Kris-tine's Personal Name List

ADELAIDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese
Pronounced: A-də-layd (English), a-de-LIE-de (Italian), ə-də-LIED (Portuguese)
Rating: 60% based on 5 votes
From the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman Emperor Otto the Great. The name became common in Britain in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.

ANAÏS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Occitan, Catalan, French
Pronounced: A-NA-EES (French)
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Occitan and Catalan form of ANNA.

ANEMONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-NEM-ə-nee
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
From the name of the anemone flower, which derives from Greek ανεμος (anemos) "wind".

ANNE (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Basque
Pronounced: AN (French, English), AN-ne (Danish), AHN-ne (Finnish), A-nə (German), AHN-nə (Dutch)
Rating: 88% based on 5 votes
French form of ANNA. In the 13th-century it was imported to England, where it was also commonly spelled Ann. The name was borne by a 17th-century English queen and also by the second wife of Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn (the mother of Queen Elizabeth I), who was eventually beheaded in the Tower of London. This is also the name of the heroine in 'Anne of Green Gables' (1908) by Canadian author L. M. Montgomery.

ANOUK
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, French
Rating: 64% based on 5 votes
Dutch and French diminutive of ANNA.

ASHER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: אָשֵׁר (Hebrew)
Pronounced: A-shər (English)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Means "happy, blessed" in Hebrew. Asher in the Old Testament is a son of Jacob by Leah's handmaid Zilpah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. The meaning of his name is explained in Genesis 30:13.

AVERY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-və-ree, AYV-ree
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
From a surname which was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.

BLYTHE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BLIEDH
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
From a surname which meant "cheerful" in Old English.

BOOKER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BUWK-ər
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From an English occupational surname meaning "maker of books". A famous bearer was Booker T. Washington (1856-1915), an African-American leader.

CALLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL-ee
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of CAROLINE, or sometimes of names beginning with Cal.

CALLIOPE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Καλλιοπη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kə-LIE-ə-pee (English)
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
Latinized form of KALLIOPE.

DAGMAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic, German, Czech, Slovak
Pronounced: DAK-mar (German)
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
From the Old Norse name Dagmær, derived from the elements dagr "day" and mær "maid". This was the name adopted by the popular Bohemian wife of the Danish king Valdemar II when they married in 1205. Her birth name was Markéta.

DANIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Armenian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: דָּנִיֵּאל (Hebrew), Даниел (Bulgarian, Macedonian), Դանիէլ (Armenian), დანიელ (Georgian), Δανιηλ (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DAN-yəl (English, Danish), dah-nee-EL (Hebrew), DA-NYEL (French), DA-nee-el (German), DA-nyel (Polish), da-NYEL (Spanish)
Rating: 90% based on 4 votes
From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.

Due to the popularity of the biblical character, the name came into use in England during the Middle Ages. Though it became rare by the 15th century, it was revived after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers of this name include English author Daniel Defoe (1660-1731), Swiss mathematician Daniel Bernoulli (1700-1782), and American frontiersman Daniel Boone (1734-1820).

DIDIER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: DEE-DYE
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
French form of DESIDERIO.

EDDIE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ED-ee
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.

EIRA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian
Pronounced: AY-rah (Swedish)
Rating: 64% based on 5 votes
Modern form of EIR.

FAYE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAY
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Variant of FAY.

GRETCHEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, English
Pronounced: GRET-khən (German), GRECH-ən (English)
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
German diminutive of MARGARETA.

HAMPUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: HAHM-pus
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Swedish diminutive of HANS.

HARLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHR-lən
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From a surname which was from a place name meaning "hare land" in Old English. In America it has sometimes been given in honour of Supreme Court justice John Marshall Harlan (1833-1911).

HAYWOOD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAY-wuwd
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "fenced wood" in Old English.

HOLLIS
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHL-is
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From an English surname which was derived from Middle English holis "holly trees". It was originally given to a person who lived near a group of those trees.

IMOGEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: IM-ə-jən
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
The name of a princess in the play 'Cymbeline' (1609) by Shakespeare. He based her on a legendary character named Innogen, but the name was printed incorrectly and never corrected. The name Innogen is probably derived from Gaelic inghean meaning "maiden".

INANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Near Eastern Mythology
Pronounced: i-NAH-nə (English)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Possibly derived from Sumerian (n)in-an-na "lady of the heavens". Inanna was the Sumerian goddess of the earth, love, fertility and war. She descended into the underworld where the ruler of that place, her sister Ereshkigal, had her killed. The god Enki interceded, and Inanna was allowed to leave the underworld as long as her husband Dumuzi took her place.

ISABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, French, German
Pronounced: ee-sa-BEL (Spanish), IZ-ə-bel (English), EE-ZA-BEL (French), ee-za-BEL (German)
Rating: 80% based on 3 votes
Medieval Occitan form of ELIZABETH. It spread throughout Spain, Portugal and France, becoming common among the royalty by the 12th century. It grew popular in England in the 13th century after Isabella of Angoulême married the English king John, and it was subsequently bolstered when Isabella of France married Edward II the following century.

This is the usual form of the name Elizabeth in Spain and Portugal, though elsewhere it is considered a parallel name, such as in France where it is used alongside Élisabeth. The name was borne by two Spanish ruling queens, including Isabel of Castile, who sponsored the explorations of Christopher Columbus.

ISADORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
Variant of ISIDORA. A famous bearer was the American dancer Isadora Duncan (1877-1927).

ISOLDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-ZOL-də (English), i-SOL-də (English), ee-ZAWL-də (German)
Rating: 80% based on 3 votes
The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, perhaps from a hypothetic name like Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice, iron" and hild "battle".

In medieval Arthurian legend Isolde was an Irish princess betrothed to King Mark of Cornwall. After accidentally drinking a love potion, she became the lover of his knight Tristan, which led to their tragic deaths. The story was popular during the Middle Ages and the name became relatively common in England at that time. It was rare by the 19th century, though some interest was generated by Richard Wagner's opera 'Tristan und Isolde' (1865).

KATHERINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KATH-ə-rin, KATH-rin
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
From the Greek name Αικατερινη (Aikaterine). The etymology is debated: it could derive from the earlier Greek name ‘Εκατερινη (Hekaterine), which came from ‘εκατερος (hekateros) "each of the two"; it could derive from the name of the goddess HECATE; it could be related to Greek αικια (aikia) "torture"; or it could be from a Coptic name meaning "my consecration of your name". In the early Christian era it became associated with Greek καθαρος (katharos) "pure", and the Latin spelling was changed from Katerina to Katharina to reflect this.

The name was borne by a semi-legendary 4th-century saint and martyr from Alexandria who was tortured on a spiked wheel. The saint was initially venerated in Syria, and returning crusaders introduced the name to Western Europe. It has been common in England since the 12th century in many different spellings, with Katherine and Catherine becoming standard in the later Middle Ages.

Famous bearers of the name include Catherine of Siena, a 14th-century mystic, and Catherine de' Medici, a 16th-century French queen. It was also borne by three of Henry VIII's wives, including Katherine of Aragon, and by two empresses of Russia, including Catherine the Great.

KATHLEEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: kath-LEEN
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Anglicized form of CAITLÍN.

KAYLEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-lee
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Combination of KAY (1) and the popular name suffix lee.

KEITH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: KEETH (English)
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
From a Scottish surname which was originally derived from a place name, itself probably derived from the Brythonic element cet meaning "wood". This was the surname of a long line of Scottish nobles. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.

KEITHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of KEITH.

KELLY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KEL-ee (English)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of the Irish given name CEALLACH or the surname derived from it Ó Ceallaigh. As a surname, it has been borne by actor and dancer Gene Kelly (1912-1996) and actress and princess Grace Kelly (1929-1982).

LACHLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Australian)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Originally a Scottish nickname for a person who was from Norway. In Scotland, Norway was known as the "land of the lochs", or Lochlann.

LIVIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: LEE-vya (Italian)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of LIVIUS. This was the name of the wife of the Roman emperor Augustus.

LOÏC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Breton
Pronounced: LAW-EEK (French)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Breton form of LOUIS.

LUCAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: LOO-kəs (English), LUY-kahs (Dutch), LUY-KA (French), LOO-kəsh (Portuguese), LOO-kas (Spanish, Classical Latin)
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
Latin form of Loukas (see LUKE).

LUCIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: loo-CHEE-a (Italian), loo-TSEE-a (German), LOO-tsya (German), LOO-shə (English), loo-SEE-ə (English), LOO-chya (Romanian), LOO-kee-a (Classical Latin)
Rating: 88% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus she is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.

MABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY-bəl
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Medieval feminine form of AMABILIS. This spelling and Amabel were common during the Middle Ages, though they became rare after the 15th century. It was revived in the 19th century after the publication of C. M. Yonge's novel 'The Heir of Redclyffe' (1854), which featured a character named Mabel (as well as one named Amabel).

MAËLYS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MA-E-LEES
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of MAËL, possibly influenced by the spelling of MAILYS.

MAGGIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAG-ee
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of MARGARET.

MATHIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, French
Pronounced: MA-tis (German), MA-TEES (French)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
German and French form of MATTHIAS.

MATS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Swedish and Norwegian short form of MATTHIAS.

MAYNARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY-nərd
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From an English surname which was derived from the Germanic given name MEGINHARD.

NATHANIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: נְתַנְאֵל (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: nə-THAN-yəl (English)
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
Variant of NATHANAEL. It has been regularly used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. This has been the most popular spelling, even though the spelling Nathanael is found in most versions of the New Testament. The American writer Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864), author of 'The Scarlet Letter', was a famous bearer of this name.

NED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NED
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of EDWARD or EDMUND. It has been used since the 14th century, and may have had root in the medieval affectionate phrase mine Ed, which was later reinterpreted as my Ned.

NIKETAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Νικητας (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Derived from Greek νικητης (niketes) meaning "winner, victor". Saint Niketas was a 4th-century bishop of Remesiana in Serbia. He is a patron saint of Romania.

PERSIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Περσις (Ancient Greek)
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Greek name meaning "Persian woman". This was the name of a woman mentioned in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament.

REED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: REED
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From an English surname which comes from multiple sources, including Old English read meaning "red" (originally a nickname given to a person with red hair or a ruddy complexion) and Old English ried meaning "clearing" (given to a person who lived in a clearing in the woods).

ROMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German
Other Scripts: Роман (Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: ru-MAN (Russian), RAW-man (Polish)
Rating: 95% based on 2 votes
From the Late Latin name Romanus which meant "Roman".

ROSCOE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAHS-ko
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From an English surname, originally derived from a place name, which meant "doe wood" in Old Norse.

RUSSEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RUS-əl
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Variant of RUSSELL.

RUXANDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Romanian form of ROXANA.

SADIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SAY-dee
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of SARAH.

SAGA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norse Mythology, Swedish, Icelandic
Pronounced: SAH-gah (Swedish)
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Possibly means "seeing one" in Old Norse. This was the name of the Norse goddess of poetry and history, sometimes identified with the goddess Frigg. This is also a modern Swedish word meaning "story, fairy tale".

SIRI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: SEE-ree (Swedish)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Short form of SIGRID.

SUNNIVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Scandinavian form of the Old English name Sunngifu, which meant "sun gift" from the Old English elements sunne "sun" and giefu "gift". This was the name of a legendary English saint who was shipwrecked in Norway and killed by the inhabitants.

SVEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: SVE-ah
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
From a personification of the country of Sweden, in use since the 17th century. It is a derivative of Svear, the Swedish name for the ancient Germanic tribe the Swedes. The Swedish name of the country of Sweden is Sverige, a newer form of Svear rike meaning "the realm of the Svear".

VALDEMAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Pronounced: VAHL-de-mahr (Finnish)
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Scandinavian form of WALDEMAR. This was the name of four kings of Denmark.

VILLE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish, Swedish
Pronounced: VEEL-le (Finnish)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Finnish and Swedish diminutive of WILLIAM.

WILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIL-ə
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of WILLIAM.
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2017.