kookiemonster71's Personal Name List

ADAIR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Rating: 60% based on 8 votes

From an English surname which was derived from the given name EDGAR.

ADALIA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: אֲדַלְיָא (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: a-də-LIE-ə (English), ə-DAH-lee-ə (English)

Rating: 59% based on 8 votes

Possibly means "YAHWEH is just" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a son of Haman.

ADARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: אַדָרָה (Hebrew)

Rating: 44% based on 8 votes

Means "noble" in Hebrew.

ADELA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Polish, Romanian, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: ə-DEL-ə (English), ah-DE-lah (Polish)

Rating: 69% based on 8 votes

Originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element adal meaning "noble". Saint Adela was a 7th-century Frankish princess who founded a monastery at Pfazel in France. This name was also borne by a daughter of William the Conqueror.

ADORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: ah-DHO-rah

Rating: 48% based on 8 votes

Short form of ADORACIÓN

ALAINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: ə-LAYN-ə

Rating: 49% based on 7 votes

Variant of of ALANA, probably influenced by ELAINE.

ALANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ə-LAN-ə

Rating: 53% based on 7 votes

Feminine form of ALAN

ALINA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic

Rating: 47% based on 7 votes

Means "noble" in Arabic.

ALONDRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: ah-LON-drah

Rating: 62% based on 6 votes

Derived from Spanish alondra meaning "lark".

AMANDINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: a-mawn-DEEN

Rating: 68% based on 5 votes

French diminutive of AMANDA

AMAR (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Indian

Other Scripts: अमर (Hindi)

Rating: 34% based on 5 votes

Means "immortal" in Sanskrit.

AMARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Western African, Igbo

Rating: 62% based on 5 votes

Means "grace" in Igbo.

AMBROSE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AM-broz

Rating: 63% based on 3 votes

From the Late Latin name Ambrosius, which was derived from the Greek name Αμβροσιος (Ambrosios) meaning "immortal". Saint Ambrose was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Milan, who is considered a Doctor of the Church. Due to the saint, the name came into general use in Christian Europe, though it was never particularly common in England.

APOLENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Czech, Slovak

Rating: 44% based on 5 votes

Czech and Slovak form of APOLLONIA

APOLLINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Rating: 72% based on 5 votes

French form of APOLLONIA

ASA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: אָסָא (Hebrew)

Pronounced: AY-sə (English)

Rating: 56% based on 17 votes

Means "doctor" in Hebrew. This name was borne by a king of Judah in the Old Testament.

ASHA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Indian

Other Scripts: आशा (Hindi)

Rating: 60% based on 5 votes

Derived from Sanskrit आशा (asha) meaning "wish, desire, hope".

AURELIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Roman, Italian, Romanian, Polish

Pronounced: ow-RE-lyah (Italian), ow-REL-yah (Polish)

Rating: 75% based on 6 votes

Feminine form of AURELIUS

AUTUMN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AW-təm

Rating: 64% based on 5 votes

From the name of the season, ultimately from Latin autumnus. This name has been in general use since the 1960s.

AVISHAI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: אֲבִישַׁי (Hebrew)

Rating: 35% based on 4 votes

Hebrew form of ABISHAI

BEVERLY

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BEV-ər-lee

Rating: 45% based on 6 votes

From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "beaver stream" in Old English. It came into use as a masculine given name in the 19th century, and it became common as an American feminine name after the publication of George Barr McCutcheon's novel 'Beverly of Graustark' (1904).

CAMELLIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: kə-MEEL-ee-ə, kə-MEL-ee-ə

Rating: 50% based on 6 votes

From the name of the flowering shrub, which was named for the botanist and missionary Georg Josef Kamel.

CAPRINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Various

Rating: 25% based on 2 votes

From the name of the Italian island of Capri.

CARINA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German

Pronounced: kə-REEN-ə (English), kah-REE-nah (German)

Rating: 48% based on 4 votes

Elaborated form of CARA. This name is also borne by a constellation in the southern sky, in which case the name means "keel" in Latin, referring to a part of Jason's ship the Argo.

CASSANDRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Κασσανδρα (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: kə-SAN-drə (English), kə-SAHN-drə (English), kahs-SAHN-drah (Italian)

Rating: 54% based on 7 votes

From the Greek Κασσανδρα (Kassandra), which possibly meant "shining upon man", derived from κεκασμαι (kekasmai) "to shine" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek myth Cassandra was a Trojan princess, the daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but when she spurned his advances he cursed her so nobody would believe her prophecies.

In the Middle Ages this name was common in England due to the popularity of medieval tales about the Trojan War. It subsequently became rare, but was revived in the 20th century.

CASSARAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: kə-SER-ə, KAS-ə-rə

Rating: 45% based on 4 votes

Recently created name intended to mean "what will be, will be". It is from the title of the 1956 song 'Que Sera, Sera', which was taken from the Italian phrase che sara, sara. The phrase que sera, sera is not grammatically correct in any Romance language.

CELESTE

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Italian, English

Pronounced: che-LE-ste (Italian), sə-LEST (English)

Rating: 66% based on 7 votes

Italian feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS. It is also the English feminine form.

CELINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Polish

Pronounced: tse-LEE-nah

Rating: 40% based on 5 votes

Short form of MARCELINA

CÉLINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: say-LEEN

Rating: 57% based on 6 votes

French feminine form of CAELINUS. This name can also function as a short form of MARCELINE.

CHARLES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: CHAHR-əlz (English), SHAHRL (French)

Rating: 80% based on 6 votes

From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word which meant "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic element hari meaning "army, warrior".

The popularity of the name in continental Europe was due to the fame of Charles the Great (742-814), commonly known as Charlemagne, a king of the Franks who came to rule over most of Europe. It was subsequently borne by several Holy Roman Emperors, as well as kings of France, Spain, Portugal, Sweden and Hungary. The name did not become common in Britain until the 17th century when it was carried by the Stuart king Charles I. It had been introduced into the Stuart royal family by Mary Queen of Scots, who had been raised in France.

Famous bearers of the name include naturalist Charles Darwin (1809-1882) who revolutionized biology with his theory of evolution, novelist Charles Dickens (1812-1870) who wrote such works as 'Great Expectations' and 'A Tale of Two Cities', French statesman Charles de Gaulle (1890-1970), and American cartoonist Charles Schulz (1922-2000), the creator of the 'Peanuts' comic strip.

CICELY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SIS-ə-lee

Rating: 72% based on 5 votes

Medieval variant of CECILY

CLAIRE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: KLER

Rating: 85% based on 8 votes

French form of CLARA

CLARICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Rating: 40% based on 51 votes

Possibly from a medieval French form of Claritia, a derivative of CLARA. It was brought to England in the Middle Ages.

CLARISA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: klah-REE-sah

Rating: 58% based on 5 votes

Spanish form of CLARISSA

CLARISSA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese

Pronounced: klə-RIS-ə (English)

Rating: 82% based on 5 votes

Latinate form of CLARICE

CLARK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KLAHRK

Rating: 15% based on 2 votes

From an English surname meaning "cleric" or "scribe", from Old English clerec which originally meant "priest". A famous bearer of the surname was William Clark (1770-1838), an explorer of the west of North America. It was also borne by the American actor Clark Gable (1901-1960).

CYNTHIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Κυνθια (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: SIN-thee-ə (English)

Rating: 41% based on 27 votes

Latinized form of Greek Κυνθια (Kynthia) which means "woman from Kynthos". This was an epithet of the Greek moon goddess Artemis, given because Kynthos was the mountain on Delos on which she and her twin brother Apollo were born. It was not used as a given name until the Renaissance, and it did not become common in the English-speaking world until the 19th century.

DAFINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Albanian, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Дафина (Macedonian)

Rating: 68% based on 5 votes

Albanian and Macedonian form of DAPHNE

DAHLIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: DAL-yə

Rating: 77% based on 7 votes

From the name of the flower, which was named for the Swedish botanist Anders Dahl.

DAMIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Polish, Dutch

Pronounced: DAY-mee-ən (English), DAHM-yahn (Polish)

Rating: 37% based on 10 votes

From the Greek name Δαμιανος (Damianos) which was derived from Greek δαμαω (damao) "to tame". Saint Damian was martyred with his twin brother Cosmo in Syria early in the 4th century. They are the patron saints of physicians. Due his renown, the name came into general use in Christian Europe. Another saint by this name was Peter Damian, an 11th-century cardinal and theologian from Italy.

DAMON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology, English

Other Scripts: Δαμων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: DAY-mən (English)

Rating: 32% based on 10 votes

Derived from Greek δαμαω (damao) meaning "to tame". According to Greek legend, Damon and Pythias were friends who lived on Syracuse in the 4th century BC. When Pythias was sentenced to death, he was allowed to temporarily go free on the condition that Damon take his place in prison. Pythias returned just before Damon was to be executed in his place, and the king was so impressed with their loyalty to one another that he pardoned Pythias. As an English given name, it has only been regularly used since the 20th century.

DANIELA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Polish, Czech, Romanian, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Slovene, English

Pronounced: dahn-YE-lah (German, Polish)

Feminine form of DANIEL

DANTE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: DAHN-te

Rating: 47% based on 26 votes

Medieval short form of DURANTE. The most notable bearer of this name was Dante Alighieri, the 13th-century Italian poet who wrote 'The Divine Comedy'.

DANYA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: דַּנְיָה (Hebrew)

Rating: 42% based on 6 votes

Feminine form of DAN (1)

DAVID

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: דָּוִד (Hebrew), Давид (Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: DAY-vid (English), dah-VEED (Jewish), da-VEED (French), DAH-vit (German, Dutch), dah-VEET (Russian)

Rating: 62% based on 5 votes

From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was probably derived from Hebrew דוד (dwd) meaning "beloved". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.

This name has been used in Britain since the Middle Ages. It has been especially popular in Wales, where it is used in honour of the 5th-century patron saint of Wales (also called Dewi), as well as in Scotland, where it was borne by two kings. Famous bearers include empiricist philosopher David Hume (1711-1776), explorer David Livingstone (1813-1873) and soccer player David Beckham (1975-). This is also the name of the hero of Charles Dickens' semi-autobiographical novel 'David Copperfield' (1850).

DEAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DEEN

Rating: 58% based on 6 votes

From a surname, see DEAN (1) and DEAN (2). The actor James Dean (1931-1955) was a famous bearer of the surname.

DELILAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English

Other Scripts: דְּלִילָה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: di-LIE-lə (English)

Rating: 80% based on 3 votes

Means "delicate, weak, languishing" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is the lover of Samson, whom she betrays to the Philistines by cutting his hair, which is the source of his power. Despite her character flaws, the name began to be used by the Puritans in the 17th century. It has been used occasionally in the English-speaking world since that time.

DELORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: də-LAWR-ə

Rating: 56% based on 5 votes

Altered form of DOLORES

DESMOND

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Irish

Pronounced: DEZ-mənd

Rating: 78% based on 6 votes

From an Irish surname which was derived from Deasmhumhain meaning "South Munster", originally indicating a person who came from that region in Ireland.

DEVIKA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Indian

Other Scripts: देविका (Hindi)

Means "little goddess" from Sanskrit देवी (devi) "goddess" and (ka) "little".

DIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, German, Dutch, Romanian, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Roman Mythology

Other Scripts: Диана (Russian, Bulgarian)

Pronounced: die-AN-ə (English), dee-AH-nah (Italian, German, Dutch)

Rating: 68% based on 5 votes

Probably derived from an old Indo-European root meaning "heavenly, divine", related to dyeus (see ZEUS). Diana was a Roman goddess of the moon, hunting, forests, and childbirth, often identified with the Greek goddess Artemis.

As a given name, Diana has been regularly used since the Renaissance. It became more common in the English-speaking world following Sir Walter Scott's novel 'Rob Roy' (1817), which featured a character named Diana Vernon. It also appeared in George Meredith's novel 'Diana of the Crossways' (1885). A notable bearer was Diana Spencer (1961-1997), the Princess of Wales.

DONOVAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English

Rating: 44% based on 7 votes

From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Donndubháin meaning "descendent of DONNDUBHÁN".

DRAKE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DRAYK

Rating: 55% based on 2 votes

From an English surname derived from the Old Norse given name Draki or the Old English given name Draca both meaning "dragon".

DREW

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DROO

Rating: 48% based on 5 votes

Short form of ANDREW

ELISE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English

Pronounced: e-LEE-zə (German), i-LEES (English), i-LEEZ (English)

Rating: 50% based on 2 votes

Short form of ELIZABETH

ELLIS (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-is

Rating: 60% based on 6 votes

From an English surname which was derived from the given name ELIJAH.

ÉLODIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: ay-lo-DEE

Personal note: Rhymes with Melody

Rating: 77% based on 6 votes

French form of ALODIA

ÉLOÏSE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: ay-lo-EEZ

Rating: 74% based on 7 votes

French form of ELOISE

EMANUEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Romanian, Portuguese, Czech, Croatian

Pronounced: e-MAH-nuw-el (German)

Rating: 56% based on 5 votes

Form of EMMANUEL

EMMANUELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: e-man-WEL

Rating: 50% based on 6 votes

French feminine form of EMMANUEL

ESHE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Eastern African, Swahili

Rating: 48% based on 5 votes

Variant of ASHA (2)

ESTELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: es-TEL

Rating: 62% based on 6 votes

From an Old French name which was derived from Latin stella, meaning "star". It was rare in the English-speaking world in the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due to the character Estella Havisham in Charles Dickens' novel 'Great Expectations' (1860).

EVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Macedonian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: Ева (Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Church Slavic), ევა (Georgian)

Pronounced: E-vah (Italian, Spanish, Danish), EE-və (English), E-fah (German), AY-vah (Dutch)

Rating: 57% based on 7 votes

Latinate form of EVE. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. It is also a variant Russian transcription of YEVA. This name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.

EVANDER (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology

Other Scripts: Ευανδρος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ee-VAN-dər (English), ə-VAN-dər (English)

Rating: 44% based on 30 votes

Variant of Evandrus, Latin form of the Greek name Ευανδρος (Euandros) which meant "good man", derived from Greek ευ "good" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Roman mythology Evander was an Arcadian hero of the Trojan War who founded the city of Pallantium near the spot where Rome was later built.

EVE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Biblical

Other Scripts: חַוָּה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: EEV (English), EV (French)

Rating: 57% based on 6 votes

From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חוה (chawah) "to breathe" or the related word חיה (chayah) "to live". According to the Old Testament Book of Genesis, Eve and Adam were the first humans. She gave the forbidden fruit to Adam, causing their expulsion from the Garden of Eden. Despite this potentially negative association, the name was occasionally used during the Middle Ages. In the English-speaking world both Eve and the Latin form Eva were revived in the 19th century.

FARAI

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Southern African, Shona

Rating: 52% based on 5 votes

Means "rejoice" in Shona.

FARRAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: فرح (Arabic)

Rating: 40% based on 6 votes

Variant transcription of FARAH

FORREST

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: FAWR-əst

Rating: 62% based on 5 votes

From an English surname meaning "forest", originally belonging to a person who lived near a forest. In America it has sometimes been used in honour of the Confederate Civil War general Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-1877). This name was borne by the title character in the movie 'Forrest Gump' (1994) about a loveable simpleton. Use of the name increased when the movie was released, but has since faded away.

FRANCESCA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Catalan

Pronounced: frahn-CHES-kah (Italian)

Rating: 68% based on 6 votes

Italian and Catalan feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).

FREEMAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: FREE-mən

Rating: 42% based on 6 votes

From an English surname meaning "free man". It originally denoted a person who was not a serf.

GLORIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Polish

Pronounced: GLAWR-ee-ə (English), glo-REE-ah (Italian), GLAW-ryah (Polish)

Rating: 54% based on 5 votes

Means "glory" in Latin. The name (first?) appeared in E. D. E. N. Southworth's novel 'Gloria' (1891) and subsequently in George Bernard Shaw's play 'You Never Can Tell' (1898). It was popularized in the early 20th century by American actress Gloria Swanson (1899-1983). Another famous bearer is feminist Gloria Steinem (1934-).

HADRIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: History

Pronounced: HAY-dree-ən (English)

Rating: 38% based on 45 votes

From the Roman cognomen Hadrianus, which meant "from Hadria" in Latin. Hadria was a town in northern Italy (it gave its name to the Adriatic Sea). A famous bearer of the name was Publius Aelius Hadrianus, better known as Hadrian, a 2nd-century Roman emperor who built a wall across northern Britain.

HALINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Polish

Pronounced: hah-LEE-nah

Rating: 15% based on 2 votes

Polish form of GALINA

HARMON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HAHR-mən

From a surname which was derived from the given name HERMAN.

HARMONY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HAHR-mə-nee

Rating: 62% based on 6 votes

From the English word harmony, ultimately deriving from Greek ‘αρμονια (harmonia).

HYPATIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: ‘Υπατια (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 50% based on 5 votes

Derived from Greek ‘υπατος (hypatos) meaning "highest, supreme". Hypatia of Alexandria was a 5th-century philosopher and mathematician, daughter of the mathematician Theon.

IMANI

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Eastern African, Swahili, African American

Rating: 38% based on 5 votes

Means "faith" in Swahili, ultimately of Arabic origin.

INDIRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Indian, Hinduism

Other Scripts: इन्दिरा (Hindi, Sanskrit)

Rating: 57% based on 6 votes

Means "beauty" in Sanskrit. This is another name of Lakshmi, the wife of the Hindu god Vishnu. A notable bearer was India's first female prime minister, Indira Gandhi (1917-1984).

JACINDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Rating: 68% based on 6 votes

Variant of JACINTA

JOELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Rating: 43% based on 6 votes

Feminine form of JOEL

JOSEPHINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German

Pronounced: JO-sə-feen (English), yo-ze-FEE-nə (German)

Rating: 47% based on 6 votes

English and German form of JOSÉPHINE

KAMIL (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: كامل (Arabic)

Rating: 29% based on 26 votes

Means "perfect" in Arabic.

KANE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 32% based on 5 votes

Anglicized form of CATHÁN

KETURAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: קְטוּרָה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: ki-TOOR-ə (English), kee-TYOOR-ə (English)

Rating: 47% based on 6 votes

Means "incense" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is Abraham's wife after Sarah dies.

LEANDER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Λεανδρος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: lee-AN-dər (English)

Rating: 67% based on 7 votes

From the Greek Λεανδρος (Leandros) which means "lion of a man" from Greek λεων (leon) "lion" and ανδρος (andros) "of a man". In Greek legend Leander was the lover of Hero. Every night he swam across the Hellespont to meet her, but on one occasion he was drowned when a storm arose. When Hero saw his dead body she threw herself into the waters and perished.

LEELA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Indian

Other Scripts: लीला (Hindi)

Rating: 42% based on 5 votes

Variant transcription of LILA (1)

LENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Russian, English, Italian, Portuguese

Other Scripts: Лена (Russian)

Pronounced: LE-nah (German, Italian), LYE-nah (Russian), LEE-nə (English)

Rating: 60% based on 2 votes

Scandinavian, German and Polish short form of HELENA or MAGDALENA, and a Russian short form of YELENA.

LENORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Rating: 66% based on 5 votes

Short form of ELENORA

LEO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman

Pronounced: LE-o (German), LAY-o (Dutch), LEE-o (English)

Rating: 50% based on 2 votes

Derived from Latin leo "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.

LIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, English

Rating: 50% based on 5 votes

Short form of ELIANA (1), JULIANA, LILIANA, and other names that end in liana. This is also the word for a type of vine that grows in jungles.

LILIAN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: LIL-ee-ən (English)

Rating: 57% based on 6 votes

Variant of LILLIAN

LILIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, English

Pronounced: lee-LYAH-nah (Italian, Polish), lil-ee-AN-ə (English)

Rating: 66% based on 7 votes

Latinate form of LILLIAN

LILLIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LIL-ee-ə, LIL-yə

Rating: 65% based on 6 votes

Short form of LILLIAN or an elaborated form of LILY.

LILLIAN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LIL-ee-ən

Rating: 70% based on 2 votes

Probably originally a diminutive of ELIZABETH. It may also be considered an elaborated form of LILY, from the Latin word for "lily" lilium. This name has been used in England since the 16th century.

LINNAEA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: li-NAY-ə

Rating: 37% based on 6 votes

From the word for the type of flower, also called the twinflower (see LINNÉA).

LINNÉA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish

Pronounced: lin-NE-ah

Rating: 63% based on 7 votes

From the name of a flower, also known as the twinflower. The Swedish botanist Carolus Linnaeus named it after himself, it being his favourite flower.

LIONEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

Pronounced: lee-o-NEL

Rating: 50% based on 6 votes

Diminutive of LÉON. A notable bearer is Argentine soccer star Lionel Messi (1987-).

LIORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: לִיאוֹרָה (Hebrew)

Rating: 80% based on 5 votes

Strictly feminine form of LIOR

LIVIA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Romanian, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: LEE-vyah (Italian)

Rating: 55% based on 6 votes

Feminine form of LIVIUS. This was the name of the wife of the Roman emperor Augustus.

LORENZO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, Spanish

Pronounced: lo-REN-tso (Italian), lo-REN-tho (Spanish), lo-REN-so (Latin American Spanish)

Rating: 48% based on 5 votes

Italian and Spanish form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)). Lorenzo de' Medici, known as the Magnificent, was a ruler of Florence during the Renaissance. He was also a great patron of the arts who employed Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Botticelli and other famous artists.

LYDIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Finnish, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Λυδια (Ancient Greek), Лѷдіа (Church Slavic)

Pronounced: LID-ee-ə (English), LUY-dee-ah (German)

Rating: 80% based on 8 votes

Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. In the modern era the name has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

MAGDALENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Spanish, Occitan, Slovene, Czech, Polish, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian, Romanian, Finnish, English

Other Scripts: Магдалена (Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)

Pronounced: mahk-dah-LE-nah (German), mahg-dah-LE-nah (Polish), mag-da-LAY-na (English)

Rating: 75% based on 6 votes

Latinate form of MAGDALENE

MAGDALENE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Danish, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Μαγδαληνη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: mahk-dah-LE-nə (German), MAG-də-lən (English), MAG-də-leen (English)

Rating: 68% based on 6 votes

From a title which meant "of Magdala". Mary Magdalene, a character in the New Testament, was named thus because she was from Magdala - a village on the Sea of Galilee whose name meant "tower" in Hebrew. She was cleaned of evil spirits by Jesus and then remained with him during his ministry, witnessing the crucifixion and the resurrection. She was a popular saint in the Middle Ages, and the name became common then. In England it is traditionally rendered Madeline, while Magdalene or Magdalen is the learned form.

MAHALIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Rating: 36% based on 5 votes

Variant of MAHALA

MARGAUX

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: mar-GO

Rating: 60% based on 5 votes

Variant of MARGOT influenced by the name of the wine-producing French town. It was borne by Margaux Hemingway (1954-1996), granddaughter of author Ernest Hemingway, who had it changed from Margot.

MARIEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MER-ee-əl, MAR-ee-əl

Rating: 60% based on 5 votes

Diminutive of MARY influenced by MURIEL. In the case of actress Mariel Hemingway (1961-), the name is from the Cuban town of Mariel.

MARIELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Rating: 65% based on 6 votes

French diminutive of MARIE

MARJANI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Eastern African, Swahili

Rating: 45% based on 4 votes

Means "coral" in Swahili, originally a borrowing from Arabic.

MARLENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Polish

Pronounced: mahr-LEEN-ə (English), mahr-LE-nah (Polish)

Rating: 60% based on 5 votes

Latinate form of MARLENE

MARQUISE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: African American (Modern)

Pronounced: mahr-KEE

Rating: 30% based on 5 votes

Variant of MARQUIS. Technically, marquise is the feminine form of the title marquis.

MAXWELL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAKS-wel

Rating: 58% based on 6 votes

From a Scottish surname meaning "Mack's stream", from the name Mack, a short form of the Scandinavian name MAGNUS, combined with Old English wella "stream". A famous bearer of the surname was James Maxwell (1831-1879), a Scottish physicist who studied gases and electromagnetism.

MILENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Czech, Russian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Polish, Italian

Other Scripts: Милена (Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: mee-LE-nah (Italian)

Rating: 54% based on 5 votes

Feminine form of MILAN. It began to be used in Italy in honour of Milena Vukotić (1847-1923), mother of Helen of Montenegro, the wife of Italian king Victor Emmanuel III. In Italy it can also be considered a combination of MARIA and ELENA.

NADIRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: نادرة (Arabic)

Rating: 15% based on 2 votes

Feminine form of NADIR

NA'IMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: نعيمة (Arabic)

Rating: 64% based on 5 votes

Feminine form of NA'IM

NALINI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Indian

Other Scripts: नलिनी (Hindi)

Personal note: Like NALINA as well but not listed here.

Means "lotus" in Sanskrit.

NAOMI (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Japanese

Other Scripts: 直美 (Japanese)

Rating: 53% based on 6 votes

From Japanese 直 (nao) "honest, straight" and 美 (mi) "beautiful".

NEVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Rating: 44% based on 5 votes

Short form of GENEVA

NIOBE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Νιοβη (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 38% based on 5 votes

Meaning unknown. In Greek mythology Niobe was the daughter of Tantalos, a king of Asia Minor. Because she boasted that she was superior to Leto, Leto's children Apollo and Artemis killed her 14 children with poison arrows. In grief, Niobe was turned to stone by Zeus.

NIZHONI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Native American, Navajo

Means "beautiful" in Navajo.

NOELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: no-EL

Rating: 40% based on 5 votes

English form of NOËLLE

OCTAVIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: ahk-TAYV-ee-ə (English)

Rating: 66% based on 5 votes

Feminine form of OCTAVIUS. Octavia was the wife of Mark Antony and the sister of Roman emperor Augustus. In 19th-century England it was sometimes given to the eighth-born child.

ODELIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Rating: 77% based on 6 votes

Form of ODILIA

ODESSA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Various

Rating: 72% based on 5 votes

From the name of a Ukrainian city that sits on the north coast of the Black Sea. This name can also be used as a feminine form of ODYSSEUS.

OLIVIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: ə-LIV-ee-ə (English), o-LEE-vee-ah (German)

Rating: 60% based on 6 votes

This name was first used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy 'Twelfth Night' (1602). Shakespeare may have based it on OLIVER or OLIVA, or perhaps directly on the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.

The name has been used in the English-speaking world since the 18th century, though it did not become overly popular until the last half of the 20th century. Its rise in popularity in America was precipitated by a character on the 1970s television series 'The Waltons'.

PHAEDRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Φαιδρα (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 67% based on 6 votes

From the Greek Φαιδρα (Phaidra), derived from φαιδρος (phaidros) meaning "bright". Phaedra was the daughter of Minos and the wife of Theseus in Greek mythology. Aphrodite caused her to fall in love with her stepson Hippolytos, and after she was rejected by him she killed herself.

QUINCY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KWINT-see

Rating: 48% based on 5 votes

From a surname which was derived (via the place name CUINCHY) from the given name QUINTUS. A famous bearer was John Quincy Adams (1767-1848), sixth president of the United States, who was born in the town of Quincy, Massachusetts.

RACHELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: RAY-chəl, rə-SHEL

Rating: 34% based on 5 votes

Variant of RACHEL influenced by the spelling of ROCHELLE.

RAMSEY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: RAM-zee

Rating: 42% based on 43 votes

From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "wild-garlic island" in Old English.

RAQUEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English

Pronounced: rah-KEL (Spanish)

Rating: 48% based on 5 votes

Spanish and Portuguese form of RACHEL

REUBEN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, English

Other Scripts: רְאוּבֵן (Hebrew)

Pronounced: ROO-bən (English)

Rating: 63% based on 7 votes

Means "behold, a son" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the eldest son of Jacob and Leah and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. It has been used as a Christian name in Britain since the Protestant Reformation.

RIGEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Astronomy

Derived from Arabic الرجل (al-Rijl) meaning "foot". This is the name of the star that forms the left foot of the constellation Orion.

ROSA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English

Pronounced: RO-sah (Spanish, Dutch), RAW-zah (Italian), RO-zə (English)

Rating: 54% based on 5 votes

Generally this can be considered a Latin form of ROSE, though originally it may have come from the Germanic name ROZA (2). This was the name of a 13th-century saint from Viterbo in Italy. In the English-speaking world it was first used in the 19th century. A famous bearer was civil rights activist Rosa Parks (1913-2005).

ROSAIRE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

Pronounced: ro-ZER

Rating: 60% based on 5 votes

Means "rosary" French.

SAFIRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Esperanto

Pronounced: sah-FEE-rah

Personal note: suh FIE ruh

Rating: 62% based on 5 votes

Means "like a sapphire" in Esperanto.

SAGE

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: SAYJ

Rating: 54% based on 5 votes

From the English word sage, which denotes either a type of spice or else a wise person.

SAPPHIRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical

Pronounced: sə-FIE-rə (English)

From the Greek name Σαπφειρη (Sappheire), which was from Greek σαπφειρος (sappheiros) meaning "sapphire" or "lapis lazuli" (ultimately derived from the Hebrew word סַפִּיר (sappir)). Sapphira is a character in Acts in the New Testament who is killed by God for lying.

SEIJA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Finnish

Derived from Finnish seijas meaning "tranquil, serene".

SHANIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: shə-NIE-ə

Rating: 34% based on 5 votes

In the case of singer Shania Twain (1965-), it is based on an Ojibwa phrase meaning "she's on her way".

SILAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Σιλας (Greek)

Pronounced: SIE-ləs (English)

Rating: 55% based on 2 votes

Short form of SILVANUS. This is the name of a companion of Saint Paul in the New Testament. It was not used as an English name until after the Protestant Reformation.

SKYE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: SKIE

Rating: 54% based on 5 votes

From the name of the Isle of Skye off the west coast of Scotland. It is sometimes considered a variant of SKY.

SOLOMON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English, Jewish

Other Scripts: שְׁלֹמֹה (Hebrew)

Pronounced: SAHL-ə-mən (English)

Rating: 78% based on 5 votes

From the Hebrew name שְׁלֹמֹה (Shelomoh) which was derived from Hebrew שָׁלוֹם (shalom) "peace". Solomon was a king of Israel, the son of David, renowned for his wisdom. Supposedly, he wrote the Book of Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and the Song of Solomon in the Old Testament. This name has never been overly common in the Christian world, and it is considered typically Jewish.

SUBIRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Eastern African, Swahili

Rating: 38% based on 4 votes

Means "patience" in Swahili.

SUNITA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Indian, Hinduism

Other Scripts: सुनीता (Hindi, Sanskrit)

Rating: 50% based on 5 votes

Means "well conducted, polite", derived from the Sanskrit prefix सु (su) "good" combined with नीत (nita) "conducted". In Hindu legend this is the name of the daughter of King Anga of Bengal.

TAHIRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: طاهرة (Arabic)

Rating: 38% based on 4 votes

Feminine form of TAHIR

TAMAR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: תָּמָר (Hebrew), თამარ (Georgian)

Pronounced: TAH-mahr (English), TAY-mahr (English)

Rating: 50% based on 5 votes

Means "palm tree" in Hebrew. Tamar is the daughter-in-law of Judah in the Old Testament. Also in the Old Testament, this is the name of a daughter of David. This name was borne by a 12th-century ruling queen of Georgia who presided over the kingdom at the peak of its power.

THADDEUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Pronounced: THAD-ee-əs (English)

Rating: 72% based on 5 votes

From Θαδδαιος (Thaddaios), the Greek form of the Aramaic name Thaddai. It is possibly derived from a word meaning "heart", but it may in fact be an Aramaic form of a Greek name such as Θεοδωρος (see THEODORE). In the Gospel of Matthew, Thaddaeus is listed as one of the twelve apostles, though elsewhere in the New Testament his name is omitted and Jude's appears instead. It is likely that the two names refer to the same person.

THELONIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Various

Rating: 50% based on 5 votes

Latinized form of Tielo (see TILO). A famous bearer was jazz musician Thelonious Monk (1917-1982).

THERON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Θηρων (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 40% based on 4 votes

Means "hunter" in Greek.

TIFFANY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: TIF-ə-nee

Rating: 50% based on 4 votes

Medieval form of THEOPHANIA. This name was traditionally given to girls born on the Epiphany (January 6), the festival commemorating the visit of the Magi to the infant Jesus. The name died out after the Middle Ages, but it was revived by the movie 'Breakfast at Tiffany's' (1961), the title of which refers to the Tiffany's jewelry store in New York.

TIMO (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Finnish, German, Dutch

Pronounced: TEE-mo (German, Dutch)

Personal note: TEE-moh

Rating: 38% based on 5 votes

Finnish, German and Dutch short form of Timotheus (see TIMOTHY).

TIRZAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: תִּרְצָה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: TIR-zə (English)

Rating: 53% based on 3 votes

From the Hebrew name תִּרְצָה (Tirtzah) meaning "favourable". Tirzah is the name of one of the daughters of Zelophehad in the Old Testament. It also occurs in the Old Testament as a place name, the early residence of the kings of the northern kingdom.

TRUMAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: TROO-mən

Rating: 52% based on 5 votes

From a surname which meant "trusty man" in Middle English. A famous bearer of the surname was American president Harry S. Truman (1884-1972). It was also borne by American writer Truman Capote (1924-1984).

ULYSSES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Roman Mythology, English

Pronounced: yoo-LIS-eez (English)

Latin form of ODYSSEUS. It was borne by Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), the commander of the Union forces during the American Civil War, who went on to become an American president. Irish author James Joyce used it as the title of his book 'Ulysses' (1920), which loosely parallels Homer's epic the 'Odyssey'.

VALENTINE (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: va-lawn-TEEN

Rating: 56% based on 5 votes

French feminine form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)).

VANCE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: VANTS

Rating: 48% based on 5 votes

From an English surname which was derived from Old English fenn meaning "marsh, fen".

VERENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Late Roman

Pronounced: ve-RE-nah (German)

Rating: 60% based on 7 votes

Possibly related to Latin verus "true". This might also be a Coptic form of the Ptolemaic name BERENICE. Saint Verena was a 3rd-century Egyptian-born nurse who went with the Theban Legion to Switzerland. After the legion was massacred she settled near Zurich.

VERITY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Pronounced: VER-i-tee

Rating: 61% based on 7 votes

From the English word meaning "verity, truth". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.

VERONA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Various

Rating: 30% based on 5 votes

From the name of the city in Italy, which is itself of unknown meaning.

VINCENT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak

Pronounced: VIN-sənt (English), ven-SAWN (French)

Rating: 67% based on 6 votes

From the Roman name Vincentius, which was from Latin vincere "to conquer". This name was popular among early Christians, and it was borne by many saints. As an English name, Vincent has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 19th century. Famous bearers include the French priest Saint Vincent de Paul (1581-1660) and the post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890).

VIOLET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: VIE-lət, VIE-ə-lət

Rating: 70% based on 7 votes

From the English word violet for the purple flower, ultimately derived from Latin viola. It was common in Scotland from the 16th century, and it came into general use as an English given name during the 19th century.

VIVEKA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish

Rating: 32% based on 5 votes

Swedish form of WIEBKE

XANTHIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Rating: 44% based on 5 votes

Modern elaborated form of XANTHE

YADIRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish (Latin American), American (Hispanic)

Rating: 48% based on 5 votes

Meaning unknown, possibly derived from an Arabic name. It has been used in Mexico since at least the 1940s.

YASMINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Iranian

Other Scripts: یاسمینا (Persian)

Rating: 40% based on 5 votes

Variant of YASMIN

YELENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Елена (Russian)

Pronounced: ye-LYE-nah, ee-LYE-nah

Rating: 55% based on 6 votes

Russian form of HELEN

ZAIDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic

Rating: 47% based on 3 votes

Feminine form of ZAYD
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2014.