Yippal's Personal Name List

AADOLF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: AH-dolf
Rating: 26% based on 9 votes
Finnish form of ADOLF.
ADA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Polish, Hungarian, Italian, Finnish, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: AY-də(English) A-da(Polish) AH-dah(Finnish)
Rating: 54% based on 9 votes
Originally a short form of Germanic names such as ADELAIDE or ADELINA that begin with the element adal meaning "noble". This name was borne by Augusta Ada King (1815-1852), the Countess of Lovelace (known as Ada Lovelace), a daughter of Lord Byron. She was an assistant to Charles Babbage, the inventor of an early mechanical computer.
ADALIA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: אֲדַלְיָא(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: a-də-LIE-ə(English) ə-DAH-lee-ə(English)
Rating: 36% based on 7 votes
Meaning unknown, possibly of Persian origin. In Book of Esther in the Old Testament this is the name of a son of Haman the Agagite.
ADAMINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ad-ə-MEEN-ə
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of ADAM.
ADELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ə-DEHL-ə
Variant of ADELA.
ADOLPHE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-DAWLF
Rating: 36% based on 5 votes
French form of ADOLF, rarely used since World War II.
AGATA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Polish, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Агата(Russian, Serbian)
Pronounced: a-GA-ta(Italian, Polish) a-GHA-ta(Spanish) u-GA-tə(Russian)
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
Form of AGATHA in various languages.
AGNIESZKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: ag-NYEH-shka
Rating: 36% based on 5 votes
Polish form of AGNES.
AILEEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish, Irish, English
Pronounced: ie-LEEN(English) IE-leen(English)
Rating: 20% based on 5 votes
Variant of EILEEN.
AINA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: IE-nah(Finnish) IE-na(Swedish)
Rating: 34% based on 5 votes
Variant of AINO. It also means "always" in Finnish.
AISLING
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: ASH-lyən
Rating: 36% based on 5 votes
Means "dream" or "vision" in Irish Gaelic. This name was created in the 20th century.
AKSELI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: AHK-seh-lee
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Finnish form of AXEL.
ALEKSANDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, Serbian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian, Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian
Other Scripts: Александра(Russian, Ukrainian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: u-lyik-SAN-drə(Russian) a-leh-KSAN-dra(Polish)
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
Form of ALEXANDRA in several languages.
ALEKSEI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Алексей(Russian)
Pronounced: u-lyi-KSYAY
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian Алексей (see ALEKSEY).
ALEKSIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish, Latvian
Pronounced: ˈɑlɛksis(Finnish)
Finnish and Latvian form of ALEXIS. This name was borne by Finnish author Aleksis Kivi (originally Alexis Stenvall) who wrote the first significant novel in the Finnish language, 'Seitsemän veljestä' ('Seven Brothers') in 1870.
ALICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Italian, German, Czech
Pronounced: AL-is(English) A-LEES(French) u-LEE-si(European Portuguese) a-LEE-see(Brazilian Portuguese) a-LEE-cheh(Italian) a-LEE-sə(German) A-li-tseh(Czech)
Rating: 72% based on 5 votes
From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was among the most common names in England until the 16th century, when it began to decline. It was revived in the 19th century.

This name was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's novels Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) and Through the Looking Glass (1871).

ALIISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: AH-lee-sah
Rating: 34% based on 5 votes
Finnish form of ALICE.
ALIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Welsh form of ALICE.
ALMA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Dutch
Pronounced: AL-mə(English) AL-ma(Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
This name became popular after the Battle of Alma (1854), which took place near the River Alma in Crimea and ended in a victory for Britain and France. However, the name was in rare use before the battle; it was probably inspired by Latin almus "nourishing". It also coincides with the Spanish word meaning "the soul".
AMALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Greek, Swedish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic (Latinized) [1]
Other Scripts: Αμαλία(Greek)
Pronounced: a-MA-lya(Spanish, German) ah-MAH-lee-ah(Dutch)
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Latinized form of the Germanic name Amala, a short form of names beginning with the element amal meaning "work".
AMELINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1]
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Old Germanic form of EMMELINE.
AMINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Bosnian, Tatar, Kazakh
Other Scripts: آمنة, أمينة(Arabic) Әминә(Tatar) Әмина(Kazakh)
Pronounced: A-mee-nah(Arabic) a-MEE-nah(Arabic)
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
Alternate transcription of Arabic AMINAH (1) or AMINAH (2), as well as the Bosnian, Tatar and Kazakh forms.
ANASTASIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, English, Spanish, Italian, Georgian, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αναστασία(Greek) Анастасия(Russian) Анастасія(Ukrainian, Belarusian) ანასტასია(Georgian) Ἀναστασία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: a-na-sta-SEE-a(Greek) u-nu-stu-SYEE-yə(Russian) an-ə-STAY-zhə(English) a-nas-TA-sya(Spanish) a-na-STA-zya(Italian) A-NA-STA-SEE-A(Classical Greek)
Feminine form of ANASTASIUS. This was the name of a 4th-century Dalmatian saint who was martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. Due to her, the name has been common in Eastern Orthodox Christianity (in various spellings). As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the youngest daughter of the last Russian tsar Nicholas II, who was rumoured to have escaped the execution of her family in 1918.
ANDOR (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
From the Old Norse name Arnþórr, derived from the element arn "eagle" combined with the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR).
ANDRASTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Celtic Mythology
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
Possibly means "invincible" in Celtic. This was the name of a Briton goddess of victory who was invoked by Boudicca before her revolt.
ANDROMEDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀνδρομέδα, Ἀνδρομέδη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AN-DRO-MEH-DA(Classical Greek) an-DRAH-mi-də(English)
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Means "to be mindful of a man" from the Greek element ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός) combined with μέδομαι (medomai) meaning "to be mindful of". In Greek mythology Andromeda was an Ethiopian princess rescued from sacrifice by the hero Perseus. A constellation in the northern sky is named for her. This is also the name of a nearby galaxy, given because it resides (from our point of view) within the constellation.
ANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Άννα(Greek) Анна(Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Bulgarian, Church Slavic) Ἄννα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AN-ə(English) AN-na(Italian, Polish, Icelandic) A-na(German, Swedish, Greek, Czech) AH-na(Dutch) AHN-nah(Norwegian, Finnish) AN-nah(Danish) AWN-naw(Hungarian) AN-nə(Russian, Catalan)
Rating: 74% based on 5 votes
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary.

In England, this Latin form has been used alongside the vernacular forms Ann and Anne since the late Middle Ages. Anna is currently the most common of these spellings in all English-speaking countries (since the 1970s), however the biblical form Hannah is presently more popular than all three.

The name was borne by several Russian royals, including an 18th-century empress of Russia. It is also the name of the main character in Leo Tolstoy's novel Anna Karenina (1877), about a married aristocrat who begins an ultimately tragic relationship with Count Vronsky.

ANNORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Medieval English variant of HONORA.
ANNUKKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: AHN-nook-kah
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
Finnish diminutive of ANNA.
ANTOINETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AHN-TWA-NEHT
Rating: 62% based on 5 votes
Feminine diminutive of ANTOINE. This name was borne by Marie Antoinette, the queen of France during the French Revolution. She was executed by guillotine.
ANTONIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Romanian, Greek, Croatian, Bulgarian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Αντωνία(Greek) Антония(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: an-TO-nya(Italian, Spanish, German) an-TO-nee-ə(English) ahn-TO-nee-a(Dutch)
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ANWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Means "very beautiful" in Welsh.
ARAMIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
The surname of one of the musketeers in The Three Musketeers (1844) by Alexandre Dumas. Dumas based the character on the 17th-century Henri d'Aramitz, whose surname was derived from the French village of Aramits (itself from Basque aran meaning "valley").
ARTEMIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Greek
Other Scripts: Ἄρτεμις(Ancient Greek) Άρτεμις(Greek)
Pronounced: AR-TEH-MEES(Classical Greek) AHR-tə-mis(English)
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Meaning unknown, possibly related either to Greek ἀρτεμής (artemes) meaning "safe" or ἄρταμος (artamos) meaning "a butcher". Artemis was the Greek goddess of the moon and hunting, the twin of Apollo and the daughter of Zeus and Leto. She was known as Diana to the Romans.
ARTHUR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: AHR-thər(English) AR-TUYR(French) AR-tuwr(German) AHR-tuyr(Dutch)
Rating: 63% based on 6 votes
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius.

Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been based on a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (perhaps briefly in the 7th-century poem Y Gododdin and more definitively and extensively in the 9th-century History of the Britons by Nennius [1]). However, his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth [2]. His tales were later taken up and expanded by French and English writers.

The name came into general use in England in the Middle Ages due to the prevalence of Arthurian romances, and it enjoyed a surge of popularity in the 19th century. Famous bearers include German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), mystery author and Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), and science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008).

ASHA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Malayalam
Other Scripts: आशा(Hindi, Marathi) ಆಶಾ(Kannada) ആശാ(Malayalam)
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
Derived from Sanskrit आशा (asha) meaning "wish, desire, hope".
ASHLEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ASH-lee
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
From an English surname that was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from a combination of Old English æsc and leah. Until the 1960s it was more commonly given to boys in the United States, but it is now most often used on girls. It reached its height of popularity in America in 1987, but it did not become the highest ranked name until 1991, being overshadowed by the likewise-popular Jessica until then. In the United Kingdom it is still more common as a masculine name.
AUGUSTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Italian, Portuguese, Polish, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: ow-GUWS-ta(German) ow-GOOS-ta(Italian, Polish) ə-GUS-tə(English)
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of AUGUSTUS. It was introduced to Britain when King George III, a member of the German House of Hanover, gave this name to his second daughter in the 18th century.
AUKUSTI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: OW-koos-tee
Finnish form of AUGUSTUS.
BEATA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, German, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: beh-A-ta(Polish, German)
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Derived from Latin beatus meaning "blessed". This was the name of a few minor saints.
BEATRICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English, Swedish
Pronounced: beh-a-TREE-cheh(Italian) BEE-ə-tris(English) BEET-ris(English) BEH-ah-trees(Swedish) beh-ah-TREES(Swedish)
Rating: 67% based on 7 votes
Italian form of BEATRIX. Beatrice Portinari (1266-1290) was the woman who was loved by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. She serves as Dante's guide through paradise in his epic poem the Divine Comedy (1321). This is also the name of a character in Shakespeare's comedy Much Ado About Nothing (1599), in which Beatrice and Benedick are fooled into confessing their love for one another.
BEAUREGARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BO-rə-gahrd
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
From a French surname meaning "beautiful outlook".
BESS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEHS
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of ELIZABETH.
BETHAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: BETH-an
Rating: 13% based on 4 votes
Welsh diminutive of ELIZABETH.
BETHEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BETH-əl
From an Old Testament place name meaning "house of God" in Hebrew. This was a town north of Jerusalem, where Jacob saw his vision of the stairway. It is occasionally used as a given name.
BIRGITTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish
Pronounced: bir-GI-ta(Swedish) BEER-geet-tah(Finnish)
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Most likely a Scandinavian form of BRIDGET via the Latinized form Brigitta. Alternatively it could be a feminine derivative of BIRGER. This is the name of the patron saint of Europe, Birgitta of Sweden, the 14th-century founder of the Bridgettine nuns. Her father's name was Birger.
BLUE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BLOO
Middle English from Old French bleu, ultimately of Germanic origin and related to Old English blǣwen ‘blue’ and Old Norse blár ‘dark blue.’
BRONTE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BRAHN-tee
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
From a surname, an Anglicized form of Irish Ó Proinntigh meaning "descendant of Proinnteach". The given name Proinnteach meant "bestower" in Gaelic. The Brontë sisters - Charlotte, Emily, and Anne - were 19th-century English novelists. Their father changed the spelling of the family surname from Brunty to Brontë, possibly to make it coincide with Greek βροντή meaning "thunder".
CARLYLE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kahr-LIEL
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Variant of CARLISLE.
CARON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 8% based on 4 votes
Derived from Welsh caru meaning "to love".
CATHARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, Swedish
Pronounced: kah-tah-REE-nah(Dutch)
Rating: 42% based on 5 votes
Dutch and Swedish form of KATHERINE.
CATHERINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KA-TU-REEN(French) KA-TREEN(French) KATH-ə-rin(English) KATH-rin(English)
Rating: 58% based on 6 votes
French form of KATHERINE, and also a common English variant.
CECILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Romanian, Finnish, German
Pronounced: seh-SEE-lee-ə(English) seh-SEEL-yə(English) cheh-CHEE-lya(Italian) theh-THEE-lya(European Spanish) seh-SEE-lya(Latin American Spanish) seh-SEEL-yah(Danish, Norwegian)
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus meaning "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.

Due to the popularity of the saint, the name became common in the Christian world during the Middle Ages. The Normans brought it to England, where it was commonly spelled Cecily - the Latinate form Cecilia came into use in the 18th century.

CECILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SEHS-ə-lee
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
English form of CECILIA. This was the usual English form during the Middle Ages.
CHARIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, English (Rare)
Other Scripts: Χάρις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KAYR-is(English)
Rating: 22% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of CHARES. It came into use as an English given name in the 17th century.
CHARLEMAGNE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: SHAHR-lə-mayn(English)
Rating: 34% based on 5 votes
From Old French Charles le Magne meaning "CHARLES the Great". This is the name by which the Frankish king Charles the Great (742-814) is commonly known.
CLARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: KLA-ra(German, Spanish, Italian) KLA-ru(Portuguese) KLA-RA(French) KLEHR-ə(American English) KLAR-ə(American English) KLAH-rə(British English)
Rating: 64% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus, which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.
CONRÍ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Means "wolf king" in Irish Gaelic.
CRESCENTIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Late Roman
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of CRESCENTIUS. Saint Crescentia was a 4th-century companion of Saint Vitus. This is also the name of the eponymous heroine of a 12th-century German romance.
DAGMAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic, German, Czech, Slovak
Pronounced: DAK-mar(German) DAG-mar(Czech)
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
From the Old Norse name Dagmær, derived from the elements dagr "day" and mær "maid". This was the name adopted by the popular Bohemian wife of the Danish king Valdemar II when they married in 1205. Her birth name was Markéta.
DAMIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Polish, Dutch
Pronounced: DAY-mee-ən(English) DA-myan(Polish)
Rating: 66% based on 5 votes
From the Greek name Δαμιανός (Damianos), which was derived from Greek δαμάζω (damazo) meaning "to tame". Saint Damian was martyred with his twin brother Cosmas in Syria early in the 4th century. They are the patron saints of physicians. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in Christian Europe. Another saint by this name was Peter Damian, an 11th-century cardinal and theologian from Italy.
DANILO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian
Other Scripts: Данило(Serbian)
Pronounced: da-NEE-lo(Italian, Spanish)
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Form of DANIEL in various languages.
DARCY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAHR-see
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
From an English surname that was derived from Norman French d'Arcy, originally denoting one who came from Arcy in France. This was the surname of a character in Jane Austen's novel Pride and Prejudice (1813).
DASHIELL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: də-SHEEL, DASH-il
Rating: 34% based on 5 votes
In the case of American author Dashiell Hammett (1894-1961) it was from his mother's surname, which was possibly an Anglicized form of French de Chiel, of unknown meaning.
DAVID
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: דָּוִד(Hebrew) Давид(Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: DAY-vid(English) da-VEED(Hebrew, Brazilian Portuguese) DA-VEED(French) da-BEEDH(Spanish) du-VEED(European Portuguese) DA-vit(German, Czech) DAH-vid(Swedish, Norwegian) DAH-vit(Dutch) du-VYEET(Russian)
Rating: 80% based on 5 votes
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was derived from Hebrew דּוֹד (dod) meaning "beloved" or "uncle". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.

This name has been used in Britain since the Middle Ages. It has been especially popular in Wales, where it is used in honour of the 5th-century patron saint of Wales (also called Dewi), as well as in Scotland, where it was borne by two kings. Over the last century it has been one of the English-speaking world's most consistently popular names, never leaving the top 30 names for boys in the United States, and reaching the top rank in England and Wales during the 1950s and 60s. In Spain it was the most popular name for boys during the 1970s and 80s.

Famous bearers include empiricist philosopher David Hume (1711-1776), explorer David Livingstone (1813-1873), musician David Bowie (1947-2016), and soccer player David Beckham (1975-). This is also the name of the hero of Charles Dickens' semi-autobiographical novel David Copperfield (1850).

DAVIDE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: DA-vee-deh
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Italian form of DAVID.
DAVINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: də-VEE-nə
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of DAVID. It originated in Scotland.
DECIMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: DEH-kee-ma
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of DECIMUS.
DORCAS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: Δορκάς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DAWR-kəs(English)
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
Derived from Greek δορκάς (dorkas) meaning "gazelle". This is the Greek translation of the name Tabitha in the New Testament (see Acts 9:36).
DOROTHY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAWR-ə-thee, DAWR-thee
Rating: 73% based on 4 votes
Usual English form of DOROTHEA. It has been in use since the 16th century. The author L. Frank Baum used it for the central character in his fantasy novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) and several of its sequels.
EDDA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian [1]
Possibly from Old Norse meaning "great-grandmother". This was the name of two 13th-century Icelandic literary works: the Poetic Edda and the Prose Edda. This is also the name of a character in the Poetic Edda, though it is unclear if her name is connected to the name of the collection.
EINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: AY-neh
Feminine form of EINO.
EINI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: AY-nee
Feminine form of EINO.
EIRLYS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: AYR-lis
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Means "snowdrop (flower)" in Welsh.
ELEANOR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ə-nawr
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
From the Old French form of the Occitan name Alienòr. Among the name's earliest bearers was the influential Eleanor of Aquitaine (12th century), who was the queen of Louis VII, the king of France, and later Henry II, the king of England. She was named Aenor after her mother, and was called by the Occitan phrase alia Aenor "the other AENOR" in order to distinguish her from her mother. However, there appear to be examples of bearers prior to Eleanor of Aquitaine. It is not clear whether they were in fact Aenors who were retroactively recorded as having the name Eleanor, or whether there is an alternative explanation for the name's origin.

The popularity of the name Eleanor in England during the Middle Ages was due to the fame of Eleanor of Aquitaine, as well as two queens of the following century: Eleanor of Provence, the wife of Henry III, and Eleanor of Castile, the wife of Edward I. More recently, it was borne by first lady Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), the wife of American president Franklin Roosevelt.

ELEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: EHL-ehn
Welsh form of HELEN. This was the name of a 4th-century Welsh saint. It also appears in the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, belonging to a woman who built the roads in Wales.
ELEONOORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish (Rare)
Pronounced: EH-leh-o-no-rah
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Finnish form of ELEANOR.
ELINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish, Estonian, Swedish
Pronounced: EH-lee-nah(Finnish) eh-LEE-nah(Swedish)
Finnish, Estonian and Swedish form of HELEN.
ELISABET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, Spanish, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ἐλισάβετ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: eh-LEE-sa-beht(Swedish, Norwegian) eh-LEE-sa-behd(Danish) EH-lee-sah-beht(Finnish) eh-lee-sa-BEHT(Spanish)
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
Scandinavian and Finnish form of ELIZABETH. It is also used in Spain alongside the traditional form Isabel.
ELISABETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: eh-lee-za-BEHT-ta
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
Italian form of ELIZABETH.
ELLINOORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: EL-li-no:-rah
Finnish variant of ELEANOR.
ELLINOR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Scandinavian form of ELEANOR.
ELMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, German, English
Pronounced: EHL-ma(German) EHL-mə(English)
Rating: 50% based on 6 votes
Short form of WILHELMINE or names ending in elma, such as ANSELMA. It has also been recorded as a combination of ELIZABETH and MARY, as in the case of the 19th-century daughter of the Earl of Elgin, who was named using her mother's first and middle names [1].
ELOISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: eh-lo-EE-za
Rating: 50% based on 6 votes
Italian form of ELOISE.
ELSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Icelandic, Finnish, Italian
Pronounced: EHL-sə(English) EHL-za(German) EHL-sah(Finnish)
Short form of ELISABETH.
ELSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish, Norwegian, German, Dutch
Pronounced: EHL-seh(Danish, Norwegian) EHL-zə(German) EHL-sə(Dutch)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Short form of ELISABETH.
ELSI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: EHL-see
Diminutive of ELISABET.
EMIL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Romanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Hungarian, Icelandic, English
Other Scripts: Емил(Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian) Эмиль(Russian)
Pronounced: EH-mil(Swedish, Czech) EH-meel(German, Slovak, Hungarian) eh-MEEL(Romanian) EH-myeel(Polish) eh-MYEEL(Russian) ə-MEEL(English) EHM-il(English)
From the Roman family name Aemilius, which was derived from Latin aemulus meaning "rival".
EMILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Finnish, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Емилия(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: eh-MEE-lya(Italian, Spanish) EH-mee-lee-ah(Finnish) eh-MYEE-lya(Polish) eh-MEE-lee-ah(Swedish) i-MEE-lee-ə(English)
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMLYN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Probably from the name of an ancient region in Wales, its name meaning "around the valley". It has also been suggested that this name is a Welsh form of Aemilianus (see EMILIANO).
EMMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Dutch, German, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: EHM-ə(English) EH-MA(French) EH-ma(Spanish, German) EHM-mah(Finnish)
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of King Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of King Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.

After the Norman Conquest this name became common in England. It was revived in the 18th century, perhaps in part due to Matthew Prior's 1709 poem Henry and Emma [2]. It was also used by Jane Austen for the central character, the matchmaker Emma Woodhouse, in her novel Emma (1816).

In the United States, it was third in rank in 1880 (behind only the ubiquitous Mary and Anna). It declined steadily over the next century, beginning another rise in the 1980s and eventually becoming the most popular name for girls in 2008. At this time it also experienced similar levels of popularity elsewhere, including the United Kingdom (where it began rising a decade earlier), Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Scandinavia and the Netherlands.

EMMELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ə-leen, EHM-ə-lien
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
From an Old French form of the Germanic name Amelina, originally a diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element amal meaning "work". The Normans introduced this name to England.
ENNI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: EHN-nee
Feminine form of EINO.
ETHEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ETH-əl
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Short form of names beginning with the Old English element æðel meaning "noble". It was coined in the 19th century, when many Old English names were revived. It was popularized by the novels The Newcomes (1855) by William Makepeace Thackeray and The Daisy Chain (1856) by C. M. Yonge. A famous bearer was American actress and singer Ethel Merman (1908-1984).
EUDORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Εὐδώρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: yoo-DAWR-ə(English)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Means "good gift" in Greek, from the elements εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift". This was the name of a nymph, one of the Hyades, in Greek mythology.
EULALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, English, Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Εὐλαλία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ew-LA-lya(Spanish) yoo-LAY-lee-ə(English)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Derived from Greek εὔλαλος (eulalos) meaning "sweetly-speaking", itself from εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and λαλέω (laleo) meaning "to talk". This was the name of an early 4th-century saint and martyr from Merida in Spain. She is a patron saint of Barcelona.
EUPHEMIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, English (Archaic)
Other Scripts: Εὐφημία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: yoo-FEE-mee-ə(English)
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
Means "to use words of good omen" from Greek εὐφημέω (euphemeo), a derivative of εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and φημί (phemi) meaning "to speak, to declare". Saint Euphemia was an early martyr from Chalcedon.
FANNY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Spanish
Pronounced: FAN-ee(English) FA-NEE(French)
Rating: 16% based on 5 votes
Diminutive of FRANCES, FRANÇOISE or STÉPHANIE. In the English-speaking world this has been a vulgar slang word since the late 19th century, and the name has subsequently dropped out of common use.
FARAMUND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1]
Derived from the Germanic elements fara "journey" and mund "protection". This was the name of a semi-legendary 5th-century king of the Franks.
FELIX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: FEH-liks(German, Swedish) FAY-liks(Dutch) FEE-liks(English) FEH-leeks(Classical Latin)
From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.

Due to its favourable meaning, this name was popular among early Christians, being borne by many early saints and four popes. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages, though it has been more popular in continental Europe. A notable bearer was the German composer Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847).

FEODORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Феодора(Russian)
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Russian form of THEODORA.
FRANCES
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FRAN-sis
Rating: 73% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of FRANCIS. The distinction between Francis as a masculine name and Frances as a feminine name did not arise until the 17th century [1]. A notable bearer was Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini (1850-1917), a social worker and the first American to be canonized.
FRANCESCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan
Pronounced: fran-CHEHS-ka(Italian) frən-SEHS-kə(Catalan)
Rating: 56% based on 5 votes
Italian and Catalan feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRANCIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: FRAN-sis(English) FRAHN-SEES(French)
Rating: 63% based on 4 votes
English form of the Late Latin name Franciscus meaning "Frenchman", ultimately from the Germanic tribe of the Franks, who were named for a type of spear that they used. This name was borne by the 13th-century Saint Francis of Assisi, who was originally named Giovanni but was given the nickname Francesco by his father, an admirer of the French. Francis went on to renounce his father's wealth and devote his life to the poor, founding the Franciscan order of friars. Later in his life he apparently received the stigmata.

Due to the renown of the saint, this name became widespread in Western Europe during the Middle Ages. However, it was not regularly used in Britain until the 16th century. Famous bearers include Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552), a missionary to East Asia, the philosopher and scientist Francis Bacon (1561-1626), and the explorer and admiral Sir Francis Drake (1540-1595).

In the English-speaking world this name is occasionally used for girls, as a variant of the homophone Frances.

FRANS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Pronounced: FRAHNS(Dutch, Finnish)
Dutch, Scandinavian and Finnish form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FREDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FREE-də
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Short form of names ending in freda or fred, such as WINIFRED or ALFREDA.
FRIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: FREE-dah(Swedish)
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
Germanic name, originally a short form of other feminine names containing the Germanic element frid meaning "peace". This is also the Scandinavian equivalent, from the Old Norse cognate Fríða. A famous bearer was Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907-1954).
GARETH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English (British), Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: GAR-əth(English)
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
Meaning unknown. It first appears in this form in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation of Arthurian legends Le Morte d'Arthur, in which Gareth was a Knight of the Round Table, the brother of Sir Gawain. Malory based the name on Gahariet, which was the name of a similar Arthurian character in French sources. It may ultimately have a Welsh origin, possibly related to gwaredd meaning "gentleness".
GAVRIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: גַּבְרִיאֵל(Hebrew)
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
Hebrew form of GABRIEL.
GENESIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JEHN-ə-sis
Rating: 18% based on 6 votes
Means "birth, origin" in Greek. This is the name of the first book of the Old Testament in the Bible. It tells of the creation of the world, the expulsion of Adam and Eve, Noah and the great flood, and the three patriarchs.
GEOFFREY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: JEHF-ree(English) ZHAW-FREH(French)
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
From a Norman French form of a Germanic name. The second element is Germanic frid "peace", but the first element may be either gawia "territory", walha "foreign" or gisil "hostage". It is possible that two or more names merged into a single form. In the later Middle Ages Geoffrey was further confused with the distinct name Godfrey.

The Normans introduced this name to England where it became common among the nobility. Famous medieval literary bearers include the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth and the 14th-century poet Geoffrey Chaucer, writer of The Canterbury Tales. By the end of the Middle Ages it had become uncommon, but it was revived in the 20th century, often in the spelling Jeffrey.

GEORGE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Romanian
Pronounced: JAWRJ(English) JYOR-jeh(Romanian)
Rating: 68% based on 4 votes
From the Greek name Γεώργιος (Georgios), which was derived from the Greek word γεωργός (georgos) meaning "farmer, earthworker", itself derived from the elements γῆ (ge) meaning "earth" and ἔργον (ergon) meaning "work". Saint George was a 3rd-century Roman soldier from Palestine who was martyred during the persecutions of Emperor Diocletian. Later legends describe his defeat of a dragon, with which he was often depicted in medieval art.

Initially Saint George was primarily revered by Eastern Christians, but returning crusaders brought stories of him to Western Europe and he became the patron of England, Portugal, Catalonia and Aragon. The name was rarely used in England until the German-born George I came to the British throne in the 18th century. Five subsequent British kings have borne the name.

Other famous bearers include two kings of Greece, the composer George Frideric Handel (1685-1759), the first president of the United States, George Washington (1732-1797), and the Pacific explorer George Vancouver (1757-1798). This was also the pen name of authors George Eliot (1819-1880) and George Orwell (1903-1950), real names Mary Anne Evans and Eric Arthur Blair respectively.

GEORGIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek
Other Scripts: Γεωργία(Greek)
Pronounced: JAWR-jə(English)
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
Latinate feminine form of GEORGE. This is the name of an American state, which was named after the British king George II. A famous bearer was the American painter Georgia O'Keeffe (1887-1986).
GEORGIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Romanian
Pronounced: jawr-jee-AN-ə(English)
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of GEORGE. This form of the name has been in use in the English-speaking world since the 18th century.
GIDEON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew
Other Scripts: גִּדְעוֹן(Hebrew)
Pronounced: GID-ee-ən(English)
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
Means "feller, hewer" in Hebrew. Gideon is a hero and judge of the Old Testament. He led the vastly outnumbered Israelites against the Midianites, defeated them, and killed their two kings. In the English-speaking world, Gideon has been used as a given name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans.
GISBERT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: GEES-behrt(German)
From a Germanic name in which the second element is beraht "bright". The first element is probably a shortened form of gisil "pledge, hostage" (making it a variant of GILBERT), though it could be related to Gallo-Celtic gaiso "spear".
GRANIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
Latinized form of GRÁINNE.
GREGOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Scottish, Slovak, Slovene
Pronounced: GREH-go(German) GREH-gawr(Slovak)
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
German, Scottish, Slovak and Slovene form of Gregorius (see GREGORY). A famous bearer was Gregor Mendel (1822-1884), a Czech monk and scientist who did experiments in genetics.
GREGORY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GREHG-ə-ree
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
English form of Latin Gregorius, which was from the Late Greek name Γρηγόριος (Gregorios), derived from γρήγορος (gregoros) meaning "watchful, alert". This name was popular among early Christians, being borne by a number of important saints including Saint Gregory Thaumaturgus (3rd century), Saint Gregory the Illuminator (4th century), Saint Gregory of Nyssa (4th century), Saint Gregory of Nazianzus (4th century), and Saint Gregory of Tours (6th century). It was also borne by the 6th-century pope Saint Gregory I the Great, a reformer and Doctor of the Church, as well as 15 subsequent popes.

Due to the renown of the saints by this name, Gregory (in various spellings) has remained common in the Christian world through the Middle Ages and to the present day. It has been used in England since the 12th century. A famous bearer from the modern era was American actor Gregory Peck (1916-2003).

GRISELDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Literature
Pronounced: gri-ZEHL-də(English) gree-SEHL-da(Spanish)
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Possibly derived from the Germanic elements gris "grey" and hild "battle". It is not attested as a Germanic name. This was the name of a patient wife in medieval tales by Boccaccio and Chaucer.
HALDOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
From the Old Norse name Hallþórr, which meant "Thor's rock" from hallr "rock" combined with the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR).
HALLA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish, Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic, Norwegian, Faroese, Danish
Pronounced: HUL-lah(Finnish)
Feminine form of HALLR. Halla is also a Finnish word for an occasion when in growing season temperature lowers so much that ground gets covered with frost.
HALLEY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: Hal-ee, HAL-ee, HA-lee
Variant of HALLIE.
HAMNET
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of HAMO. This was the name of a son of Shakespeare who died in childhood. His death may have provided the inspiration for his father's play Hamlet.
HEDDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Swedish
Pronounced: HEHD-dah
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of HEDVIG. This is the name of the heroine of the play Hedda Gabler (1890) by the Norwegian dramatist Henrik Ibsen.
HELENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Portuguese, Catalan, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Finnish, Estonian, Slovene, Croatian, Sorbian, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἑλένη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEH-leh-na(German, Czech) heh-LEH-na(German) heh-LEH-nah(Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish) i-LEH-nu(European Portuguese) eh-LEH-nu(Brazilian Portuguese) ə-LEH-nə(Catalan) kheh-LEH-na(Polish) HEH-leh-nah(Finnish) HEHL-ə-nə(English) hə-LAYN-ə(English) hə-LEEN-ə(English)
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
Latinate form of HELEN.
HELMI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish, Swedish
Pronounced: HEHL-mee(Finnish)
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of VILHELMIINA or VILHELMINA. It also means "pearl" in Finnish.
HENRIETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hungarian, Finnish, Swedish, Dutch
Pronounced: hehn-ree-EHT-ə(English) HEHN-ree-eht-taw(Hungarian) HEHN-ree-eht-tah(Finnish)
Rating: 75% based on 4 votes
Latinate form of HENRIETTE. It was introduced to England by Henriette Marie, the wife of the 17th-century English king Charles I. The name Henriette was also Anglicized as Harriet, a form that was initially more popular.
HENRIIKKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: HEHN-reek-kah
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Finnish feminine form of HENRY.
HERO (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἡρώ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HIR-o(English)
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Derived from Greek ἥρως (heros) meaning "hero". In Greek legend she was the lover of Leander, who would swim across the Hellespont each night to meet her. He was killed on one such occasion when he got caught in a storm while in the water, and when Hero saw his dead body she drowned herself. This is also the name of a character in Shakespeare's play Much Ado About Nothing (1599).
HOPE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HOP
Rating: 8% based on 4 votes
From the English word hope, ultimately from Old English hopian. This name was first used by the Puritans in the 17th century.
HULDA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Norse Mythology [1]
Pronounced: HUWL-da(German)
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Derived from Old Norse hulda meaning "hiding, secrecy". This was the name of a sorceress in Norse mythology. As a modern name, it can also derive from archaic Swedish huld meaning "gracious, sweet, lovable" [2].
IDRIS (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Means "ardent lord" from Welsh udd "lord, prince" combined with ris "ardent, enthusiastic, impulsive".
ILIAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Ηλίας(Greek)
Pronounced: ee-LEE-ahs
Modern Greek form of ELIAS.
ILLIAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Manx
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Manx form of WILLIAM.
ILTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: EEL-tah
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Means "evening" in Finnish.
IMOGEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: IM-ə-jehn
Rating: 50% based on 6 votes
The name of a princess in the play Cymbeline (1609) by Shakespeare. He based her on a legendary character named Innogen, but the name was printed incorrectly and never corrected. The name Innogen is probably derived from Gaelic inghean meaning "maiden".
INGRID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
Pronounced: ING-rid(Swedish) ING-ri(Norwegian) ING-grit(German, Dutch) ING-greet(German)
Rating: 82% based on 6 votes
From the Old Norse name Ingríðr meaning "Ing is beautiful", derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with fríðr "beautiful". A famous bearer was the Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman (1915-1982).
IPHIGENIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἰφιγένεια(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 10% based on 4 votes
Latinized form of IPHIGENEIA.
ISAAC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Spanish, Catalan, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: יִצְחָק(Hebrew)
Pronounced: IE-zək(English)
Rating: 60% based on 5 votes
From the Hebrew name יִצְחָק (Yitzchaq) meaning "he will laugh, he will rejoice", derived from צָחַק (tzachaq) meaning "to laugh". The Old Testament explains this meaning, by recounting that Abraham laughed when God told him that his aged wife Sarah would become pregnant with Isaac (see Genesis 17:17), and later Sarah laughed when overhearing the same prophecy (see Genesis 18:12). When Isaac was a boy, God tested Abraham's faith by ordering him to sacrifice his son, though an angel prevented the act at the last moment. Isaac went on to become the father of Esau and Jacob with his wife Rebecca.

As an English Christian name, Isaac was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, though it was more common among Jews. It became more widespread after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers include the physicist and mathematician Sir Isaac Newton (1643-1727) and the science-fiction writer Isaac Asimov (1920-1992).

ISABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, French, German
Pronounced: ee-sa-BEHL(Spanish) IZ-ə-behl(English) EE-ZA-BEHL(French) ee-za-BEHL(German)
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
Medieval Occitan form of ELIZABETH. It spread throughout Spain, Portugal and France, becoming common among the royalty by the 12th century. It grew popular in England in the 13th century after Isabella of Angoulême married the English king John, and it was subsequently bolstered when Isabella of France married Edward II the following century.

This is the usual form of the name Elizabeth in Spain and Portugal, though elsewhere it is considered a parallel name, such as in France where it is used alongside Élisabeth. The name was borne by two Spanish ruling queens, including Isabel of Castile, who sponsored the explorations of Christopher Columbus.

ISABELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Romanian
Pronounced: ee-za-BEHL-la(Italian) ee-za-BEH-la(German) iz-ə-BEHL-ə(English)
Rating: 30% based on 5 votes
Latinate form of ISABEL. This name was borne by many medieval royals, including queen consorts of England, France, Portugal, the Holy Roman Empire and Hungary, as well as the powerful ruling queen Isabella of Castile (properly called Isabel).

In the United States this form was much less common than Isabel until the early 1990s, when it began rapidly rising in popularity. It reached a peak in 2009 and 2010, when it was the most popular name for girls in America, an astounding rise over only 20 years.

A famous bearer is the Italian actress Isabella Rossellini (1952-).

ISAIAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: יְשַׁעְיָהוּ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ie-ZAY-ə(American English) ie-ZIE-ə(British English)
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
From the Hebrew name יְשַׁעְיָהוּ (Yesha'yahu) meaning "YAHWEH is salvation", from the roots יָשַׁע (yasha') meaning "to save" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. Isaiah is one of the four major prophets of the Old Testament, supposedly the author of the Book of Isaiah. He was from Jerusalem and probably lived in the 8th century BC, at a time when Assyria threatened the Kingdom of Judah. As an English Christian name, Isaiah was first used after the Protestant Reformation.
ISASKAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish (Rare)
Pronounced: I-sahs-kahr
Finnish form of ISSACHAR.
ISHBEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Anglicized form of ISEABAIL.
ISIDOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Russian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Исидор(Russian)
Pronounced: EE-see-dawr(German)
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
German and Russian form of ISIDORE.
ISOLDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-ZOL-də(English) i-SOL-də(English)
Rating: 68% based on 4 votes
Latinate form of ISOLDE.
ISOTTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ee-ZOT-ta
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
Italian form of ISOLDE.
ITHEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Means "generous lord" from the Welsh elements udd "lord, prince" and hael "generous".
IÐUNN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian [1], Icelandic
Probably derived from Old Norse "again" and unna "to love". In Norse mythology Iðunn was the goddess of spring and immortality whose responsibility it was to guard the gods' apples of youth.
JACK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAK
Rating: 72% based on 5 votes
Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of JOHN. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as Jack and the Beanstalk, Little Jack Horner, and Jack Sprat.

American writers Jack London (1876-1916) and Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) were two famous bearers of this name. It is also borne by the actor Jack Nicholson (1937-) and the golfer Jack Nicklaus (1940-). Apart from Nicklaus, none of these famous bearers were given the name Jack at birth.

In the United Kingdom this form has been bestowed more frequently than John since the 1990s, being the most popular name for boys from 1996 to 2008.

JAMES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JAYMZ(English)
Rating: 93% based on 4 votes
English form of the Late Latin name Iacomus, a variant of the Biblical Latin form Iacobus, from the Hebrew name Ya'aqov (see JACOB). This was the name of two apostles in the New Testament. The first was Saint James the Greater, the apostle John's brother, who was beheaded under Herod Agrippa in the Book of Acts. The second was James the Lesser, son of Alphaeus. Another James (known as James the Just) is also mentioned in the Bible as being the brother of Jesus.

This name has been used in England since the 13th century, though it became more common in Scotland where it was borne by several kings. In the 17th century the Scottish king James VI inherited the English throne, becoming the first ruler of all Britain, and the name grew much more popular. In American name statistics (recorded since 1880) this name has never been out of the top 20, making it arguably the era's most consistently popular name. It was the top ranked name for boys in the United States from 1940 to 1952.

Famous bearers include the English explorer Captain James Cook (1728-1779), the Scottish inventor James Watt (1736-1819), and the Irish novelist and poet James Joyce (1882-1941). This name has also been borne by six American presidents. A notable fictional bearer is the British spy James Bond, created by author Ian Fleming.

JANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAYN
Rating: 80% based on 5 votes
Medieval English form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). This became the most common feminine form of John in the 17th century, surpassing Joan. In the first half of the 20th century Joan once again overtook Jane for a few decades in both the United States and the United Kingdom.

Famous bearers include the uncrowned English queen Lady Jane Grey (1536-1554), who ruled for only 9 days, British novelist Jane Austen (1775-1817), who wrote Sense and Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice, British primatologist Jane Goodall (1934-), and American actress Jane Fonda (1937-). This is also the name of the central character in Charlotte Brontë's novel Jane Eyre (1847), which tells of Jane's sad childhood and her relationship with Edward Rochester.

JANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, Swedish, Finnish, English
Pronounced: YAHN-nah(Dutch, Finnish) JAN-ə(English)
Feminine form of JAN (1). As an English name, it is an elaboration of JAN (2).
JEMIMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: יְמִימָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: jə-MIE-mə(English)
Rating: 47% based on 6 votes
Means "dove" in Hebrew. This was the oldest of the three daughters of Job in the Old Testament. As an English name, Jemima first became common during the Puritan era.
JEREMIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Judeo-Christian Legend
Other Scripts: יְרַחְמְאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 15% based on 4 votes
From Latin Hieremihel, probably from the Hebrew name Yerachme'el (see JERAHMEEL). Jeremiel (also called Remiel or Uriel) is named as an archangel in some verions of the apocryphal book of 2 Esdras (preserved in Latin) in the Old Testament.
JINNY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JIN-ee
Diminutive of VIRGINIA.
JOAN (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JON
Rating: 42% based on 5 votes
Medieval English form of Johanne, an Old French form of Iohanna (see JOANNA). This was the usual English feminine form of John in the Middle Ages, but it was surpassed in popularity by Jane in the 17th century. It again became quite popular in the first half of the 20th century, entering the top ten names for both the United States and the United Kingdom, though it has since faded.

This name (in various spellings) has been common among European royalty, being borne by ruling queens of Naples, Navarre and Castile. Another famous bearer was Joan of Arc, a patron saint of France (where she is known as Jeanne d'Arc). She was a 15th-century peasant girl who, after claiming she heard messages from God, was given leadership of the French army. She defeated the English in the battle of Orléans but was eventually captured and burned at the stake.

Other notable bearers include the actress Joan Crawford (1904-1977) and the comedian Joan Rivers (1933-2014), both Americans.

JOEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Finnish, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-əl(English) JOL(English) kho-EHL(Spanish) zhoo-EHL(Portuguese) YO-ehl(Swedish, Finnish)
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
From the Hebrew name יוֹאֵל (Yo'el) meaning "YAHWEH is God", from the elements יוֹ (yo) and אֵל ('el), both referring to the Hebrew God. Joel is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Joel, which describes a plague of locusts. In England, it was first used as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation.
JOHANN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: YO-han
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
German form of Iohannes (see JOHN). Famous bearers include German composer Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750), German novelist and poet Johann Goethe (1749-1832), and Austrian composers Johann Strauss the Elder (1804-1849) and his son Johann Strauss the Younger (1825-1899).
JOHNNY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAHN-ee(American English) JAWN-ee(British English)
Rating: 52% based on 5 votes
Diminutive of JOHN. A famous bearer is American actor Johnny Depp (1963-).
JOONA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: YO-nah
Rating: 20% based on 5 votes
Finnish form of JONAH.
JORDAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Macedonian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Јордан(Macedonian, Serbian)
Pronounced: JAWR-dən(English) ZHAWR-DAHNN(French)
Rating: 26% based on 5 votes
From the name of the river that flows between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". In the New Testament John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name in Europe after crusaders brought water back from the river to baptize their children. There may have been some influence from the Germanic name JORDANES, notably borne by a 6th-century Gothic historian.

This name died out after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. In America and other countries it became fairly popular in the second half of the 20th century. A famous bearer of the surname is former basketball star Michael Jordan (1963-).

JOSEPH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹסֵף(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-səf(English) ZHO-ZEHF(French) YO-zehf(German)
Rating: 56% based on 5 votes
From Ioseph, the Latin form of Greek Ἰωσήφ (Ioseph), which was from the Hebrew name יוֹסֵף (Yosef) meaning "he will add", from the root יָסַף (yasaf). In the Old Testament Joseph is the eleventh son of Jacob and the first with his wife Rachel. Because he was the favourite of his father, his older brothers sent him to Egypt and told their father that he had died. In Egypt, Joseph became an advisor to the pharaoh, and was eventually reconciled with his brothers when they came to Egypt during a famine. This name also occurs in the New Testament, belonging to Saint Joseph the husband of Mary, and to Joseph of Arimathea.

In the Middle Ages, Joseph was a common Jewish name, being less frequent among Christians. In the late Middle Ages Saint Joseph became more highly revered, and the name became popular in Spain and Italy. In England it became common after the Protestant Reformation. In the United States it has stayed within the top 25 names for boys since 1880, making it one of the most enduringly popular names of this era.

This name was borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Portugal. Other notable bearers include the founder of Mormonism Joseph Smith (1805-1844), Polish-British author Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) and the Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin (1878-1953).

JOY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JOI
Rating: 8% based on 4 votes
Simply from the English word joy, ultimately derived from Norman French joie, Latin gaudia. It has been regularly used as a given name since the late 19th century.
JUDE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JOOD(English)
Rating: 56% based on 5 votes
Variant of JUDAS. It is used in many English versions of the New Testament to denote the second apostle named Judas, in order to distinguish him from Judas Iscariot. He was supposedly the author of the Epistle of Jude. In the English-speaking world, Jude has occasionally been used as a given name since the time of the Protestant Reformation.
JUHANA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: YOO-hah-nah
Rating: 8% based on 4 votes
Finnish form of JOHN.
KAARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: KAH-ree-nah
Finnish form of KATHERINE.
KAARLO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: KAHR-lo
Finnish form of CHARLES.
KASTEHELMI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Kastehelmi is Finnish and means "dewdrop" Nameday for Kastehelmi is May 7th.
KATARIINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish, Estonian
Pronounced: KAH-tah-ree-nah(Finnish)
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
Finnish and Estonian form of KATHERINE.
KATHARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: ka-ta-REE-na(German, Swedish)
Rating: 66% based on 5 votes
German form of KATHERINE.
KATHLEEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KATH-leen
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Anglicized form of CAITLÍN.
KATHRYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KATH-rin
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
Contracted form of KATHERINE.
KATINKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Hungarian, Dutch
Pronounced: ka-TING-ka(German) KAW-teeng-kaw(Hungarian)
Rating: 15% based on 4 votes
German diminutive of KATHARINA, a Hungarian diminutive of KATALIN and a Dutch diminutive of CATHARINA.
KAYLEIGH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-lee
Rating: 0% based on 4 votes
Variant of KAYLEE. This is also a common Anglicized form of the Gaelic word ceilidh, a traditional social gathering and dance.
KERTTU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: KEHRT-too
Finnish form of GERTRUDE.
KIELO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: KEE-lo
Means "lily of the valley" in Finnish.
KITTY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIT-ee
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of KATHERINE.
KLAUDIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Slovak
Pronounced: KLOW-dya(Polish)
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Polish and Slovak feminine form of CLAUDIUS.
KLAUDIJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
Croatian feminine form of CLAUDIUS.
KRIEMHILD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Rare), Germanic Mythology
Pronounced: KREEM-hilt(German)
Derived from the Germanic elements grim "mask" and hild "battle". Kriemhild was a beautiful heroine in the Germanic saga the Nibelungenlied, where she is the sister of Günther and the wife of Siegfried. After her husband is killed by Hagen with the consent of Günther, Kriemhild tragically exacts her revenge.
KRISTIINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish, Estonian
Pronounced: KREES-tee-nah(Finnish)
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
Finnish and Estonian form of CHRISTINA.
KSENIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Ксения(Russian) Ксенія(Ukrainian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: KSEH-nya(Polish) KSYEH-nyi-yə(Russian)
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Polish form of XENIA, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian Ксения or Ukrainian/Belarusian Ксенія (see KSENIYA).
LAHJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: LAHH-yah
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Means "gift" in Finnish.
LANCELOT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: LAN-sə-laht(English)
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Meaning unknown, possibly an Old French diminutive of Lanzo (see LANCE). In Arthurian legend Lancelot was the bravest of the Knights of the Round Table. He became the lover of Arthur's wife Guinevere, ultimately causing the destruction of Arthur's kingdom. His earliest appearance is in the works of the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes.
LEAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: לֵאָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: LEE-ə(English)
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
From the Hebrew name לֵאָה (Le'ah), which was probably derived from the Hebrew word לְאָה (le'ah) meaning "weary". Alternatively it might be related to Akkadian littu meaning "cow". In the Old Testament Leah is the first wife of Jacob and the mother of seven of his children. Jacob's other wife was Leah's younger sister Rachel, who he preferred. Leah later offered Jacob her handmaid Zilpah in order for him to conceive more children.

Although this name was used by Jews in the Middle Ages, it was not typical as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation, being common among the Puritans.

LEMPI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: LEHM-pee
Means "love" in Finnish.
LENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Russian, English, Italian, Portuguese, Greek
Other Scripts: Лена(Russian) Λένα(Greek)
Pronounced: LEH-na(Swedish, German, Polish, Italian) LYEH-nə(Russian) LEE-nə(English)
Rating: 75% based on 4 votes
Short form of names ending in lena, such as HELENA, MAGDALENA or YELENA.
LENI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: LEH-nee
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
German diminutive of HELENE or MAGDALENA.
LENORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 68% based on 4 votes
Short form of ELENORA.
LEONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Czech
Pronounced: lee-O-nə(English) LEH-o-na(German, Czech)
Rating: 65% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of LEON.
LÉONIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LEH-AW-NEE
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
French feminine form of LEONIUS.
LEONOR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: leh-o-NOR(Spanish) leh-oo-NOR(European Portuguese) leh-o-NOKH(Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of ELEANOR. It was brought to Spain in the 12th-century by Eleanor of England, who married King Alfonso VIII of Castile.
LIBBY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIB-ee
Originally a medieval diminutive of Ibb, itself a diminutive of ISABEL. It is also used as a diminutive of ELIZABETH.
LILIAN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: LIL-ee-ən(English) LEE-LYAHN(French)
Rating: 66% based on 5 votes
English variant of LILLIAN, as well as a French masculine form.
LILITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: LIL-ith(English)
Rating: 75% based on 4 votes
Derived from Akkadian lilitu meaning "of the night". This was the name of a demon in ancient Assyrian myths. In Jewish tradition she was Adam's first wife, sent out of Eden and replaced by Eve because she would not submit to him. The offspring of Adam (or Samael) and Lilith were the evil spirits of the world.
LOIS (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Λωΐς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LO-is(English)
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Possibly derived from Greek λωίων (loion) meaning "more desirable" or "better". Lois is mentioned in the New Testament as the mother of Eunice and the grandmother of Timothy. As an English name, it came into use after the Protestant Reformation. In fiction, this is the name of the girlfriend of the comic book hero Superman.
LOUIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English, Dutch
Pronounced: LWEE(French) LOO-is(English) LOO-ee(English) loo-EE(Dutch)
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of 18 kings of France, starting with Louis I the son of Charlemagne. Others include Louis IX (Saint Louis) who led two crusades and Louis XIV (called the Sun King) who was the ruler of France during the height of its power, the builder of the Palace of Versailles, and the longest reigning monarch in the history of Europe. It was also borne by kings of Germany (as Ludwig), Hungary (as Lajos), and other places.

Apart from royalty, this name was only moderately popular in France during the Middle Ages. After the French Revolution, when Louis XVI was guillotined, it became less common.

The Normans brought the name to England, where it was usually spelled Lewis, though the spelling Louis has been more common in America. Famous bearers include French scientist Louis Pasteur (1822-1895), Métis leader Louis Riel (1844-1885), who led a rebellion against Canada, Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), who wrote Treasure Island and Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, and American jazz musician Louis Armstrong (1901-1971).

LOUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: LO-nah
From Finnish word lounas "southwest" or lounatuuli "southwest wind".
LUCIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: loo-CHEE-a(Italian) loo-TSEE-a(German) LOO-tsya(German) LOO-shə(English) loo-SEE-ə(English) luy-SEE-a(Swedish) LOO-chya(Romanian) LOO-kee-a(Classical Latin)
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus she is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.
LUCIEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LUY-SYEHN
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
French form of LUCIANUS.
LUCINDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Portuguese, Literature
Pronounced: loo-SIN-də(English)
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
An elaboration of LUCIA created by Cervantes for his novel Don Quixote (1605). It was subsequently used by Molière in his play The Doctor in Spite of Himself (1666).
LUCRETIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: loo-KREE-shə(English)
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of the Roman family name Lucretius, possibly from Latin lucrum meaning "profit, wealth". In Roman legend Lucretia was a maiden who was raped by the son of the king of Rome. This caused a great uproar among the Roman citizens, and the monarchy was overthrown. This name was also borne by a saint and martyr from Spain.
LUTHER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LOO-thər
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
From a German surname, itself from the Germanic given name LEUTHAR. The surname was borne by Martin Luther, a 16th-century monk and theologian, who started the Protestant Reformation by nailing his famous 95 theses to a church door. It has since been used as a given name in his honour, especially among Protestants. A notable bearer from the modern era was the American civil rights leader Martin Luther King (1929-1968).
LUZ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: LOOTH(European Spanish) LOOS(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Means "light" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de la Luz, meaning "Our Lady of Light".
LYDIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Λυδία(Ancient Greek) Лѷдіа(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: LID-ee-ə(English) LUY-dya(German)
Rating: 60% based on 5 votes
Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor, said to be named for the legendary king LYDOS. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. In the modern era the name has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.
LYYDIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish (Rare)
Pronounced: LUY-dee-ah
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Finnish variant of LYDIA.
MAGDALENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Catalan, Occitan, Slovene, Czech, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian, Romanian, English
Other Scripts: Магдалена(Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)
Pronounced: mag-da-LEH-na(Polish) mak-da-LEH-na(German) magh-dha-LEH-na(Spanish) məg-də-LEH-nə(Catalan) MAG-da-leh-na(Czech) mag-də-LAY-nə(English)
Rating: 74% based on 5 votes
Latinate form of MAGDALENE.
MAIJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish, Latvian
Pronounced: MIE-yah(Finnish)
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Finnish and Latvian variant of MARIA or MARIJA.
MAIR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: MIER
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Welsh form of MARY.
MALVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Finnish (Rare), German, Danish, Spanish (Latin American)
Pronounced: MAHL-vah(Finnish)
Short form of MALVINA. It may be partly inspired by Latin, Swedish and Finnish malva "mallow, hollyhock (flower)".
MARGAREETA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish (Rare), Estonian (Rare)
Pronounced: MAHR-gah-reh-tah(Finnish)
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Finnish and Estonian variant form of MARGARET.
MARIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Other Scripts: Μαρία(Greek) Мария(Russian, Bulgarian) Марія(Ukrainian) Маріа(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: ma-REE-a(Italian, German, Swedish, Dutch, Greek, Romanian) mu-REE-u(European Portuguese) ma-REE-u(Brazilian Portuguese) mə-REE-ə(Catalan, English) mah-REE-ah(Norwegian, Danish) MAR-ya(Polish) MAH-ree-ah(Finnish) mu-RYEE-yə(Russian) mu-RYEE-yu(Ukrainian)
Rating: 78% based on 4 votes
Latin form of Greek Μαρία, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.

This was the name of two ruling queens of Portugal. It was also borne by the Habsburg queen Maria Theresa (1717-1780), whose inheritance of the domains of her father, the Holy Roman emperor Charles VI, began the War of the Austrian Succession.

MARIANNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Pronounced: MA-RYAN(French) mar-ee-AN(English) ma-RYA-nə(German) MAH-ree-ahn-neh(Finnish)
Rating: 78% based on 5 votes
Originally a French diminutive of MARIE. It is also considered a combination of MARIE and ANNE (1). Shortly after the formation of the French Republic in 1792, a female figure by this name was adopted as the symbol of the state.
MARIETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Greek, Hungarian, German, Polish
Other Scripts: Μαριέττα(Greek)
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of MARIA.
MARIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Romanian, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, French, Lithuanian
Pronounced: MA-ree-oos(Classical Latin) MEHR-ee-əs(English) MAR-ee-əs(English) MA-ryuws(German) MA-RYUYS(French)
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
Roman family name that was derived either from MARS, the name of the Roman god of War, or else from the Latin root mas, maris meaning "male". Gaius Marius was a famous Roman consul of the 2nd century BC. Since the start of the Christian era, it has occasionally been used as a masculine form of MARIA.
MARJATTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: MAHR-yaht-tah
Diminutive of MARJA.
MARKETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: MAHR-keht-tah
Finnish form of MARGARET.
MARLENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Polish
Pronounced: mahr-LEEN-ə(English) mar-LEH-na(Polish)
Rating: 68% based on 4 votes
Latinate form of MARLENE.
MÄRTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Swedish short form of MARGARETA.
MARTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, Greek, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Μάρθα(Greek) Марѳа(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: MAHR-thə(English) MAR-ta(German)
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
From Aramaic מַרְתָּא (marta') meaning "the lady, the mistress", feminine form of מַר (mar) meaning "master". In the New Testament this is the name of the sister of Lazarus and Mary of Bethany (who is sometimes identified with Mary Magdalene). She was a witness to Jesus restoring her dead brother to life.

The name was not used in England until after the Protestant Reformation. A notable bearer was Martha Washington (1731-1802), the wife of the first American president George Washington. It is also borne by the media personality Martha Stewart (1941-).

MATILDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Finnish, Slovak
Pronounced: mə-TIL-də(English) MAH-teel-dah(Finnish) MA-teel-da(Slovak)
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
From the Germanic name Mahthildis meaning "strength in battle", from the elements maht "might, strength" and hild "battle". Saint Matilda was the wife of the 10th-century German king Henry I the Fowler. The name was common in many branches of European royalty in the Middle Ages. It was brought to England by the Normans, being borne by the wife of William the Conqueror himself. Another notable royal by this name was a 12th-century daughter of Henry I of England, known as the Empress Matilda because of her first marriage to the Holy Roman emperor Henry V. She later invaded England, laying the foundations for the reign of her son Henry II.

The name was very popular until the 15th century in England, usually in the vernacular form Maud. Both forms were revived by the 19th century. This name appears in the popular Australian folk song Waltzing Matilda, written in 1895.

MATLEENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: MAHT-leh-nah
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Finnish form of MAGDALENE.
MATTEUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian
Pronounced: maht-TEH-uys
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Swedish and Norwegian form of MATTHEW, used to refer to the evangelist and apostle also known as Levi.
MATTHIAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, French, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ματθίας(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ma-TEE-as(German) maht-TEE-ahs(Swedish) MA-TYAS(French) mə-THIE-əs(English) MAT-tee-as(Classical Latin)
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
Variant of Matthaios (see MATTHEW), which appears in the New Testament as the name of the apostle chosen to replace the traitor Judas Iscariot. This was also the name of kings of Hungary, including Matthias I who made important reforms to the kingdom in the 15th century.
MEHITABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: מְהֵיטַבְאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: mi-HIT-ə-behl(English)
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
Variant of MEHETABEL.
MEIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: מֵאִירָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of MEIR.
MELINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek
Other Scripts: Μελίνα(Greek)
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
Elaboration of Mel, either from names such as MELISSA or from Greek μέλι (meli) meaning "honey". A famous bearer was Greek-American actress Melina Mercouri (1920-1994), who was born Maria Amalia Mercouris.
MEREDITH
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: MEHR-ə-dith(English)
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
From the Welsh name Maredudd or Meredydd, possibly meaning "great lord" or "sea lord". Since the mid-1920s it has been used more often for girls than for boys in English-speaking countries, though it is still a masculine name in Wales. A famous bearer of this name as surname was the English novelist and poet George Meredith (1828-1909).
MIHANGEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Welsh name of the archangel Michael, formed from a contraction of MICHAEL and "angel".
MIKAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Breton
Pronounced: MEE-ka-ehl(Swedish, Norwegian) MEE-kal(Danish) MEE-kah-ehl(Finnish)
Rating: 34% based on 5 votes
Scandinavian, Finnish and Breton form of MICHAEL.
MILMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: MIL-mah
Variant of EMILIA.
MNEMOSYNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Μνημοσύνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: MNEH-MO-SUY-NEH(Classical Greek) ni-MAWS-i-nee(English)
Rating: 5% based on 4 votes
Means "remembrance" in Greek. In Greek mythology Mnemosyne was a Titan goddess of memory. She was the mother by Zeus of the nine Muses.
MOLLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHL-ee
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of MARY. It developed from Malle and Molle, other medieval diminutives. James Joyce used this name in his novel Ulysses (1920), where it belongs to Molly Bloom, the wife of the main character.
MORRIGAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish Mythology
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
Derived from Irish Mór Ríoghain meaning "great queen". In Irish myth she was a goddess of war and death who often took the form of a crow.
NANCY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NAN-see
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Previously a medieval diminutive of ANNIS, though since the 18th century it has been a diminutive of ANN. It is now usually regarded as an independent name. During the 20th century it became very popular in the United States. A city in the Lorraine region of France bears this name, though it derives from a different source.
NANNA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic, Norse Mythology
Pronounced: NAN-nah(Danish) NAHN-nah(Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic)
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Possibly derived from Old Norse nanþ meaning "daring, brave". In Norse legend she was a goddess who died of grief when her husband Balder was killed.
NELL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NEHL
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Medieval diminutive of names beginning with El, such as ELEANOR, ELLEN (1) or HELEN. It may have arisen from the medieval affectionate phrase mine El, which was later reinterpreted as my Nel.
NELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NEHL
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Variant of NELL.
NIKOLAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Николай(Russian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: nyi-ku-LIE(Russian)
Rating: 68% based on 4 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Николай (see NIKOLAY).
NIKOLAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek, English
Other Scripts: Νικόλας(Greek)
Pronounced: NIK-ə-ləs(English) NIK-ləs(English)
Rating: 78% based on 4 votes
Variant of NIKOLAOS (Greek) or NICHOLAS (English).
NOEMI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, Czech, Polish, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: no-EH-mee(Italian)
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Italian, German, Czech and Polish form of NAOMI (1).
NOOMI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Finnish, Danish, Norwegian (Rare)
Pronounced: NOO-mi(Swedish) NAW-mi(Finnish)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Variant of Naomi.
OFELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: o-FEH-lya
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Spanish and Italian form of OPHELIA.
OLGA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Estonian, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian, Greek
Other Scripts: Ольга(Russian, Ukrainian) Олга(Serbian, Bulgarian) Όλγα(Greek)
Pronounced: OL-gə(Russian) AWL-ga(Polish, German) AWL-ka(Icelandic) OL-gha(Spanish) OL-ga(Czech)
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Russian form of HELGA. The Varangians brought it from Scandinavia to Russia. The 10th-century Saint Olga was the wife of Igor I, grand prince of Kievan Rus (a state based around the city of Kiev). Following his death she ruled as regent for her son for 18 years. After she was baptized in Constantinople she attempted to convert her subjects to Christianity.
OPHELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Literature
Pronounced: o-FEEL-ee-ə(English) o-FEEL-yə(English)
Rating: 68% based on 5 votes
Derived from Greek ὄφελος (ophelos) meaning "help, advantage". This name was probably created by the 15th-century poet Jacopo Sannazaro for a character in his poem Arcadia. It was borrowed by Shakespeare for his play Hamlet (1600), in which it belongs to Hamlet's lover who eventually goes insane and drowns herself. In spite of this, the name has been used since the 19th century.
ORPHEUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ὀρφεύς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: OR-PEWS(Classical Greek) AWR-fee-əs(English)
Rating: 63% based on 4 votes
Perhaps related to Greek ὄρφνη (orphne) meaning "the darkness of night". In Greek mythology Orpheus was a poet and musician who went to the underworld to retrieve his dead wife Eurydice. He succeeded in charming Hades with his lyre, and he was allowed to lead his wife out of the underworld on the condition that he not look back at her until they reached the surface. Unfortunately, just before they arrived his love for her overcame his will and he glanced back at her, causing her to be drawn back to Hades.
OSSIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Variant of OISÍN used by James Macpherson in his epic poems, which he claimed to have based on early Irish legends.
OTTILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: oot-TEE-lee-ah
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
Swedish form of ODILIA.
OWAIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: O-wien(Welsh)
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Probably a Welsh form of EUGENE, though other theories connect it to Welsh eoghunn meaning "youth". This was the name of several figures from Welsh history and mythology. In Arthurian legend Owain (also called Yvain in French sources) was one of the Knights of the Round Table, the son of King Urien and husband of the Lady of the Fountain. His character was based on that of Owain ap Urien, a 6th-century Welsh prince who fought against the Angles. This name was also borne by Owain Glyndwr, a 14th-century leader of Welsh resistance against English rule.
OWEN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: O-in(English)
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
Anglicized form of OWAIN.
PARSIFAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German (Rare)
Pronounced: PAR-zee-fal
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
German form of PERCIVAL.
PARTHENOPE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Παρθενόπη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: pahr-THEHN-ə-pee(English)
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
Means "maiden's voice", derived from Greek παρθένος (parthenos) meaning "maiden, virgin" and ὄψ (ops) meaning "voice". In Greek legend this is the name of one of the Sirens who enticed Odysseus.
PERCEVAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Variant of PERCIVAL.
PERDITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
Derived from Latin perditus meaning "lost". Shakespeare created this name for the daughter of Hermione in his play The Winter's Tale (1610).
PEREDUR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: peh-REH-dir(Welsh)
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Possibly means "hard spears" in Welsh. This was the name of several figures from Welsh mythology. It was later used by the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth in his Arthurian tales. The character of Percival was probably based on him.
PEREGRINE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PEHR-ə-grin
Rating: 68% based on 4 votes
From the Late Latin name Peregrinus, which meant "traveller". This was the name of several early saints.
PERPETUA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: pehr-PEH-twa(Spanish)
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Derived from Latin perpetuus meaning "continuous". This was the name of a 3rd-century saint martyred with another woman named Felicity.
PERSEPHONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Περσεφόνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PEHR-SEH-PO-NEH(Classical Greek) pər-SEHF-ə-nee(English)
Rating: 62% based on 5 votes
Meaning unknown, probably of Pre-Greek origin, but perhaps related to Greek πέρθω (pertho) meaning "to destroy" and φονή (phone) meaning "murder". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus. She was abducted to the underworld by Hades, but was eventually allowed to return to the surface for part of the year. The result of her comings and goings is the changing of the seasons. With her mother she was worshipped in the Eleusinian Mysteries, which were secret rites practiced at the city of Eleusis near Athens.
PHARAMOND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, French (Rare)
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
French form of FARAMUND used by Shakespeare in Henry V (1599).
PHILIPPA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British), German
Pronounced: FI-li-pə(English)
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
Latinate feminine form of PHILIP.
PHILLIPA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Feminine variant of PHILIP.
PHILOMENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Late Greek
Other Scripts: Φιλομένα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: fil-ə-MEEN-ə(English)
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
From Greek φίλος (philos) meaning "friend, lover" and μένος (menos) meaning "mind, strength, force". This was the name of an obscure early saint and martyr. The name came to public attention in the 19th century after a tomb seemingly marked with the name Filumena was found in Rome, supposedly belonging to another martyr named Philomena. This may have in fact been a representation of the Greek word φιλομήνη (philomene) meaning "loved".
PIP
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PIP
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of PHILIP or PHILIPPA. This was the name of the main character in Great Expectations (1860) by Charles Dickens.
POLYMNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Πολύμνια, Πολυύμνια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PO-LUYM-NEE-A(Classical Greek)
Rating: 15% based on 4 votes
Means "abounding in song", derived from Greek πολύς (polys) meaning "much" and ὕμνος (hymnos) meaning "song, hymn". In Greek mythology she was the goddess of dance and sacred songs, one of the nine Muses.
POPPY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: PAHP-ee
Rating: 54% based on 5 votes
From the word for the red flower, derived from Old English popæg.
RAGNHILD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Ragnhildr, composed of the elements regin "advice, counsel" and hildr "battle".
RAPHAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: רָפָאֵל, רְפָאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: RA-fa-ehl(German) RAF-ee-əl(English) RAF-ay-ehl(English) rah-fie-EHL(English)
Rating: 85% based on 4 votes
From the Hebrew name רָפָאֵל (Rafa'el) meaning "God heals", from the roots רָפָא (rafa') meaning "to heal" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". In Hebrew tradition Raphael is the name of an archangel. He appears in the Book of Tobit, in which he disguises himself as a man named Azarias and accompanies Tobias on his journey to Media, aiding him along the way. In the end he cures Tobias's father Tobit of his blindness. He is not mentioned in the New Testament, though tradition identifies him with the angel troubling the water in John 5:4.

This name has never been common in the English-speaking world, though it has been well-used elsewhere in Europe. A famous bearer was the 16th-century Renaissance master Raphael Sanzio (1483-1520), usually known simply as Raphael.

REGULUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Roman cognomen meaning "prince, little king", a diminutive of Latin rex "king". This was the cognomen of several 3rd-century BC consuls from the gens Atilia. It was also the name of several early saints. A star in the constellation Leo bears this name as well.
REKO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: REH-ko
Finnish form of GREGORY.
REMIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Variant of JEREMIEL appearing in some versions of the Old Testament.
REMIGIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: reh-MEE-jo(Italian) reh-MEE-khyo(Spanish)
Rating: 48% based on 5 votes
Italian and Spanish form of Remigius (see RÉMY).
REMUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Romanian
Pronounced: REH-moos(Classical Latin) REE-məs(English)
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
Meaning unknown. In Roman legend Romulus and Remus were the founders of Rome. Remus was later slain by Romulus.
RODOLPHE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: RO-DAWLF
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
French form of RUDOLF.
ROMEO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ro-MEH-o(Italian) RO-mee-o(English)
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
Italian form of the Late Latin Romaeus or Late Greek Ρωμαῖος (Romaios), which meant "from ROME" or "Roman". In medieval Italian this meant "a pilgrim to Rome". Romeo is best known as the lover of Juliet in Shakespeare's tragedy Romeo and Juliet (1596).
ROSEMARY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROZ-mə-ree, ROZ-mehr-ee
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
Combination of ROSE and MARY. This name can also be given in reference to the herb, which gets its name from Latin ros marinus meaning "dew of the sea". It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
ROWENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ro-EEN-ə
Rating: 66% based on 5 votes
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Latinized form of a Germanic name derived from the elements hrod "fame" and wunn "joy, bliss". According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, this was the name of a daughter of the Saxon chief Hengist. Alternatively, Geoffrey may have based it on a Welsh name. It was popularized by Sir Walter Scott, who used it for a character in his novel Ivanhoe (1819).
RUUSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: ROO-sah
Variant of RUUSU.
SANCHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Rare)
Pronounced: SAN-cha
Rating: 13% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of SANCHO.
SANNI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: SAHN-nee
Finnish diminutive of SUSANNA.
SARAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, German, Hebrew, Arabic, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: שָׂרָה(Hebrew) سارة(Arabic)
Pronounced: SEHR-ə(English) SAR-ə(English) SA-RA(French) ZA-ra(German) SA-rah(Arabic)
Rating: 30% based on 5 votes
Means "lady, princess, noblewoman" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of Abraham's wife, considered the matriarch of the Jewish people. She was barren until she unexpectedly became pregnant with Isaac at the age of 90. Her name was originally Sarai, but God changed it at the same time Abraham's name was changed (see Genesis 17:15).

In England, Sarah came into use after the Protestant Reformation. It was consistently popular in the 20th century throughout the English-speaking world, reaching the top of the charts for England and Wales in the 1970s and 80s.

Notable bearers include Sarah Churchill (1660-1744), an influential British duchess and a close friend of Queen Anne, and the French actress Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923).

SELWYN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SEHL-win
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from an Old English given name, which was formed of the elements sele "manor" and wine "friend".
SHANE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: SHAYN
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Anglicized form of SEÁN. It came into general use in America after the release of the western movie Shane (1953).
SHIRLEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHUR-lee
Rating: 10% based on 4 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "bright clearing" in Old English. This is the name of a main character in Charlotte Brontë's semi-autobiographical novel Shirley (1849). The child actress Shirley Temple (1928-2014) helped to popularize this name.
SILKE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch
Pronounced: ZIL-kə(German)
Rating: 24% based on 5 votes
German and Dutch diminutive of CELIA or CECILIA.
SILVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, English, German, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: SEEL-vya(Italian) SEEL-bya(Spanish) SIL-vee-ə(English) ZIL-vya(German)
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of SILVIUS. Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome. This was also the name of a 6th-century saint, the mother of the pope Gregory the Great. It has been a common name in Italy since the Middle Ages. It was introduced to England by Shakespeare, who used it for a character in his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1594). It is now more commonly spelled Sylvia in the English-speaking world.
SISSI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Modern), Popular Culture, Finnish
Pronounced: SIS-ee(German, Popular Culture) SIS-si(Finnish)
Diminutive of CECILIA, ELISABET and names beginning Si-. Specifically, it is a nickname of Empress Elisabeth of Austria popularised through the film "Sissi" (1955).

Sissi is also Finnish for "guerrilla" and a type of training in the Finnish Defence Forces and the Finnish Border Guard.

SOMERLED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Anglicized form of the Old Norse name Sumarliði meaning "summer traveller". This was the name of a 12th-century Scottish warlord who created a kingdom on the Scottish islands.
SONER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
Means "last man" in Turkish.
SOPHIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Σοφία(Greek)
Pronounced: so-FEE-ə(English) sə-FIE-ə(British English) zo-FEE-a(German)
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred during the reign of the emperor Hadrian. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which is the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.

This name was common among continental European royalty during the Middle Ages, and it was popularized in Britain by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century. It was the name of characters in the novels Tom Jones (1749) by Henry Fielding and The Vicar of Wakefield (1766) by Oliver Goldsmith.

In the United States this name was only moderately common until the 1990s when it began rising in popularity, eventually becoming the most popular for girls from 2011 to 2013. A famous bearer is the Italian actress Sophia Loren (1934-).

SOPHRONIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, Late Greek
Other Scripts: Σωφρονία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of SOPHRONIUS. Torquato Tasso used it in his epic poem Jerusalem Delivered (1580), in which it is borne by the lover of Olindo.
SOPHY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SO-fee
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Variant of SOPHIE or a diminutive of SOPHIA.
SUOMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: SOO-mah
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
Derived from Finnish Suomi meaning "Finland".
TABITHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ταβιθά(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: TAB-i-thə(English)
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
Means "gazelle" in Aramaic. Tabitha in the New Testament was a woman restored to life by Saint Peter. Her name is translated into Greek as Dorcas (see Acts 9:36). As an English name, Tabitha became common after the Protestant Reformation. It was popularized in the 1960s by the television show Bewitched, in which Tabitha (sometimes spelled Tabatha) is the daughter of the main character.
TARA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAHR-ə, TEHR-ə, TAR-ə
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Anglicized form of the Irish place name Teamhair, which possibly means "elevated place" in Gaelic. This was the name of the sacred hill near Dublin where the Irish high kings resided. It was popularized as a given name by the novel Gone with the Wind (1936) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1939), in which it is the name of the O'Hara plantation.
TEGAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Derived from Welsh teg meaning "fair".
TEGWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements teg "fair" and gwen "blessed".
TEO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Croatian
Pronounced: TEH-o
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Short form of TEODORO and other names that begin with Teo.
TEODOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Bulgarian, Slovak, Czech, Polish, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Теодор(Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: teh-O-dor(Romanian) TEH-aw-dawr(Slovak) TEH-o-dor(Czech, Croatian) teh-AW-dawr(Polish)
Rating: 68% based on 4 votes
Form of THEODORE used in various languages.
TESNI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Means "warmth from the sun" in Welsh.
THEODORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Θεοδώρα(Greek)
Pronounced: thee-ə-DAWR-ə(English)
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of THEODORE. This name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by several empresses including the influential wife of Justinian in the 6th century.
THEODORE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: THEE-ə-dawr
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
From the Greek name Θεόδωρος (Theodoros), which meant "gift of god" from Greek θεός (theos) meaning "god" and δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift". The name Dorothea is derived from the same roots in reverse order. This was the name of several saints, including Theodore of Amasea, a 4th-century Greek soldier; Theodore of Tarsus, a 7th-century archbishop of Canterbury; and Theodore the Studite, a 9th-century Byzantine monk. It was also borne by two popes.

This was a common name in classical Greece, and, due to both the saints who carried it and the favourable meaning, it came into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was however rare in Britain before the 19th century. Famous bearers include three tsars of Russia (in the Russian form Fyodor) and American president Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919).

THEODOSIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, Greek
Other Scripts: Θεοδοσία(Greek)
Pronounced: TEH-O-DO-SEE-A(Classical Greek) thee-ə-DO-see-ə(English) thee-ə-DO-shə(English)
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of THEODOSIUS.
TISIPHONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Τισιφόνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ti-SIF-ə-nee(English)
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Means "avenging murder" in Greek, derived from τίσις (tisis) meaning "vengeance" and φονή (phone) meaning "murder". This was the name of one of the Furies or Ἐρινύες (Erinyes) in Greek mythology. She killed Cithaeron with the bite of one of the snakes on her head.
TOIVO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: TOI-vo
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Means "hope" in Finnish.
TRISTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TRIS-tə
Rating: 7% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of TRISTAN.
TUOVI
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Derived from the place name Tuovila "village of Tove", a village in Finland. It was invented by the Finnish author Yrjö Sakari Yrjö-Koskinen for a character of his novel "Pohjan-Piltti" (1859).
ULRIKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: uyl-REE-ka
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Swedish feminine form of ULRICH. This was the name of two queens of Sweden.
UNNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Scandinavian, Danish (Rare), Faroese, Icelandic, Swedish (Rare), Finnish (Rare)
Pronounced: EW-nuh(Old Norse, Danish, Faroese, Icelandic) UHN-nah(Swedish)
A name found "in Old Swedish and Old West Norse as Una, Unna" (and in Old Danish as Una), ultimately from either of the Old Norse verbs unnr "to wave, billow, roll, undulate" (from Proto-Germanic *unþi-) or unna "to love" (Old English unnan, Old High German (gi)unnan) (compare UNNR, IÐUNN). According to the Viking Answer Lady, "The runic examples (which include the nominative form una and the accusative form unu) should be interpreted as Una, from the Old West Norse verb una "to enjoy, be happy with, be content"."
VALENTIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Romanian, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Czech, Russian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Валентин(Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: VA-LAHN-TEHN(French) va-lehn-TEEN(Romanian) VA-lehn-teen(German) VA-lehn-kyin(Czech) və-lyin-TYEEN(Russian)
Rating: 63% based on 4 votes
Form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)) in several languages.
VALENTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Russian, German, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Romanian, Spanish, Greek, Latvian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Валентина(Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian) Βαλεντίνα(Greek)
Pronounced: va-lehn-TEE-na(Italian) və-lyin-TYEE-nə(Russian) ba-lehn-TEE-na(Spanish)
Rating: 63% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)). A famous bearer was the Soviet cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova (1937-), who in 1963 became the first woman to visit space.
VALENTINO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: va-lehn-TEE-no
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Italian form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)).
VALERIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, German, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: va-LEH-rya(Italian) ba-LEH-rya(Spanish)
Rating: 80% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of VALERIUS. This was the name of a 2nd-century Roman saint and martyr.
VENUS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: WEH-noos(Classical Latin) VEE-nəs(English)
Rating: 8% based on 4 votes
Means "love, sexual desire" in Latin. This was the name of the Roman goddess of love and sex. Her character was assimilated with that of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. As the mother of Aeneas she was considered an ancestor of the Roman people. The second planet from the sun is named after her.
VIDAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
Pronounced: VEE-dahr(Swedish)
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
From the Old Norse Víðarr, which is possibly derived from víðr "wide" and arr "warrior". In Norse mythology Víðarr was the son of Odin and Grid. At the time of the end of the world, the Ragnarok, he will avenge his father's death.
VIENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: VEE-eh-nah
Variant of VIENO. Viena may also refer to the area of White Sea Karelia or White Karelia in the northwestern Russia, known as Vienan Karjala or Viena in Finnish and Karelian.
VIKTORIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Βικτωρία, Βικτώρια, Βικτόρια(Greek) Виктория(Russian, Bulgarian) Вікторія(Ukrainian) Вікторыя(Belarusian)
Pronounced: vik-TO-rya(German) vyik-TO-ryi-yə(Russian)
Rating: 80% based on 4 votes
German, Scandinavian and Greek variant of VICTORIA. It is also an alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Виктория or Ukrainian Вікторія (see VIKTORIYA) or Belarusian Вікторыя (see VIKTORYIA).
VILHELMIINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: VEEL-hehl-mee-nah
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Finnish feminine form of WILLIAM.
VINCENT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak
Pronounced: VIN-sənt(English, Dutch) VEHN-SAHN(French) VEEN-tsent(Slovak)
Rating: 68% based on 5 votes
From the Roman name Vincentius, which was derived from Latin vincere meaning "to conquer". This name was popular among early Christians, and it was borne by many saints. As an English name, Vincent has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 19th century. Famous bearers include the French priest Saint Vincent de Paul (1581-1660) and the post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890).
VIOLET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VIE-lit, VIE-ə-lit
Rating: 70% based on 5 votes
From the English word violet for the purple flower, ultimately derived from Latin viola. It was common in Scotland from the 16th century, and it came into general use as an English given name during the 19th century.
VIVEKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Swedish form of WIEBKE.
WILLEM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: VI-ləm
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Dutch form of WILLIAM. Willem the Silent, Prince of Orange, was the leader of the Dutch revolt against Spain that brought about the independence of the Netherlands. He is considered the founder of the Dutch royal family. In English he is commonly called William of Orange.
WILLEMINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: vi-lə-MEE-nah
Feminine form of WILLEM.
WILLOUGHBY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: WIL-ə-bee
Rating: 83% based on 3 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "willow town" in Old English.
ZACHARY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: ZAK-ə-ree(English)
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
Usual English form of ZACHARIAS, used in some English versions of the New Testament. This form has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation. It was borne by American military commander and president Zachary Taylor (1784-1850).
behindthename.com   ·   Copyright © 1996-2020