lady murasaki's Personal Name List

AKIRA

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Japanese

Other Scripts: 昭, 明, 亮 (Japanese)

Rating: 51% based on 52 votes

From Japanese "bright", "bright" or "clear".

ALEXANDER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: al-əg-ZAN-dər (English), ah-lek-SAHN-der (German), ah-lək-SAHN-dər (Dutch)

Rating: 71% based on 56 votes

Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ALIDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch, German, Hungarian

Pronounced: ah-LEE-dah (German)

Rating: 45% based on 46 votes

Diminutive of ADELAIDE

ALIZA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: עַלִיזָה (Hebrew)

Pronounced: ah-LEE-zah

Rating: 41% based on 47 votes

Means "joyful" in Hebrew.

ALLEGRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare), Italian (Rare)

Pronounced: ə-LEG-rə (English), ahl-LE-grah (Italian)

Rating: 58% based on 52 votes

Means "cheerful, lively" in Italian. It is not a traditional Italian name. It was borne by a short-lived illegitimate daughter of Lord Byron.

AMALIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch, German, Finnish, Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)

Pronounced: ah-MAH-lee-ah (Dutch, German)

Rating: 63% based on 47 votes

Latinized form of the Germanic name Amala, a short form of names beginning with the element amal meaning "work".

AMEDEO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Rating: 46% based on 41 votes

Italian form of AMADEUS. A notable bearer of this name was Amedeo Avogadro (1776-1856), an Italian chemist most famous for the constant that now bears his name: Avogadro's Number. Another famous bearer was the Italian painter and sculptor Amedeo Modigliani (1884-1920).

AMIT (2)

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: עָמִית (Hebrew)

Pronounced: ah-MEET

Rating: 33% based on 42 votes

Means "friend" in Hebrew.

ANGELICA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Romanian, Literature

Pronounced: an-JEL-i-kə (English), ahn-JE-lee-kah (Italian)

Rating: 44% based on 43 votes

Derived from Latin angelicus meaning "angelic", ultimately related to Greek αγγελος (angelos) "messenger". The poets Boiardo and Ariosto used this name in their 'Orlando' poems (1495 and 1532), where it belongs to Orlando's love interest. It has been used as a given name since the 18th century.

ANNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Αννα (Greek), Анна (Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Bulgarian, Church Slavic)

Pronounced: AN-a (English), AHN-nah (Italian, Dutch, Polish), AH-nah (German, Russian)

Rating: 70% based on 50 votes

Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary. In the English-speaking world, this form came into general use in the 18th century, joining Ann and Anne.

The name was borne by several Russian royals, including an 18th-century empress of Russia. It was also the name of the main character in Leo Tolstoy's novel 'Anna Karenina' (1877), a woman forced to choose between her son and her lover.

ANTONIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Polish, Romanian, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: ahn-TO-nyah (Italian, Spanish), an-TON-ee-ə (English), ahn-TO-nee-ah (German, Dutch), ahn-TAWN-yah (Polish)

Rating: 61% based on 49 votes

Feminine form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).

ARTEMISIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Αρτεμισια (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 57% based on 51 votes

Feminine form of ARTEMISIOS. This was the name of the 4th-century BC builder of the Mausoleum, one of the seven wonders of the world. She built it in memory of her husband, the Carian prince Mausolus.

ARTHUR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: AHR-thər (English), ar-TUYR (French), AHR-toor (German), AHR-tur (Dutch)

Rating: 55% based on 45 votes

The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.

The name came into general use in England in the Middle Ages due to the prevalence of Arthurian romances, and it enjoyed a surge of popularity in the 19th century. Famous bearers include German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), mystery author and Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), and science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008).

ASAF

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: אָסָף (Hebrew)

Rating: 29% based on 41 votes

Hebrew form of ASAPH

ASHER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: אָשֵׁר (Hebrew)

Pronounced: A-shər (English)

Rating: 57% based on 49 votes

Means "happy" or "blessed" in Hebrew. Asher in the Old Testament is a son of Jacob and Leah's handmaid Zilpah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel.

ATARAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: עֲטָרָה (Hebrew)

Pronounced: AT-ə-rə (English)

Rating: 42% based on 39 votes

Means "crown" in Hebrew. She was a minor Old Testament character, the wife of Jerahmeel.

AVITAL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: אֲבִיטָל (Ancient Hebrew)

Rating: 39% based on 40 votes

Hebrew form of ABITAL

BRUNO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Croatian, Polish, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: BROO-no (German), BRUW-naw (Polish)

Rating: 34% based on 44 votes

Derived from the Germanic element brun meaning "brown". Saint Bruno of Cologne was a German monk of the 11th century who founded the Carthusian Order. The surname has belonged Giordano Bruno, a philosopher burned at the stake by the Inquisition.

CLAUDIO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, Spanish

Pronounced: KLOW-dyo

Rating: 45% based on 42 votes

Italian and Spanish form of CLAUDIUS

CONSTANZA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: kon-STAHN-thah (Spanish), kon-STAHN-sah (Latin American Spanish)

Rating: 47% based on 40 votes

Spanish form of CONSTANTIA

DALIA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish (Latin American), American (Hispanic)

Rating: 54% based on 46 votes

Spanish form of DAHLIA. The Dahlia is the national flower of Mexico.

DAMIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Polish, Dutch

Pronounced: DAY-mee-ən (English), DAHM-yahn (Polish)

Rating: 58% based on 44 votes

From the Greek name Δαμιανος (Damianos) which was derived from Greek δαμαω (damao) "to tame". Saint Damian was martyred with his twin brother Cosmo in Syria early in the 4th century. They are the patron saints of physicians. Due his renown, the name came into general use in Christian Europe. Another saint by this name was Peter Damian, an 11th-century cardinal and theologian from Italy.

DAVIDE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: DAH-vee-de

Rating: 43% based on 43 votes

Italian form of DAVID

DELIA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Δηλια (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: DEEL-ee-ə (English), DEEL-yə (English), DEL-yah (Italian, Spanish)

Rating: 50% based on 40 votes

Means "of Delos" in Greek. This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Artemis, given because she and her twin brother Apollo were born on the island of Delos. The name appeared in several poems of the 16th and 17th centuries, and it has occasionally been used as a given name since that time.

DONATO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese

Pronounced: do-NAH-to (Italian, Spanish)

Rating: 44% based on 36 votes

From the Late Latin name Donatus meaning "given". Several early saints had this name. The name was also borne by two Renaissance masters: the sculptor Donato di Niccolo di Bette Bardi (also known as Donatello), and the architect Donato Bramante.

ELENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Bulgarian, Romanian, Macedonian, Croatian, Slovene, Lithuanian, Russian, German, Medieval Slavic

Other Scripts: Елена (Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Church Slavic)

Pronounced: E-le-nah (Italian), e-LE-nah (Spanish), ye-LYE-nah (Russian), ee-LYE-nah (Russian)

Rating: 66% based on 38 votes

Cognate of HELEN, and a variant Russian transcription of YELENA.

ELEONORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Croatian

Pronounced: e-le-o-NO-rah (German), e-le-aw-NAW-rah (Polish)

Rating: 70% based on 41 votes

Cognate of ELEANOR

ELSA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Finnish, Italian

Pronounced: EL-sə (English), EL-sah (German)

Rating: 56% based on 21 votes

Short form of ELISABETH

EMANUEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Romanian, Portuguese, Czech, Croatian

Pronounced: e-MAH-nuw-el (German)

Rating: 59% based on 37 votes

Form of EMMANUEL

EMILIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Finnish, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English

Pronounced: e-MEEL-yah (Italian, Spanish, Polish)

Rating: 62% based on 39 votes

Feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).

EVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Macedonian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: Ева (Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Church Slavic), ევა (Georgian)

Pronounced: E-vah (Italian, Spanish, Danish), EE-və (English), E-fah (German), AY-vah (Dutch)

Rating: 68% based on 23 votes

Latinate form of EVE. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. It is also a variant Russian transcription of YEVA. This name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.

FIAMMETTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: fyahm-MET-tah

Rating: 51% based on 44 votes

Derived from Italian fiamma "fire" combined with a diminutive suffix.

GIANCARLO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: jahn-KAHR-lo

Rating: 42% based on 35 votes

Combination of GIANNI and CARLO

GIOVANNI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: jo-VAHN-nee

Rating: 53% based on 36 votes

Italian form of Iohannes (see JOHN). The Renaissance painter Giovanni Bellini and the 17th-century painter and sculptor Giovanni Bernini are two famous bearers of this name.

IGNAZIO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Rating: 43% based on 36 votes

Italian form of IGNATIUS

JESSICA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian

Pronounced: JES-i-kə (English)

Rating: 48% based on 41 votes

This name was first used in this form by Shakespeare in his play 'The Merchant of Venice' (1596), where it belongs to the daughter of Shylock. Shakespeare probably based it on the biblical name ISCAH, which would have been spelled Jescha in his time. It was not commonly used as a given name until the middle of the 20th century.

JULIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Polish, German

Pronounced: JOO-lee-ən (English), JOOL-yən (English), YUWL-yahn (Polish), YOO-lee-ahn (German)

Rating: 62% based on 38 votes

From the Roman name Iulianus, which was derived from JULIUS. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints, including the legendary Saint Julian the Hospitaller. This name has been used in England since the Middle Ages, at which time it was also a feminine name (from Juliana, eventually becoming Gillian).

JUNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JOON

Rating: 57% based on 40 votes

From the name of the month, which was originally derived from the name of the Roman goddess Juno. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.

KEZIAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: קְצִיעָה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: kə-ZIE-ə (English)

Rating: 43% based on 35 votes

From the Hebrew name קְצִיעָה (Qetzi'ah) meaning "cassia", from the name of the spice tree. In the Old Testament she is a daughter of Job.

LAYLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic, English

Other Scripts: ليلى (Arabic)

Pronounced: LAY-lə (English)

Rating: 50% based on 38 votes

Means "night" in Arabic. This was the name of the object of romantic poems written by the 7th-century poet known as Qays. The story of Qays and Layla became a popular romance in medieval Arabia and Persia. The name became used in the English-speaking world after the 1970 release of the song 'Layla' by Derek and the Dominos, the title of which was inspired by the medieval story.

LEONARDO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, History

Pronounced: le-o-NAHR-do (Italian, Spanish), lee-ə-NAHR-do (English)

Rating: 55% based on 37 votes

Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of LEONARD. A notable bearer was Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), an Italian artist and scientist of the Renaissance. He is also known as the inventor of several contraptions, including flying machines, as well as the painter of the 'Mona Lisa'. Another famous bearer was Leonardo Fibonacci, a 13th-century Italian mathematician. A more recent bearer is American actor Leonardo DiCaprio (1974-).

LEVI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew, English, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: לֵוִי (Hebrew)

Pronounced: LEE-vie (English), LE:-vee (Dutch)

Rating: 52% based on 41 votes

Means "attached" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, Levi is the third son of Jacob and Leah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of the Israelites (the tribe that eventually became the priests of the Israelites). In the New Testament this is another name for the apostle Matthew. As an English Christian name, Levi came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

LIORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: לִיאוֹרָה (Hebrew)

Rating: 55% based on 38 votes

Strictly feminine form of LIOR

LUISA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Italian

Pronounced: LWEE-sah (Spanish), LWEE-zah (Italian)

Rating: 53% based on 39 votes

Feminine form of LUIS

MAIA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, Roman Mythology, Georgian

Other Scripts: Μαια (Ancient Greek), მაია (Georgian)

Pronounced: MAY-ə (English), MIE-ə (English)

Rating: 56% based on 36 votes

Meaning unknown. In Greek and Roman mythology she was the eldest of the Pleiades, the group of seven stars in the constellation Taurus, who were the daughters of Atlas and Pleione. Her son by Zeus was Hermes.

MALKA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: מַלְכָּה (Hebrew)

Rating: 38% based on 34 votes

Means "queen" in Hebrew.

MARIA

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Icelandic, Corsican, Basque, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic

Other Scripts: Μαρια (Greek), Маріа (Church Slavic)

Pronounced: mah-REE-ah (Italian, German, Dutch), mə-REE-ə (Catalan, English), MAHR-yah (Polish)

Rating: 53% based on 38 votes

Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.

This was the name of two ruling queens of Portugal. It was also borne by the Habsburg queen Maria Theresa (1717-1780), whose inheritance of the domains of her father, the Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI, began the War of the Austrian Succession.

MEITAL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: מֵיטַל (Hebrew)

Rating: 37% based on 35 votes

Means "dew drop" in Hebrew.

MÉLISANDE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Rating: 58% based on 39 votes

French form of MILLICENT used by Maurice Maeterlinck in his play 'Pelléas et Mélisande' (1893). The play was later adapted by Claude Debussy into an opera (1902).

MICHELE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: mee-KE-le

Rating: 41% based on 35 votes

Italian form of MICHAEL

MIRIAM

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew, English, German, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: מִרְיָם (Hebrew)

Pronounced: MIR-ee-əm (English)

Rating: 63% based on 39 votes

Original Hebrew form of MARY. It is used in the Old Testament, where it belongs to the elder sister of Moses and Aaron. It has long been popular among Jews, and it has been used as an English Christian name since the Protestant Reformation.

NICCOLÒ

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian

Pronounced: neek-ko-LO

Rating: 50% based on 35 votes

Italian form of NICHOLAS. A famous bearer was Niccolò Machiavelli, a 16th-century political philosopher from Florence.

PALOMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: pah-LO-mah

Rating: 52% based on 40 votes

Means "dove, pigeon" in Spanish.

PERDITA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Rating: 39% based on 39 votes

Derived from Latin perditus meaning "lost". Shakespeare created this name for the daughter of Hermione in his play 'The Winter's Tale' (1610).

RAPHAEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, French, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: רָפָאֵל, רְפָאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Ραφαηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ra-fa-EL (French), RAF-ee-el (English), RAY-fee-əl (English)

Rating: 66% based on 40 votes

From the Hebrew name רָפָאֵל (Rafa'el) which meant "God has healed". In Hebrew tradition Raphael was the name of one of the seven archangels. He appears in the Old Testament in the Book of Tobit, where it is told how he aided Tobias. This name has never been common in the English-speaking world, though it has been well-used elsewhere in Europe. A famous bearer was the 16th-century Renaissance master Raphael Sanzio (usually known simply as Raphael).

RENATA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Polish, Czech, Croatian, Slovene, Late Roman

Pronounced: re-NAH-tah (Italian, Spanish, German, Polish)

Rating: 58% based on 39 votes

Feminine form of RENATUS

RIVKA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: רִיבְקָה (Hebrew)

Rating: 52% based on 37 votes

Hebrew form of REBECCA

ROSALIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Late Roman

Pronounced: ro-zah-LEE-ah (Italian)

Rating: 61% based on 38 votes

Late Latin name derived from rosa "rose". This was the name of a 12th-century Sicilian saint.

ROWENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ro-EE-nə

Rating: 58% based on 40 votes

Meaning uncertain, possibly a Latinized form of a Germanic name derived from the elements hrod "fame" and wynn "joy". According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, this was the name of a daughter of the Saxon chief Hengist. It was popularized by Sir Walter Scott, who used it for a character in his novel 'Ivanhoe' (1819).

SAFFRON

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: SAF-rən

Rating: 47% based on 39 votes

From the English word which refers either to a spice, the crocus flower from which it is harvested, or the yellow-orange colour of the spice. It is ultimately derived from Arabic زعفران (za'faran).

SAKURA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Japanese

Other Scripts: 桜, 咲良 (Japanese)

Rating: 44% based on 37 votes

From Japanese "cherry blossom", though it is often written さくら using the hiragana writing system. It can also come from 咲 (saku) "blossom" and 良 (ra) "good".

SAPPHIRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical

Pronounced: sə-FIE-rə (English)

Rating: 56% based on 38 votes

From the Greek name Σαπφειρη (Sappheire), which was from Greek σαπφειρος (sappheiros) meaning "sapphire" or "lapis lazuli" (ultimately derived from the Hebrew word סַפִּיר (sappir)). Sapphira is a character in Acts in the New Testament who is killed by God for lying.

SEBASTIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Finnish, Romanian

Pronounced: ze-BAHS-tee-ahn (German), sə-BAS-chən (English), se-BAHS-tyahn (Polish)

Rating: 70% based on 43 votes

From the Latin name Sebastianus which meant "from Sebaste". Sebaste was the name a town in Asia Minor, its name deriving from Greek σεβαστος (sebastos) "venerable" (a translation of Latin Augustus, the title of the Roman emperors). Saint Sebastian was a 3rd-century Roman soldier martyred by arrows after it was discovered he was a Christian. Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in medieval Europe, especially in Spain and France. It was also borne by a 16th-century king of Portugal who died in a crusade against Morocco.

SHIFRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: שִׁפְרָה (Hebrew)

Rating: 39% based on 34 votes

Hebrew form of SHIPHRAH

SHULAMIT

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: שׁוּלַמִּית (Hebrew)

Rating: 33% based on 35 votes

Variant transcription of SHULAMMITE

SIMEON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Bulgarian, Serbian

Other Scripts: שִׁמְעוֹן (Ancient Hebrew), Симеон (Bulgarian, Serbian)

Pronounced: SIM-ee-ən (English)

Rating: 52% based on 38 votes

From the Hebrew name Shim'on (see SIMON). In the Old Testament this is the name of the second son of Jacob and the founder of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. In the New Testament this is the name of a man who blessed the newborn Jesus. It was also borne by a powerful 10th-century ruler of Bulgaria.

SOLEDAD

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: so-le-DHAHD

Rating: 44% based on 38 votes

Means "solitude" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, María de Soledad, meaning "Mary of Solitude".

STELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian

Pronounced: STEL-ə (English)

Rating: 66% based on 44 votes

Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets 'Astrophel and Stella'. It was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play 'A Streetcar Named Desire' (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.

TAL

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: טַל (Hebrew)

Rating: 42% based on 36 votes

Derived from Hebrew טַל (tal) meaning "dew".

VERA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Portuguese

Other Scripts: Вера (Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: VYE-rah (Russian), VEER-ə (English), VER-ə (English)

Rating: 58% based on 23 votes

Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.

VERITY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Pronounced: VER-i-tee

Rating: 50% based on 39 votes

From the English word meaning "verity, truth". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.

VICTOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Romanian, Late Roman

Pronounced: VIK-tər (English), veek-TOR (French)

Rating: 49% based on 40 votes

Roman name meaning "victor" in Latin. It was common among early Christians, and was borne by several early saints and three popes. It was rare as an English name during the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the French writer Victor Hugo (1802-1885), who wrote 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.

VIRGINIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Romanian, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: vər-JIN-yə (English), veer-JEE-nyah (Italian), beer-KHEE-nyah (Spanish)

Rating: 52% based on 42 votes

Feminine form of the Roman family name Verginius or Virginius which is of unknown meaning, but long associated with Latin virgo "maid, virgin". According to a legend, it was the name of a Roman woman killed by her father so as to save her from the clutches of a crooked official.

This was the name of the first English baby born in the New World: Virginia Dare in 1587 on Roanoke Island. Perhaps because of this, the name has generally been more popular in America than elsewhere in the English-speaking world, though in both Britain and America it was not often used until the 19th century. The baby was named after the Colony of Virginia, which was itself named for Elizabeth I, the Virgin Queen. A more recent bearer was the English novelist Virginia Woolf (1882-1941).

YARDENA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: יַרְדֵנָה (Hebrew)

Rating: 35% based on 35 votes

Hebrew feminine form of JORDAN

YEHUDIT

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: יְהוּדִית (Hebrew)

Rating: 34% based on 37 votes

Hebrew form of JUDITH

ZELPHA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Ζελφα (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 30% based on 35 votes

Form of ZILPAH used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.

ZIPPORAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical, Hebrew

Other Scripts: צִפּוֹרָה (Hebrew)

Pronounced: zi-PAWR-ə (English), ZIP-ər-ə (English)

Rating: 46% based on 41 votes

From the Hebrew name צִפּוֹרָה (Tzipporah) which meant "bird". In the Old Testament she is the wife of Moses.

ZOHAR

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Hebrew

Other Scripts: זֹהַר (Hebrew)

Rating: 35% based on 36 votes

Means "light, brilliance" in Hebrew.
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2014.