Agent Pilchard's Personal Name List

AALIYAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, English (Modern)
Other Scripts: عالية (Arabic)
Pronounced: ah-LEE-ə (English)
Feminine form of AALI. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by the singer Aaliyah Haughton (1979-2001), who was known simply as Aaliyah.

ABEGAIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AB-ə-gayl
Variant of ABIGAIL.

ABIGAIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: אֲבִיגַיִל (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: AB-ə-gayl (English), A-bee-giel (German)
From the Hebrew name אֲבִיגָיִל ('Avigayil) meaning "my father is joy". In the Old Testament this is the name of Nabal's wife. After Nabal's death she became the third wife of King David.

As an English name, Abigail first became common after the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans. The biblical Abigil refers to herself as a servant, and beginning in the 17th century the name became a slang term for a servant, especially after the release of the play 'The Scornful Lady' (1616) which featured a character named Abigail. The name went out of fashion at that point, but it was revived in the 20th century.

ABIGAYLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AB-ə-gayl
Variant of ABIGAIL.

ABRAHAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, Spanish, French, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: אַבְרָהָם (Hebrew)
Pronounced: AY-brə-ham (English), A-BRA-AM (French), AH-brah-hahm (Dutch), A-bra-ham (German)
This name may be viewed either as meaning "father of many" in Hebrew or else as a contraction of ABRAM (1) and הָמוֹן (hamon) "many, multitude". The biblical patriarch Abraham was originally named Abram but God changed his name (see Genesis 17:5). With his father Terah, he led his wife Sarah, his nephew Lot and their other followers from Ur into Canaan. He is regarded by Jews as being the founder of the Hebrews through his son Isaac and by Muslims as being the founder of the Arabs through his son Ishmael.

As an English Christian name, Abraham became common after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was the American president Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), who pushed to abolish slavery and led the country through the Civil War.

ADAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: Адам (Russian, Ukrainian, Serbian, Macedonian), אָדָם (Hebrew), آدم (Arabic), ადამ (Georgian), Αδαμ (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-dəm (English), A-DAHN (French), A-dam (German, Polish, Arabic), A-dahm (Dutch), u-DAM (Russian), ah-DAHM (Ukrainian)
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make".

According to Genesis in the Old Testament Adam was created from the earth by God (there is a word play on Hebrew אֲדָמָה ('adamah) "earth"). He and Eve were supposedly the first humans, living happily in the Garden of Eden until they ate the forbidden fruit from the tree of knowledge. As a result they were expelled from Eden to the lands to the east, where they gave birth the second generation, including Cain, Abel and Seth.

As an English Christian name, Adam has been common since the Middle Ages, and it received a boost after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Scottish economist Adam Smith (1723-1790).

ADANNAYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Western African, Igbo
Means "her father's daughter" in Igbo.

ADHARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Derived from Arabic عذارى ('adhara) meaning "maidens". This is the name of the second brightest star (after Sirius) in the constellation Canis Major.

ÁEDÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology
Older form of AODHÁN. This was the name of a 6th-century king of the Scots.

AELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αελλα (Ancient Greek)
Means "whirlwind" in Greek. In Greek myth this was the name of an Amazon warrior killed by Herakles during his quest for Hippolyta's girdle.

AEMILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).

AGNETHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: ahng-NE-tah (Swedish)
Scandinavian variant of AGNES.

AIDAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: AY-dən (English)
Anglicized form of AODHÁN. In the latter part of the 20th century it became popular in America due to its sound, since it uses the same fashionable aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden and Hayden.

AIMI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 愛美, etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: A-EE-MEE
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" and (mi) meaning "beautiful". Other combinations of kanji characters are possible.

ÁINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: AWN-ye
Means "radiance" in Gaelic. This was the name of the queen of the fairies in Celtic mythology. It is also taken as an Irish form of Anne.

AKEMI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 明美, etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: A-KE-MEE
From Japanese (ake) meaning "bright" and (mi) meaning "beautiful". Other kanji combinations are possible.

AKIRA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 昭, 明, 亮, 晶, etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: A-KYEE-RA
From Japanese (akira) meaning "bright", (akira) meaning "bright" or (akira) meaning "clear". Other kanji with the same pronunciation can also form this name.

ALAIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Means "joyful, happy" in Basque.

ALAINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ə-LAYN-ə
Variant of ALANA, probably influenced by ELAINE.

ALANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ə-LAN-ə
Feminine form of ALAN.

ALANIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-LAN-is
Feminine form of ALAN. Canadian musician Alanis Morissette (1974-) was named after her father Alan. Her parents apparently decided to use this particular spelling after seeing this word in a Greek newspaper.

ALANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ə-LAN-ə
Feminine form of ALAN.

ALANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern), Irish
Pronounced: ə-LAN-ə (English)
Variant of ALANA. It has been influenced by the affectionate Anglo-Irish word alannah, from the Irish Gaelic phrase a leanbh meaning "O child".

ALANNIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-LAN-is
Variant of ALANIS.

ALAYNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ə-LAYN-ə
Variant of ALAINA.

ALBERT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Catalan, German, Polish, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Romanian, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
Other Scripts: Альберт (Russian)
Pronounced: AL-bərt (English), AL-BER (French), əl-BERT (Catalan), AL-bert (German, Polish), AHL-bərt (Dutch), AWL-bert (Hungarian)
From the Germanic name Adalbert, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and beraht "bright". This name was common among medieval German royalty. The Normans introduced it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Æðelberht. Though it became rare in England by the 17th century, it was repopularized in the 19th century by the German-born Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.

This name was borne by two 20th-century kings of Belgium. Other famous bearers include the German physicist Albert Einstein (1879-1955), creator of the theory of relativity, and Albert Camus (1913-1960), a French-Algerian writer and philosopher.

ALBERTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese
Pronounced: al-BUR-tə (English), al-BER-ta (Italian)
Feminine form of ALBERT. This is the name of a Canadian province, which was named in honour of a daughter of Queen Victoria.

ALBERTE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Galician
Pronounced: al-BER-te
Galician form of ALBERT.

ALBERTE (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Danish
Pronounced: AL-BERT (French)
French and Danish feminine form of ALBERT.

ALBERTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Dutch, Portuguese
Pronounced: al-ber-TEE-na (Italian)
Feminine diminutive of ALBERT.

ALBERTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AL-BER-TEEN
French feminine form of ALBERT.

ALEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-LEE-ə
Variant of AALIYAH.

ALEASE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Possibly a variant of ALICIA.

ALEIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: ah-LIE-dah
Dutch short form of ADELAIDE.

ALENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Czech, Slovak, Slovene
Short form of MAGDALENA or HELENA.

ALEXANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: a-lig-ZAN-dər (English), a-le-KSAN-du (German), ah-lək-SAHN-dər (Dutch), AW-lek-sawn-der (Hungarian)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ALEXIS
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: German, French, English, Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αλεξης (Greek), Αλεξις (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: a-LE-ksis (German), A-LEK-SEE (French), ə-LEK-sis (English)
From the Greek name Αλεξις (Alexis), which meant "helper" or "defender", derived from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, to help". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek comic poet, and also of several saints. It is used somewhat interchangeably with the related name Αλεξιος or Alexius, borne by five Byzantine emperors. In the English-speaking world it is more commonly used as a feminine name.

ALIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: علياء (Arabic)
Variant transcription of ALYA.

ALIAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Variant of AALIYAH.

ALICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Italian
Pronounced: AL-is (English), A-LEES (French), a-LEE-che (Italian)
From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).

ALICIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English
Pronounced: a-LEE-thya (European Spanish), a-LEE-sya (Latin American Spanish), ə-LEE-shə (English), ə-LEE-see-ə (English)
Latinized form of ALICE.

ALIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, German, Hungarian
Pronounced: a-LEE-da (German)
Diminutive of ADELAIDE.

ALINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian, German, Italian, Polish
Pronounced: a-LEE-na (German, Italian), a-LYEE-na (Polish)
Short form of ADELINA and names that end in alina.

ALISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Finnish
Other Scripts: Алиса (Russian)
Pronounced: u-LYEE-sə (Russian), AH-lee-sah (Finnish)
Russian and Finnish form of ALICE.

ALISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ə-LIS-ə
Variant of ALYSSA.

ALISYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-LIS-yə
Personal note: from Baby Name Expert
Variant of ALICIA.

ALIYA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh, Tatar, Arabic
Other Scripts: Әлия (Kazakh), Алия (Tatar), عليّة (Arabic)
Kazakh and Tatar form of ALIYAH (1). It is also a variant transcription of Arabic ALIYAH (1).

ALIYA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֲלִיָּה (Hebrew)
Variant transcription of ALIYAH (2).

ALIYAH (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: عليّة (Arabic)
Feminine form of ALI (1).

ALIYAH (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֲלִיָּה (Hebrew)
Means "to ascend" in Hebrew. This is also a Hebrew word referring to immigration to Israel.

ALIYYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: عليّة (Arabic)
Variant transcription of ALIYAH (1).

ALIYYAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: عليّة (Arabic)
Variant transcription of ALIYAH (1).

ALIZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: עַלִיזָה (Hebrew)
Pronounced: ah-LEE-zah
Means "joyful" in Hebrew.

ALYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Indonesian, Malay
Other Scripts: علياء (Arabic)
Means "sky, heaven, loftiness" in Arabic.

ALYSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ə-LIS-ə
Variant of ALICIA.

ALYSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AL-is
Variant of ALICE.

ALYSSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ə-LIS-ə
Variant of ALICIA. The spelling has probably been influenced by that of the alyssum flower, the name of which is derived from Greek α (a), a negative prefix, combined with λυσσα (lyssa) "madness, rabies", since it was believed to cure madness.

AMAIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Means "the end" in Basque. This is also the name of a mountain and a village in the Basque region of Spain.

AMALA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tamil, Indian, Malayalam
Other Scripts: அமலா (Tamil), അമല (Malayalam)
Derived from Sanskrit अमल (amala) meaning "clean, pure".

AMÁLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian, Portuguese, Slovak
Pronounced: AW-ma-lee-aw (Hungarian)
Hungarian, Portuguese and Slovak form of AMALIA.

AMALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Pronounced: ah-MAH-lee-ah (Dutch), a-MA-lya (German)
Latinized form of the Germanic name Amala, a short form of names beginning with the element amal meaning "work".

AMÁLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech
Czech form of AMALIA.

AMALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: a-MA-lyə
German variant of AMALIA.

AMALIJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian, Slovene, Croatian
Lithuanian, Slovene and Croatian form of AMALIA.

AMAYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque, Spanish
Variant of AMAIA.

AMBER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: AM-bər
From the English word amber that denotes either the gemstone, which is formed from fossil resin, or the orange-yellow colour. The word ultimately derives from Arabic عنبر ('anbar). It began to be used as a given name in the late 19th century, but it only became popular after the release of Kathleen Winsor's novel 'Forever Amber' (1944).

AMBERLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AM-bər-lee
Elaboration of AMBER, influenced by the spelling of the name KIMBERLY.

AMÉLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese
Portuguese form of AMELIA.

AMELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: ə-MEE-lee-ə (English), ə-MEEL-yə (English), a-ME-lya (Italian, Polish), a-ME-lee-a (German)
Variant of AMALIA, though it is sometimes confused with EMILIA, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of George II and George III. Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.

AMÉLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-ME-LEE
French form of AMELIA.

AMELIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: A-me-lee, a-me-LEE
German variant of AMELIA.

AMETHYST
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AM-ə-thist
From the name of the purple semi-precious stone, which is derived from the Greek negative prefix α (a) and μεθυστος (methystos) meaning "intoxicated, drunk", as it was believed to be a remedy against drunkenness.

AMILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-MEE-lee-ə, ə-MEEL-yə
Variant of either AMALIA or EMILIA.

AMY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-mee
English form of the Old French name Amée meaning "beloved" (modern French aimée), a vernacular form of the Latin Amata. As an English name, it was in use in the Middle Ages (though not common) and was revived in the 19th century.

ANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Slovene, Bulgarian, Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian
Other Scripts: Ана (Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian), ანა (Georgian)
Pronounced: A-na (Spanish)
Form of ANNA.

ANAÏS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Occitan, Catalan, French
Pronounced: A-NA-EES (French)
Occitan and Catalan form of ANNA.

ANDREW
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: AN-droo (English)
English form of the Greek name Ανδρεας (Andreas), which was derived from ανδρειος (andreios) "manly, masculine", a derivative of ανηρ (aner) "man". In the New Testament the apostle Andrew, the first disciple to join Jesus, is the brother of Simon Peter. According to tradition, he later preached in the Black Sea region, with some legends saying he was crucified on an X-shaped cross. Andrew, being a Greek name, was probably only a nickname or a translation of his real Hebrew name, which is not known.

This name has been common (in various spellings) throughout the Christian world, and it became very popular in the Middle Ages. Saint Andrew is regarded as the patron of Scotland, Russia, Greece and Romania. The name has been borne by three kings of Hungary, American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), and, more recently, English composer Andrew Lloyd Webber (1948-).

ANELIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Short form of ANNELIESE.

ANGEL
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Ангел (Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: AYN-jəl (English)
From the medieval Latin masculine name Angelus which was derived from the name of the heavenly creature (itself derived from the Greek word αγγελος (angelos) meaning "messenger"). It has never been very common in the English-speaking world, where it is sometimes used as a feminine name in modern times.

ANGELICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Romanian, Literature
Pronounced: an-JEL-i-kə (English), an-JE-lee-ka (Italian)
Derived from Latin angelicus meaning "angelic", ultimately related to Greek αγγελος (angelos) "messenger". The poets Boiardo and Ariosto used this name in their 'Orlando' poems (1495 and 1532), where it belongs to Orlando's love interest. It has been used as a given name since the 18th century.

ANIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Russian
Other Scripts: Аня (Russian)
Pronounced: A-nya (Polish)
Polish diminutive of ANNA, and a variant Russian transcription of ANYA.

ANIELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: a-NYE-la
Polish form of ANGELA.

ANILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: अनिला (Hindi)
Feminine form of ANIL.

ANISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Combination of ANNA and the popular name suffix issa. This name was first brought to public attention by the child actress Anissa Jones (1958-1976).

ANJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, German, Dutch
Other Scripts: Ања (Serbian)
Pronounced: AHN-yah (Swedish, Finnish), AN-ya (Croatian, Serbian, German)
Form of ANYA.

ANNABELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: AN-ə-bel (English)
Variant of ANNABEL. It can also be taken as a combination of ANNA and BELLE.

ANNALEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Combination of ANNA and LEE.

ANNALISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Combination of ANNA and LISA.

ANNELI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: AHN-ne-lee
Finnish diminutive of ANNA.

ANNELIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: A-ne-lee (German)
Short form of ANNELIESE.

ANNELIESE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch
Pronounced: A-nə-lee-zə (German), ahn-nə-LEE-sə (Dutch)
Combination of ANNA and LIESE.

ANNELISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish
Danish form of ANNELIESE.

ANYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Аня (Russian)
Pronounced: A-nyə
Russian diminutive of ANNA.

ARELI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: אַרְאֵלִי (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ay-REE-lie (English)
Means "lion of God, hero" in Hebrew. This was the name of a son of Gad in the Old Testament.

ARIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AHR-ee-ə
Means "song" or "melody" in Italian (literally means "air"). An aria is an elaborate vocal solo, the type usually performed in operas. As an English name, it has only been in use since the 20th century. It is not common in Italy.

ARIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ar-ee-AN-ə, ar-ee-AHN-ə
Variant of ARIANNA.

ARIELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ar-ee-EL-ə, er-ee-EL-ə
Strictly feminine form of ARIEL.

ARYANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Variant of ARIANA.

ASHLEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ASH-lee
Feminine variant of ASHLEY.

ASHLEY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ASH-lee
From an English surname which was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from a combination of Old English æsc and leah. Until the 1960s it was more commonly given to boys in the United States, but it is now most often used on girls.

ASHLYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ASH-lin
Combination of ASHLEY and the popular name suffix lyn.

ASHLYNN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ASH-lin
Variant of ASHLYN.

AUTUMN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AW-təm
From the name of the season, ultimately from Latin autumnus. This name has been in general use since the 1960s.

AVA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-və
Variant of EVE. A famous bearer was the American actress Ava Gardner (1922-1990).

AVA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: آوا (Persian)
Means "voice, sound" in Persian.

AVANI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Marathi, Gujarati
Other Scripts: अवनी (Marathi), અવની (Gujarati)
Means "earth" in Sanskrit.

AYALA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אַיָּלָה (Hebrew)
Pronounced: ie-ah-LAH
Means "doe, gazelle, hind" in Hebrew.

AYLA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֵלָה (Hebrew)
Variant transcription of ELAH.

AYLA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Means "moonlight, halo" in Turkish.

AYLA (3)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Created for the novel 'Clan of the Cave Bear' (1980) by author Jean M. Auel. In the novel Ayla is an orphaned Cro-Magnon girl adopted by Neanderthals. Ayla is the Neanderthal pronunciation of her real name, which is not given.

AYLİN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish, Azerbaijani
Means "moon halo" in Turkish and Azerbaijani.

BAILEY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAY-lee
From a surname derived from Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", originally denoting one who was a bailiff.

BAYLEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BAY-lee
Variant of BAILEY.

BELINDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: bə-LIN-də
The meaning of this name is not known for certain. The first element could be related Italian bella "beautiful". The second element could be related to Germanic lind "serpent, dragon" or linde "soft, tender". This name first arose in the 17th century, and was subsequently used by Alexander Pope in his poem 'The Rape of the Lock' (1712).

BEN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: BEN
Short form of BENJAMIN or BENEDICT. A notable bearer was Ben Jonson (1572-1637), an English poet and playwright.

BENAIAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: בְּנָיָהוּ (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: bi-NIE-ə (English), bi-NAY-ə (English)
From the Hebrew name בְּנָיָהוּ (Benayahu) meaning "YAHWEH has built". This was the name of numerous Old Testament characters.

BENJ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BENJ
Short form of BENJAMIN.

BENJAMIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Biblical
Other Scripts: בִּנְיָמִין (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: BEN-jə-min (English), BEN-ZHA-MEN (French), BEN-ya-meen (German)
From the Hebrew name בִּנְיָמִין (Binyamin) which means "son of the south" or "son of the right hand". Benjamin in the Old Testament is the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob and the founder of one of the southern tribes of the Hebrews. He was originally named בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oniy) meaning "son of my sorrow" by his mother Rachel, who died shortly after childbirth, but it was later changed by his father (see Genesis 35:18).

As an English name, Benjamin came into general use after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), an American statesman, inventor, scientist and philosopher.

BENJI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEN-jee
Diminutive of BENJAMIN.

BENJY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEN-jee
Diminutive of BENJAMIN.

BENNIE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEN-ee
Diminutive of BENJAMIN or BENEDICT.

BENNY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEN-ee
Diminutive of BENJAMIN or BENEDICT.

BENSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEN-sən
From a surname which originally meant "son of BENEDICT".

BETHAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: BETH-an
Welsh diminutive of ELIZABETH.

BETHANY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: BETH-ə-nee (English)
From the name of a biblical town, possibly derived from Hebrew בֵּית־תְּאֵנָה (beit-te'enah) meaning "house of figs". In the New Testament the town of Bethany was the home of Lazarus and his sisters Mary and Martha. It has been in use as a rare given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, used primarily by Catholics in honour of Mary of Bethany. In America it became moderately common after the 1950s.

BONNIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAHN-ee
Means "pretty" from the Scottish word bonnie, which was itself derived from Middle French bon "good". It has been in use as an American given name since the 19th century, and it became especially popular after the movie 'Gone with the Wind' (1939), in which it was the nickname of Scarlett's daughter.

BRENDAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: BREN-dən (English)
From Brendanus, the Latinized form of the Irish name Bréanainn which was derived from a Welsh word meaning "prince". Saint Brendan was a 6th-century Irish abbot who, according to legend, crossed the Atlantic and reached North America with 17 other monks.

BRENDON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BREN-dən
Variant of BRENDAN.

BRENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BREN-ə
Possibly a variant of BRENDA or a feminine form of BRENNAN.

BRENNAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: BREN-ən (English)
From an Irish surname derived from Ó Braonáin meaning "descendant of Braonán". Braonán is a byname meaning "rain, moisture, drop" (with a diminutive suffix).

BRIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: bree-AN-ə, bree-AHN-ə, brie-AN-ə
Feminine form of BRIAN. This name was used by Edmund Spenser in 'The Faerie Queene' (1590). The name was not commonly used until the 1970s, when it rapidly became popular in the United States.

BRITNEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRIT-nee
Variant of BRITTANY.

BRITTANY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRIT-nee, BRIT-ə-nee
From the name of the region in the northwest of France, called in French Bretagne. It was named for the Britons who settled there after the fall of the Western Roman Empire and the invasions of the Anglo-Saxons. As a given name, it first came into common use in America in the 1970s.

BRITTNEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRIT-nee
Variant of BRITTANY.

BROOKE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRUWK
Variant of BROOK. The name came into use in the 1950s, probably influenced by American socialite Brooke Astor (1902-2007). It was further popularized by actress Brooke Shields (1965-).

BROOKLYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRUWK-lən
From the name of the borough of New York City, originally derived from Dutch Breukelen meaning "broken land". It can also be viewed as a combination of BROOK and the popular name suffix lyn.

BRYANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: bree-AN-ə, bree-AHN-ə, brie-AN-ə
Variant of BRIANA.

CADEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-dən
Sometimes explained as a derivative of the Irish surname Caden, which is a reduced form of the Gaelic surname Mac Cadáin meaning "son of Cadán". In actuality, its popularity in America beginning in the 1990s is due to its sound - it shares its fashionable aden suffix sound with other popular names like Hayden, Aidan and Braden.

CAI (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Variant of KAI (1).

CAILYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-lin
Variant of KAYLYN.

CAITLÍN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KAHT-leen
Irish form of Cateline, the Old French form of KATHERINE.

CAITLIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KAHT-leen (Irish), KAYT-lin (English)
Anglicized form of CAITLÍN.

CAITLYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAYT-lin
Variant of CAITLIN.

CALISTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Portuguese, Spanish
Pronounced: kə-LIS-tə (English), ka-LEE-sta (Spanish)
Feminine form of CALLISTUS. As an English name it might also be a variant of KALLISTO.

CAMERON
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAM-rən
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked nose" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and sròn "nose".

CAMRYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAM-rin
Feminine variant of CAMERON.

CAOIMHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: KEE-va
Derived from Gaelic caomh meaning "beautiful, gentle, kind".

CARINA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Portuguese, Spanish, German, Late Roman
Pronounced: kə-REEN-ə (English), ka-REE-na (German)
Late Latin name derived from cara meaning "dear, beloved". This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr. It is also the name of a constellation in the southern sky, though in this case it means "keel" in Latin, referring to a part of Jason's ship the Argo.

CAROLYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KER-ə-lin, KAR-ə-lin
Variant of CAROLINE.

CARYS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: KAHR-is
Derived from Welsh caru meaning "love". This is a relatively modern Welsh name, in common use only since the middle of the 20th century.

CASSIDY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAS-i-dee
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Caiside meaning "descendant of CAISIDE".

CATALINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ka-ta-LEE-na
Spanish form of KATHERINE.

CATARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Occitan, Galician
Pronounced: ka-ta-REE-na (Galician)
Portuguese, Occitan and Galician form of KATHERINE.

CERYS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Variant of CARYS.

CHARIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, English (Rare)
Other Scripts: Χαρις (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KAR-is (English)
Feminine form of CHARES. It came into use as an English given name in the 17th century.

CHARLIE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHAHR-lee
Diminutive or feminine form of CHARLES. A famous bearer is Charlie Brown, the main character in the comic strip 'Peanuts' by Charles Schulz.

CHARLOTTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: SHAR-LAWT (French), SHAHR-lət (English), shar-LAW-tə (German), shah-LOT (Swedish), shahr-LAWT-tə (Dutch)
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.

CHAYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: חַיָה (Hebrew)
Feminine form of CHAYYIM.

CHLOE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Χλοη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KLO-ee (English)
Means "green shoot" in Greek, referring to new plant growth in the spring. This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Demeter. The name is also mentioned by Paul in one of his epistles in the New Testament. As an English name, Chloe has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

CHRISTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Danish, English
Pronounced: KRIS-ta (German), KRIS-tə (English)
Short form of CHRISTINA.

CHRISTIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Late Roman
Pronounced: kris-tee-AN-ə (English)
Latin feminine form of CHRISTIAN.

CHRISTOPHER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KRIS-tə-fər
From the Late Greek name Χριστοφορος (Christophoros) meaning "bearing CHRIST", derived from Χριστος (Christos) combined with φερω (phero) "to bear, to carry". Early Christians used it as a metaphorical name, expressing that they carried Christ in their hearts. In the Middle Ages, literal interpretations of the name's etymology led to legends about a Saint Christopher who carried the young Jesus across a river. He has come to be regarded as the patron saint of travellers.

As an English given name, Christopher has been in general use since the 15th century. In Denmark it was borne by three kings (their names are usually spelled Christoffer), including the 15th-century Christopher of Bavaria who also ruled Norway and Sweden. Other famous bearers include Italian explorer Christopher Columbus (1451-1506), English playwright Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), English architect Christopher Wren (1632-1723) and the fictional character Christopher Robin from A. A. Milne's 'Winnie-the-Pooh' books.

CIARA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KEER-a, KEE-ar-a
Feminine form of CIAR. Saint Ciara was an Irish nun who established a monastery at Kilkeary in the 7th century.

CIARÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KEER-awn, KEE-ar-awn
Diminutive of CIAR. This was the name of two Irish saints: Saint Ciarán the Elder, the patron of the Kingdom of Munster, and Saint Ciarán of Clonmacnoise, the founder of a monastery in the 6th century.

CIERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: see-ER-ə
Variant of SIERRA.

CLARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: KLA-ra (Italian, German, Spanish), KLA-ru (Portuguese), KLER-ə (American English), KLAR-ə (American English), KLAH-rə (British English)
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.

CLAUDIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Biblical, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: KLAW-dee-ə (English), KLOW-dya (German, Italian, Romanian), KLOW-dee-ah (Dutch), KLOW-dhya (Spanish), KLOW-dee-a (Classical Latin)
Feminine form of CLAUDIUS. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament. As a Christian name it was very rare until the 16th century.

COLBY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KOL-bee
From a surname, originally from various English place names, derived from the Old Norse nickname Koli (meaning "coal, dark") and býr "town".

CONNOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAHN-ər (English)
Variant of CONOR.

CORBIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAWR-bin
From a French surname which was derived from corbeau "raven", originally denoting a person who had dark hair. The name was probably popularized in America by actor Corbin Bernsen (1954-).

CORMAC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Possibly derived from Irish Gaelic corb "raven" or "wheel" and mac "son". This was the name of a 3rd-century king of Ireland.

CRISTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian
Pronounced: kree-STEE-na (Italian, Spanish)
Italian, Spanish, Portuguese and Romanian form of CHRISTINA.

DANA (2)
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAY-nə
From a surname which originally belonged to a person who was Danish. It was originally given in honour of American lawyer Richard Henry Dana (1815-1882), the author of 'Two Years Before the Mast'.

DAVID
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: דָּוִד (Hebrew), Давид (Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: DAY-vid (English), dah-VEED (Hebrew), DA-VEED (French), da-BEEDH (Spanish), DA-vit (German), DAH-vid (Swedish, Norwegian), DAH-vit (Dutch), du-VYEET (Russian)
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was probably derived from Hebrew דוד (dwd) meaning "beloved". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.

This name has been used in Britain since the Middle Ages. It has been especially popular in Wales, where it is used in honour of the 5th-century patron saint of Wales (also called Dewi), as well as in Scotland, where it was borne by two kings. Famous bearers include empiricist philosopher David Hume (1711-1776), explorer David Livingstone (1813-1873), musician David Bowie (1947-2016), and soccer player David Beckham (1975-). This is also the name of the hero of Charles Dickens' semi-autobiographical novel 'David Copperfield' (1850).

DAVIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAV-in
Possibly a variant of DEVIN influenced by DAVID.

DAVINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: də-VEEN-ə
Feminine form of DAVID. It originated in Scotland.

DAWN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAWN
From the English word dawn, ultimately derived from Old English dagung.

DAWSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAW-sən
From a surname meaning "son of DAVID". This name was popularized in the late 1990s by the television drama 'Dawson's Creek'.

DEACON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: DEE-kən
Either from the occupational surname Deacon or directly from the vocabulary word deacon, which refer to a cleric in the Christian church (ultimately from Greek διακονος (diakonos) meaning "servant").

DEANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: dee-AN-ə, DEEN-ə
Either a variant of DIANA or a feminine form of DEAN. This name was popularized by the Canadian actress and singer Deanna Durbin (1921-), whose birth name was Edna. Her stage name was a rearrangement of the letters of her real name.

DECLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Deaglán, which is of unknown meaning. Saint Declan was a 5th-century missionary to Ireland.

DELANEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: də-LAYN-ee
From a surname: either the English surname DELANEY (1) or the Irish surname DELANEY (2).

DELILAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Other Scripts: דְּלִילָה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: di-LIE-lə (English)
Means "delicate, weak, languishing" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is the lover of Samson, whom she betrays to the Philistines by cutting his hair, which is the source of his power. Despite her character flaws, the name began to be used by the Puritans in the 17th century. It has been used occasionally in the English-speaking world since that time.

DEVIN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: DEV-in
From a surname, either the Irish surname DEVIN (1) or the English surname DEVIN (2).

DEVON
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEV-ən, də-VAHN
Variant of DEVIN. It may also be partly inspired by the name of the county of Devon in England, which got its name from the Dumnonii, a Celtic tribe.

DEVYN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: DEV-in
Variant of DEVIN.

DONOVAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Donndubháin meaning "descendant of DONNDUBHÁN".

DREW
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DROO
Short form of ANDREW.

DUSTY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DUS-tee
From a nickname originally given to people perceived as being dusty. It is also used a diminutive of DUSTIN. A famous bearer was British singer Dusty Springfield (1939-1999), who acquired her nickname as a child.

DYLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: DUL-an (Welsh), DIL-ən (English)
From the Welsh elements dy meaning "great" and llanw meaning "tide, flow". In Welsh mythology Dylan was a god or hero associated with the sea. He was the son of Arianrhod and was accidentally slain by his uncle Govannon.

Famous bearers include the Welsh poet Dylan Thomas (1914-1953) and the American musician Bob Dylan (1941-), real name Robert Zimmerman, who took his stage surname from the poet's given name. Due to those two bearers, use of the name has spread outside of Wales in the last half of the 20th century. It received a further boost in popularity in the 1990s due to a character on the television series 'Beverly Hills 90210'.

EBONY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EB-ən-ee
From the English word ebony for the black wood which comes from the ebony tree. It is ultimately from the Egyptian word hbnj. In America this name is most often used by black parents.

EDISON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ED-i-sən
From an English surname which meant either "son of EDA (2)" or "son of ADAM". A famous bearer of the surname was the inventor Thomas Edison (1847-1931).

EDWARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Polish
Pronounced: ED-wərd (English), ED-vart (Polish)
Means "rich guard", derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and weard "guard". This was the name of several Anglo-Saxon kings, the last being Saint Edward the Confessor shortly before the Norman conquest in the 11th century. He was known as a just ruler, and because of his popularity his name remained in use after the conquest when most other Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. The 13th-century Plantagenet king Henry III named his son and successor after the saint, and seven subsequent kings of England were also named Edward.

This is one of the few Old English names to be used throughout Europe (in various spellings). A famous bearer was the British composer Edward Elgar (1857-1934). It was also used by author Charlotte Brontë for the character Edward Rochester, the main love interest of the title character in her novel 'Jane Eyre' (1947).

ELAHEH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: الهه (Persian)
Means "goddess" in Persian.

ELEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Short form of ELEANOR. This was also the name of an ancient Italian town (modern Velia) which is well known for being the home of the philosopher Parmenides and his student Zeno of Elea, who was famous for his paradoxes.

ELIANA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: e-LYA-na (Italian)
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of ÉLIANE.

ELIANA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֶלִיעַנָה (Hebrew)
Means "my God has answered" in Hebrew.

ELISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Finnish, English
Pronounced: e-LEE-za (Italian, German), E-lee-sah (Finnish)
Short form of ELISABETH.

ELISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Dutch, English
Pronounced: e-LEE-zə (German), e-LEE-se (Norwegian, Danish, Swedish), i-LEES (English), i-LEEZ (English)
Short form of ELIZABETH.

ELISSA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Meaning unknown (possibly Phoenician in origin). This is another name of Dido, the legendary queen of Carthage.

ELISSA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Variant of ELISA.

ÉLODIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: E-LAW-DEE
French form of ALODIA.

ELYSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH. It was popularized in the early 1980s by a character from the television comedy 'Family Ties'.

ELYSIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
From Elysium, the name of the realm of the dead in Greek and Roman mythology, which means "blissful".

EMALEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Variant of EMILY.

EMELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: i-MEE-lee-ə, i-MEEL-yə
Variant of AMELIA.

EMELIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: EM-e-lee
Swedish feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).

EMELY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: EM-ə-lee
Variant of EMILY.

EMER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: EE-mur (Irish)
Possibly from Gaelic eimh "swift". In Irish legend she was the wife of Cúchulainn. She was said to possess the six gifts of womanhood: beauty, voice, speech, needlework, wisdom and chastity.

EMERSON
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EM-ər-sən
From an English surname meaning "son of EMERY". The surname was borne by Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American writer and philosopher who wrote about transcendentalism.

EMERY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EM-ə-ree
Norman form of EMMERICH. The Normans introduced it to England, and though it was never popular, it survived until the end of the Middle Ages. As a modern given name, it is likely inspired by the surname Emery, which was itself derived from the medieval given name. It can also be given in reference to the hard black substance called emery.

EMILEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: EM-ə-lee
Personal note: from Baby Name Expert
Variant of EMILY.

EMÍLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Slovak, Hungarian
Pronounced: E-mee-lee-a (Slovak), E-mee:-lee-aw (Hungarian)
Portuguese, Slovak and Hungarian feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).

EMILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Finnish, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Pronounced: e-MEE-lya (Italian, Spanish), E-mee-lee-ah (Finnish), e-MYEE-lya (Polish), e-MEE-lee-ah (Swedish)
Feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).

ÉMILIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: E-MEE-LEE
French feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).

EMÍLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech
Czech feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).

EMILIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Pronounced: e-MEE-lyə (German), e-MEE-lee-e (Norwegian), EM-i-lee (Swedish)
German and Scandinavian feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).

EMILIJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Емилија (Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: EM-ee-lee-ya (Serbian, Croatian)
Feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).

EMILIYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Емилия (Bulgarian)
Bulgarian feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).

EMILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EM-ə-lee
English feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL). In the English-speaking world it was not common until after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century; the princess Amelia Sophia (1711-1786) was commonly known as Emily in English, even though Amelia is an unrelated name.

Famous bearers include the British author Emily Brontë (1818-1848), who wrote 'Wuthering Heights', and the American poet Emily Dickinson (1830-1886).

ESSIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ES-ee
Diminutive of ESTELLE or ESTHER.

ETHAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: אֵיתָן (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: EE-thən (English), E-TAN (French)
From the Hebrew name אֵיתָן ('Eitan) meaning "solid, enduring, firm". In the Old Testament this name is borne by a few minor characters, including the wise man Ethan the Ezrahite, supposedly the author of Psalm 89.

After the Protestant Reformation it was occasionally used as a given name in the English-speaking world, and it became somewhat common in America due to the fame of the revolutionary Ethan Allen (1738-1789). It only became popular towards the end of the 20th century. It is the name of the main character in Edith Wharton's novel 'Ethan Frome' (1911), about a man in love with his wife's cousin.

ÉVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: E-vaw
Hungarian form of EVE.

EVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, English, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Ευα (Greek), Ева (Bulgarian, Russian, Church Slavic), ევა (Georgian)
Pronounced: E-ba (Spanish), E-va (Italian, Czech, Slovak, Icelandic), EE-və (English), E-fa (German), AY-vah (Dutch), E-vah (Danish), YE-və (Russian), E-wa (Classical Latin)
Latinate form of EVE. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. It is also a variant transcription of Russian YEVA. This name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.

EVADNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ευαδνη (Ancient Greek)
From Greek Ευαδνη (Euadne), which is of unknown meaning, though the first element is derived from Greek ευ (eu) "good". In Greek legend Evadne was the wife of Capaneus. After Capaneus was killed by a lightning bolt sent from Zeus she committed suicide by throwing herself onto his burning body.

EVAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: EV-ən (English)
Anglicized form of Iefan, a Welsh form of JOHN.

EVANDER (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Ευανδρος (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ee-VAN-dər (English), ə-VAN-dər (English)
Variant of Evandrus, the Latin form of the Greek name Ευανδρος (Euandros), derived from Greek ευ (eu) meaning "good" and ανηρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Roman mythology Evander was an Arcadian hero of the Trojan War who founded the city of Pallantium near the spot where Rome was later built.

EVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: חַוָּה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: EEV (English)
From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חוה (chawah) "to breathe" or the related word חיה (chayah) "to live". According to the Old Testament Book of Genesis, Eve and Adam were the first humans. God created her from one of Adam's ribs to be his companion. At the urging of a serpent she ate the forbidden fruit and shared some with Adam, causing their expulsion from the Garden of Eden.

Despite this potentially negative association, the name was occasionally used by Christians during the Middle Ages. In the English-speaking world both Eve and the Latin form Eva were revived in the 19th century.

FAWN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAWN
From the English word fawn for a young deer.

FELICITY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: fi-LIS-i-tee
From the English word felicity meaning "happiness", which ultimately derives from Latin felicitas "good luck". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans around the 17th century. It can sometimes be used as an English form of the Latin name FELICITAS. This name was revived in the late 1990s after the appearance of the television series 'Felicity'.

GABRIELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Hungarian, English, Swedish
Pronounced: ga-BRYEL-la (Italian), GAWB-ree-el-law (Hungarian), ga-bree-EL-ə (English), gah-bree-EL-lah (Swedish)
Feminine form of GABRIEL.

GEMMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan, English (British), Dutch
Pronounced: JEM-ma (Italian), ZHEM-mə (Catalan), JEM-ə (English), KHE-mah (Dutch)
Medieval Italian nickname meaning "gem, precious stone". It was borne by the wife of the 13th-century Italian poet Dante Alighieri.

GENEVIÈVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHU-NU-VYEV, ZHUN-VYEV
From the medieval name Genovefa, which is of uncertain origin. It could be derived from the Germanic elements kuni "kin, family" and wefa "wife, woman". Alternatively it could be of Gaulish origin, from the related Celtic element genos "kin, family" combined with a second element of unknown meaning. This name was borne by Saint Geneviève, the patron saint of Paris, who inspired the city to resist the Huns in the 5th century.

GEORGE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Romanian
Pronounced: JAWRJ (English)
From the Greek name Γεωργιος (Georgios) which was derived from the Greek word γεωργος (georgos) meaning "farmer, earthworker", itself derived from the elements γη (ge) "earth" and εργον (ergon) "work". Saint George was a 3rd-century Roman soldier from Palestine who was martyred during the persecutions of emperor Diocletian. Later legends describe his defeat of a dragon, with which he was often depicted in medieval art.

Initially Saint George was primarily revered by Eastern Christians, but returning crusaders brought stories of him to Western Europe and he became the patron of England, Portugal, Catalonia and Aragon. The name was rarely used in England until the German-born George I came to the British throne in the 18th century. Five subsequent British kings have borne the name.

Other famous bearers include two kings of Greece, the composer George Frideric Handel (1685-1759), the first president of the United States, George Washington (1732-1797), and the Pacific explorer George Vancouver (1757-1798). This was also the pen name of authors George Eliot (1819-1880) and George Orwell (1903-1950), real names Mary Anne Evans and Eric Arthur Blair respectively.

GEORGIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek
Other Scripts: Γεωργια (Greek)
Pronounced: JAWR-jə (English)
Latinate feminine form of GEORGE. This is the name of an American state, which was named after the British king George II. A famous bearer was the American painter Georgia O'Keeffe (1887-1986).

GEORGIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Romanian
Pronounced: jor-JYAH-nə (English), jor-JAY-nə (English)
Feminine form of GEORGE. This form of the name has been in use in the English-speaking world since the 18th century.

GINNY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JIN-ee
Diminutive of VIRGINIA.

GRACE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GRAYS
From the English word grace, which ultimately derives from Latin gratia. This was one of the virtue names created in the 17th century by the Puritans. The actress Grace Kelly (1929-1982) was a famous bearer.

GRIFFIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GRIF-in
Personal note: from Baby Name Expert
Latinized form of GRUFFUDD. This name can also be inspired by the English word griffin, a creature with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle, ultimately from Greek γρυψ (gryps).

HANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Biblical
Other Scripts: חַנָּה (Hebrew)
Pronounced: HAN-ə (English), HA-na (German)
From the Hebrew name חַנָּה (Channah) meaning "favour" or "grace". In the Old Testament this is the name of the wife of Elkanah. Her rival was Elkanah's other wife Peninnah, who had children while Hannah remained barren. After a blessing from Eli she finally became pregnant with Samuel.

As an English name, Hannah was not regularly used until after the Protestant Reformation. The Greek and Latin version Anna, which is used in the New Testament, has traditionally been more common as a Christian name.

HAZEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAY-zəl
From the English word hazel for the tree or the light brown colour, derived ultimately from Old English hæsel. It was coined as a given name in the 19th century.

HEIDI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English
Pronounced: HIE-dee (German, English), HAY-dee (Finnish)
Personal note: from Baby Name Expert
German diminutive of ADELHEID. This is the name of the title character in the children's novel 'Heidi' (1880) by Johanna Spyri. The name began to be used in the English-speaking world shortly after the 1937 release of the movie adaptation, which starred Shirley Temple.

HOLLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHL-ee
From the English word for the holly tree, ultimately derived from Old English holen.

IMOGEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: IM-ə-jən
The name of a princess in the play 'Cymbeline' (1609) by Shakespeare. He based her on a legendary character named Innogen, but the name was printed incorrectly and never corrected. The name Innogen is probably derived from Gaelic inghean meaning "maiden".

IRIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish
Other Scripts: Ιρις (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: IE-ris (English), EE-ris (German, Dutch), EE-rees (Finnish, Spanish), EE-REES (French)
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the name of the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.

ISABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, French, German
Pronounced: ee-sa-BEL (Spanish), IZ-ə-bel (English), EE-ZA-BEL (French), ee-za-BEL (German)
Medieval Occitan form of ELIZABETH. It spread throughout Spain, Portugal and France, becoming common among the royalty by the 12th century. It grew popular in England in the 13th century after Isabella of Angoulême married the English king John, and it was subsequently bolstered when Isabella of France married Edward II the following century.

This is the usual form of the name Elizabeth in Spain and Portugal, though elsewhere it is considered a parallel name, such as in France where it is used alongside Élisabeth. The name was borne by two Spanish ruling queens, including Isabel of Castile, who sponsored the explorations of Christopher Columbus.

ISABELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: EE-ZA-BEL (French), IZ-ə-bel (English), ee-za-BE-lə (German), ee-sah-BEL-lə (Dutch)
French form of ISABEL.

ISLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: IE-lə
Variant of ISLAY, typically used as a feminine name.

ITALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
From the Italian name of the country of Italy, Italia (see ITALUS).

IVORY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: African American
Pronounced: IE-və-ree, IEV-ree
From the English word for the hard, creamy-white substance which comes from elephant tusks and was formerly used to produce piano keys.

IVY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: IE-vee
From the English word for the climbing plant that has small yellow flowers. It is ultimately derived from Old English ifig.

JACOB
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Jewish, Biblical
Other Scripts: יַעֲקֹב (Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAY-kəb (English), YAH-kawp (Dutch)
From the Latin Iacobus, which was from the Greek Ιακωβος (Iakobos), which was from the Hebrew name יַעֲקֹב (Ya'aqov). In the Old Testament Jacob (later called Israel) is the son of Isaac and Rebecca and the father of the twelve founders of the twelve tribes of Israel. He was born holding his twin brother Esau's heel, and his name is explained as meaning "holder of the heel" or "supplanter", because he twice deprived his brother of his rights as the firstborn son (see Genesis 27:36). Other theories claim that it is in fact derived from a hypothetical name like יַעֲקֹבְאֵל (Ya'aqov'el) meaning "may God protect".

The English names Jacob and James derive from the same source, with James coming from Latin Iacomus, a later variant of Iacobus. Unlike English, many languages do not have separate spellings for the two names.

In England, Jacob was mainly regarded as a Jewish name during the Middle Ages, though the variant James was used among Christians. Jacob came into general use as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Jacob Grimm (1785-1863), the German linguist and writer who was, with his brother Wilhelm, the author of 'Grimm's Fairy Tales'.

JADE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: JAYD (English), ZHAD (French)
From the name of the precious stone that is often used in carvings. It is derived from Spanish (piedra de la) ijada meaning "(stone of the) flank", relating to the belief that jade could cure renal colic. As a given name, it came into general use during the 1970s.

JADEN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JAY-dən
An invented name, using the popular aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden, Hayden and Aidan. This name first became common in American in the 1990s when similar-sounding names were increasing in popularity. It is sometimes considered a variant of JADON.

JADON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יָדוֹן (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAH-dən (English), JAY-dən (English)
Possibly means either "thankful" or "he will judge" in Hebrew. This name is borne by a minor character in the Old Testament.

JAIME (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAY-mee
Variant of JAMIE. The character Jaime Sommers from the television series 'The Bionic Woman' (1976-1978) helped to popularize the name. It can sometimes be given in reference to the French phrase j'aime meaning "I love", though it is pronounced differently.

JAMIE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: JAY-mee
Originally a Lowland Scots diminutive of JAMES. Since the late 19th century it has also been used as a feminine form.

JANAE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Elaborated form of JANE.

JANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAYN
Medieval English form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). This became the most common feminine form of John in the 17th century, surpassing Joan.

Famous bearers include the uncrowned English queen Lady Jane Grey (1536-1554), who ruled for only 9 days, the British novelist Jane Austen (1775-1817), who wrote 'Sense and Sensibility' and 'Pride and Prejudice', and the British primatologist Jane Goodall (1934-). This is also the name of the central character in Charlotte Brontë's novel 'Jane Eyre' (1847), which tells of her sad childhood and her relationship with Edward Rochester.

JAYA
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Hinduism, Tamil, Indian, Telugu, Hindi, Marathi
Other Scripts: जया, जय (Sanskrit), ஜெயா, ஜெய (Tamil), జయ (Telugu), जया (Hindi, Marathi)
Derived from Sanskrit जय (jaya) meaning "victory". This is a transcription of both the feminine form जया (an epithet of the Hindu goddess Durga) and the masculine form जय (borne by several characters in Hindu texts). As a modern personal name, this transcription is both feminine and masculine in southern India, but typically only feminine in the north.

JAYDEN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JAY-dən
Variant of JADEN.

JAYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JAY-lə
Combination of JAY (1) and the popular name suffix la.

JAYLEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JAY-lee
Combination of JAY (1) and LEE.

JAYLIN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: African American (Modern), English (Modern)
Pronounced: JAY-lin
Variant of JALEN. It can also be a feminine elaboration of JAY (1).

JAYNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: JAY-nə
Variant of JANE.

JEMIMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: יְמִימָה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: jə-MIE-mə (English)
Means "dove" in Hebrew. This was the oldest of the three daughters of Job in the Old Testament. As an English name, Jemima first became common during the Puritan era.

JEMMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: JEM-ə
Variant of GEMMA.

JENAE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Diminutive of JENNIFER.

JENNIFER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Spanish
Pronounced: JEN-i-fər (English), JE-ni-fu (German)
From a Cornish form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar (see GUINEVERE). This name has only been common outside of Cornwall since the beginning of the 20th century, after it was featured in George Bernard Shaw's play 'The Doctor's Dilemma' (1906).

JESSICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: JES-i-kə (English), ZHE-SEE-KA (French), YE-see-ka (German)
This name was first used in this form by Shakespeare in his play 'The Merchant of Venice' (1596), where it belongs to the daughter of Shylock. Shakespeare probably based it on the biblical name ISCAH, which would have been spelled Jescha in his time. It was not commonly used as a given name until the middle of the 20th century. Notable bearers include actresses Jessica Tandy (1909-1994) and Jessica Lange (1949-).

JIA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Chinese
Other Scripts: 佳, 家, etc. (Chinese)
From Chinese (jiā) meaning "good, auspicious, beautiful", (jiā) meaning "home, family", or other characters which are pronounced similarly.

JOELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Feminine form of JOEL.

JOLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JO-lee (English), ZHAW-LEE (French)
Means "pretty" in French. This name was popularized by American actress Angelina Jolie (1975-), whose surname was originally her middle name. It is not used as a given name in France.

JOSEPH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹסֵף (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-səf (English), ZHO-ZEF (French), YO-zef (German)
From Ioseph, the Latin form of Greek Ιωσηφ (Ioseph), which was from the Hebrew name יוֹסֵף (Yosef) meaning "he will add". In the Old Testament Joseph is the eleventh son of Jacob and the first with his wife Rachel. Because he was the favourite of his father, his older brothers sent him to Egypt and told their father that he had died. In Egypt, Joseph became an advisor to the pharaoh, and was eventually reconciled with his brothers when they came to Egypt during a famine. This name also occurs in the New Testament, belonging to Saint Joseph the husband of Mary, and to Joseph of Arimathea.

In the Middle Ages, Joseph was a common Jewish name, being less frequent among Christians. In the late Middle Ages Saint Joseph became more highly revered, and the name became popular in Spain and Italy. In England it became common after the Protestant Reformation. This name was borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Portugal. Other notable bearers include Polish-British author Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) and the Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin (1878-1953).

JOSHUA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: יְהוֹשֻׁעַ (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAW-shoo-ə (English)
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹשֻׁעַ (Yehoshu'a) meaning "YAHWEH is salvation". As told in the Old Testament, Joshua was a companion of Moses. He went up Mount Sinai with Moses when he received the Ten Commandments from God, and later he was one of the twelve spies sent into Canaan. After Moses died Joshua succeeded him as leader of the Israelites and he led the conquest of Canaan. His original name was Hoshea.

The name Jesus comes from a Greek translation of the Aramaic short form יֵשׁוּעַ (Yeshu'a), which was the real name of Jesus. As an English name, Joshua has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

JOSIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JO-zee
Short form of JOSEPHINE.

KADEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-dən
Variant of CADEN.

KAELEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KAY-lee
Variant of KAYLEE.

KAI (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Frisian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch
Pronounced: KIE (German, Swedish, Finnish)
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Frisian diminutive of GERHARD, NICOLAAS, CORNELIS or GAIUS.

KAI (3)
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Hawaiian
Means "sea" in Hawaiian.

KAIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Estonian
Diminutive of KATARINA or KATARIINA.

KAILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish
Other Scripts: קַײלָע (Yiddish)
Yiddish form of KELILA.

KAILEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-lee
Variant of KAYLEE.

KAILEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-lee
Variant of KAYLEE.

KAILYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-lin
Variant of KAYLYN.

KAITLIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAYT-lin
Variant of CAITLIN.

KAITLYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAYT-lin
Variant of CAITLIN.

KAITLYNN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAYT-lin
Variant of CAITLIN.

KALEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hawaiian
Means "joy, happiness" in Hawaiian.

KALEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-lee
Variant of KAYLEE.

KALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-lee
Variant of KAYLEE.

KALINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian, Polish
Other Scripts: Калина (Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: ka-LYEE-na (Polish)
Means "viburnum tree" in Bulgarian, Macedonian and Polish.

KALLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL-ee
Variant of CALLIE.

KALYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-lin
Variant of KAYLYN.

KAMRYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAM-rin
Feminine variant of CAMERON.

KATARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Other Scripts: Катарина (Serbian)
Pronounced: kah-tah-REE-nah (Swedish), ka-ta-REE-na (German)
Cognate of KATHERINE.

KATELYNN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAYT-lin
Variant of CAITLIN.

KATIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Russian
Other Scripts: Катя (Russian)
Pronounced: KA-tyə (Russian)
Italian diminutive of CATERINA, as well as a Russian variant transcription of KATYA.

KATYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Катя (Russian)
Pronounced: KA-tyə
Diminutive of YEKATERINA.

KAYLA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAY-lə
Personal note: from Baby Name Expert
Combination of KAY (1) and the popular name suffix la. Use of the name was greatly increased in the 1980s after the character Kayla Brady began appearing on the American soap opera 'Days of Our Lives'.

KAYLA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish
Other Scripts: קַײלָע (Yiddish)
Variant transcription of KAILA.

KAYLEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-lee
Combination of KAY (1) and the popular name suffix lee.

KAYLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-lee
Variant of KAYLEE.

KAYLIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-lin
Variant of KAYLYN.

KAYLYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-lin
Combination of KAY (1) and the popular name suffix lyn.

KAYLYNN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-lin
Variant of KAYLYN.

KEELEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KEE-lee
Variant of KEELY.

KEELY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEE-lee
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Caolaidhe meaning "descendant of Caoladhe". The given name Caoladhe is derived from the Gaelic word caol "slender".

KEILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Possibly a variant of KAYLA (1).

KEIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Variant of KIRA (2). This spelling was popularized by British actress Keira Knightley (1985-).

KELLY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KEL-ee (English)
Anglicized form of the Irish given name CEALLACH or the surname derived from it Ó Ceallaigh. As a surname, it has been borne by actor and dancer Gene Kelly (1912-1996) and actress and princess Grace Kelly (1929-1982).

KELSIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KEL-see
Variant of KELSEY.

KENNEDY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: KEN-ə-dee (English)
From an irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cinnéidigh meaning "descendant of CENNÉTIG". The name is often given in honour of assassinated American president John F. Kennedy (1917-1963).

KEVIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: KEV-in (English), KE-VEEN (French), KE-vin (German)
Anglicized form of the Irish name Caoimhín, derived from the older Irish Cóemgein, composed of the Old Irish elements cóem "kind, gentle, handsome" and gein "birth". Saint Caoimhín established a monastery in Glendalough, Ireland in the 6th century and is the patron saint of Dublin. It became popular in the English-speaking world outside of Ireland in the 20th century.

KIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: KEE-ah
Diminutive of KRISTINA.

KIANA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hawaiian
Hawaiian form of DIANA.

KIERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KEER-a, KEE-ar-a
Anglicized form of CIARA (1).

KIERSTEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Variant of KIRSTEN.

KILEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIE-lee
Variant of KYLIE.

KIRI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Maori
Means "skin of a tree or fruit" in Maori. This name has been brought to public attention by New Zealand opera singer Kiri Te Kanawa (1944-).

KIRSTEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish, Norwegian, English
Pronounced: KEER-sten (Danish, Norwegian), KUR-stən (English)
Danish and Norwegian form of CHRISTINA.

KRISTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, English, Finnish
Pronounced: KRIS-ta (German), KRIS-tə (English), KREES-tah (Finnish)
Short form of KRISTINA.

KRISTEN (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KRIS-tin
Variant of KRISTIN.

KYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIE-lə
Feminine form of KYLE.

KYLEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIE-lee
Variant of KYLIE.

KYRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIE-rə, KEE-rə
Variant of KIRA (2), sometimes considered a feminine form of CYRUS.

LACHLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Australian)
Originally a Scottish nickname for a person who was from Norway. In Scotland, Norway was known as the "land of the lochs", or Lochlann.

LAELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: LIE-lee-a
Feminine form of Laelius, a Roman family name of unknown meaning. This is also the name of a type of flower, an orchid found in Mexico and Central America.

LÁILÁ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Sami
Sami variant form of HELGA.

LAINEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: LAYN-ee
Variant of LANEY.

LALA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Лала (Bulgarian)
From a South Slavic word meaning "tulip". It is derived via Turkish from Persian لاله (laleh).

LANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Russian, Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Лана (Russian, Serbian)
Pronounced: LAH-nə (English)
Short form of ALANA (English) or SVETLANA (Russian). In the English-speaking world, it was popularized by actress Lana Turner (1921-1995).

LANDON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAN-dən
From a surname which was derived from an Old English place name meaning "long hill" (effectively meaning "ridge"). Use of the name may have been inspired in part by the actor Michael Landon (1936-1991).

LANEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAYN-ee
Diminutive of ELAINE.

LÁRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic
Pronounced: LOW-rah
Icelandic form of LAURA.

LÁRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic
Pronounced: LOW-rah
Icelandic form of LAURA.

LAYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, English
Other Scripts: ليلى (Arabic)
Pronounced: LAY-lə (English)
Means "night" in Arabic. This was the name of the object of romantic poems written by the 7th-century poet known as Qays. The story of Qays and Layla became a popular romance in medieval Arabia and Persia. The name became used in the English-speaking world after the 1970 release of the song 'Layla' by Derek and the Dominos, the title of which was inspired by the medieval story.

LEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Slovene, Croatian
Pronounced: LE-a (German), LE-ah (Finnish)
Form of LEAH.

LEAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: לֵאָה (Hebrew)
Pronounced: LEE-ə (English)
From the Hebrew name לֵאָה (Le'ah) which was probably derived from the Hebrew word לְאָה (le'ah) meaning "weary". Alternatively it might derive from a Chaldean name meaning "mistress" or "ruler" in Akkadian. In the Old Testament Leah is the first wife of Jacob and the mother of seven of his children. Jacob's other wife was Leah's sister Rachel. Although this name was used by Jews in the Middle Ages, it was not typical as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation, being common among the Puritans.

LEELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Telugu, Kannada, Tamil, Malayalam
Other Scripts: लीला (Hindi), లీలా (Telugu), ಲೀಲಾ (Kannada), லீலா (Tamil), ലീലാ (Malayalam)
Variant transcription of LILA (1).

LEIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical Greek, Popular Culture
Other Scripts: Λεια (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LAY-a (English)
Form of LEAH used in the Greek Old Testament. This is the name of a princess in the 'Star Wars' movies by George Lucas, who probably based it on Leah.

LEILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Persian, English, Georgian
Other Scripts: ليلى (Arabic), لیلا (Persian), ლეილა (Georgian)
Pronounced: LAY-lə (English), LEE-lə (English), LIE-lə (English)
Variant of LAYLA. This spelling was used by Lord Byron for characters in 'The Giaour' (1813) and 'Don Juan' (1819), and it is through him that the name was introduced to the English-speaking world.

LELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Variant of LEILA.

LELAND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
From a surname, originally from an English place name, which meant "fallow land" in Old English. A famous bearer was the politician, businessman and Stanford University founder Leland Stanford (1824-1893).

LELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Italian form of LAELIA.

LEYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Azerbaijani, English (Modern)
Other Scripts: ليلى (Arabic), لیلا (Persian)
Variant of LEILA.

LÍA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Galician
Pronounced: LEE-a
Galician form of LEAH.

LÍA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Galician
Pronounced: LEE-a
Galician form of LEAH.

LIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, English
Short form of JULIANA, LILIANA, and other names that end in liana. This is also the word for a type of vine that grows in jungles.

LIBBY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIB-ee
Originally a medieval diminutive of Ibb, itself a diminutive of ISABEL. It is also used as a diminutive of ELIZABETH.

LIBERTY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIB-ər-tee
Simply from the English word liberty, derived from Latin libertas, a derivative of liber "free". Interestingly, since 1880 this name has charted on the American popularity lists in three different periods: in 1918 (at the end of World War I), in 1976 (the American bicentennial), and after 2001 (during the War on Terrorism).

LIGEIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Λιγεια (Ancient Greek)
Derived from Greek λιγυς (ligys) meaning "clear-voiced, shrill, whistling". This was the name of one of the Sirens in Greek legend. It was also used by Edgar Allan Poe in his story 'Ligeia' (1838).

LILA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: लीला (Hindi)
Means "play, amusement" in Sanskrit.

LILAC
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LIE-lək
From the name of the shrub with purple or white flowers. It is derived via Arabic from Persian.

LILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Лилия (Russian), Лілія (Ukrainian)
Pronounced: LYEE-lyi-yə (Russian)
Spanish and Italian form of LILY, as well as a Russian and Ukrainian variant transcription of LILIYA.

LILIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, English
Pronounced: lee-LYA-na (Italian, Polish), lil-ee-AN-ə (English)
Latinate form of LILLIAN.

LILIBETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH.

LILLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee-ə, LIL-yə
Short form of LILLIAN or an elaborated form of LILY.

LILLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee
Variant of LILY.

LILLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: LIL-ee (English)
English variant of LILY. It is also used in Scandinavia, as a form of LILY or a diminutive of ELISABETH.

LILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee
From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.

LILYANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Лиляна (Bulgarian)
Bulgarian form of LILLIAN.

LINDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch, German, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, French, Latvian, Finnish, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: LIN-də (English), LIN-da (German), LEEN-da (Italian), LEEN-DA (French), LEEN-dah (Finnish)
Originally a medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element linde meaning "soft, tender". It also coincides with the Spanish and Portuguese word linda meaning "beautiful".

LINDSAY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: LIN-zee (English)
From an English and Scottish surname which was originally derived from the name of the region Lindsey, which means "LINCOLN island" in Old English. As a given name it was typically masculine until the 1960s (in Britain) and 1970s (in America) when it became popular for girls, probably due to its similarity to Linda and because of American actress Lindsay Wagner (1949-).

LINDSEY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: LIN-zee (English)
Variant of LINDSAY.

LINDY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIN-dee
Originally this was a masculine name, coming into use in America in 1927 when the dance called the Lindy Hop became popular. The dance was probably named for aviator Charles Lindbergh. Later this name was used as a diminutive of LINDA.

LINNÉA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: lin-NE-ah
From the name of a flower, also known as the twinflower. The Swedish botanist Carolus Linnaeus named it after himself, it being his favourite flower.

LYRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: LIE-rə (English)
The name of the constellation in the northern sky containing the star Vega. It is said to be shaped after the lyre of Orpheus.

LYRIC
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: LIR-ik
Means simply "lyric, songlike" from the English word, ultimately derived from Greek λυρικος (lyrikos).

MACEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MAY-see
Variant of MACY.

MACIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY-see
Variant of MACY.

MADALYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAD-ə-lin
Variant of MADELINE.

MADELEINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Swedish
Pronounced: MAD-LEN (French), MAD-ə-lin (English), MAD-ə-lien (English), mahd-e-LEN (Swedish)
French form of MAGDALENE.

MADELYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAD-ə-lin
Variant of MADELINE.

MAE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY
Variant of MAY. A famous bearer was American actress Mae West (1893-1980), whose birth name was Mary.

MAEGAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MEG-ən
Variant of MEGAN.

MAI (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (mai) meaning "plum, apricot".

MAI (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 舞, 麻衣, 真愛, etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: MA-EE
From Japanese (mai) meaning "dance" or 麻衣 (mai) meaning "linen robe". It can also come from (ma) meaning "real, genuine" combined with (ai) meaning "love, affection". Other kanji or kanji combinations can also form this name.

MAIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Roman Mythology, Portuguese, Georgian
Other Scripts: Μαια (Ancient Greek), მაია (Georgian)
Pronounced: MIE-A (Classical Greek), MAY-ə (English), MIE-ə (English)
Meaning unknown. In Greek and Roman mythology she was the eldest of the Pleiades, the group of seven stars in the constellation Taurus, who were the daughters of Atlas and Pleione. Her son by Zeus was Hermes.

MAIA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: MIE-ya (Classical Latin), MAY-ə (English), MIE-ə (English)
Means "great" in Latin. This was the name of a Roman goddess of spring, the wife of Vulcan. The month of May is named for her.

MAIA (3)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Basque form of MARIA.

MAIARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Native American, Tupí
Means "wise" in Tupí.

MALEAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Variant of MALIA.

MALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hawaiian
Either a Hawaiian form of MARIA or a variant of MALIE.

MALINA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Feminine form of MALCOLM.

MALINA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Serbian, Polish
Other Scripts: Малина (Bulgarian, Serbian)
Pronounced: ma-LYEE-na (Polish)
Means "raspberry" in several Slavic languages.

MARIA
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Other Scripts: Μαρια (Greek), Мария (Russian, Bulgarian), Марія (Ukrainian), Маріа (Church Slavic)
Pronounced: ma-REE-a (Italian, German, Dutch, Greek), mu-REE-u (European Portuguese), ma-REE-u (Brazilian Portuguese), mə-REE-ə (Catalan, English), mah-REE-ah (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish), MAR-ya (Polish), MAH-ree-ah (Finnish), mu-RYEE-yə (Russian), mu-RYEE-yu (Ukrainian)
Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.

This was the name of two ruling queens of Portugal. It was also borne by the Habsburg queen Maria Theresa (1717-1780), whose inheritance of the domains of her father, the Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI, began the War of the Austrian Succession.

MARIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Spanish, Romanian, Czech, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: mə-RYA-nə (Portuguese), ma-RYA-na (Spanish)
Roman feminine form of MARIANUS. After the classical era it was frequently interpreted as a combination of MARIA and ANA. In Portuguese it is further used as a form of MARIAMNE.

MARIELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ma-RYEL-la
Italian diminutive of MARIA.

MARLEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MAHR-lee
Variant of MARLEY.

MARLEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MAHR-lee
From a surname which was taken from a place name meaning either "pleasant wood", "boundary wood" or "marten wood" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the Jamaican musician Bob Marley (1945-1981).

MARTIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish
Other Scripts: Мартин (Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: MAHR-tin (English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish), MAR-TEN (French), MAR-teen (German, Slovak), MAWR-teen (Hungarian), mar-TIN (Bulgarian), MAHR-teen (Finnish)
From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god MARS. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.

An influential bearer of the name was Martin Luther (1483-1546), the theologian who began the Protestant Reformation. The name was also borne by five popes (two of them more commonly known as Marinus). Other more recent bearers include the German philosopher Martin Heidegger (1889-1976), the American civil rights leader Martin Luther King (1929-1968), and the American filmmaker Martin Scorsese (1942-).

MARY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: MER-ee (English), MAR-ee (English)
Usual English form of Maria, the Latin form of the New Testament Greek names Μαριαμ (Mariam) and Μαρια (Maria) - the spellings are interchangeable - which were from Hebrew מִרְיָם (Miryam), a name borne by the sister of Moses in the Old Testament. The meaning is not known for certain, but there are several theories including "sea of bitterness", "rebelliousness", and "wished for child". However it was most likely originally an Egyptian name, perhaps derived in part from mry "beloved" or mr "love".

This is the name of several New Testament characters, most importantly Mary the mother of Jesus. According to the gospels, Jesus was conceived in her by the Holy Spirit while she remained a virgin. This name was also borne by Mary Magdalene, a woman cured of demons by Jesus. She became one of his followers and later witnessed his crucifixion and resurrection.

Due to the Virgin Mary this name has been very popular in the Christian world, though at certain times in some cultures it has been considered too holy for everyday use. In England it has been used since the 12th century, and it has been among the most common feminine names since the 16th century. The Latinized form Maria is also used in English as well as in several other languages.

This name has been borne by two queens of England, as well as a Queen of Scotland, Mary Queen of Scots. Another notable bearer was Mary Shelley (1797-1851), the author of 'Frankenstein'. A famous fictional character by this name is Mary Poppins from the children's books by P. L. Travers, first published in 1934.

MARYANNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: mer-ee-AN, mar-ee-AN
Personal note: from Baby Name Expert
Combination of MARY and ANNE (1).

MARYBETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: mer-ee-BETH, mar-ee-BETH
Combination of MARY and BETH.

MASON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY-sən
From an English surname meaning "stoneworker", from an Old French word of Germanic origin (akin to Old English macian "to make").

MEADOW
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MED-o
From the English word meadow, ultimately from Old English mædwe.

MEAGAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEG-ən
Variant of MEGAN.

MEAGHAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEG-ən
Variant of MEGAN.

MEGAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: MEG-ən (English)
Welsh diminutive of MARGARET. In the English-speaking world outside of Wales it has only been regularly used since the middle of the 20th century.

MEGHAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEG-ən
Variant of MEGAN.

MEI (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Chinese
Other Scripts: 美, 梅, etc. (Chinese)
From Chinese (měi) meaning "beautiful" or (méi) meaning "plum", as well as other characters which are pronounced similarly.

MELANIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: MEL-ə-nee (English), ME-la-nee (German), me-la-NEE (German)
From Mélanie, the French form of the Latin name Melania, derived from Greek μελαινα (melaina) meaning "black, dark". This was the name of a Roman saint who gave all her wealth to charity in the 5th century. Her grandmother was also a saint with the same name.

The name was common in France during the Middle Ages, and was it introduced from there to England, though it eventually became rare. Interest in it was revived by the character Melanie Wilkes from the novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1939).

MELINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek
Other Scripts: Μελινα (Greek)
Elaboration of Mel, either from names such as MELISSA or from Greek μελι (meli) meaning "honey". A famous bearer was Greek-American actress Melina Mercouri (1920-1994), who was born Maria Amalia Mercouris.

MELINDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hungarian
Pronounced: mə-LIN-də (English), ME-leen-daw (Hungarian)
Combination of Mel (from names such as MELANIE or MELISSA) with the popular name suffix inda. It was created in the 18th century, and may have been inspired by the similar name Belinda. In Hungary, the name was popularized by the 1819 play 'Bánk Bán' by József Katona.

MELODY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEL-ə-dee
From the English word melody, which is derived (via Old French and Late Latin) from Greek μελος (melos) "song" combined with αειδω (aeido) "to sing".

MIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Pronounced: MEE-ah (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch), MEE-a (German), MEE-ə (English)
Scandinavian, Dutch and German diminutive of MARIA. It coincides with the Italian word mia meaning "mine".

MICHAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: מִיכָאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Μιχαηλ (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: MIE-kəl (English), MI-kha-el (German), MEE-kah-el (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
From the Hebrew name מִיכָאֵל (Mikha'el) meaning "who is like God?". This is a rhetorical question, implying no person is like God. Michael is one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament he is named as a protector of Israel. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies in the war against Satan, and is thus considered the patron saint of soldiers in Christianity.

The popularity of the saint led to the name being used by nine Byzantine emperors, including Michael VIII Palaeologus who restored the empire in the 13th century. It has been common in Western Europe since the Middle Ages, and in England since the 12th century. It has been borne (in various spellings) by rulers of Russia (spelled Михаил), Romania (Mihai), Poland (Michał), and Portugal (Miguel). Other bearers of this name include the British chemist/physicist Michael Faraday (1791-1867), musician Michael Jackson (1958-2009), and basketball player Michael Jordan (1963-).

MICHELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Dutch
Pronounced: MEE-SHEL (French), mi-SHEL (English)
French feminine form of MICHEL. It has been common in the English-speaking world since the middle of the 20th century.

MIELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: mee-E-la
Means "honey-sweet" in Esperanto.

MINDY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MIN-dee
Diminutive of MELINDA.

MISSY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MIS-ee
Diminutive of MELISSA. This is also a slang term meaning "young woman".

MISTY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MIS-tee
From the English word misty, ultimately derived from Old English. The jazz song 'Misty' (1954) by Erroll Garner may have helped popularize the name.

MITZI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: MIT-see
German diminutive of MARIA.

MOLLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHL-ee
Diminutive of MARY. It developed from Malle and Molle, other medieval diminutives. James Joyce used this name in his novel 'Ulysses' (1920), where it belongs to Molly Bloom, the wife of the main character.

NATALEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: NAT-ə-lee
Variant of NATALIE.

NATALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, English, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Greek, Georgian, Russian, Ukrainian, Late Roman
Other Scripts: Ναταλια (Greek), ნატალია (Georgian), Наталия (Russian), Наталія (Ukrainian)
Pronounced: na-TA-lya (Polish, Italian, Spanish)
Latinate form of Natalia (see NATALIE).

NATALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
Pronounced: NAT-ə-lee (English), NA-ta-lee (German)
From the Late Latin name Natalia, which meant "Christmas Day" from Latin natale domini. This was the name of the wife of the 4th-century martyr Saint Adrian of Nicomedia. She is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church, and the name has traditionally been more common among Eastern Christians than those in the West. It was popularized in America by actress Natalie Wood (1938-1981), who was born to Russian immigrants.

NATALYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Наталья (Russian)
Pronounced: nu-TA-lyə
Russian form of Natalia (see NATALIE).

NAYELI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Native American, Zapotec
Means "I love you" in the Zapotec language.

NEHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Malayalam, Kannada, Punjabi, Gujarati, Bengali, Telugu
Other Scripts: नेहा (Hindi, Marathi), നേഹ (Malayalam), ನೇಹಾ (Kannada), ਨੇਹਾ (Gurmukhi), નેહા (Gujarati), নেহা (Bengali), నేహా (Telugu)
Possibly from Sanskrit स्नेह (sneha) meaning "love, tenderness".

NELLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NEL-ee
Diminutive of NELL.

NELLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NEL-ee
Diminutive of NELL.

NEVAEH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: nə-VAY-ə
The word heaven spelled backwards. It became popular after the musician Sonny Sandoval from the rock group P.O.D. gave it to his daughter in 2000.

NIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Welsh form of NIAMH.

NIA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Eastern African, Swahili
Means "purpose" in Swahili.

NIAMH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: NYEE-əv (Irish), NYEEV (Irish)
Means "bright" in Irish. She was the daughter of the sea god in Irish legends. She fell in love with the poet Oisín, son of Fionn.

NICOLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Dutch, German
Pronounced: NEE-KAWL (French), ni-KOL (English), nee-KAWL (German)
French feminine form of NICHOLAS, commonly used in the English-speaking world since the middle of the 20th century. A famous bearer is American-Australian actress Nicole Kidman (1967-).

NOELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: no-EL
English form of NOËLLE.

PATRICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English, French, German
Pronounced: PAT-rik (English), PA-TREEK (French), PA-trik (German)
From the Latin name Patricius, which meant "nobleman". This name was adopted in the 5th-century by Saint Patrick, whose birth name was Sucat. He was a Romanized Briton who was captured and enslaved in his youth by Irish raiders. After six years of servitude he escaped home, but he eventually became a bishop and went back to Ireland as a missionary. He is traditionally credited with Christianizing the island, and is regarded as Ireland's patron saint.

In England and elsewhere in Europe during the Middle Ages this name was used in honour of the saint. However, it was not generally given in Ireland before the 17th century because it was considered too sacred for everyday use. It has since become very common there.

PAYTON
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: PAYT-ən
Variant of PEYTON.

PERSEPHONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Περσεφονη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PER-SE-PO-NE (Classical Greek), pər-SEF-ə-nee (English)
Meaning unknown, probably of Pre-Greek origin, but perhaps related to Greek περθω (pertho) "to destroy" and φονη (phone) "murder". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus. She was abducted to the underworld by Hades, but was eventually allowed to return to the surface for part of the year. The result of her comings and goings is the changing of the seasons.

PETER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Slovak, Biblical
Pronounced: PEE-tər (English), PE-tu (German), PAY-tər (Dutch), PE-tər (Danish, Slovene), PE-ter (Slovak)
Derived from the Greek Πετρος (Petros) meaning "stone". This is a translation used in most versions of the New Testament of the name Cephas, meaning "stone" in Aramaic, which was given to the apostle Simon by Jesus (compare Matthew 16:18 and John 1:42). Simon Peter was the most prominent of the apostles during Jesus' ministry and is often considered the first pope.

Due to the renown of the apostle, this name became common throughout the Christian world (in various spellings). In England the Normans introduced it in the Old French form Piers, which was gradually replaced by the spelling Peter starting in the 15th century.

Besides the apostle, other saints by this name include the 11th-century reformer Saint Peter Damian and the 13th-century preacher Saint Peter Martyr. It was also borne by rulers of Aragon, Portugal, and Russia, including the Russian tsar Peter the Great (1672-1725), who defeated Sweden in the Great Northern War. Famous fictional bearers include Peter Rabbit from Beatrix Potter's children's books, and Peter Pan, the boy who refused to grow up in J. M. Barrie's 1904 play.

PEYTON
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAYT-ən
From an English surname, originally a place name meaning "PÆGA's town". A famous bearer was Peyton Randolph (1721-1775), the first president of the Continental Congress. It is also borne by American football quarterback Peyton Manning (1976-).

PHYLLIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German
Other Scripts: Φυλλις (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: FIL-is (English)
Means "foliage" in Greek. In Greek mythology this was the name of a woman who killed herself out of love for Demophon and was subsequently transformed into an almond tree. It began to be used as a given name in England in the 16th century, though it was often confused with Felicia.

POPPY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: PAH-pee
From the word for the red flower, derived from Old English popæg.

PRIYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Kannada, Bengali
Other Scripts: प्रिया (Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi), பிரியா (Tamil), ప్రియ (Telugu), പ്രിയാ (Malayalam), ಪ್ರಿಯಾ (Kannada), প্রিয়া (Bengali)
Means "beloved" in Sanskrit. In Hindu legend this is the name of a daughter of King Daksha.

REESE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Anglicized form of RHYS.

RICHARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: RICH-ərd (English), REE-SHAR (French), REE-khart (German)
Means "brave power", derived from the Germanic elements ric "power, rule" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, and it has been very common there since that time. It was borne by three kings of England including Richard I the Lionheart, one of the leaders of the Third Crusade in the 12th century.

Famous bearers include two German opera composers, Richard Wagner (1813-1883) and Richard Strauss (1864-1949), as well as British explorer Sir Richard Burton (1821-1890), American physicist Richard Feynman (1918-1988) and American musician Little Richard (1932-).

RILEY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RIE-lee
From a surname which comes from two distinct sources. As an Irish surname it is a variant of REILLY. As an English surname it is derived from a place name meaning "rye clearing" in Old English.

RIVER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: RIV-ər
From the English word that denotes a flowing body of water. The word is ultimately derived (via Old French) from Latin ripa "riverbank".

ROSALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Late Roman
Pronounced: ro-za-LEE-a (Italian)
Late Latin name derived from rosa "rose". This was the name of a 12th-century Sicilian saint.

ROSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: ROZ
Originally a Norman form of a Germanic name, which was composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.

ROSIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROZ-ee
Diminutive of ROSE.

RYLEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: RIE-lee
Feminine variant of RILEY.

SAVANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: sə-VAN-ə
Variant of SAVANNAH.

SAVANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: sə-VAN-ə
From the English word for the large grassy plain, ultimately deriving from the Taino (Native American) word zabana. It came into use as a given name in America in the 19th century. It was revived in the 1980s by the movie 'Savannah Smiles' (1982).

SCARLETT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SKAHR-lit
From a surname which denoted a person who sold or made clothes made of scarlet (a kind of cloth, ultimately derived from Persian سقرلاط (saghrilat)). Margaret Mitchell used this name for Scarlett O'Hara, the main character in her novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936). Scarlett's name came from her grandmother's maiden name.

SERENITY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: sə-REN-i-tee
From the English word meaning "serenity, tranquility", ultimately from Latin serenus meaning "clear, calm".

SHANIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: shə-NIE-ə
In the case of singer Shania Twain (1965-), who chose it as her stage name, she has claimed it was based on an Ojibwa phrase meaning "on my way". This appears to be untrue.

SHAYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHAY-lə
Variant of SHEILA, influenced by the spelling and sound of KAYLA (1).

SHAYNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish
Other Scripts: שֵׁײנָא (Yiddish)
Means "beautiful" in Yiddish.

SHYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Variant of SHEILA.

SIENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: see-EN-ə
From the English word meaning "orange-red". It is ultimately from the name of the city of Siena in Italy, because of the colour of the clay there.

SKY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SKIE
Simply from the English word sky, which was ultimately derived from Old Norse sky "cloud".

SKYE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SKIE
From the name of the Isle of Skye off the west coast of Scotland. It is sometimes considered a variant of SKY.

SKYLAR
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SKIE-lər
Variant of SKYLER.

SKYLER
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SKIE-lər
Variant of SCHUYLER. The spelling was modified due to association with the name Tyler and the English word sky.

STACEY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STAY-see
Variant of STACY.

STAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STAHR
From the English word for the celestial body, ultimately from Old English steorra.

STARLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STAHR-lə
Elaborated form of STAR.

STEPHANIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German
Pronounced: STEF-ə-nee (English), SHTE-fa-nee (German)
Feminine form of STEPHEN.

SULLIVAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SUL-i-vən
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Súilleabháin meaning "descendant of Súilleabhán". The name Súilleabhán means "little dark eye" in Irish.

SUMMER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SUM-ər
From the name of the season, ultimately from Old English sumor. It has been in use as a given name since the 1970s.

SUNITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali
Other Scripts: सुनीता (Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali)
Means "well conducted, wise", derived from the Sanskrit prefix सु (su) meaning "good" combined with नीत (nita) meaning "conducted, led". In Hindu legend this is the name of the daughter of King Anga of Bengal.

SUNITHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil, Malayalam
Other Scripts: ಸುನಿತಾ (Kannada), సునీతా (Telugu), சுனிதா (Tamil), സുനിത (Malayalam)
Southern Indian form of SUNITA.

SUNITI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: सुनीती (Hindi)
Means "good conduct" from the Sanskrit prefix सु (su) meaning "good" combined with नीति (niti) meaning "guidance, moral conduct".

TABEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: ta-BE-a
German short form of TABITHA. This form was used in earlier editions of the Luther Bible.

TABITHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ταβιθα (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: TAB-i-thə (English)
Means "gazelle" in Aramaic. Tabitha in the New Testament was a woman restored to life by Saint Peter. Her name is translated into Greek as Dorcas (see Acts 9:36). As an English name, Tabitha became common after the Protestant Reformation. It was popularized in the 1960s by the television show 'Bewitched', in which Tabitha (sometimes spelled Tabatha) is the daughter of the main character.

TAHLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Australian)
Variant of TALIA (2).

TAHNEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TAW-nee
Variant of TAWNY.

TALIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: טַלְיָה, טַלְיָא (Hebrew)
Variant transcription of TALYA.

TALYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: טַלְיָה, טַלְיָא (Hebrew)
Means "dew from God" in Hebrew.

TAMARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Hungarian, English, Dutch, Spanish, Italian
Other Scripts: Тамара (Russian, Ukrainian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: tu-MA-rə (Russian), TA-ma-ra (Slovak), ta-MA-ra (Polish, Spanish, Italian), TAW-maw-raw (Hungarian), tə-MAHR-ə (English), TAM-ə-rə (English)
Russian form of TAMAR. Russian performers such as Tamara Karsavina (1885-1978), Tamara Drasin (1905-1943), Tamara Geva (1907-1997) and Tamara Toumanova (1919-1996) introduced it to the English-speaking world. It was also borne by the Polish cubist painter Tamara de Lempicka (1898-1980).

TAMERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Variant of TAMARA.

TAMIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Elaborated form of the popular name syllable Tam, from names such as TAMARA or TAMIKA. It was popularized by Canadian singer Tamia Hill (1975-), who is known simply as Tamia.

TARYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAHR-in
Probably a feminine form of TYRONE. Actors Tyrone Power and Linda Christian created it for their daughter Taryn Power (1953-).

TAWNY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: TAW-nee
From the English word, ultimately deriving from Old French tané, which means "light brown".

TAYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: TAY-lə
Probably a feminine form of TAYLOR influenced by similar-sounding names such as KAYLA (1).

TAYLER
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: TAY-lər
Variant of TAYLOR.

TEAGAN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Tadhgáin meaning "descendant of Tadhgán". The given name Tadhgán is a diminutive of TADHG.

TEGAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Derived from Welsh teg "fair".

TEMPERANCE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Pronounced: TEM-prənts, TEM-pər-ənts
From the English word meaning "moderation" or "restraint". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.

THALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Greek
Other Scripts: Θαλεια (Greek)
Personal note: from Baby Name Expert
From the Greek name Θαλεια (Thaleia), derived from θαλλω (thallo) meaning "to blossom". In Greek mythology she was one of the nine Muses, presiding over comedy and pastoral poetry. This was also the name of one of the three Graces or Χαριτες (Charites).

THOMAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Θωμας (Greek)
Pronounced: TAHM-əs (American English), TAWM-əs (British English), TAW-MA (French), TO-mas (German), TO-mahs (Dutch), tho-MAHS (Greek)
Greek form of the Aramaic name תָּאוֹמָא (Ta'oma') which meant "twin". In the New Testament this is the name of an apostle. When he heard that Jesus had risen from the dead he initially doubted the story, until Jesus appeared before him and he examined his wounds himself. According to tradition he was martyred in India. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world.

In England the name was introduced by the Normans and became very popular due to Saint Thomas Becket, a 12th-century archbishop of Canterbury and martyr. Another notable saint by this name was the 13th-century Italian philosopher and theologian Thomas Aquinas, who is regarded as a Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include philosopher Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), American president Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), novelist Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), and inventor Thomas Edison (1847-1931).

TIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: tee-AN-ə
Short form of TATIANA or CHRISTIANA.

TIANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: tee-AN-ə
Variant of TIANA.

TIARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: tee-AHR-ə
From the English word for a semicircle crown, ultimately of Greek origin.

TIFFANY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TIF-ə-nee
Medieval form of THEOPHANIA. This name was traditionally given to girls born on the Epiphany (January 6), the festival commemorating the visit of the Magi to the infant Jesus. The name died out after the Middle Ages, but it was revived by the movie 'Breakfast at Tiffany's' (1961), the title of which refers to the Tiffany's jewelry store in New York.

TIGER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TIE-gər
From the name of the large striped cat, derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek τιγρις (tigris), ultimately of Iranian origin. A famous bearer is American golfer Tiger Woods (1975-).

TILLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TIL-ee
Diminutive of MATILDA.

TYRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Þýri, a variant of the Norse names ÞÓRVÍ or ÞÓRVEIG.

VIOLET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VIE-lit, VIE-ə-lit
From the English word violet for the purple flower, ultimately derived from Latin viola. It was common in Scotland from the 16th century, and it came into general use as an English given name during the 19th century.

WENDY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WEN-dee
In the case of the character from J. M. Barrie's play 'Peter Pan' (1904), it was created from the nickname fwendy "friend", given to the author by a young friend. However, the name was used prior to the play (rarely), in which case it could be related to the Welsh name GWENDOLEN and other names beginning with the element gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed". The name only became common after Barrie's play ran.

WILLIAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIL-yəm
From the Germanic name Willahelm, which was composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". Saint William of Gellone was an 8th-century cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England in the 11th century. It was later borne by three other English kings, as well as rulers of Scotland, Sicily (of Norman origin), the Netherlands and Prussia.

Other famous bearers include William Wallace, a 13th-century Scottish hero, and William Tell, a legendary 14th-century Swiss hero. In the literary world it was borne by dramatist William Shakespeare (1564-1616), poet William Blake (1757-1827), poet William Wordsworth (1770-1850), dramatist William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), author William Faulkner (1897-1962), and author William S. Burroughs (1914-1997).

WINIFRED
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: WIN-i-frid
Anglicized form of GWENFREWI, the spelling altered by association with WINFRED. It became used in England in the 16th century.

WINTER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: WIN-tər
From the English word for the season, derived from Old English winter.

WREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: REN
From the English word for the small songbird. It is ultimately derived from Old English wrenna.

ZAHRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Persian
Other Scripts: زهراء (Arabic), زهرا (Persian)
Means "brilliant, bright" in Arabic. This is an epithet of the Prophet Muhammad's daughter Fatimah.
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2017.