ICEyun's Personal Name List

ADELAIDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese
Pronounced: A-də-layd(English) a-deh-LIE-deh(Italian) ə-də-LIED(Portuguese)
Rating: 67% based on 46 votes
From the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman emperor Otto the Great. The name became common in Britain in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.
ALANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Breton
Pronounced: ə-LAN-ə(English)
Rating: 59% based on 37 votes
Feminine form of ALAN.
ALICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Italian, Czech
Pronounced: AL-is(English) A-LEES(French) a-LEE-cheh(Italian)
Rating: 73% based on 41 votes
From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).
ALICIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English, Swedish
Pronounced: a-LEE-thya(European Spanish) a-LEE-sya(Latin American Spanish) ə-LEE-shə(English) ə-LEE-see-ə(English)
Rating: 48% based on 36 votes
Latinized form of ALICE.
AMABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 52% based on 39 votes
Medieval feminine form of AMABILIS.
AMBROSIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αμβροσια(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 51% based on 35 votes
Feminine form of Ambrosios (see AMBROSE).
AMINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bosnian, Arabic
Other Scripts: آمنة, أمينة(Arabic)
Rating: 45% based on 32 votes
Bosnian form of AMINAH (2). It is also an alternate transcription of Arabic AMINAH (1) or AMINAH (2).
ANAHITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian, Persian Mythology
Other Scripts: آناهیتا(Persian)
Rating: 33% based on 32 votes
Means "immaculate, undefiled" from Avestan a "not" and ahit "unclean". This was the name of the Persian goddess of fertility and water. She was sometimes identified with Artemis, Aphrodite and Athena.
ANTONIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Romanian, Greek, Croatian, Bulgarian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Αντωνια(Greek) Антония(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: an-TO-nya(Italian, Spanish, German) an-TO-nee-ə(English) ahn-TO-nee-a(Dutch)
Rating: 59% based on 36 votes
Feminine form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ARISTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: ə-RIS-tə(English)
Rating: 49% based on 32 votes
Means "ear of corn" in Latin. This is the name of a star, also known as Spica, in the constellation Virgo.
ASTRID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French
Pronounced: AS-trid(Swedish) AH-stree(Norwegian) A-strit(German) AS-TREED(French)
Rating: 58% based on 39 votes
Modern form of ÁSTRÍÐR. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of 'Pippi Longstocking'.
ATHENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Αθηνα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-TEH-NA(Classical Greek) ə-THEE-nə(English)
Rating: 65% based on 37 votes
Meaning unknown. Athena was the Greek goddess of wisdom and warfare and the patron goddess of the city of Athens in Greece. It is likely that her name is derived from that of the city, not vice versa. The earliest mention of her seems to be a 15th-century BC Mycenaean Greek inscription from Knossos on Crete.

The daughter of Zeus, she was said to have sprung from his head fully grown after he impregnated and swallowed her mother Metis. Athena is associated with the olive tree and the owl.

AUTUMN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AW-təm
Rating: 62% based on 18 votes
From the name of the season, ultimately from Latin autumnus. This name has been in general use since the 1960s.
AYLA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Rating: 53% based on 34 votes
Means "moonlight, halo" in Turkish.
AYSU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Rating: 31% based on 30 votes
Derived from Turkish ay meaning "moon" and su meaning "water".
AZURE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AZH-ər
Rating: 46% based on 30 votes
From the English word that means "sky blue". It is ultimately (via Old French, Latin and Arabic) from Persian لاجورد (lajvard) meaning "azure, lapis lazuli".
BLYTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BLIEDH
Personal note: mn only
Rating: 55% based on 23 votes
From a surname that meant "cheerful" in Old English.
BONNIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAHN-ee
Rating: 44% based on 34 votes
Means "pretty" from the Scottish word bonnie, which was itself derived from Middle French bon "good". It has been in use as an American given name since the 19th century, and it became especially popular after the movie 'Gone with the Wind' (1939), in which it was the nickname of Scarlett's daughter.
BRIDGET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: BRIJ-it(English)
Rating: 61% based on 36 votes
Anglicized form of the Irish name Brighid meaning "exalted one". In Irish mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire, poetry and wisdom, the daughter of the god Dagda. In the 5th century it was borne by Saint Brigid, the founder of a monastery at Kildare and a patron saint of Ireland. Because of the saint, the name was considered sacred in Ireland, and it did not come into general use there until the 17th century. In the form Birgitta this name has been common in Scandinavia, made popular by the 14th-century Saint Birgitta of Sweden, patron saint of Europe.
BRIGITTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, French
Pronounced: bree-GI-tə(German) BREE-ZHEET(French)
Rating: 46% based on 16 votes
German and French form of BRIDGET.
CALYPSO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Καλυψω(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kə-LIP-so(English)
Rating: 43% based on 32 votes
From Greek Καλυψω (Kalypso), which probably meant "she that conceals", derived from καλυπτω (kalypto) "to cover, to conceal". In Greek myth this was the name of the nymph who fell in love with Odysseus after he was shipwrecked on her island of Ogygia. When he refused to stay with her she detained him for seven years until Zeus ordered her to release him.
CAMILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, German, Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: kə-MIL-ə(English) ka-MEEL-la(Italian) kah-MEEL-lah(Danish) KAH-meel-lah(Finnish) ka-MI-la(German)
Rating: 53% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of CAMILLUS. This was the name of a legendary warrior maiden of the Volsci, as told by Virgil in the 'Aeneid'. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Fanny Burney's novel 'Camilla' (1796).
CAMILLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KA-MEE(French) kə-MEEL(English)
Rating: 52% based on 17 votes
French feminine and masculine form of CAMILLA. It is also used in the English-speaking world, where it is generally only feminine.
CAROLINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: KA-RAW-LEEN(French) KAR-ə-lien(English) KAR-ə-lin(English) ka-ro-LEE-nə(German)
Personal note: honoring
Rating: 83% based on 6 votes
French feminine form of CAROLUS.
CASSANDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κασσανδρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kə-SAN-drə(English) kə-SAHN-drə(English) kas-SAN-dra(Italian) ka-SAN-dra(German)
Rating: 62% based on 37 votes
From the Greek name Κασσανδρα (Kassandra), derived from possibly κεκασμαι (kekasmai) "to excel, to shine" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek myth Cassandra was a Trojan princess, the daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but when she spurned his advances he cursed her so nobody would believe her prophecies.

In the Middle Ages this name was common in England due to the popularity of medieval tales about the Trojan War. It subsequently became rare, but was revived in the 20th century.

CASSIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAS-ee
Personal note: nn only
Rating: 44% based on 33 votes
Diminutive of CASSANDRA and other names beginning with Cass.
CHARLOTTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: SHAR-LAWT(French) SHAHR-lət(English) shar-LAW-tə(German) sha-LOT(Swedish) shahr-LAW-tə(Dutch)
Rating: 69% based on 43 votes
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.
CLARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: KLA-ra(German, Spanish, Italian) KLA-ru(Portuguese) KLA-RA(French) KLEHR-ə(American English) KLAR-ə(American English) KLAH-rə(British English)
Rating: 68% based on 37 votes
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus, which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.
COLINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KO-LEEN
Rating: 28% based on 13 votes
Diminutive of NICOLE.
DAHLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: DAL-yə, DAHL-yə, DAYL-yə
Rating: 80% based on 5 votes
From the name of the flower, which was named for the Swedish botanist Anders Dahl.
DAPHNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, Dutch
Other Scripts: Δαφνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DA-PNEH(Classical Greek) DAF-nee(English) DAHF-nə(Dutch)
Rating: 53% based on 38 votes
Means "laurel" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was a nymph turned into a laurel tree by her father in order that she might escape the pursuit of Apollo. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the end of the 19th century.
DIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Диана(Russian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: die-AN-ə(English) DYA-na(Spanish, Italian, German, Polish) dee-A-nə(Catalan) dee-AH-nah(Dutch) dee-A-na(Classical Latin)
Rating: 66% based on 37 votes
Probably derived from an old Indo-European root meaning "heavenly, divine", related to dyeus (see ZEUS). Diana was a Roman goddess of the moon, hunting, forests, and childbirth, often identified with the Greek goddess Artemis.

As a given name, Diana has been regularly used since the Renaissance. It became more common in the English-speaking world following Sir Walter Scott's novel 'Rob Roy' (1817), which featured a character named Diana Vernon. It also appeared in George Meredith's novel 'Diana of the Crossways' (1885). A notable bearer was Diana Spencer (1961-1997), the Princess of Wales.

EILEEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: ie-LEEN(English) IE-leen(English)
Rating: 45% based on 32 votes
Anglicized form of EIBHLÍN. It is also sometimes considered an Irish form of HELEN. It first became popular in the English-speaking world outside of Ireland near the end of the 19th century.
ELENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovak, Lithuanian, Russian, Greek, German, English, Medieval Slavic
Other Scripts: Елена(Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Church Slavic) Ελενα(Greek)
Pronounced: EH-leh-na(Italian, German) eh-LEH-na(Spanish) yi-LYEH-nə(Russian) i-LYEH-nə(Russian) EHL-ə-nə(English) ə-LAY-nə(English)
Personal note: pronounced Eh-LEEN-ah
Rating: 58% based on 37 votes
Form of HELEN used in various languages, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian Елена (see YELENA).
ELISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Dutch, English
Pronounced: eh-LEE-zə(German) eh-LEE-seh(Norwegian, Danish, Swedish) i-LEES(English) EE-lees(English)
Rating: 64% based on 36 votes
Short form of ELIZABETH.
ELYSIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Rating: 48% based on 16 votes
From Elysium, the name of the realm of the dead in Greek and Roman mythology, which means "blissful".
ESTHER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Spanish, Dutch, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: אֶסְתֵר(Hebrew) Εσθηρ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EHS-tər(English, Dutch) EHS-TEHR(French)
Rating: 61% based on 36 votes
Possibly means "star" in Persian. Alternatively it could be a derivative of the name of the Near Eastern goddess ISHTAR. The Book of Esther in the Old Testament tells the story of Queen Esther, the Jewish wife of the king of Persia. The king's advisor Haman persuaded the king to exterminate all the Jews in the realm. Warned of this plot by her cousin Mordecai, Esther revealed her Jewish ancestry and convinced the king to execute Haman instead. Her original Hebrew name was Hadassah.

This name has been used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. In America it received a boost in popularity after the birth of Esther Cleveland (1893-1980), the daughter of President Grover Cleveland.

EURYDICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ευρυδικη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ew-RUY-dee-keh(Classical Latin) yuw-RID-i-see(English)
Personal note: GP
Rating: 47% based on 31 votes
From the Greek Ευρυδικη (Eurydike) meaning "wide justice", derived from ευρυς (eurys) "wide" and δικη (dike) "justice". In Greek myth she was the wife of Orpheus. Her husband tried to rescue her from Hades, but he failed when he disobeyed the condition that he not look back upon her on their way out.
EVANGELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: i-VAN-jə-leen
Rating: 76% based on 5 votes
Means "good news" from Greek ευ (eu) "good" and αγγελμα (angelma) "news, message". It was (first?) used by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in his epic poem 'Evangeline' (1847). It also appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) as the full name of the character Eva.
EVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: חַוָּה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: EEV(English)
Rating: 64% based on 35 votes
From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חָוָה (chawah) meaning "to breathe" or the related word חָיָה (chayah) meaning "to live". According to the Old Testament Book of Genesis, Eve and Adam were the first humans. God created her from one of Adam's ribs to be his companion. At the urging of a serpent she ate the forbidden fruit and shared some with Adam, causing their expulsion from the Garden of Eden.

Despite this potentially negative association, the name was occasionally used by Christians during the Middle Ages. In the English-speaking world both Eve and the Latin form Eva were revived in the 19th century.

FATIMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: فاطمة(Arabic)
Pronounced: FAT-i-ma
Rating: 35% based on 30 votes
Alternate transcription of Arabic فاطمة (see FATIMAH).
FAWN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAWN
Rating: 32% based on 31 votes
From the English word fawn for a young deer.
FIERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: fee-EH-ra
Rating: 47% based on 28 votes
Means "proud" in Esperanto.
FIONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: fee-O-nə(English)
Rating: 68% based on 37 votes
Feminine form of FIONN. This name was (first?) used by Scottish poet James Macpherson in his poem 'Fingal' (1762).
FRANCESCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan
Pronounced: fran-CHEHS-ka(Italian) frən-SEHS-kə(Catalan)
Rating: 71% based on 18 votes
Italian and Catalan feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
HERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: ‘Ηρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEH-RA(Classical Greek) HEHR-ə(English)
Rating: 52% based on 29 votes
Uncertain meaning, possibly from either Greek ‘ηρως (heros) "hero, warrior"; ‘ωρα (hora) "period of time"; or ‘αιρεω (haireo) "to be chosen". In Greek mythology Hera was the queen of the gods, the sister and wife of Zeus. She presided over marriage and childbirth.
IMOGEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: IM-ə-jehn
Rating: 58% based on 34 votes
The name of a princess in the play 'Cymbeline' (1609) by Shakespeare. He based her on a legendary character named Innogen, but the name was printed incorrectly and never corrected. The name Innogen is probably derived from Gaelic inghean meaning "maiden".
INGRID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
Pronounced: ING-rid(Swedish) ING-ri(Norwegian) ING-grit(German, Dutch) ING-greet(German)
Rating: 55% based on 35 votes
From the Old Norse name Ingríðr meaning "Ing is beautiful", derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with fríðr "beautiful". A famous bearer was the Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman (1915-1982).
JANICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAN-is
Rating: 16% based on 8 votes
Elaborated form of JANE, created by Paul Leicester Ford for his novel 'Janice Meredith' (1899).
JANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, Swedish, Finnish, English
Pronounced: YAHN-nah(Dutch, Finnish) JAN-ə(English)
Rating: 42% based on 31 votes
Feminine form of JAN (1). As an English name, it is an elaboration of JAN (2).
JOANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Polish, Biblical
Pronounced: jo-AN-ə(English) yaw-AN-na(Polish)
Rating: 57% based on 33 votes
English and Polish form of Latin Iohanna, which was derived from Greek Ιωαννα (Ioanna), the feminine form of Ioannes (see JOHN). This is the spelling used in the English New Testament, where it belongs to a follower of Jesus who is regarded as a saint. In the Middle Ages in England it was used as a Latinized form of Joan (the usual feminine form of John) and it became common as a given name in the 19th century.
JUSTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Dutch, German
Pronounced: ZHUYS-TEEN(French) jus-TEEN(English)
Rating: 54% based on 15 votes
French feminine form of Iustinus (see JUSTIN). This is the name of the heroine in the novel 'Justine' (1791) by the Marquis de Sade.
KATARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Sorbian
Other Scripts: Катарина(Serbian)
Pronounced: ka-ta-REE-na(Swedish, German)
Rating: 60% based on 36 votes
Form of KATHERINE in several languages.
KATHLEEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KATH-leen
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Anglicized form of CAITLÍN.
KATINKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Hungarian, Dutch
Pronounced: ka-TING-ka(German) KAW-teeng-kaw(Hungarian)
Rating: 38% based on 31 votes
German diminutive of KATHARINA, a Hungarian diminutive of KATALIN and a Dutch diminutive of CATHARINA.
LAURA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Lithuanian, Latvian, Late Roman
Pronounced: LAWR-ə(English) LOW-ra(Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Polish, German, Dutch) LOW-rah(Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish) LAW-oo-raw(Hungarian)
Rating: 49% based on 18 votes
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.

As an English name, Laura has been used since the 13th century. Famous bearers include Laura Secord (1775-1868), a Canadian heroine during the War of 1812, and Laura Ingalls Wilder (1867-1957), an American author who wrote the 'Little House on the Prairie' series of novels.

LEONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Czech
Pronounced: lee-O-nə(English) LEH-o-na(German)
Rating: 53% based on 34 votes
Feminine form of LEON.
LILA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: लीला(Hindi)
Personal note: pronounced LEE-lah
Rating: 46% based on 19 votes
Means "play, amusement" in Sanskrit.
LILITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: LIL-ith(English)
Rating: 55% based on 34 votes
Derived from Akkadian lilitu meaning "of the night". This was the name of a demon in ancient Assyrian myths. In Jewish tradition she was Adam's first wife, sent out of Eden and replaced by Eve because she would not submit to him. The offspring of Adam (or Samael) and Lilith were the evil spirits of the world.
LUCRETIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: loo-KREE-shə(English)
Rating: 42% based on 31 votes
Feminine form of the Roman family name Lucretius, possibly from Latin lucrum "profit, wealth". In Roman legend Lucretia was a maiden who was raped by the son of the king of Rome. This caused a great uproar among the Roman citizens, and the monarchy was overthrown. This name was also borne by a saint and martyr from Spain.
MARIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Other Scripts: Μαρια(Greek) Мария(Russian, Bulgarian) Марія(Ukrainian) Маріа(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: ma-REE-a(Italian, German, Swedish, Dutch, Greek) mu-REE-u(European Portuguese) ma-REE-u(Brazilian Portuguese) mə-REE-ə(Catalan, English) mah-REE-ah(Norwegian, Danish) MAR-ya(Polish) MAH-ree-ah(Finnish) mu-RYEE-yə(Russian) mu-RYEE-yu(Ukrainian)
Rating: 54% based on 14 votes
Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.

This was the name of two ruling queens of Portugal. It was also borne by the Habsburg queen Maria Theresa (1717-1780), whose inheritance of the domains of her father, the Holy Roman emperor Charles VI, began the War of the Austrian Succession.

MARILYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAR-ə-lin, MAR-lin
Rating: 52% based on 29 votes
Combination of MARY and lyn. It has been used since the start of the 20th century. A famous bearer was the American actress Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962).
MARIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Марин(Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: MA-REHN(French)
Rating: 44% based on 28 votes
French, Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian and Macedonian form of MARINUS.
MARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Greek, Finnish, Estonian, Russian, Ukrainian, Romanian, Czech, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Latvian, Georgian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Μαρινα(Greek) Марина(Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian) მარინა(Georgian)
Pronounced: ma-REE-na(Italian, Spanish, German) mə-REEN-ə(English) mu-RYEE-nə(Russian) MA-ri-na(Czech)
Rating: 55% based on 32 votes
Feminine form of MARINUS.
MARIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: MEHR-is, MAR-is
Rating: 45% based on 28 votes
Means "of the sea", taken from the Latin title of the Virgin Mary, Stella Maris, meaning "star of the sea".
MARISKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian, Dutch
Pronounced: mah-RIS-kah(Dutch)
Rating: 48% based on 12 votes
Diminutive of MARIA.
MELANIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: MEHL-ə-nee(English) MEH-la-nee(German) meh-la-NEE(German)
Rating: 49% based on 35 votes
From Mélanie, the French form of the Latin name Melania, derived from Greek μελαινα (melaina) meaning "black, dark". This was the name of a Roman saint who gave all her wealth to charity in the 5th century. Her grandmother was also a saint with the same name.

The name was common in France during the Middle Ages, and was it introduced from there to England, though it eventually became rare. Interest in it was revived by the character Melanie Wilkes from the novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1939).

MEREDITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: MEHR-ə-dith(English)
Rating: 54% based on 33 votes
From the Welsh name Maredudd or Meredydd, possibly meaning "great lord" or "sea lord". Since the mid-1920s it has been used more often for girls than for boys in English-speaking countries, though it is still a masculine name in Wales. A famous bearer of this name as surname was the English novelist and poet George Meredith (1828-1909).
MILLARAY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Native American, Mapuche
Personal note: GP
Rating: 39% based on 31 votes
Means "golden flower" in Mapuche.
MINA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch, Limburgish
Pronounced: MEE-nə(English) MEE-nah(Dutch, Limburgish)
Rating: 58% based on 33 votes
Short form of WILHELMINA and other names ending in mina. This was the name of a character in the novel 'Dracula' (1897) by Bram Stoker.
MIRA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Malayalam, Tamil, Kannada
Other Scripts: मीरा(Hindi, Marathi) മീര(Malayalam) மீரா(Tamil) ಮೀರಾ(Kannada)
Rating: 67% based on 34 votes
Means "sea, ocean" in Sanskrit. This was the name of a 16th-century Indian princess who devoted her life to the god Krishna.
MORGANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: mawr-GAN-ə
Rating: 56% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of MORGAN (1).
MORRIGAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish Mythology
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Derived from Irish Mór Ríoghain meaning "great queen". In Irish myth she was a goddess of war and death who often took the form of a crow.
MORTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian
Personal note: character only
Rating: 31% based on 29 votes
Lithuanian form of MARTHA.
MYFANWY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 38% based on 13 votes
Means "my woman" from the Welsh prefix my "my" combined with banw "woman".
NADIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Italian, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Надя(Russian, Bulgarian) Надія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: NA-DYA(French) NAD-ee-ə(English) NAHD-ee-ə(English) NA-dyə(Russian)
Rating: 57% based on 32 votes
Variant of NADYA (1) used in the western world, as well as an alternate transcription of the Slavic name. It began to be used in France in the 19th century. The name received a boost in popularity from the Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci (1961-).
NATALYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Наталья(Russian)
Pronounced: nu-TA-lyə
Rating: 48% based on 16 votes
Russian form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NINA (3)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Нина(Russian)
Pronounced: NYEE-nə
Rating: 56% based on 18 votes
Russian form of NINO (2).
NORA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Latvian, German, Dutch, Italian
Pronounced: NAWR-ə(Irish, English) NO-ra(German)
Rating: 67% based on 37 votes
Short form of HONORA or ELEANOR. Henrik Ibsen used it for a character in his play 'A Doll's House' (1879).
OCÉANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-SEH-AN
Rating: 44% based on 14 votes
Derived from French océan meaning "ocean".
ODESSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Rating: 61% based on 33 votes
From the name of a Ukrainian city that sits on the north coast of the Black Sea. This name can also be used as a feminine form of ODYSSEUS.
ODETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-DEHT
Rating: 63% based on 7 votes
French diminutive of ODA or ODILIA. This is the name of a princess who has been transformed into a swan in the ballet 'Swan Lake' (1877) by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.
RACHAEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAY-chəl
Rating: 44% based on 29 votes
Variant of RACHEL, the spelling probably influenced by that of Michael.
RAPHAELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: ra-fa-EH-la
Rating: 49% based on 30 votes
Feminine form of RAPHAEL.
RENATA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Polish, Czech, Croatian, Slovene, Late Roman
Pronounced: reh-NA-ta(Italian, Spanish, German, Polish) REH-na-ta(Czech)
Rating: 56% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of RENATUS.
RIO (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 莉央, 莉緒, 里桜, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: REE-O
Rating: 34% based on 28 votes
From Japanese (ri) meaning "white jasmine" or (ri) meaning "village" combined with (o) meaning "center", (o) meaning "thread" or (o) meaning "cherry blossom". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
ROSALIND
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAHZ-ə-lind
Rating: 57% based on 34 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements hros meaning "horse" and lind meaning "soft, tender, flexible". The Normans introduced this name to England, though it was not common. During the Middle Ages its spelling was influenced by the Latin phrase rosa linda "beautiful rose". The name was popularized by Edmund Spencer, who used it in his poetry, and by William Shakespeare, who used it for the heroine in his comedy 'As You Like It' (1599).
ROSEMARY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROZ-mə-ree
Rating: 64% based on 35 votes
Combination of ROSE and MARY. This name can also be given in reference to the herb, which gets its name from Latin ros marinus meaning "dew of the sea". It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
ROSETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ro-ZEHT-ta
Rating: 53% based on 33 votes
Italian diminutive of ROSA (1).
ROSIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RO-zee
Personal note: nn only
Rating: 41% based on 15 votes
Diminutive of ROSE.
ROWENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ro-EEN-ə
Rating: 56% based on 15 votes
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Latinized form of a Germanic name derived from the elements hrod "fame" and wunn "joy, bliss". According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, this was the name of a daughter of the Saxon chief Hengist. Alternatively, Geoffrey may have based it on a Welsh name. It was popularized by Sir Walter Scott, who used it for a character in his novel 'Ivanhoe' (1819).
SAFFRON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SAF-rən
Rating: 54% based on 30 votes
From the English word that refers either to a spice, the crocus flower from which it is harvested, or the yellow-orange colour of the spice. It is derived via Old French from Arabic زعفران (za'faran), itself probably from Persian meaning "gold leaves".
SARAI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: שָׂרָי(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: SEHR-ie(English)
Rating: 52% based on 31 votes
Means "my princess" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, this was Sarah's name before God changed it (see Genesis 17:15).
SCHEHERAZADE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: shə-HEHR-ə-zahd(English)
Personal note: GP
Rating: 39% based on 30 votes
Anglicized form of SHAHRAZAD.
SIOBHÁN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: shi-VAWN, SHI-wan
Rating: 54% based on 8 votes
Irish form of Jehanne, a Norman French variant of JEANNE.
SOLÈNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SAW-LEHN
Rating: 49% based on 14 votes
Variant of SOLANGE.
SONYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English
Other Scripts: Соня(Russian)
Pronounced: SO-nyə(Russian) SON-yə(English) SAWN-yə(English)
Rating: 40% based on 11 votes
Russian diminutive of SOPHIA. This is the name of a character in Leo Tolstoy's novel 'War and Peace' (1869, English translation 1886).
SWANHILDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Rare)
Personal note: GP and/or character only
Rating: 45% based on 28 votes
Variant of SWANHILD.
SYLVANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: sil-VAN-ə(English)
Rating: 42% based on 29 votes
Variant of SILVANA.
SYLVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German
Pronounced: SIL-vee-ə(English) SUYL-vee-ah(Finnish)
Rating: 65% based on 34 votes
Variant of SILVIA. This has been the most common English spelling since the 19th century.
TATYANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Татьяна(Russian) Татяна(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: tu-TYA-nə(Russian)
Rating: 39% based on 28 votes
Russian and Bulgarian form of TATIANA.
TETHYS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Τηθυς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: TEH-TUYS(Classical Greek) TEE-this(English) TEH-this(English)
Rating: 25% based on 28 votes
Derived from Greek τηθη (tethe) meaning "grandmother". In Greek mythology this was the name of a Titan associated with the sea. She was the wife of Oceanus.
URSULA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, Late Roman
Pronounced: UR-sə-lə(English) UR-syoo-lə(English) UWR-zoo-la(German) OOR-soo-lah(Finnish)
Rating: 48% based on 30 votes
Means "little bear", derived from a diminutive form of the Latin word ursa "she-bear". Saint Ursula was a legendary virgin princess of the 4th century who was martyred by the Huns while returning from a pilgrimage. In England the saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and the name came into general use at that time.
VALKYRIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: VAL-ki-ree(English)
Personal note: GP
Rating: 30% based on 29 votes
Means "chooser of the slain", derived from Old Norse valr "the slain" and kyrja "chooser". In Norse myth the Valkyries were maidens who led heroes killed in battle to Valhalla.
VERA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Georgian
Other Scripts: Вера(Russian, Serbian, Macedonian) ვერა(Georgian)
Pronounced: VYEH-rə(Russian) VEE-rə(English) VEHR-ə(English) VEH-ra(German, Dutch) VEH-rah(Swedish) BEH-ra(Spanish) VEH-raw(Hungarian)
Rating: 62% based on 34 votes
Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.
VERITY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VEHR-i-tee
Rating: 54% based on 31 votes
From the English word meaning "verity, truth". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
VIOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Czech
Pronounced: vie-O-lə(English) vi-O-lə(English) VIE-ə-lə(English) VYAW-la(Italian) vi-OO-la(Swedish) VYO-la(German) VEE-o-law(Hungarian)
Rating: 51% based on 33 votes
Means "violet" in Latin. This was the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's play 'Twelfth Night' (1602).
WHITNEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIT-nee
Rating: 27% based on 30 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "white island" in Old English. Its popular use as a feminine name was initiated by actress Whitney Blake (1925-2002) in the 1960s, and further boosted in the 1980s by singer Whitney Houston (1963-2012).
WILLEMINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: vi-lə-MEE-nah
Rating: 47% based on 31 votes
Dutch feminine form of WILLIAM.
YSEULT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Rating: 25% based on 6 votes
French form of ISOLDE.
ZELDA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ZEHL-də
Rating: 47% based on 32 votes
Short form of GRISELDA.
ZELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Rating: 49% based on 30 votes
German diminutive of MARCELLA.
ZIPPORAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew
Other Scripts: צִפּוֹרָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: zi-PAWR-ə(English) ZIP-ə-rə(English)
Rating: 53% based on 32 votes
From the Hebrew name צִפּוֹרָה (Tzipporah), derived from צִפּוֹר (tzippor) meaning "bird". In the Old Testament this is the name of the Midianite wife of Moses. She was the daughter of the priest Jethro.
JADE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: JAYD(English) ZHAD(French)
Rating: 46% based on 33 votes
From the name of the precious stone that is often used in carvings. It is derived from Spanish (piedra de la) ijada meaning "(stone of the) flank", relating to the belief that jade could cure renal colic. As a given name, it came into general use during the 1970s. It was initially unisex, though it is now mostly feminine.
LUX
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: LUKS(English)
Rating: 43% based on 30 votes
Derived from Latin lux meaning "light".
YUN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Chinese
Other Scripts: 云, 允, etc.(Chinese)
Pronounced: UYN
Rating: 38% based on 30 votes
From Chinese (yún) meaning "cloud" or (yǔn) meaning "allow, consent", as well as other Chinese characters that are pronounced in a similar way.
ADONAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Theology
Other Scripts: אֲדֹנָי(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 31% based on 16 votes
Means "my lord" in Hebrew. This was the title used to refer to the God of the Israelites, Yahweh, whose name was forbidden to be spoken.
ALASTAIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 73% based on 39 votes
Anglicized form of ALASDAIR.
ALBAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, French, Albanian, English (Rare)
Pronounced: AL-ban(German) AL-BAHN(French) AL-bən(English) AWL-bən(English)
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
From the Roman cognomen Albanus, which meant "from Alba". Alba (from Latin albus "white") was the name of various places within the Roman Empire, including the city Alba Longa. This name was borne by Saint Alban, the first British martyr (4th century). According to tradition, he sheltered a fugitive priest in his house. When his house was searched, he disguised himself as the priest, was arrested in his stead, and was beheaded. As an English name, Alban was occasionally used in the Middle Ages and was revived in the 18th century, though it is now uncommon.
ALDO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: AL-do(Italian)
Rating: 35% based on 33 votes
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element ald "old", and possibly also with adal "noble".
ALESSANDRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: a-lehs-SAN-dro
Rating: 49% based on 34 votes
Italian form of ALEXANDER. A famous bearer was Alessandro Volta (1745-1827), the Italian physicist who invented the battery.
AMBROSE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AM-broz
Rating: 60% based on 35 votes
From the Late Latin name Ambrosius, which was derived from the Greek name Αμβροσιος (Ambrosios) meaning "immortal". Saint Ambrose was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Milan, who is considered a Doctor of the Church. Due to the saint, the name came into general use in Christian Europe, though it was never particularly common in England.
ANGELO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ANG-jeh-lo
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Italian form of Angelus (see ANGEL).
ARTAXERXES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Persian (Hellenized), Biblical
Other Scripts: Αρταξερξης(Ancient Greek)
Personal note: GP
Rating: 39% based on 30 votes
Greek form of the Persian name Artakhshathra meaning "righteous ruler". This was the name of several Achaemenid Persian rulers. It was also borne by the founder of the Sassanid Empire, usually known by the Middle Persian form Ardashir.
ASA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: אָסָא(Hebrew)
Pronounced: AY-sə(English)
Rating: 50% based on 33 votes
Possibly means "healer" in Hebrew. This name was borne by the third king of Judah, as told in the Old Testament.
ASLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish, Kazakh, Azerbaijani, Chechen, Ossetian, Circassian
Other Scripts: Аслан(Kazakh, Chechen, Ossetian) Аслъан(Western Circassian) Аслъэн(Eastern Circassian)
Personal note: GP, mn only
Rating: 41% based on 31 votes
From Turkic arslan meaning "lion". This was a byname or title borne by several medieval Turkic rulers, including the Seljuk sultan Alp Arslan (a byname meaning "brave lion") who drove the Byzantines from Anatolia in the 11th century. The author C. S. Lewis later used the name Aslan for the main protagonist (a lion) in his 'Chronicles of Narnia' series of books, first appearing in 1950.
AURELIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: ow-REH-lyo
Rating: 47% based on 32 votes
Italian and Spanish form of AURELIUS.
AVERY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-və-ree, AYV-ree
Rating: 49% based on 32 votes
From a surname that was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.
CONRAD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: KAHN-rad(English) KAWN-rat(German)
Rating: 42% based on 5 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements kuoni "brave" and rad "counsel". This was the name of a 10th-century saint and bishop of Konstanz, in southern Germany. It was also borne by several medieval German kings and dukes. In England it was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has only been common since the 19th century when it was reintroduced from Germany.
CYRYL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: TSI-ril
Rating: 38% based on 29 votes
Polish form of CYRIL.
DARIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Lithuanian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: də-RIE-əs(English) DAR-ee-əs(English)
Rating: 48% based on 30 votes
Roman form of Δαρειος (Dareios), which was the Greek form of the Persian name Dārayavahush, which was composed of the elements dâraya "to possess" and vahu "good". Three ancient kings of Persia bore this name, including Darius the Great who expanded the Achaemenid Empire to its greatest extent. His forces invaded Greece but were defeated in the Battle of Marathon.

It has never been very common as a given name in the English-speaking world, though it rose in popularity after the middle of the 20th century. In Lithuania it may be given in honour of the Lithuanian-American aviator Steponas Darius (1896-1933), who died attempting to fly nonstop from New York to Lithuania. His surname was an Americanized form of the original Darašius.

DESMOND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: DEHZ-mənd(English)
Rating: 62% based on 18 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from Deasmhumhain meaning "South Munster", originally indicating a person who came from that region in Ireland.
DONOVAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: DAHN-ə-vən(English)
Rating: 59% based on 32 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Donndubháin meaning "descendant of DONNDUBHÁN".
ELIAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Dutch, Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ηλιας(Greek)
Pronounced: ə-LEE-əsh(Portuguese) eh-LEE-as(German) EH-lee-ahs(Finnish) i-LIE-əs(English) ee-LIE-əs(English)
Rating: 67% based on 33 votes
Form of ELIJAH used in several languages. This is the form used in the Greek New Testament.
ELLIOTT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ee-ət
Rating: 58% based on 33 votes
From an English surname that was derived from a diminutive of the medieval name ELIAS.
EMRYS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 35% based on 6 votes
Welsh form of AMBROSE. Emrys Wledig (or Ambrosius Aurelianus) was a Romano-British military leader who fought against the invading Anglo-Saxons in the 5th century. Tales of his life were used by the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth to create the character of Merlin, who he called Merlinus Ambrosius or Myrddin Emrys.
ENDYMION
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ενδυμιων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ehn-DIM-ee-ən(English)
Personal note: GP
Rating: 33% based on 29 votes
Derived from Greek ενδυειν (endyein) meaning "to dive into, to enter". In Greek mythology he was an Aeolian mortal loved by the moon goddess Selene, who asked Zeus to grant him eternal life. Zeus complied by putting him into an eternal sleep in a cave on Mount Latmos.
ERIK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, German, Dutch, English
Pronounced: EH-rik(Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch) EH-reek(Finnish, Slovak, Slovene, Hungarian) EHR-ik(English)
Rating: 54% based on 31 votes
Scandinavian form of ERIC. This was the name of kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway. King Erik IX of Sweden (12th century) is the patron saint of that country.
FIRDAUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Persian
Other Scripts: فردوس(Arabic) فردوس(Persian)
Rating: 33% based on 28 votes
Derived from the Arabic word فردوس (firdaws) meaning "paradise", ultimately derived from Avestan pairidaeza meaning "garden, enclosure". This name belonged to the 11th-century Persian poet and historian Firdausi, the author of the 'Shahnameh'.
HUGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, Dutch, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Pronounced: OO-gho(Spanish) OO-ghoo(European Portuguese) OO-goo(Brazilian Portuguese) HYOO-go(English) HUY-gho(Dutch) HOO-go(German) UY-GO(French)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of HUGH. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.
JAREK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish, Czech
Pronounced: YA-rehk(Polish)
Rating: 36% based on 28 votes
Diminutive of Slavic names beginning with the element yaru meaning "fierce, strong", such as JAROSŁAW or JAROSLAV.
JARETH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: JAR-əth(English)
Rating: 40% based on 15 votes
Probably a blend of JARED and GARETH. This was the name of the Goblin King, played by David Bowie, in the movie 'Labyrinth' (1986).
JULIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman, English, German, Finnish, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch
Pronounced: YOO-lee-oos(Classical Latin) JOO-lee-əs(English) YOO-lyuws(German) YOO-lyoos(Finnish, Danish) YOO-lee-uys(Swedish)
Rating: 60% based on 33 votes
From a Roman family name that was possibly derived from Greek ιουλος (ioulos) meaning "downy-bearded". Alternatively, it could be related to the name of the Roman god JUPITER. This was a prominent patrician family of Rome, who claimed descent from the mythological Julus, son of Aeneas. Its most notable member was Gaius Julius Caesar, who gained renown as a military leader for his clever conquest of Gaul. After a civil war he became the dictator of the Roman Republic, but was eventually stabbed to death in the senate.

Although this name was borne by several early saints, including a pope, it was rare during the Middle Ages. It was revived in Italy and France during the Renaissance, and was subsequently imported to England.

JUSTE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHUYST
Rating: 23% based on 12 votes
French form of JUSTUS.
KAI (3)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hawaiian
Rating: 56% based on 32 votes
Means "sea" in Hawaiian.
KENT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KENT
Personal note: honoring, MN only
Rating: 49% based on 34 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from Kent, the name of a county in England, which may be derived from a Brythonic word meaning "coastal district".
LARK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LAHRK
Rating: 49% based on 34 votes
From the English word for the type of songbird.
LAWRENCE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWR-əns
Rating: 51% based on 31 votes
Variant of LAURENCE (1). This spelling of the name is now more common than Laurence in the English-speaking world, probably because Lawrence is the usual spelling of the surname. The surname was borne by the author and poet D. H. Lawrence (1885-1930), as well as the revolutionary T. E. Lawrence (1888-1935), who was known as Lawrence of Arabia.
LOUIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English, Dutch
Pronounced: LWEE(French) LOO-is(English) LOO-ee(English) loo-EE(Dutch)
Rating: 56% based on 14 votes
French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of 18 kings of France, starting with Louis I the son of Charlemagne. Others include Louis IX (Saint Louis) who led two crusades and Louis XIV (called the Sun King) who was the ruler of France during the height of its power, the builder of the Palace of Versailles, and the longest reigning monarch in the history of Europe. It was also borne by kings of Germany (as Ludwig), Hungary (as Lajos), and other places.

Apart from royalty, this name was only moderately popular in France during the Middle Ages. After the French Revolution, when Louis XVI was guillotined, it became less common.

The Normans brought the name to England, where it was usually spelled Lewis, though the spelling Louis has been more common in America. Famous bearers include French scientist Louis Pasteur (1822-1895), Métis leader Louis Riel (1844-1885), who led a rebellion against Canada, Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), who wrote 'Treasure Island' and 'Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde', and American jazz musician Louis Armstrong (1901-1971).

LUCA (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: LOO-ka
Rating: 58% based on 32 votes
Italian and Romanian form of Lucas (see LUKE). This name was borne by Luca della Robbia, a Renaissance sculptor from Florence.
MASSIMO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: MAS-see-mo
Rating: 40% based on 30 votes
Italian form of MAXIMUS.
ORION
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ωριων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AW-REE-AWN(Classical Greek) o-RIE-ən(English)
Rating: 53% based on 32 votes
Meaning unknown, but possibly related to Greek ‘οριον (horion) meaning "boundary, limit". Alternatively it may be derived from Akkadian Uru-anna meaning "light of the heavens". This is the name of a constellation, which gets its name from a legendary Greek hunter who was killed by a scorpion sent by the earth goddess Gaia.
PHOENIX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: FEE-niks
Rating: 50% based on 35 votes
From the name of a beautiful immortal bird that appears in Egyptian and Greek mythology. After living for several centuries in the Arabian Desert, it would be consumed by fire and rise from its own ashes, with this cycle repeating every 500 years. The name of the bird was derived from Greek φοινιξ (phoinix) meaning "dark red".
RAPHAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: רָפָאֵל, רְפָאֵל(Ancient Hebrew) Ραφαηλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: RA-fa-ehl(German) RA-fee-əl(English) RA-fay-ehl(English) rah-fie-EHL(English)
Rating: 60% based on 30 votes
From the Hebrew name רָפָאֵל (Rafa'el) meaning "God heals", from the roots רָפָא (rafa') meaning "to heal" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". In Hebrew tradition Raphael is the name of an archangel. He appears in the Book of Tobit, in which he disguises himself as a man named Azarias and accompanies Tobias on his journey to Media, aiding him along the way. In the end he cures Tobias's father Tobit of his blindness. He is not mentioned in the New Testament, though tradition identifies him with the angel troubling the water in John 5:4.

This name has never been common in the English-speaking world, though it has been well-used elsewhere in Europe. A famous bearer was the 16th-century Renaissance master Raphael Sanzio (1483-1520), usually known simply as Raphael.

RHYS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: REES
Rating: 55% based on 33 votes
Means "enthusiasm" in Welsh. Several Welsh rulers have borne this name, including the 12th-century Rhys ap Gruffydd who fought against the invading Normans.
ROWAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: RO-ən(English)
Rating: 60% based on 21 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.
TINO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: TEE-no
Rating: 35% based on 28 votes
Short form of VALENTINO, MARTINO, and other names ending in tino.
VINCENT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak
Pronounced: VIN-sənt(English, Dutch) VEHN-SAHN(French)
Rating: 65% based on 34 votes
From the Roman name Vincentius, which was from Latin vincere "to conquer". This name was popular among early Christians, and it was borne by many saints. As an English name, Vincent has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 19th century. Famous bearers include the French priest Saint Vincent de Paul (1581-1660) and the post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890).
BLAIR
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: BLEHR(English)
Rating: 57% based on 6 votes
From a Scottish surname that is derived from Gaelic blár meaning "plain, field, battlefield".
RORY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: RAWR-ee
Rating: 45% based on 34 votes
Anglicized form of RUAIDHRÍ.
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