating: 43% based on 4 votes

Feminine form of the Roman family name Verginius or Virginius which is of unknown meaning, but long associated with Latin virgo "maid, virgin". According to a legend, it was the name of a Roman woman killed by her father so as to save her from the clutches of a crooked official.

This was the name of the first English baby born in the New World: Virginia Dare in 1587 on Roanoke Island. Perhaps because of this, the name has generally been more popular in America than elsewhere in the English-speaking world, though in both Britain and America it was not often used until the 19th century. The baby was named after the Colony of Virginia, which was itself named for Elizabeth I, the Virgin Queen. A more recent bearer was the English novelist Virginia Woolf (1882-1941).

VIVIEN (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Rating: 38% based on 4 votes

Used by Alfred Lord Tennyson as the name of the Lady of the Lake in his Arthurian epic 'Idylls of the King' (1859). Tennyson may have based it on VIVIENNE, but it possibly arose as a misreading of NINIAN. A famous bearer was British actress Vivien Leigh (1913-1967), who played Scarlett O'Hara in 'Gone with the Wind'.

WENCESLAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: History

Pronounced: WEN-səs-laws (English)

Rating: 28% based on 5 votes

Latinized form of Veceslav (see VÁCLAV).

WICKANINNISH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Native American, Nuu-chah-nulth

Pronounced: wik-ə-NIN-ish (English)

Rating: 13% based on 3 votes

Possibly means "having no one in front of him in the canoe" in the Nuu-chah-nulth (or Nootka) language. This was the name of a chief of the Clayoquot in the late 18th century, at the time of European contact.

WILHELMINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch, German, Polish, English

Pronounced: vil-hel-MEE-nah (Dutch)

Rating: 64% based on 5 votes

Dutch, German and Polish feminine form of WILHELM

WILLOW

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: WIL-o

Rating: 38% based on 6 votes

From the name of the tree, which is ultimately derived from Old English welig.

WOLFGANG

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Ancient Germanic, History

Pronounced: VAWLF-gahng (German), WUWLF-gang (English)

Rating: 80% based on 1 vote

Derived from the Germanic elements wulf meaning "wolf" and gang "path". Two famous bearers of this name were Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) and German novelist and poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832).

XANTHE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Ξανθη (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 40% based on 5 votes

Derived from Greek ξανθος (xanthos) meaning "yellow" or "fair hair". This was the name of a few minor figures in Greek mythology.

XAVIER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Catalan, Spanish (Archaic)

Pronounced: ZAY-vee-ər (English), ZAY-vyər (English), ig-ZAY-vee-ər (English), za-VYAY (French), sha-VYER (Portuguese)

Rating: 33% based on 4 votes

Derived from the Basque place name Etxaberri meaning "the new house". This was the surname of the Jesuit priest Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552). He was a missionary to India, Japan, China, and other areas in East Asia, and he is the patron saint of the Orient and missionaries. His surname has since been adopted as a given name in his honour, chiefly among Catholics.

XOCHIPILLI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Aztec and Toltec Mythology

Rating: 22% based on 5 votes

Means "flower prince" in Nahuatl. He was the Aztec god of love, flowers, song and games, the twin brother of Xochiquetzal.

XOCHIQUETZAL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Aztec and Toltec Mythology

Rating: 26% based on 5 votes

Means "flower feather" in Nahuatl. This was the name of the Aztec goddess of love, flowers and the earth, the twin sister of Xochipilli.

YVES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

Pronounced: EEV

Rating: 48% based on 4 votes

Medieval French form of IVO (1). This was the name of two French saints: an 11th-century bishop of Chartres and a 13th-century parish priest and lawyer, also known as Ivo of Kermartin, the patron saint of Brittany.

ZACCHAEUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Pronounced: za-KEE-əs (English)

Rating: 53% based on 6 votes

From the Greek form of the Hebrew name זַכָּי (Zakkay) which meant "pure". In the New Testament he is a tax collector of Jericho who gives half of his possessions to charity.

ZELDA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Yiddish

Other Scripts: זֶעלְדָא (Yiddish)

Rating: 70% based on 3 votes

Feminine form of SELIG

ZELDA (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ZEL-də

Rating: 70% based on 6 votes

Short form of GRISELDA

ZENOBIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Ζηνοβια (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: zə-NO-bee-ə (English)

Rating: 0% based on 1 vote

Means "life of Zeus", derived from Greek Ζηνο (Zeno), a prefix form of the name of ZEUS, combined with βιος (bios) "life". This was the name of a 3rd-century queen of Palmyra. After claiming the title 'Queen of the East' and expanding her realm into Roman territory she was defeated by emperor Aurelian.

ZORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Зора (Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)

Rating: 45% based on 4 votes

From a South and West Slavic word meaning "dawn, aurora".
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2014.