Alcyone's Personal Name List

ADARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: אַדָרָה (Hebrew)

Rating: 51% based on 9 votes

Means "noble" in Hebrew.

ADERYN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 47% based on 3 votes

Means "bird" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.

ADHARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Astronomy

Rating: 54% based on 8 votes

Derived from Arabic عذارى ('adhara) meaning "maidens". This is the name of the second brightest star (after Sirius) in the constellation Canis Major.

ADLAI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: עַדְלָי (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: AD-lay (English), AD-lie (English)

Rating: 50% based on 7 votes

Contracted form of ADALIA. This is the name of the father of one of King David's herdsmen in the Old Testament.

ADRIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AYD-ree-ə

Rating: 45% based on 8 votes

Short form of ADRIANA

ALANNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ə-LAN-ə

Rating: 49% based on 10 votes

Feminine form of ALAN

ALANNAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern), Irish

Pronounced: ə-LAN-ə (English)

Rating: 25% based on 8 votes

Variant of ALANA. It has been influenced by the affectionate Anglo-Irish word alannah, from the Irish Gaelic phrase a leanbh meaning "O child".

ALARIC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: AL-ə-rik (English)

Rating: 46% based on 7 votes

From the Gothic name Alareiks which meant "ruler of all", derived from the Germanic element ala "all" combined with ric "ruler, power". This was the name of a king of the Visigoths who sacked Rome in the 5th century.

ALCYONE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Αλκυονη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: al-SIE-ə-nee (English)

Rating: 49% based on 9 votes

Latinized form of Greek Αλκυονη (Alkyone), derived from the word αλκυων (alkyon) or ‘αλκυων (halkyon) meaning "kingfisher". In Greek myth this name belonged to a daughter of Aeolus and the wife of Ceyx. After her husband was killed in a shipwreck she threw herself into the water, but the gods saved her and turned them both into kingfishers. This is also the name of the brightest of the Pleiades, the seven stars in the constellation Taurus.

ALEXANDER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: al-əg-ZAN-dər (English), ah-lek-SAHN-der (German), ah-lək-SAHN-dər (Dutch)

Rating: 71% based on 8 votes

Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ALEXANDRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, English, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Spanish, Russian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρα (Greek), Александра (Russian)

Pronounced: ah-lek-SAHN-drah (German, Romanian), ah-lək-SAHN-drah (Dutch), al-əg-ZAN-drə (English), ə-lə-SHAN-drə (Portuguese), ə-lə-SHAN-drə (Brazilian Portuguese)

Rating: 51% based on 9 votes

Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.

ALEXANDRINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, German

Pronounced: al-eg-zan-DREEN (French), ah-lek-sahn-DREE-nə (German)

Rating: 40% based on 9 votes

French and German elaborated form of ALEXANDRA. This was the name of a Danish queen, the wife of King Christian X.

ALEXIS

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: German, French, English, Greek, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Αλεξης (Greek), Αλεξις (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ah-LEK-sis (German), al-ek-SEE (French), ə-LEK-sis (English)

Rating: 39% based on 8 votes

From the Greek name Αλεξις (Alexis), which meant "helper" or "defender", derived from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, to help". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek comic poet, and also of several saints. It is used somewhat interchangeably with the related name Αλεξιος or Alexius, borne by five Byzantine emperors. In the English-speaking world it is more commonly used as a feminine name.

ALISTAIR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish

Rating: 77% based on 7 votes

Anglicized form of ALASDAIR

ALUDRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Astronomy

Rating: 56% based on 7 votes

Derived from Arabic العذرا (al-'adhra) meaning "the maiden". This is the name of a star in the constellation Canis Major.

AMALIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch, German, Finnish, Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)

Pronounced: ah-MAH-lee-ah (Dutch, German)

Rating: 48% based on 8 votes

Latinized form of the Germanic name Amala, a short form of names beginning with the element amal meaning "work".

AMARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Western African, Igbo

Rating: 40% based on 7 votes

Means "grace" in Igbo.

AMBROSE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AM-broz

Rating: 66% based on 8 votes

From the Late Latin name Ambrosius, which was derived from the Greek name Αμβροσιος (Ambrosios) meaning "immortal". Saint Ambrose was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Milan, who is considered a Doctor of the Church. Due to the saint, the name came into general use in Christian Europe, though it was never particularly common in England.

AMBROSIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Αμβροσια (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 44% based on 7 votes

Feminine form of Ambrosios (see AMBROSE).

AMBROSINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: am-BRO-zeen

Rating: 51% based on 7 votes

Feminine form of AMBROSE

ANATOLE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

Rating: 55% based on 8 votes

French form of ANATOLIUS

ANDROMEDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Ανδρομεδη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: an-DRAW-mə-də (English)

Rating: 71% based on 8 votes

Means "to think of a man" from the Greek element ανδρος (andros) "of a man" combined with μηδομαι (medomai) "to think, to be mindful of". Andromeda is a constellation in the northern sky, which gets its name from a mythical Greek princess who was rescued from sacrifice by Perseus. This is also the name of a nearby galaxy, given because it resides (from our point of view) within the constellation.

ANNORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Rating: 51% based on 7 votes

Medieval English variant of HONORA

ANSEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AN-səl

Rating: 63% based on 7 votes

From a surname which was derived from the given name ANSELM. A famous bearer was American photographer Ansel Adams (1902-1984).

ANWEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 47% based on 7 votes

Means "very beautiful" in Welsh.

ARACELI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: ah-rah-THE-lee (Spanish), ah-rah-SE-lee (Latin American Spanish)

Rating: 40% based on 7 votes

Means "altar of the sky" from Latin ara "altar" and coeli "sky". This is an epithet of the Virgin Mary in her role as the patron saint of Lucena, Spain.

ARACELY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Rating: 37% based on 7 votes

Variant of ARACELI

ARAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Lithuanian

Rating: 30% based on 7 votes

Means "eagle" in Lithuanian.

ARDEN

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AHR-dən

Rating: 40% based on 8 votes

From an English surname, originally taken from various place names, which were derived from a Celtic word meaning "high".

ARIADNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Catalan, Russian, Polish

Other Scripts: Ариадна (Russian)

Pronounced: ah-RYAHD-nah (Spanish, Polish)

Rating: 36% based on 7 votes

Spanish, Catalan, Russian and Polish form of ARIADNE

ARIADNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Αριαδνη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ah-ree-AHD-ne (Ancient Greek), ar-ee-AD-nee (English)

Rating: 53% based on 9 votes

Means "most holy", composed of the Cretan Greek elements αρι (ari) "most" and αδνος (adnos) "holy". In Greek mythology, Ariadne was the daughter of King Minos. She fell in love with Theseus and helped him to escape the Labyrinth and the Minotaur, but was later abandoned by him. Eventually she married the god Dionysus.

ARLETTE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: ar-LET

Rating: 30% based on 2 votes

French form of HERLEVA

ARMELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Rating: 30% based on 6 votes

Feminine form of ARMEL

ARTEMIS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Αρτεμις (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: AHR-tə-mis (English)

Rating: 40% based on 8 votes

Meaning unknown, possibly related either to Greek αρτεμης (artemes) "safe" or αρταμος (artamos) "a butcher". Artemis was the Greek goddess of the moon and hunting, the twin of Apollo and the daughter of Zeus and Leto. She was known as Diana to the Romans.

ASHER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: אָשֵׁר (Hebrew)

Pronounced: A-shər (English)

Rating: 48% based on 8 votes

Means "happy" or "blessed" in Hebrew. Asher in the Old Testament is a son of Jacob and Leah's handmaid Zilpah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel.

ASPEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: AS-pən

Rating: 44% based on 7 votes

From the English word for the tree, derived from Old English æspe. It is also the name of a ski resort in Colorado.

ATHENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Αθηνα (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 70% based on 7 votes

Meaning unknown, perhaps derived from Greek αθηρ (ather) "sharp" and αινη (aine) "praise". Athena was the Greek goddess of wisdom and warfare, the daughter of Zeus and the patron goddess of the city of Athens in Greece. She is associated with the olive tree and the owl.

ATTICUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Literature

Rating: 40% based on 9 votes

From a Roman name meaning "from Attica" in Latin. Attica is the region surrounding Athens in Greece. The author Harper Lee used this name in her novel 'To Kill a Mockingbird' (1960).

AUDRA (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AWD-rə

Rating: 63% based on 7 votes

Variant of AUDREY, used since the 19th century.

AUGUST

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Catalan, English

Pronounced: OW-guwst (German, Polish), AW-gəst (English)

Rating: 76% based on 8 votes

German, Polish, Scandinavian and Catalan form of AUGUSTUS

AVELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: av-ə-LEEN

Rating: 44% based on 8 votes

From the Norman French form of the Germanic name Avelina, a diminutive of AVILA. The Normans introduced this name to Britain. After the Middle Ages it became rare as an English name, though it persisted in America until the 19th century.

AYLA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: אֵלָה (Hebrew)

Rating: 43% based on 7 votes

Variant transcription of ELAH

AYLA (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Turkish

Rating: 43% based on 7 votes

Possibly means "moonlight, halo" in Turkish.

BELÉN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: be-LEN

Rating: 50% based on 7 votes

Spanish form of Bethlehem, the name of the town in Judah where King David and Jesus were born. The town's name is derived via Greek from Hebrew בֵּית לָחֶם (beit lachem) meaning "house of bread".

BETHANY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: BETH-ə-nee (English)

Rating: 25% based on 2 votes

From the name of a biblical town, possibly derived from Hebrew בֵּית־תְּאֵנָה (beit-te'enah) meaning "house of figs". In the New Testament the town of Bethany was the home of Lazarus and his sisters Mary and Martha. It has been in use as a rare given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, used primarily by Catholics in honour of Mary of Bethany. In America it became moderately common after the 1950s.

BEV

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Rating: 14% based on 7 votes

Short form of BEVERLY

BEVERLY

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BEV-ər-lee

Rating: 23% based on 8 votes

From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "beaver stream" in Old English. It came into use as a masculine given name in the 19th century, and it became common as an American feminine name after the publication of George Barr McCutcheon's novel 'Beverly of Graustark' (1904).

BEVIN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 28% based on 8 votes

Anglicized form of BÉBINN

BRANWEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology

Pronounced: BRAN-wen

Rating: 55% based on 8 votes

Means "beautiful raven" from Welsh bran "raven" and gwen "fair, white, blessed". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is the sister of the British king Bran and the wife of the Irish king Matholwch.

BRENNAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English

Pronounced: BREN-ən (English)

Rating: 38% based on 8 votes

From an Irish surname derived from Ó Braonáin meaning "descendent of Braonán". Braonán is a given name meaning "sorrow" (Irish braon "tear drop" and a diminutive suffix).

BRIALLEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 26% based on 8 votes

Derived from Welsh briallu meaning "primrose". This is a modern Welsh name.

BRIAR

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: BRIE-ər

Rating: 45% based on 8 votes

From the English word for the thorny plant.

BRIDGER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: BRIJ-ər

Rating: 20% based on 9 votes

From an English surname which originally indicated a person who lived near or worked on a bridge.

BRYNJA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian

Pronounced: BRIN-yah (Icelandic)

Rating: 35% based on 8 votes

Means "armour" in Old Norse.

CAI (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Rating: 55% based on 2 votes

Variant of KAI (1)

CAIRO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: KIE-ro

Rating: 41% based on 8 votes

From the name of the city in Egypt, called القاهرة (al-Qahirah) in Arabic, meaning "the victorious".

CAITRIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 40% based on 7 votes

Possibly a form of CAITRÍONA

CAIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman

Rating: 64% based on 8 votes

Roman variant of GAIUS

CALYPSO

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Καλυψω (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: kə-LIP-so (English)

Rating: 34% based on 7 votes

From Greek Καλυψω (Kalypso) which probably meant "she that conceals", derived from καλυπτω (kalypto) "to cover, to conceal". In Greek myth this was the name of the nymph who fell in love with Odysseus after he was shipwrecked on her island of Ogygia. When he refused to stay with her she detained him for seven years until Zeus ordered her to release him.

CAMBRIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Various

Pronounced: KAM-bree-ə (English)

Rating: 47% based on 7 votes

Latin form of the Welsh Cymru, the Welsh name for the country of Wales, derived from cymry meaning "the people". It is occasionally used as a given name in modern times.

CAMDEN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: KAM-dən

Rating: 26% based on 7 votes

From a surname which was from a place name perhaps meaning "enclosed valley" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the English historian William Camden (1551-1623).

CAMILLE

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: ka-MEE (French), kə-MEEL (English)

Rating: 63% based on 9 votes

French feminine and masculine form of CAMILLA. It is also used in the English-speaking world, where it is generally only feminine.

CAROLINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Pronounced: ka-ro-LEEN (French), KER-ə-lien (English), KER-ə-lin (English), KAR-ə-lien (English), KAR-ə-lin (English)

Rating: 76% based on 9 votes

French feminine form of CAROLUS

CASTOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Καστωρ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: KAS-tər (English)

Rating: 37% based on 7 votes

From the Greek Καστωρ (Kastor), possibly related to κεκασμαι (kekasmai) "to shine, to excel". In Greek myth Castor was a son of Zeus and the twin brother of Pollux. The constellation Gemini, which represents the two brothers, contains a star by this name.

CELESTINE

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SEL-əs-teen

Rating: 46% based on 7 votes

English form of CAELESTINUS. It is more commonly used as a feminine name, from the French feminine form Célestine.

CERIDWEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology

Pronounced: ke-RID-wen

Rating: 67% based on 9 votes

Means "blessed poetry" from Welsh cerdd "poetry" and gwen "white, fair, blessed". This is the name of a Celtic goddess of poetry.

CHARLIE

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: CHAHR-lee

Rating: 36% based on 7 votes

Diminutive or feminine form of CHARLES. A famous bearer is Charlie Brown, the main character in the comic strip 'Peanuts' by Charles Schulz.

CLAIRE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: KLER

Rating: 74% based on 8 votes

French form of CLARA

CLARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, English, Late Roman

Pronounced: KLAH-rah (Italian, German, Spanish), KLER-ə (English), KLAR-ə (English)

Rating: 70% based on 9 votes

Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.

CLARISSE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: kla-REES

Rating: 47% based on 7 votes

French form of CLARICE

COLIN (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, Irish, English

Pronounced: KAHL-in (Scottish, Irish, English), KOL-in (English)

Rating: 51% based on 8 votes

Anglicized form of CAILEAN or COILEAN

CONNOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English (Modern)

Pronounced: KAHN-ər (English)

Rating: 51% based on 8 votes

Variant of CONOR

CORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German

Pronounced: KAWR-ə (English)

Rating: 51% based on 8 votes

Created by James Fenimore Cooper for his novel 'The Last of the Mohicans' (1826). He may have based it on KORË or CORINNA.

CORBIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KAWR-bin

Rating: 36% based on 8 votes

From a French surname which was derived from corbeau "raven", originally denoting a person who had dark hair. The name was probably popularized in America by actor Corbin Bernsen (1954-).

CORINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Romanian

Rating: 40% based on 7 votes

Variant of CORINNA

CORINNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Κοριννα (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: kə-REEN-ə (English), kə-RIN-ə (English), ko-RI-nah (German)

Rating: 41% based on 8 votes

Latinized form of the Greek name Κοριννα (Korinna), which was derived from κορη (kore) "maiden". This was the name of a Greek lyric poet of the 5th century BC. The Roman poet Ovid used it for the main female character in his book 'Amores'. In the modern era it has been in use since the 17th century, when Robert Herrick used it in his poem 'Corinna's going a-Maying'.

CORINNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: ko-REEN (French), kə-REEN (English), kə-RIN (English)

Rating: 51% based on 8 votes

French form of CORINNA. The French-Swiss author Madame de Staël used it for her novel 'Corinne' (1807).

CYAN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: SIE-an

Rating: 29% based on 7 votes

From the English word meaning "greenish blue", ultimately derived from Greek κυανος (kyanos).

CYBELE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Near Eastern Mythology (Hellenized)

Other Scripts: Κυβελη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: SIB-ə-lee (English)

Rating: 36% based on 7 votes

Meaning unknown, possibly from Phrygian roots meaning either "stone" or "hair". This was the name of the Phrygian goddess of fertility and nature, later worshipped by the Greeks and Romans.

DAHLIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: DAL-yə

Rating: 66% based on 7 votes

From the name of the flower, which was named for the Swedish botanist Anders Dahl.

DANIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Rating: 27% based on 7 votes

Spanish diminutive of DANIELA

DECLAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 39% based on 8 votes

Anglicized form of Irish Deaglán, which is of unknown meaning. Saint Declan was a 5th-century missionary to Ireland.

DELPHINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: del-FEEN

Rating: 60% based on 9 votes

French form of DELPHINA

DESMOND

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Irish

Pronounced: DEZ-mənd

Rating: 53% based on 8 votes

From an Irish surname which was derived from Deasmhumhain meaning "South Munster", originally indicating a person who came from that region in Ireland.

DESPOINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, Greek

Other Scripts: Δεσποινα (Greek)

Rating: 24% based on 8 votes

Means "mistress, lady" in Greek. In Greek mythology this was the name of a daughter of Demeter and Poseidon.

DEVI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Indian, Hinduism

Other Scripts: देवी (Hindi, Sanskrit)

Rating: 39% based on 8 votes

Derived from Sanskrit देवी (devi) meaning "goddess". Devi is the Hindu mother goddess who manifests herself as all other goddesses.

DORAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 35% based on 8 votes

From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Deoradháin meaning "descendent of Deoradhán". The name Deoradhán means "exile" or "wanderer" in Gaelic.

DORIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: DAWR-ee-ən (English)

Rating: 58% based on 8 votes

The name was first used by Oscar Wilde in his novel 'The Picture of Dorian Gray' (1891), which tells the story of a man whose portrait ages while he stays young. Wilde probably took it from the name of the ancient Greek tribe the Dorians.

EIRA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 63% based on 8 votes

Means "snow" in Welsh.

EIRIAN

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 56% based on 7 votes

Means "bright, beautiful" in Welsh.

ELENI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek

Other Scripts: Ελενη (Greek)

Pronounced: e-LEN-ee

Rating: 39% based on 7 votes

Variant transcription of ELENE

ELIANA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese

Pronounced: e-LYAH-nah (Italian)

Rating: 44% based on 7 votes

Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of ÉLIANE

ELIAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Ηλιας (Greek)

Pronounced: e-LEE-ahs (German), i-LIE-əs (English), ee-LIE-əs (English)

Rating: 53% based on 7 votes

Cognate of ELIJAH. This is the form used in the Greek New Testament.

ELIORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: אֱלִיאוֹרָה (Hebrew)

Rating: 40% based on 6 votes

Feminine form of ELIOR

ELIZA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Polish

Pronounced: i-LIE-zə (English), e-LEE-zah (Polish)

Rating: 52% based on 9 votes

Short form of ELIZABETH. It was borne by the character Eliza Doolittle in George Bernard Shaw's play 'Pygmalion' (1913) and the subsequent musical adaptation 'My Fair Lady' (1956).

ELLAR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish

Rating: 33% based on 8 votes

Anglicized form of EALLAIR

ELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: EL

Rating: 36% based on 7 votes

Diminutive of ELEANOR and other names beginning with El. This name can also be given in reference to the French pronoun elle meaning "she".

ELLIOTT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ee-ət

Rating: 60% based on 7 votes

From an English surname which was derived from a diminutive of the medieval name ELIAS.

ELSA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Finnish, Italian

Pronounced: EL-sə (English), EL-sah (German)

Rating: 50% based on 8 votes

Short form of ELISABETH

ELUNED

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 41% based on 8 votes

Derived from Welsh eilun "image, idol". This was the name of a 5th-century Welsh saint.

ELYSIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Various

Rating: 49% based on 8 votes

From Elysium, the name of the realm of the dead in Greek and Roman mythology, which means "blissful".

EMERSON

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EM-ər-sən

Rating: 28% based on 8 votes

From an English surname meaning "son of EMERY". The surname was borne by Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American writer and philosopher who wrote about transcendentalism.

ENID

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance

Rating: 38% based on 8 votes

Derived from Welsh enaid meaning "soul" or "life". She is the wife of Geraint in Welsh legend and Arthurian romance.

EOWYN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Pronounced: AY-ə-win (English)

Rating: 59% based on 7 votes

Means "horse joy" in Old English. This name was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien who used Old English to represent the Rohirric language. In his novel 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) Eowyn is the niece of King Theoden of Rohan. She slays the Lord of the Nazgul in the Battle of the Pelennor Fields.

ESMOND

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: EZ-mənd

Rating: 39% based on 8 votes

Derived from the Old English elements east "grace" and mund "protection". This Old English name was rarely used after the Norman conquest. It was occasionally revived in the 19th century.

ESTAVAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish

Rating: 33% based on 7 votes

Spanish form of STEPHEN

EVADNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Ευαδνη (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 39% based on 9 votes

From Greek Ευαδνη (Euadne), which is of unknown meaning, though the first element is derived from Greek ευ "good". In Greek legend Evadne was the wife of Capaneus. After Capaneus was killed by a lightning bolt sent from Zeus she committed suicide by throwing herself onto his burning body.

EVERETT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EV-ə-rit, EV-rit

Rating: 37% based on 7 votes

From a surname which was derived from the given name EVERARD.

EVREN

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Turkish

Rating: 23% based on 6 votes

Means "cosmos, the universe" in Turkish.

FAINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Фаина (Russian)

Pronounced: fah-EE-nah

Rating: 43% based on 6 votes

Meaning unknown, possibly derived from PHAENNA.

FIERA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Esperanto

Pronounced: fee-E-rah

Rating: 65% based on 2 votes

Means "proud" in Esperanto.

FIORENZA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: fyo-REN-tsah

Rating: 37% based on 7 votes

Italian feminine form of Florentius (see FLORENCE).

FLEUR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, Dutch, English (Rare)

Pronounced: FLUUR (French, Dutch), FLUR (English)

Rating: 49% based on 7 votes

Means "flower" in French. This was the name of a character in John Galsworthy's novels 'The Forsyte Saga' (1922).

FLYNN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: FLIN

Rating: 34% based on 8 votes

From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Floinn meaning "descendent of FLANN".

FREYA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Norse Mythology, English (British, Modern)

Pronounced: FRAY-ah (Norse Mythology), FRAY-ə (English)

Rating: 70% based on 7 votes

From Old Norse Freyja meaning "lady". This is the name of the goddess of love, beauty, war and death in Norse mythology. She claimed half of the heroes who were slain in battle and brought them to her realm in Asgard. Some scholars connect her with the goddess Frigg.

This is not the usual spelling in any of the Scandinavian languages (in Sweden and Denmark it is Freja and in Norway it is Frøja) but it is the common spelling of the goddess's name in English. In the 2000s it became popular in Britain.

GALADRIEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Pronounced: gə-LAD-ree-əl (English)

Rating: 61% based on 7 votes

Means "maiden crowned with a radiant garland" in Sindarin. Galadriel was a Noldorin elf princess renowned for her beauty and wisdom in J. R. R. Tolkien's novels. The elements are galad "radiant" and riel "garlanded maiden". Alatáriel is the Quenya form of her name.

GAVIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Scottish

Pronounced: GAV-in (English)

Rating: 30% based on 7 votes

Medieval form of GAWAIN. Though it died out in England, it was reintroduced from Scotland in the 20th century.

GIDEON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew

Other Scripts: גִּדְעוֹן (Hebrew)

Pronounced: GID-ee-ən (English)

Rating: 61% based on 7 votes

Means "feller" or "hewer" in Hebrew. Gideon was a hero of the Old Testament who led the Israelites against the Midianites. In the English-speaking world, Gideon has been used as a given name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans.

GINEVRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: jee-NEV-rah

Rating: 63% based on 7 votes

Italian form of GUINEVERE. This is also the Italian name for the city of Geneva, Switzerland. It is also sometimes associated with the Italian word ginepro meaning "juniper".

GOVANNON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh Mythology

Rating: 23% based on 7 votes

Welsh cognate of GOIBNIU

GRAY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: GRAY

Rating: 42% based on 6 votes

From an English surname meaning "grey", originally given to a person who had grey hair or clothing.

GUINEVERE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: GWIN-ə-vir (English)

Rating: 71% based on 7 votes

From the Norman French form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar, composed of the elements gwen meaning "fair, white" and hwyfar meaning "smooth". In Arthurian legend she was the beautiful wife of King Arthur. According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, she was seduced by Mordred before the battle of Camlann, which led to the deaths of both Mordred and Arthur. According to the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes, she engaged in an adulterous affair with Sir Lancelot.

The Cornish form of this name, Jennifer, has become popular in the English-speaking world.

HALSTEN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish

Rating: 33% based on 7 votes

Old Swedish form of Hallsteinn (see HALSTEIN).

HANNELORE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: HAH-ne-lo-rə

Rating: 54% based on 7 votes

Combination of HANNE (1) and ELEONORE

HARMONIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: ‘Αρμονια (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 33% based on 7 votes

Means "harmony, agreement" in Greek. She was the daughter of Ares and Aphrodite, given by Zeus to Cadmus to be his wife.

HELEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Greek Mythology (Anglicized)

Other Scripts: ‘Ελενη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: HEL-ən (English)

Rating: 48% based on 6 votes

English form of the Greek ‘Ελενη (Helene), probably from Greek ‘ελενη (helene) "torch" or "corposant", or possibly related to σεληνη (selene) "moon". In Greek mythology Helen was the daughter of Zeus and Leda, whose kidnapping by Paris was the cause of the Trojan War. The name was also borne by the 4th-century Saint Helena, mother of the Roman emperor Constantine, who supposedly found the True Cross during a trip to Jerusalem.

The name was originally used among early Christians in honour of the saint, as opposed to the classical character. In England it was commonly spelled Ellen during the Middle Ages, and the spelling Helen was not regularly used until after the Renaissance. A famous bearer was Helen Keller (1880-1968), an American author and lecturer who was both blind and deaf.

HELENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Finnish, Estonian, Slovene, Croatian, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: ‘Ελενη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: he-LE-nah (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish), hay-LAY-nah (Dutch)

Rating: 52% based on 6 votes

Latinate form of HELEN

HONOR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: AHN-ər

Rating: 24% based on 7 votes

Variant of HONOUR, using the American spelling.

HONORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish, English

Rating: 27% based on 7 votes

Variant of HONORIA. It was brought to England and Ireland by the Normans.

HONORIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Late Roman

Rating: 26% based on 7 votes

Feminine form of HONORIUS

HONOUR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: AHN-ər

Rating: 34% based on 7 votes

From the English word honour, which is of Latin origin. This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century. It can also be viewed as a form of HONORIA or HONORATA, which are ultimately derived from the same source.

IDONEA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Rating: 40% based on 6 votes

Medieval English name, probably a Latinized form of IÐUNN. The spelling may have been influenced by Latin idonea "suitable". It was common in England from the 12th century.

IDONY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Rating: 43% based on 6 votes

Medieval English vernacular form of IDONEA

ILA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Indian

Other Scripts: इला (Hindi)

Rating: 35% based on 6 votes

Means "earth" or "speech" in Sanskrit.

INDIRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Indian, Hinduism

Other Scripts: इन्दिरा (Hindi, Sanskrit)

Rating: 53% based on 8 votes

Means "beauty" in Sanskrit. This is another name of Lakshmi, the wife of the Hindu god Vishnu. A notable bearer was India's first female prime minister, Indira Gandhi (1917-1984).

IONA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Scottish

Pronounced: ie-ON-ə (English)

Rating: 54% based on 7 votes

From the name of the island off Scotland where Saint Columba founded a monastery. The name of the island is Old Norse in origin, and apparently derives simply from ey meaning "island".

IONE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, English

Other Scripts: Ιονη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ie-O-nee (English), IE-o-nee (English), ie-ON (English)

Rating: 51% based on 7 votes

From Greek ιον (ion) meaning "violet flower". This was the name of a sea nymph in Greek mythology. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, though perhaps based on the Greek place name Ionia, a region on the west coast of Asia Minor.

IRA (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew

Other Scripts: עִירָא (Hebrew)

Pronounced: IE-rə (English)

Rating: 63% based on 6 votes

Means "watchful" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of King David's priest. As an English Christian given name, Ira began to be used after the Protestant Reformation. In the 17th century the Puritans brought it to America, where remained moderately common into the 20th century.

IRIS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish

Other Scripts: Ιρις (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: IE-ris (English), EE-ris (German, Dutch)

Rating: 60% based on 6 votes

Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow. This name can also be given in reference to the English word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the name of the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.

ISADORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Rating: 46% based on 7 votes

Variant of ISIDORA. A famous bearer was the American dancer Isadora Duncan (1877-1927).

ISIDOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Russian, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Исидор (Russian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: EE-see-dawr (German)

Rating: 53% based on 7 votes

German, Russian and Macedonian form of ISIDORE

ISIS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)

Other Scripts: Ισις (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: IE-sis (English)

Rating: 49% based on 7 votes

Greek form of Egyptian Ist (reconstructed as Iset or Ueset), which possibly meant "the throne". In Egyptian mythology Isis was the goddess of the sky and nature, the wife of Osiris and the mother of Horus. She was originally depicted wearing a throne-shaped headdress, but in later times she was conflated with the goddess Hathor and depicted having the horns of a cow on her head. She was also worshipped by people outside of Egypt, such as the Greeks and Romans.

ISLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish

Pronounced: IE-lə

Rating: 49% based on 7 votes

Variant of ISLAY, typically used as a feminine name.

ISLAY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish

Pronounced: IE-lə

Rating: 21% based on 7 votes

From the name of the island of Islay, which lies off of the west coast of Scotland.

ISRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: إسراء (Arabic)

Rating: 54% based on 7 votes

Means "nocturnal journey", derived from Arabic سرى (sara) "to travel at night".

IVOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, Scottish, Welsh, English (British)

Pronounced: IE-vawr (English), EE-vawr (English)

Rating: 66% based on 8 votes

From the Old Norse name Ívarr, which was derived from the elements yr "yew, bow" and arr "warrior". During the Middle Ages it was brought to Britain by Scandinavian settlers and invaders, and it was adopted in Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

IVY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: IE-vee

Rating: 53% based on 7 votes

From the English word for the climbing plant that has small yellow flowers. It is ultimately derived from Old English ifig.

JAYA

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Indian, Hinduism

Other Scripts: जया, जय (Hindi, Sanskrit)

Rating: 20% based on 4 votes

Derived from Sanskrit जय (jaya) meaning "victory". This is a transcription of both the feminine form जया (an epithet of the Hindu goddess Durga) and the masculine form जय (borne by several characters in Hindu texts).

JEFFREY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JEF-ree

Rating: 40% based on 7 votes

Medieval variant of GEOFFREY. In America, Jeffrey has been more common than Geoffrey, though this is not true in Britain.

JEREMY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: JER-ə-mee (English), JER-mee (English)

Rating: 41% based on 7 votes

Medieval English form of JEREMIAH, and the form used in some versions of the New Testament.

JORDAN

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Јордан (Macedonian)

Pronounced: JAWR-dən (English)

Rating: 50% based on 2 votes

From the name of the river which flows between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". In the New Testament John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name in Europe after crusaders brought water back from the river to baptize their children. There may have been some influence from the Germanic name JORDANES, notably borne by a 6th-century Gothic historian.

This name died out after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. In America and other countries it became fairly popular in the second half of the 20th century. A famous bearer of the surname is former basketball star Michael Jordan (1963-).

JORY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Cornish

Rating: 60% based on 2 votes

Cornish form of GEORGE

JULIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch, German, English, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: yuy-lee-AH-nah (Dutch), yoo-lee-AH-nah (German), joo-lee-AHN-ə (English)

Feminine form of Iulianus (see JULIAN). This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr from Nicomedia, and also of the Blessed Juliana of Norwich, also called Julian, a 14th-century mystic and author. The name was also borne by a 20th-century queen of the Netherlands. In England, this form has been in use since the 18th century, alongside the older form Gillian.

JULY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: ju-LIE

Rating: 20% based on 7 votes

From the name of the month, which was originally named for Julius Caesar.

KAI (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Frisian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch

Pronounced: KIE (German)

Rating: 54% based on 7 votes

Meaning uncertain, possibly a Frisian diminutive of GERHARD, NICOLAAS, CORNELIS or GAIUS.

KAI (3)

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Hawaiian

Rating: 47% based on 7 votes

Means "sea" in Hawaiian.

KAIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Norwegian

Rating: 49% based on 7 votes

Variant of KAJA (1)

KALI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Indian, Hinduism

Other Scripts: काली (Hindi, Sanskrit)

Pronounced: KAH-lee

Rating: 27% based on 6 votes

Means "the black one" in Sanskrit. The Hindu goddess Kali is the fierce destructive form of the wife of Shiva. She is usually depicted with black skin and four arms, holding a severed head and brandishing a sword.

KEIR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English (Rare)

Rating: 47% based on 6 votes

From a surname which was a variant of KERR.

KENNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish

Rating: 36% based on 7 votes

Feminine form of KENNETH

KERENSA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Rating: 54% based on 7 votes

Means "love" in Cornish.

KIERAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: KEER-awn, KEE-ar-awn

Rating: 44% based on 7 votes

Anglicized form of CIARÁN

KIRA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Кира (Russian)

Pronounced: KEE-rah

Rating: 50% based on 7 votes

Russian feminine form of CYRUS

KIRAN

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Indian

Other Scripts: किरण (Hindi)

Rating: 39% based on 7 votes

Derived from the Sanskrit word किरण (kirana), which can mean "dust" or "thread" or "sunbeam".

KIRSI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Finnish

Rating: 20% based on 7 votes

Finnish form of CHRISTINA, or a short form of KIRSIKKA. It also means "frost" in Finnish.

LARK

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: LAHRK

Rating: 64% based on 8 votes

From the English word for the type of songbird.

LAURE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: LOR

Rating: 27% based on 7 votes

French form of LAURA

LAUREL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LAWR-əl

Rating: 71% based on 7 votes

From the name of the laurel tree, ultimately from Latin laurus.

LEANDER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Λεανδρος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: lee-AN-dər (English)

Rating: 60% based on 8 votes

From the Greek Λεανδρος (Leandros) which means "lion of a man" from Greek λεων (leon) "lion" and ανδρος (andros) "of a man". In Greek legend Leander was the lover of Hero. Every night he swam across the Hellespont to meet her, but on one occasion he was drowned when a storm arose. When Hero saw his dead body she threw herself into the waters and perished.

LELAND

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Rating: 36% based on 7 votes

From a surname, originally from an English place name, which meant "fallow land" in Old English. A famous bearer was the politician, businessman and Stanford University founder Leland Stanford (1824-1893).

LENNOX

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English (Rare)

Pronounced: LEN-əks

Rating: 21% based on 8 votes

From a Scottish surname which was derived from the name of a district in Scotland. The district, called Leamhnachd in Gaelic, possibly means "place of elms".

LENORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Rating: 55% based on 2 votes

Short form of ELENORA

LENORE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: lə-NAWR

Rating: 40% based on 7 votes

Short form of ELEANOR. This was the name of the departed love of the narrator in Edgar Allan Poe's poem 'The Raven' (1845).

LEONA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German

Pronounced: lee-O-nə (English), LE-o-nah (German)

Rating: 39% based on 7 votes

Feminine form of LEON

LEONIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Late Roman

Rating: 34% based on 7 votes

Feminine form of LEONIUS

LILA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Indian

Other Scripts: लीला (Hindi)

Rating: 44% based on 8 votes

Means "play, amusement" in Sanskrit.

LILAC

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: LIE-lək

Rating: 54% based on 8 votes

From the name of the shrub with purple or white flowers. It is derived via Arabic from Persian.

LILITH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Near Eastern Mythology, Judeo-Christian Legend

Pronounced: LIL-ith (English)

Rating: 43% based on 6 votes

Derived from Akkadian lilitu meaning "of the night". This was the name of a demon in ancient Assyrian myths. In Jewish tradition she was Adam's first wife, sent out of Eden and replaced by Eve because she would not submit to him. The offspring of Adam and Lilith were the evil spirits of the world.

LINNÉA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish

Pronounced: lin-NE-ah

Rating: 60% based on 8 votes

From the name of a flower, also known as the twinflower. The Swedish botanist Carolus Linnaeus named it after himself, it being his favourite flower.

LIOR

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: לִיאוֹר (Hebrew)

Rating: 48% based on 8 votes

Means "light for me" in Hebrew.

LIORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: לִיאוֹרָה (Hebrew)

Rating: 55% based on 8 votes

Strictly feminine form of LIOR

LLYR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh Mythology

Rating: 49% based on 8 votes

Means "the sea" in Welsh. This was the name of the Welsh god of the sea. He possibly forms the basis for the legendary King Lear of the Britons.

LOGAN

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: LO-gən

From a surname which was originally derived from a Scottish place name meaning "little hollow" in Scottish Gaelic.

LORE (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Basque

Rating: 46% based on 8 votes

Means "flower" in Basque.

LOREA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Basque

Rating: 33% based on 7 votes

Variant of LORE (2)

LOREDANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Romanian

Rating: 33% based on 7 votes

Created by the French author George Sand for a character in her novel 'Mattea' (1833) and later used by the Italian author Luciano Zuccoli in his novel 'L'amore de Loredana' (1908). It was possibly based on the Venetian surname Loredan, which was derived from the place name Loreo.

LORELEI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Germanic Mythology

Pronounced: lawr-e-LIE, LAWR-e-lie

Rating: 55% based on 8 votes

From a Germanic name meaning "luring rock". This is the name of a rock headland on the Rhine River. Legends say that a maiden named the Lorelei lives on the rock and lures fishermen to their death with her song.

LORENA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Croatian

Rating: 27% based on 7 votes

Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of LORRAINE

LORRAINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: lə-RAYN

Rating: 28% based on 8 votes

From the name of a region in France, originally meaning "kingdom of LOTHAR". Lothar was a Frankish king, the great-grandson of Charlemagne, whose realm was in the part of France that is now called Lorraine, or in German Lothringen (from Latin Lothari regnum). As a given name, it has been used in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century, perhaps due to its similar sound with Laura. It became popular after World War I when the region was in the news, as it was contested between Germany and France.

LYSANDER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Λυσανδρος (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 68% based on 8 votes

From the Greek name Λυσανδρος (Lysandros) which meant "a release of a man" from Greek λυσις (lysis) "a release" and ανδρος (andros) "of a man". This was the name of a Spartan general and naval commander.

MADELAINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Rating: 60% based on 2 votes

Variant of MADELINE

MADELEINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: ma-də-LEN (French), mad-LEN (French), MAD-ə-lin (English), MAD-ə-lien (English)

Rating: 56% based on 7 votes

French form of MAGDALENE

MAE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAY

Rating: 53% based on 8 votes

Variant of MAY. A famous bearer was American actress Mae West (1893-1980), whose birth name was Mary.

MAËLLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, Breton

Rating: 44% based on 7 votes

French feminine form of MAËL

MAËLYS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Rating: 53% based on 7 votes

Feminine form of MAËL, possibly influenced by the spelling of MAILYS.

MAEVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Pacific/Polynesian, French

Rating: 41% based on 8 votes

Means "welcome" in Tahitian.

MAEVE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology

Pronounced: MAYV

Rating: 65% based on 8 votes

Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Medb meaning "intoxicating". In Irish legend this was the name of a warrior queen of Connacht. Her fight against Ulster and the hero Cúchulainn is told in the Irish epic 'The Cattle Raid of Cooley'.

MAIARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Native American, Tupí

Rating: 38% based on 6 votes

Means "wise" in Tupí.

MALACHI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: מַלְאָכִי (Hebrew)

Pronounced: MAL-ə-kie (English)

Rating: 58% based on 8 votes

From the Hebrew name מַלְאָכִי (Mal'akhiy) meaning "my messenger" or "my angel". This is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Malachi, which some claim foretells the coming of Christ. In England the name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

MALACHY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 39% based on 8 votes

Anglicized form of MAELEACHLAINN influenced by the spelling of MALACHI.

MAREN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Danish, Norwegian

Rating: 57% based on 7 votes

Danish form of MARINA

MARGO

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAHR-go

Rating: 44% based on 7 votes

Variant of MARGOT

MARIELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Rating: 41% based on 7 votes

French diminutive of MARIE

MARIKA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Czech, Slovak, Polish, Hungarian, Greek, Finnish, Estonian

Other Scripts: Μαρικα (Greek)

Rating: 36% based on 7 votes

Diminutive of MARIA

MARINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Greek, Russian, Romanian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian, Ancient Roman

Other Scripts: Μαρινα (Greek), Марина (Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian), მარინა (Georgian)

Pronounced: mah-REE-nah (Italian, Spanish, German, Russian)

Rating: 43% based on 7 votes

Feminine form of MARINUS

MARINUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman, Dutch

Rating: 33% based on 7 votes

From the Roman family name Marinus, which derives either from the name MARIUS or from the Latin word marinus "of the sea".

MARIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, French, Romanian

Pronounced: MER-ee-əs (English), MAR-ee-əs (English), MAH-ree-uws (German)

Rating: 61% based on 8 votes

Roman family name which was derived either from MARS, the name of the Roman god of War, or else from the Latin root mas, maris meaning "male". Gaius Marius was a famous Roman consul of the 2nd century BC. Since the start of the Christian era, it has occasionally been used as a masculine form of MARIA.

MAVOURNEEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

Derived from the Irish phrase mo mhúirnín meaning "my darling".

MÉLISANDE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Rating: 58% based on 9 votes

French form of MILLICENT used by Maurice Maeterlinck in his play 'Pelléas et Mélisande' (1893). The play was later adapted by Claude Debussy into an opera (1902).

MELISENDE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Medieval French

Rating: 60% based on 2 votes

Old French form of MILLICENT

MELUSINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Mythology

Rating: 44% based on 7 votes

Meaning unknown. In European folklore Melusine was a water fairy who turned into a serpent from the waist down every Saturday. She made her husband, Raymond of Poitou, promise that he would never see her on that day, and when he broke his word she left him forever.

MERCIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Rating: 39% based on 7 votes

Latinate form of MERCY. This was also the name of an old Anglo-Saxon kingdom, though it has a different origin.

MIRA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Indian

Other Scripts: मीरा (Hindi, Sanskrit)

Rating: 57% based on 7 votes

Means "sea, ocean" in Sanskrit. This was the name of a 16th-century Indian princess who devoted her life to the god Krishna.

MIRA (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Polish

Other Scripts: Мира (Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)

Rating: 51% based on 7 votes

Short form of names containing the Slavic element mir meaning "peace" or "world".

MIREIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Catalan, Spanish

Pronounced: mee-RE-yə (Catalan)

Rating: 51% based on 7 votes

Catalan form of Mirèio (see MIREILLE).

MIREILLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: mee-RAY

Rating: 51% based on 8 votes

From the Occitan name Mirèio, which was first used by the poet Frédéric Mistral for the main character in his poem 'Mirèio' (1859). He probably derived it from the Occitan word mirar meaning "to admire".

MIRIAM

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew, English, German, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: מִרְיָם (Hebrew)

Pronounced: MIR-ee-əm (English)

Rating: 69% based on 8 votes

Original Hebrew form of MARY. It is used in the Old Testament, where it belongs to the elder sister of Moses and Aaron. It has long been popular among Jews, and it has been used as an English Christian name since the Protestant Reformation.

MIRJA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Finnish

Pronounced: MEERR-yah

Rating: 35% based on 6 votes

Finnish form of MIRIAM

MIRO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Slovene, Croatian

Rating: 45% based on 6 votes

Short form of MIROSLAV

MORRIGAN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish Mythology

Rating: 26% based on 7 votes

Derived from Irish Mór Ríoghain meaning "great queen". In Irish myth she was a goddess of war and death who often took the form of a crow.

MYRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MIE-rə

Rating: 45% based on 6 votes

Created by the 17th-century poet Fulke Greville. He possibly based it on Latin myrra meaning "myrrh" (a fragrant resin obtained from a tree). Otherwise, he may have simply rearranged the letters from the name MARY. Although unrelated etymologically, this is also the name of an ancient city of Anatolia.

MYRON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Μυρων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: MIE-rən (English), MOO-ron (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 40% based on 6 votes

Derived from Greek μυρον (myron) meaning "sweet oil, perfume". Myron was the name of a 5th-century BC Greek sculptor. Saints bearing this name include a 3rd-century bishop of Crete and a 4th-century martyr from Cyzicus who was killed by a mob. These saints are more widely revered in the Eastern Church, and the name has generally been more common among Eastern Christians. As an English name, it has been used since the 19th century.

NAIARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Basque

Rating: 25% based on 6 votes

From the Basque name of the Spanish city of Nájera, which is Arabic in origin. In the 12th century there was a reported apparition of the Virgin Mary in a nearby cave.

NEPHTHYS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Egyptian Mythology

Rating: 40% based on 2 votes

Greek form of Egyptian Nebt-Het meaning "lady of the house", derived from Egyptian nbt "lady" and hwt "house". This was the name of an Egyptian goddess associated with the air, death and mourning. She was wife of the desert god Seth.

NEVENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian

Other Scripts: Невена (Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)

Rating: 40% based on 2 votes

Derived from South Slavic neven meaning "marigold".

NIALL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, Scottish

Pronounced: NEE-al, NIE-al

Rating: 53% based on 6 votes

Original Gaelic spelling of NEIL

NILA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Indian

Other Scripts: नीला (Hindi)

Rating: 25% based on 6 votes

Means "dark blue" in Sanskrit.

NIMUE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: NIM-oo-ay

Rating: 30% based on 6 votes

Meaning unknown. In Arthurian legends this is the name of a sorceress, also known as the Lady of the Lake, Vivien, or Niniane. Various versions of the tales have Merlin falling in love with her and becoming imprisoned by her magic. She first appears in the medieval French 'Lancelot-Grail' cycle.

NOLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Irish

Pronounced: NO-lə

Rating: 41% based on 7 votes

Diminutive of MAGNOLIA, FINOLA or other names containing a similar sound.

NORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Italian

Pronounced: NAWR-ə (English), NO-rah (German)

Rating: 48% based on 6 votes

Short form of HONORA or ELEANOR. Henrik Ibsen used it for a character in his play 'A Doll's House' (1879).

NOVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: NO-və

Rating: 39% based on 7 votes

Derived from Latin novus meaning "new". It was first used as a name in the 19th century.

OCEAN

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: O-shən

Rating: 27% based on 7 votes

Simply from the English word ocean for a large body of water. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ωκεανος (Okeanos), the name of the body of water thought to surround the Earth.

OCTAVIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: ahk-TAYV-ee-ə (English)

Rating: 44% based on 7 votes

Feminine form of OCTAVIUS. Octavia was the wife of Mark Antony and the sister of Roman emperor Augustus. In 19th-century England it was sometimes given to the eighth-born child.

ODESSA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Various

Rating: 41% based on 7 votes

From the name of a Ukrainian city that sits on the north coast of the Black Sea. This name can also be used as a feminine form of ODYSSEUS.

OLWEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 43% based on 6 votes

Means "white footprint" from Welsh ol "footprint, track" and gwen "white, fair, blessed". In Welsh legend Olwen was a beautiful maiden, the lover of Culhwch and the daughter of the giant Yspaddaden. Her father insisted that Culhwch complete several seemingly impossible tasks before he would allow them to marry, and Culhwch was successful with all of them.

OPHELIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Literature

Pronounced: o-FEEL-yə (English)

Rating: 41% based on 8 votes

Derived from Greek οφελος (ophelos) meaning "help". This name was probably created by the 15th-century poet Jacopo Sannazaro for a character in his poem 'Arcadia'. It was borrowed by Shakespeare for his play 'Hamlet' (1600), in which it belongs to Hamlet's lover who eventually goes insane and drowns herself. In spite of this, the name has been used since the 19th century.

OPHÉLIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: o-fay-LEE

Rating: 43% based on 7 votes

French form of OPHELIA

ORLA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: OR-la

Rating: 55% based on 6 votes

Anglicized form of ÓRFHLAITH

OTHNIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: עָתְנִיאֵל (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: AWTH-nee-əl (English)

Rating: 36% based on 7 votes

Means "lion of God" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the nephew of Caleb who becomes the first judge of Israel.

OWEN (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh, English

Pronounced: O-ən (English)

Rating: 47% based on 6 votes

Modern form of OWAIN

PANDORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Πανδωρα (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: pan-DAWR-ə (English)

Rating: 16% based on 7 votes

Means "all gifts", derived from a combination of Greek παν (pan) "all" and δωρον (doron) "gift". In Greek mythology Pandora was the first mortal woman. Zeus gave her a jar containing all of the troubles and ills that mankind now knows, and told her not to open it. Unfortunately her curiosity got the best of her and she opened it, unleashing the evil spirits into the world.

PARTHENOPE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Παρθενοπη (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 40% based on 7 votes

Means "maiden's voice", derived from Greek παρθενος (parthenos) "maiden, virgin" and οψ (ops) "voice". In Greek legend this is the name of one of the Sirens who enticed Odysseus.

PATIENCE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: PAY-shənts

Rating: 33% based on 8 votes

From the English word patience, ultimately from Latin patientia, a derivative of pati "to suffer". This was one of the virtue names coined by the Puritans in the 17th century.

PERSEPHONE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Περσεφονη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: pər-SEF-ə-nee (English)

Rating: 58% based on 8 votes

Meaning unknown, perhaps related to Greek περθω (pertho) "to destroy" and φονη (phone) "murder". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus. She was abducted to the underworld by Hades, but was eventually allowed to return to the surface for part of the year. The result of her comings and goings is the changing of the seasons.

PHAEDRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Φαιδρα (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 65% based on 8 votes

From the Greek Φαιδρα (Phaidra), derived from φαιδρος (phaidros) meaning "bright". Phaedra was the daughter of Minos and the wife of Theseus in Greek mythology. Aphrodite caused her to fall in love with her stepson Hippolytos, and after she was rejected by him she killed herself.

POLYMNIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Πολυμνια, Πολυυμνια (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 30% based on 4 votes

Means "much song" from Greek πολυς (polys) "much" and ‘υμνος (hymnos) "song, hymn". In Greek mythology she was the goddess of dance and sacred songs, one of the nine Muses.

PORTER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: PAWR-tər

Rating: 9% based on 7 votes

From an occupational English surname meaning "doorkeeper", ultimately from Old French porte "door", from Latin porta.

QUINLAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: KWIN-lən

Rating: 17% based on 7 votes

From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Caoinlean meaning "descendent of Caoinlean". The name Caoinlean means "slender" in Gaelic.

RAINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Bulgarian

Other Scripts: Райна (Bulgarian)

Rating: 40% based on 7 votes

Variant transcription of RAYNA (1)

RAVENNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Rating: 33% based on 8 votes

Either an elaboration of RAVEN, or else from the name of the city of Ravenna in Italy.

RAYA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Bulgarian

Other Scripts: Рая (Bulgarian)

Rating: 24% based on 7 votes

Diminutive of RAYNA (1)

REED

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: REED

Rating: 10% based on 2 votes

From an English surname which comes from multiple sources, including Old English read meaning "red" (originally a nickname given to a person with red hair or a ruddy complexion) and Old English ried meaning "clearing" (given to a person who lived in a clearing in the woods).

REID

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: REED

Rating: 23% based on 7 votes

From a surname which is a Scots variant of REED.

REMIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend

Rating: 46% based on 8 votes

Means "mercy of God" in Hebrew. The Book of Enoch names him as one of the seven archangels.

RILEY

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: RIE-lee

Rating: 6% based on 7 votes

From a surname which comes from two distinct sources. As an Irish surname it is a variant of REILLY. As an English surname it is derived from a place name meaning "rye clearing" in Old English.

RÍONA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 30% based on 7 votes

Either a variant of RÍOGHNACH or a short form of CATRIONA.

RIVER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: RIV-ər

Rating: 69% based on 9 votes

From the English word that denotes a flowing body of water. The word is ultimately derived (via Old French) from Latin ripa "riverbank".

ROLAND

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Polish

Pronounced: RO-lənd (English), ro-LAWN (French), RAW-lahnt (Polish)

Rating: 47% based on 7 votes

Means "famous land" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and land. Roland was a semi-legendary French hero whose story is told in the medieval epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which he is a nephew of Charlemagne killed in battle with the Saracens. The Normans introduced this name to England.

ROMAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German

Other Scripts: Роман (Russian, Ukrainian)

Pronounced: rah-MAHN (Russian), RAW-mahn (Polish)

Rating: 53% based on 8 votes

From the Late Latin name Romanus which meant "Roman".

RÓNÁN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: RON-awn

Rating: 51% based on 9 votes

Means "little seal", derived from Irish rón "seal" combined with a diminutive suffix.

RONEN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: רוֹנֶן (Hebrew)

Rating: 36% based on 8 votes

Derived from Hebrew רוֹן (ron) meaning "song, joy".

ROSELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French (Rare)

Rating: 37% based on 6 votes

French diminutive of ROSE

SAFIRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Esperanto

Pronounced: sah-FEE-rah

Rating: 37% based on 7 votes

Means "like a sapphire" in Esperanto.

SAGE

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: SAYJ

Rating: 65% based on 8 votes

From the English word sage, which denotes either a type of spice or else a wise person.

SAPPHIRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical

Pronounced: sə-FIE-rə (English)

Rating: 48% based on 8 votes

From the Greek name Σαπφειρη (Sappheire), which was from Greek σαπφειρος (sappheiros) meaning "sapphire" or "lapis lazuli" (ultimately derived from the Hebrew word סַפִּיר (sappir)). Sapphira is a character in Acts in the New Testament who is killed by God for lying.

SASKIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch, German

Pronounced: SAHS-kee-ah: (Dutch), ZAHS-kee-ah (German)

Rating: 61% based on 7 votes

From the Germanic element sachs "Saxon". The Saxons were a Germanic tribe, their name ultimately deriving from the Germanic word sahs meaning "knife".

SEPTEMBER

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: sep-TEM-bər

Rating: 38% based on 9 votes

From the name of the ninth month (though it means "seventh month" in Latin, since it was originally the seventh month of the Roman year), which is sometimes used as a given name for someone born in September.

SEVDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Turkish, Azerbaijani

Rating: 36% based on 7 votes

Means "love" in Turkish and Azerbaijani.

SIDONIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Late Roman, German

Rating: 40% based on 2 votes

Feminine form of SIDONIUS

SILAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Σιλας (Greek)

Pronounced: SIE-ləs (English)

Rating: 46% based on 8 votes

Short form of SILVANUS. This is the name of a companion of Saint Paul in the New Testament. It was not used as an English name until after the Protestant Reformation.

SIMONE (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: see-MON (French)

Rating: 34% based on 7 votes

French feminine form of SIMON. A famous bearer was Simone de Beauvoir (1908-1986), a French feminist and philosopher.

SKYE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: SKIE

Rating: 53% based on 8 votes

From the name of the Isle of Skye off the west coast of Scotland. It is sometimes considered a variant of SKY.

SOLÈNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: so-LEN

Rating: 26% based on 7 votes

Variant of SOLANGE

SOMERLED

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish

Rating: 47% based on 7 votes

Anglicized form of the Old Norse name Somarliðr meaning "summer traveller". This was the name of a 12th-century Scottish warlord who created a kingdom on the Scottish islands.

SONIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian

Pronounced: SON-yə (English), SAWN-yə (English), SO-nyah (Italian)

Rating: 30% based on 2 votes

Variant of SONYA

STELARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Esperanto

Pronounced: ste-LAH-rah

Rating: 21% based on 7 votes

Means "like a constellation" in Esperanto.

STELLAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish

Rating: 45% based on 8 votes

Meaning unknown, perhaps related to Old Norse stilling "calm", or perhaps of German origin.

SULLIVAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SUL-i-vən

Rating: 26% based on 7 votes

From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Súilleabháin meaning "descendent of Súilleabhán". The name Súilleabhán means "little dark eye" in Irish.

SYLVIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: seel-VEE

Rating: 63% based on 9 votes

French form of SILVIA

TANITH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Near Eastern Mythology

Rating: 56% based on 7 votes

Derived from Semitic roots meaning "serpent lady". This was the name of the Phoenician goddess of love, fertility, the moon and the stars.

THEA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, English

Pronounced: TE-ah (German), THEE-ə (English)

Rating: 51% based on 7 votes

Short form of DOROTHEA or THEODORA

THEIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Θεια (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 43% based on 7 votes

Possibly derived from Greek θεα (thea) meaning "goddess". In Greek myth this was the name of a Titan goddess of sight, glittering and glory. She was the wife of Hyperion and the mother of the sun god Helios, the moon goddess Selene, and the dawn goddess Eos.

THEIRN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French

Rating: 27% based on 7 votes

Possibly a Cajun French form of THEODORE

THEO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: THEE-o (English), TAY-o (Dutch)

Rating: 41% based on 7 votes

Short form of THEODORE, THEOBALD, and other names that begin with Theo.

THEODORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Greek, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Θεοδωρα (Greek)

Pronounced: thee-ə-DAWR-ə (English)

Rating: 54% based on 7 votes

Feminine form of THEODORE. This name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by several empresses including the influential wife of Justinian in the 6th century.

THEODOSIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Greek, Greek

Other Scripts: Θεοδοσια (Greek)

Rating: 37% based on 7 votes

Feminine form of THEODOSIUS

THERON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Θηρων (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 54% based on 7 votes

Means "hunter" in Greek.

THOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Norse Mythology, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian

Pronounced: THOR (English), TOR (Danish), TOOR (Swedish, Norwegian)

Rating: 65% based on 6 votes

From the Old Norse Þórr meaning "thunder", ultimately from the early Germanic *Þunraz. Thor was the Norse god of strength, thunder and war, the son of Odin. He was armed with a hammer called Mjolnir, and wore an enchanted belt that doubled his strength.

THORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German

Rating: 63% based on 6 votes

Modern form of ÞÓRA

TIERNAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 43% based on 6 votes

Anglicized form of TIGHEARNÁN

TIRZAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: תִּרְצָה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: TIR-zə (English)

Rating: 44% based on 7 votes

From the Hebrew name תִּרְצָה (Tirtzah) meaning "favourable". Tirzah is the name of one of the daughters of Zelophehad in the Old Testament. It also occurs in the Old Testament as a place name, the early residence of the kings of the northern kingdom.

TULLY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: History

Rating: 23% based on 7 votes

Form of Tullius (see TULLIO) used to refer to the Roman orator Marcus Tullius Cicero.

ULRIC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: UL-rik

Rating: 45% based on 4 votes

Originally this was a medieval form of the Old English name Wulfric meaning "wolf power". When it is used in modern times, it is usually as a variant of ULRICH.

VAUGHN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh, English

Pronounced: VAWN

Rating: 35% based on 8 votes

From a Welsh surname which was derived from Welsh bychan meaning "little".

VERA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Portuguese

Other Scripts: Вера (Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: VYE-rah (Russian), VEER-ə (English), VER-ə (English)

Rating: 69% based on 7 votes

Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.

VERE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Rating: 22% based on 5 votes

From a Norman surname which was from a French place name, which was itself derived from a Gaulish word meaning "alder".

VERED

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: וֶרֶד (Hebrew)

Rating: 52% based on 6 votes

Means "rose" in Hebrew.

VERENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Late Roman

Pronounced: ve-RE-nah (German)

Rating: 45% based on 2 votes

Possibly related to Latin verus "true". This might also be a Coptic form of the Ptolemaic name BERENICE. Saint Verena was a 3rd-century Egyptian-born nurse who went with the Theban Legion to Switzerland. After the legion was massacred she settled near Zurich.

VERITY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Pronounced: VER-i-tee

Rating: 47% based on 7 votes

From the English word meaning "verity, truth". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.

VERONICA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Romanian, Late Roman

Pronounced: və-RAHN-i-kə (English)

Rating: 70% based on 6 votes

Latin alteration of BERENICE, the spelling influenced by the ecclesiastical Latin phrase vera icon meaning "true image". This was the name of a legendary saint who wiped Jesus' face with a towel and then found his image imprinted upon it. Due to popular stories about her, the name was occasionally used in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. It was borne by the 17th-century Italian saint and mystic Veronica Giuliani. As an English name, it was not common until the 19th century, when it was imported from France and Scotland.

VIVIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Late Roman

Pronounced: vee-vee-AH-nah (Italian)

Rating: 45% based on 6 votes

Feminine form of Vivianus (see VIVIAN). Saint Viviana (also known as Bibiana) was a Roman saint and martyr of the 4th century.

VLADIMIRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian, Slovene, Croatian

Other Scripts: Владимира (Russian)

Rating: 46% based on 5 votes

Feminine form of VLADIMIR

VOIRREY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Manx

Rating: 55% based on 6 votes

Vocative form of MOIRREY

WINTER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: WIN-tər

Rating: 55% based on 8 votes

From the English word for the season, derived from Old English winter.

WREN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: REN

Rating: 52% based on 6 votes

From the English word for the small songbird. It is ultimately derived from Old English wrenna.

XANDER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Dutch, English (Modern)

Pronounced: KSAHN-dər (Dutch), ZAN-dər (English)

Rating: 28% based on 6 votes

Short form of ALEXANDER. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by a character on the television series 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer' (1997-2003).

XAVIERA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Rating: 32% based on 6 votes

Feminine form of XAVIER

XIOMARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Rating: 51% based on 7 votes

Possibly a Spanish form of GUIOMAR

ZARA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: ZAHR-ə

Rating: 41% based on 7 votes

English form of ZAÏRE. In England it came to public attention when Princess Anne gave it to her daughter in 1981. Use of the name may also be influenced by the trendy Spanish clothing retailer Zara.

ZENOVIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek

Other Scripts: Ζηνοβια (Greek)

Rating: 33% based on 6 votes

Modern Greek form of ZENOBIA

ZEPHYR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Anglicized)

Other Scripts: Ζεφυρος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ZEF-ər (English)

Rating: 50% based on 8 votes

From the Greek Ζεφυρος (Zephyros) meaning "the west wind". Zephyros was the Greek god of the west wind.

ZEPHYRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: ?

Rating: 19% based on 7 votes

Feminine form of ZEPHYR

ZÉPHYRINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French (Rare)

Rating: 43% based on 6 votes

French feminine form of Zephyrinus (see ZEFERINO).

ZIMRI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: זִמְרִי (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: ZIM-rie (English)

Rating: 54% based on 7 votes

Means either "my praise" or "my music" in Hebrew. This is the name of a king of Israel in the Old Testament who rules for only seven days.

ZINOVIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek

Other Scripts: Ζηνοβια (Greek)

Rating: 40% based on 7 votes

Modern Greek form of ZENOBIA

ZOLTÁN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hungarian

Rating: 43% based on 4 votes

Possibly related to the Turkish title sultan meaning "king, sultan". This was the name of a 10th-century ruler of Hungary, also known as Zsolt.

ZORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Зора (Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)

Rating: 49% based on 7 votes

From a South and West Slavic word meaning "dawn, aurora".

ZORION

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Basque

Rating: 33% based on 7 votes

Means "happiness" in Basque.
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2014.