ASLBankes's Personal Name List

ADDISON
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AD-ə-sən
From an English surname meaning "son of ADAM". Its recent popularity as a feminine name stems from its similarity in sound to Madison.

ADERYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Means "bird" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.

ÁEDÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology
Older form of AODHÁN. This was the name of a 6th-century king of the Scots.

AERONWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Combination of AERON (1) and the suffix gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed".

AIDAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: AY-dən (English)
Anglicized form of AODHÁN. In the latter part of the 20th century it became popular in America due to its sound, since it uses the same fashionable aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden and Hayden.

AILILL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: AL-yil (Irish)
Means "elf" in Irish Gaelic. This name occurs frequently in Irish legend, borne for example by the husband of queen Medb.

ALEXANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: a-lig-ZAN-dər (English), a-le-KSAN-du (German), ah-lək-SAHN-dər (Dutch), AW-lek-sawn-der (Hungarian)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ANAÏS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Occitan, Catalan, French
Pronounced: A-NA-EES (French)
Occitan and Catalan form of ANNA.

ANDRAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Welsh variant of ANDREAS.

ANDREW
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: AN-droo (English)
English form of the Greek name Ανδρεας (Andreas), which was derived from ανδρειος (andreios) "manly, masculine", a derivative of ανηρ (aner) "man". In the New Testament the apostle Andrew, the first disciple to join Jesus, is the brother of Simon Peter. According to tradition, he later preached in the Black Sea region, with some legends saying he was crucified on an X-shaped cross. Andrew, being a Greek name, was probably only a nickname or a translation of his real Hebrew name, which is not known.

This name has been common (in various spellings) throughout the Christian world, and it became very popular in the Middle Ages. Saint Andrew is regarded as the patron of Scotland, Russia, Greece and Romania. The name has been borne by three kings of Hungary, American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), and, more recently, English composer Andrew Lloyd Webber (1948-).

ANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Αννα (Greek), Анна (Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Bulgarian, Church Slavic)
Pronounced: AN-ə (English), AN-na (Italian, Polish, Icelandic), A-na (German, Greek), AHN-nah (Dutch, Norwegian, Finnish), AN-nah (Danish), AWN-naw (Hungarian), AN-nə (Russian, Catalan)
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary. In the English-speaking world, this form came into general use in the 18th century, joining Ann and Anne.

The name was borne by several Russian royals, including an 18th-century empress of Russia. It is also the name of the main character in Leo Tolstoy's novel 'Anna Karenina' (1877), about a married aristocrat who begins an ultimately tragic relationship with Count Vronsky.

ANWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Means "very beautiful" in Welsh.

ARDEN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AHR-dən
From an English surname, originally taken from various place names, which were derived from a Celtic word meaning "high".

ASTON
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AS-tən
From a surname which was originally derived from either a place name meaning "east town" in Old English or from the given name ÆÐELSTAN.

BENJAMIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Biblical
Other Scripts: בִּנְיָמִין (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: BEN-jə-min (English), BEN-ZHA-MEN (French), BEN-ya-meen (German)
From the Hebrew name בִּנְיָמִין (Binyamin) which means "son of the south" or "son of the right hand". Benjamin in the Old Testament is the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob and the founder of one of the southern tribes of the Hebrews. He was originally named בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oniy) meaning "son of my sorrow" by his mother Rachel, who died shortly after childbirth, but it was later changed by his father (see Genesis 35:18).

As an English name, Benjamin came into general use after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), an American statesman, inventor, scientist and philosopher.

BETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BETH
Short form of ELIZABETH, or sometimes BETHANY.

BLEDDYN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: BLEDH-in
From Welsh blaidd "wolf" combined with a diminutive suffix.

BRIALLEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: bree-AHSH-en
Derived from Welsh briallu meaning "primrose". This is a modern Welsh name.

BRYNMOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
From a Welsh place name meaning "great hill".

CAIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Roman variant of GAIUS.

CAMERON
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAM-rən
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked nose" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and sròn "nose".

CERIDWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: ke-RID-wen
Possibly from Welsh cyrrid "bent" or cerdd "poetry" combined with ven "woman" or gwen "white, fair, blessed". According to medieval Welsh legend this was the name of a sorceress or goddess who created a potion that would grant wisdom to her son Morfan. The potion was instead consumed by her servant Gwion Bach, who was subsequently reborn as the renowned bard Taliesin.

CHARLES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: CHAHRLZ (English), SHARL (French)
From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word meaning "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic name element hari meaning "army, warrior".

The popularity of the name in continental Europe was due to the fame of Charles the Great (742-814), commonly known as Charlemagne, a king of the Franks who came to rule over most of Europe. His grandfather Charles Martel had also been a noted leader of the Franks. It was subsequently the name of several Holy Roman Emperors, as well as kings of France, Spain, Portugal, Sweden and Hungary (in various spellings). After Charlemagne, his name was adopted as a word meaning "king" in many Eastern European languages, for example Czech král, Hungarian király, Russian король (korol), and Turkish kral.

The name did not become common in Britain until the 17th century when it was borne by the Stuart king Charles I. It had been introduced into the Stuart royal family by Mary Queen of Scots, who had been raised in France.

Famous bearers of the name include naturalist Charles Darwin (1809-1882) who revolutionized biology with his theory of evolution, novelist Charles Dickens (1812-1870) who wrote such works as 'Great Expectations' and 'A Tale of Two Cities', French statesman Charles de Gaulle (1890-1970), and American cartoonist Charles Schulz (1922-2000), the creator of the 'Peanuts' comic strip.

CHARLOTTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: SHAR-LAWT (French), SHAHR-lət (English), shar-LAW-tə (German), shah-LOT (Swedish), shahr-LAWT-tə (Dutch)
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.

CIANÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Diminutive of CIAN. This was the name of a 5th-century Irish saint.

CLAIRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KLER
French form of CLARA.

CONOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: KAHN-ər (English)
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Conchobhar which means "dog lover" or "wolf lover". It has been in use in Ireland for centuries and was the name of several Irish kings. It was also borne by the legendary Ulster king Conchobar mac Nessa, known for his tragic desire for Deirdre.

DAITHÍ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: DAH-hee
Variant of DÁITHÍ.

DARCY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAHR-see
From an English surname which was derived from Norman French d'Arcy, originally denoting one who came from Arcy in France. This was the surname of a character in Jane Austen's novel 'Pride and Prejudice' (1813).

DEACON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: DEE-kən
Either from the occupational surname Deacon or directly from the vocabulary word deacon, which refer to a cleric in the Christian church (ultimately from Greek διακονος (diakonos) meaning "servant").

DESIDERIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Late Roman
Feminine form of DESIDERIO. This was the Latin name of a 19th-century queen of Sweden, the wife of Karl XIV. She was born in France with the name Désirée.

DOMINIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAWM-i-nik
From the Late Latin name Dominicus meaning "of the Lord". This name was traditionally given to a child born on Sunday. Several saints have borne this name, including the 13th-century founder of the Dominican order of friars. It was in this saint's honour that the name was first used in England, starting around the 13th century. It is primarily used by Catholics.

DUNCAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: DUN-kən (English)
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Donnchadh, derived from Gaelic donn "brown" and cath "battle". This was the name of two kings of Scotland, including the one who was featured in Shakespeare's play 'Macbeth' (1606).

DYLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: DUL-an (Welsh), DIL-ən (English)
From the Welsh elements dy meaning "great" and llanw meaning "tide, flow". In Welsh mythology Dylan was a god or hero associated with the sea. He was the son of Arianrhod and was accidentally slain by his uncle Govannon.

Famous bearers include the Welsh poet Dylan Thomas (1914-1953) and the American musician Bob Dylan (1941-), real name Robert Zimmerman, who took his stage surname from the poet's given name. Due to those two bearers, use of the name has spread outside of Wales in the last half of the 20th century. It received a further boost in popularity in the 1990s due to a character on the television series 'Beverly Hills 90210'.

EACHANN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, Irish
Means "brown horse" from Gaelic each "horse" and donn "brown". It was sometimes Anglicized as Hector.

EIRENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ειρηνη (Ancient Greek)
Original Greek form of IRENE.

EIRIAN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Means "bright, beautiful" in Welsh.

ELANOR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Means "star sun" in Sindarin. In 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien this is Sam's eldest daughter, named after a type of flower.

ELIANA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֶלִיעַנָה (Hebrew)
Means "my God has answered" in Hebrew.

EMERSON
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EM-ər-sən
From an English surname meaning "son of EMERY". The surname was borne by Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American writer and philosopher who wrote about transcendentalism.

EMMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: EM-ə (English), E-MA (French), EM-mah (Finnish), E-ma (German)
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of king Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of king Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.

After the Norman conquest this name became common in England. It was revived in the 18th century, perhaps in part due to Matthew Prior's poem 'Henry and Emma' (1709). It was also used by Jane Austen for the central character, the matchmaker Emma Woodhouse, in her novel 'Emma' (1816).

ÉOWYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: AY-ə-win (English)
Means "horse joy" in Old English. This name was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien who used Old English to represent the Rohirric language. In his novel 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) Eowyn is the niece of King Theoden of Rohan. She slays the Lord of the Nazgul in the Battle of the Pelennor Fields.

EUPHEMIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, English (Archaic)
Other Scripts: Ευφημια (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: yoo-FEM-ee-ə (English)
Means "to use words of good omen" from Greek () "good" and φημι (phemi) "to speak, to declare". Saint Euphemia was an early martyr from Chalcedon.

EVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, English, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Ευα (Greek), Ева (Bulgarian, Russian, Church Slavic), ევა (Georgian)
Pronounced: E-ba (Spanish), E-va (Italian, Czech, Slovak, Icelandic), EE-və (English), E-fa (German), AY-vah (Dutch), E-vah (Danish), YE-və (Russian), E-wa (Classical Latin)
Latinate form of EVE. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. It is also a variant transcription of Russian YEVA. This name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.

EVELYN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, German
Pronounced: EV-ə-lin (English), EEV-lin (British English), EEV-ə-lin (British English), E-və-leen (German)
From an English surname which was derived from the given name AVELINE. In the 17th century when it was first used as a given name it was more common for boys, but it is now regarded as mainly feminine due to association with the related name Evelina.

FINLEY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of FIONNLAGH.

FRANKIE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FRANGK-ee
Diminutive of FRANK (1) or FRANCES.

FRASER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Rare)
Pronounced: FRAY-zər, FRAY-zhər
From a Scottish surname which is of unknown meaning. A famous bearer of the surname was Simon Fraser (1776-1862), a Canadian explorer.

GARETH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English (British), Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: GAR-əth (Welsh, English)
Meaning unknown. It first appears in this form in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation of Arthurian legends 'Le Morte d'Arthur', in which Gareth was a Knight of the Round Table, the brother of Sir Gawain. Malory based the name on Gahariet, which was the name of a similar Arthurian character in French sources. It may ultimately have a Welsh origin, possibly related to gwaredd meaning "gentleness".

GAVIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: GAV-in (English)
Medieval form of GAWAIN. Though it died out in England, it was reintroduced from Scotland in the 20th century.

GILLIAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JIL-ee-ən, GIL-ee-ən
Medieval English feminine form of JULIAN. This spelling has been in use since the 13th century, though it was not declared a distinct name from Julian until the 17th century.

GOVANNON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh Mythology
Welsh cognate of GOIBNIU.

GRÁINNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: GRAW-nyə (Irish)
Possibly derived from Gaelic grán meaning "grain". This was the name of an ancient Irish grain goddess. The name also belonged to the fiancée of Fionn mac Cumhail and the lover of Diarmaid in later Irish legend, and it is often associated with gráidh "love".

GWENAËLLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Breton
Pronounced: GWE-NA-EL (French)
Feminine form of GWENAËL.

HANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Biblical
Other Scripts: חַנָּה (Hebrew)
Pronounced: HAN-ə (English), HA-na (German)
From the Hebrew name חַנָּה (Channah) meaning "favour" or "grace". In the Old Testament this is the name of the wife of Elkanah. Her rival was Elkanah's other wife Peninnah, who had children while Hannah remained barren. After a blessing from Eli she finally became pregnant with Samuel.

As an English name, Hannah was not regularly used until after the Protestant Reformation. The Greek and Latin version Anna, which is used in the New Testament, has traditionally been more common as a Christian name.

HAVEN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAY-vən
From the English word for a safe place, derived ultimately from Old English hæfen.

IAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: EE-ən (English)
Scottish form of JOHN.

IDRIS (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Means "ardent lord" from Welsh udd "lord, prince" combined with ris "ardent, enthusiastic, impulsive".

INDIGO
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: IN-di-go
From the English word indigo for the purplish-blue dye or the colour. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ινδικον (Indikon) "Indic, from India".

JAMES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JAYMZ (English)
English form of the Late Latin name Iacomus which was derived from Ιακωβος (Iakobos), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name Ya'aqov (see JACOB). This was the name of two apostles in the New Testament. The first was Saint James the Greater, the apostle John's brother, who was beheaded under Herod Agrippa in the Book of Acts. The second was James the Lesser, son of Alphaeus. Another James (known as James the Just) is also mentioned in the Bible as being the brother of Jesus.

Since the 13th century this name has been used in England, though it became more common in Scotland where it was borne by several kings. In the 17th century the Scottish king James VI inherited the English throne, becoming the first ruler of all Britain, and the name grew much more popular. Famous bearers include the English explorer Captain James Cook (1728-1779), the Scottish inventor James Watt (1736-1819), and the Irish novelist and poet James Joyce (1882-1941). This name has also been borne by six American presidents. A notable fictional bearer is the British spy James Bond, created by author Ian Fleming.

JESSE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Biblical
Other Scripts: יִשַׁי (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JES-ee (English), YES-sə (Dutch)
From the Hebrew name יִשַׁי (Yishay) which possibly means "gift". In the Old Testament Jesse is the father of King David. It began to be used as an English given name after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Jesse James (1847-1882), an American outlaw who held up banks and stagecoaches. He was eventually shot by a fellow gang member for a reward. Another famous bearer was the American athlete Jesse Owens (1913-1980), whose real name was James Cleveland (or J. C.) Owens.

JONATHAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹנָתָן (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAHN-ə-thən (American English), JAWN-ə-thən (British English), YO-na-tan (German), ZHAW-NA-TAHN (French)
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹנָתָן (Yehonatan),contracted to יוֹנָתָן (Yonatan), meaning "YAHWEH has given". According to the Old Testament, Jonathan was the eldest son of Saul. His relationship with his father was strained due to his close friendship with his father's rival David. Along with Saul he was killed in battle with the Philistines.

As an English name, Jonathan did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was the Anglo-Irish satirist Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), who wrote 'Gulliver's Travels' and other works.

JULES (2)
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JOOLZ
Diminutive of JULIA or JULIAN.

JULIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Roman, Biblical
Other Scripts: Юлия (Russian), Юлія (Ukrainian)
Pronounced: JOO-lee-ə (English), YOO-lya (German, Polish), YOO-lee-ah (Swedish, Danish, Finnish), KHOO-lya (Spanish), YOO-lyi-yə (Russian), YOO-lee-a (Classical Latin)
Feminine form of the Roman family name JULIUS. Among the notable women from this family were Julia Augusta (also known as Livia Drusilla), the wife of Emperor Augustus, and Julia the Elder, the daughter of Augustus and the wife of Tiberius. A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was also borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. Additionally, Shakespeare used it in his comedy 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594).

It has been common as a given name in the English-speaking world only since the 18th century. A famous modern bearer is American actress Julia Roberts (1967-).

JULIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Polish, German
Pronounced: JOO-lee-ən (English), JOOL-yən (English), YOO-lyan (Polish, German)
From the Roman name Iulianus, which was derived from JULIUS. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints, including the legendary Saint Julian the Hospitaller. This name has been used in England since the Middle Ages, at which time it was also a feminine name (from Juliana, eventually becoming Gillian).

JULIANNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: joo-lee-AN
Feminine form of Iulianus (see JULIAN).

JULIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHUY-LYEN
French feminine form of Iulianus (see JULIAN).

KAI (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Frisian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch
Pronounced: KIE (German, Swedish, Finnish)
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Frisian diminutive of GERHARD, NICOLAAS, CORNELIS or GAIUS.

KAVERI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: कावेरी (Hindi)
From the name of the Kaveri River in southern India.

KIEFER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KEE-fər
From a German surname meaning either "pine tree" or "barrel maker".

LACHLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Australian)
Originally a Scottish nickname for a person who was from Norway. In Scotland, Norway was known as the "land of the lochs", or Lochlann.

LAOGHAIRE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: LEE-ə-ryə
Modern Irish form of LÓEGAIRE.

LENNON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Rare)
Pronounced: LEN-ən
Anglicized form of the Irish surname Ó Leannáin, which means "descendant of Leannán". The name Leannán means "lover" in Gaelic. This surname was borne by musician John Lennon (1940-1980), a member of the Beatles.

LIAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: LEE-əm (English)
Irish short form of WILLIAM.

LILEAS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Scottish form of LILLIAN.

LIVIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Roman family name which may be related to either Latin liveo "to envy" or lividus "blue, envious". Titus Livius, also known as Livy, was a Roman historian who wrote a history of the city of Rome.

LOGAN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: LO-gən (English)
From a surname which was originally derived from a Scottish place name meaning "little hollow" in Scottish Gaelic.

LORCCÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: LOR-kan
Variant of LORCÁN.

LUCAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: LOO-kəs (English), LUY-kahs (Dutch), LUY-KA (French), LOO-kəsh (Portuguese), LOO-kas (Spanish, Classical Latin)
Latin form of Loukas (see LUKE).

LUCIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian, English
Pronounced: LOO-chyan (Romanian), LOO-shən (English)
Romanian and English form of LUCIANUS. Lucian is the usual name of Lucianus of Samosata in English.

LUKEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Basque form of LUCIANUS.

LYDIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Λυδια (Ancient Greek), Лѷдіа (Church Slavic)
Pronounced: LID-ee-ə (English), LUY-dya (German)
Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor, said to be named for the legendary king LYDOS. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. In the modern era the name has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

MADDOX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MAD-əks
From a Welsh surname meaning "son of MADOC". It was brought to public attention when the actress Angelina Jolie gave this name to her adopted son in 2002.

MALACHI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: מַלְאָכִי (Hebrew)
Pronounced: MAL-ə-kie (English)
From the Hebrew מַלְאָכִי (Mal'akhiy) meaning "my messenger" or "my angel". This is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Malachi, which some claim foretells the coming of Christ. In England the name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

MARISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English
Pronounced: ma-REE-za (Italian), ma-REE-sa (Spanish), mə-RIS-ə (English)
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese combination of MARIA and LUISA.

MATTEO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mat-TE-o
Italian form of MATTHEW.

MEG
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEG
Medieval diminutive of MARGARET.

NEIL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English
Pronounced: NEEL (English)
From the Gaelic name Niall, which is of disputed origin, possibly meaning "champion" or "cloud". This was the name of a semi-legendary 4th-century Irish king, Niall of the Nine Hostages.

In the early Middle Ages the name was adopted by Viking raiders and settlers in Ireland in the form Njal. The Vikings transmitted it to England and Scotland, as well as bringing it back to Scandinavia. It was also in use among the Normans, who were of Scandinavian origin. A famous bearer of this name was American astronaut Neil Armstrong (1930-2012), the first person to walk on the moon.

NELLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NEL-ee
Diminutive of NELL.

NIGEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NIE-jəl
From Nigellus, a medieval Latinized form of NEIL. It was commonly associated with Latin niger "black". It was revived in the 19th century, perhaps in part due to Sir Walter Scott's novel 'The Fortunes of Nigel' (1822).

NILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tamil, Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: நீலா (Tamil), नीला (Hindi)
Means "dark blue" in Sanskrit.

NILES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NIELZ
From a surname which was derived from the given name NEIL.

NIVEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Anglicized form of NAOMHÁN.

NORAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: NAWR-ə
Variant of NORA.

NUADA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish Mythology
Possibly means "protector" in Celtic. In Irish myth he was an Irish god and a leader of the Tuatha De Danann. He was killed in battle against the Fomorii.

OLIVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: o-LIV-ee-ə (English), o-LEE-vya (Italian, German), o-LEE-bya (Spanish), O-lee-vee-ah (Finnish)
This name was first used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy 'Twelfth Night' (1602). Shakespeare may have based it on OLIVER or OLIVA, or perhaps directly on the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.

The name has been used in the English-speaking world since the 18th century, though it did not become overly popular until the last half of the 20th century. Its rise in popularity in America was precipitated by a character on the 1970s television series 'The Waltons'.

PAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Παν (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PAN (Classical Greek, English)
Derived from a Greek word meaning "shepherd". In Greek mythology Pan was a half-man, half-goat god associated with shepherds, flocks and pastures.

PHAEDRUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Φαιδρος (Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of the Greek name Φαιδρος (Phaidros), which meant "bright". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Greek philosopher, and also of a 1st-century Roman fabulist who was originally a slave from Thrace.

PHELAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Anglicized form of FAOLÁN.

PIPPIN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of PÉPIN.

PIPPIN (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: PIP-in (English)
The name of a hobbit in 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien. His full given name was Peregrin, a semi-translation into English of his true hobbit name Razanur meaning "traveller".

RACHEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: רָחֵל (Hebrew), Ραχηλ (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: RAY-chəl (English), RA-SHEL (French), RA-khəl (German), RAH-khəl (Dutch)
From the Hebrew name רָחֵל (Rachel) meaning "ewe". In the Old Testament this is the name of the favourite wife of Jacob and the mother of Joseph and Benjamin. She was the younger sister of Jacob's first wife Leah.

The name was common among Jews in the Middle Ages, but it was not generally used as a Christian name in the English-speaking world until after the Protestant Reformation. A notable bearer was the American conservationist Rachel Carson (1907-1964).

REBEKAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: רִבְקָה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: rə-BEK-ə (English)
Form of REBECCA used in some versions of the Bible.

REUBEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, English
Other Scripts: רְאוּבֵן (Hebrew)
Pronounced: ROO-bən (English)
Means "behold, a son" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the eldest son of Jacob and Leah and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. Reuben was cursed by his father because he slept with Jacob's concubine Bilhah. It has been used as a Christian name in Britain since the Protestant Reformation.

RHYDDERCH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: HRUDH-erkh
Means "reddish brown" in Welsh. It is sometimes used as a Welsh form of RODERICK.

RHYS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: HREES (Welsh), REES (English)
Means "enthusiasm" in Welsh. Several Welsh rulers have borne this name.

ROKUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: RO-kus
Dutch variant of ROCHUS.

ROWAN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: RO-ən (English)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.

SEBASTIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Finnish, Romanian
Pronounced: ze-BAS-tyan (German), sə-BAS-chən (English), se-BAS-tyan (Polish), SE-bahs-tee-ahn (Finnish)
From the Latin name Sebastianus which meant "from Sebaste". Sebaste was the name a town in Asia Minor, its name deriving from Greek σεβαστος (sebastos) "venerable" (a translation of Latin Augustus, the title of the Roman emperors). According to Christian tradition, Saint Sebastian was a 3rd-century Roman soldier martyred during the persecutions of the emperor Diocletian. After he was discovered to be a Christian, he was tied to a stake and shot with arrows. This however did not kill him. Saint Irene of Rome healed him and he returned to personally admonish Diocletian, whereupon the emperor had him beaten to death.

Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in medieval Europe, especially in Spain and France. It was also borne by a 16th-century king of Portugal who died in a crusade against Morocco.

SHERWOOD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHUR-wuwd
From an English place name (or from a surname which was derived from it) meaning "bright forest". This was the name of the forest in which the legendary outlaw Robin Hood made his home.

SILAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Σιλας (Greek)
Pronounced: SIE-ləs (English)
Probably a short form of SILVANUS. This is the name of a companion of Saint Paul in the New Testament. Paul refers to him as Silvanus in his epistles, though it is possible that Silas was in fact a Greek form of the Hebrew name SAUL (via Aramaic).

As an English name it was not used until after the Protestant Reformation. It was utilized by George Eliot for the title character in her novel 'Silas Marner' (1861).

SILVANUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: sil-VAY-nəs (English)
Roman name derived from Latin silva "wood, forest". Silvanus was the Roman god of forests. This name appears in the New Testament belonging to one of Saint Paul's companions, also called Silas.

SOFIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Swedish, German, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Greek, Finnish, Estonian, Slovak, Romanian, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Σοφια (Greek), София (Russian, Bulgarian), Софія (Ukrainian)
Pronounced: zo-FEE-a (German), so-FEE-a (Italian), soo-FEE-ə (Portuguese), saw-FEE-a (Greek), SO-fee-ah (Finnish)
Form of SOPHIA.

SOPHIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Σοφια (Greek)
Pronounced: so-FEE-ə (English), sə-FIE-ə (British English), zo-FEE-a (German)
Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred during the reign of the emperor Hadrian. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which is the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.

This name was common among continental European royalty during the Middle Ages, and it was popularized in Britain by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century. It was the name of characters in the novels 'Tom Jones' (1749) by Henry Fielding and 'The Vicar of Wakefield' (1766) by Oliver Goldsmith. A famous bearer is the Italian actress Sophia Loren (1934-).

SPENCER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SPEN-sər
From a surname which meant "dispenser of provisions" in Middle English. A famous bearer was American actor Spencer Tracy (1900-1967). It was also the surname of Princess Diana (1961-1997).

STEPHEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: STEEV-ən (English), STEF-ən (English)
From the Greek name Στεφανος (Stephanos) meaning "crown", more precisely "that which surrounds". Saint Stephen was a deacon who was stoned to death, as told in Acts in the New Testament. He is regarded as the first Christian martyr. Due to him, the name became common in the Christian world. It was popularized in England by the Normans.

This was the name of kings of England, Serbia, and Poland, as well as ten popes. It was also borne by the first Christian king of Hungary (11th century), who is regarded as the patron saint of that country. More recent bearers include British physicist Stephen Hawking (1942-) and the American author Stephen King (1947-).

STEVEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: STEE-vən (English), STAY-vən (Dutch)
Medieval English variant of STEPHEN, and a Dutch variant of STEFAN. The filmmaker Steven Spielberg (1946-), director of 'E.T.' and 'Indiana Jones', is a famous bearer of this name.

SUSANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Swedish, Finnish, Russian, Dutch, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Other Scripts: Сусанна (Russian), שׁוֹשַׁנָּה (Ancient Hebrew), Сѹсанна (Church Slavic)
Pronounced: soo-ZAN-na (Italian), SOO-sahn-nah (Finnish), suw-SAN-nə (Russian), soo-ZAN-ə (English)
From Σουσαννα (Sousanna), the Greek form of the Hebrew name שׁוֹשַׁנָּה (Shoshannah). This was derived from the Hebrew word שׁוֹשָׁן (shoshan) meaning "lily" (in modern Hebrew this also means "rose"), perhaps ultimately from Egyptian sšn "lotus". In the Old Testament Apocrypha this is the name of a woman falsely accused of adultery. The prophet Daniel clears her name by tricking her accusers, who end up being condemned themselves. It also occurs in the New Testament belonging to a woman who ministers to Jesus.

As an English name, it was occasionally used during the Middle Ages in honour of the Old Testament heroine. It did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation, at which time it was often spelled Susan.

TIGHEARNÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: TEER-nawn
Means "little lord" from Irish Gaelic tigern "lord" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a 12th-century king of Breifne in Ireland.

TREASA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: TRA-sa
Possibly means "strength" in Irish Gaelic. It is also sometimes used as an Irish form of THERESA.

TRYSTAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Variant of TRISTAN.

WILLIAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIL-yəm
From the Germanic name Willahelm, which was composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". Saint William of Gellone was an 8th-century cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England in the 11th century. It was later borne by three other English kings, as well as rulers of Scotland, Sicily (of Norman origin), the Netherlands and Prussia.

Other famous bearers include William Wallace, a 13th-century Scottish hero, and William Tell, a legendary 14th-century Swiss hero. In the literary world it was borne by dramatist William Shakespeare (1564-1616), poet William Blake (1757-1827), poet William Wordsworth (1770-1850), dramatist William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), author William Faulkner (1897-1962), and author William S. Burroughs (1914-1997).

WINSTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIN-stən
From a surname derived from an English place name, which was in turn derived from the Old English given name WYNNSTAN. A famous bearer was Winston Churchill (1874-1965), the British prime minister during World War II. This name was also borne by the fictional Winston Smith, the protagonist in George Orwell's 1949 novel '1984'.

YORK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: YORK
From a surname, which was derived from York, the name of a city in northern England. The city name was originally Eburacon, Latinized as Eboracum, meaning "yew" in Brythonic, but it was altered by association with Old English Eoforwic, meaning "pig farm".
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2017.