lcgirl20's Personal Name List

ALBAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, French, Albanian, English (Rare)
Pronounced: AL-ban(German) AL-BAHN(French) AL-bən(English) AWL-bən(English)
Rating: 33% based on 12 votes
From the Roman cognomen Albanus, which meant "from Alba". Alba (from Latin albus "white") was the name of various places within the Roman Empire, including the city Alba Longa. This name was borne by Saint Alban, the first British martyr (4th century). According to tradition, he sheltered a fugitive priest in his house. When his house was searched, he disguised himself as the priest, was arrested in his stead, and was beheaded. As an English name, Alban was occasionally used in the Middle Ages and was revived in the 18th century, though it is now uncommon.
ALEKSEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Алексей(Russian)
Pronounced: u-lyi-KSYAY
Rating: 61% based on 15 votes
Russian form of ALEXIS. This was the name of a 17th-century czar of Russia.
ALOISIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Rare)
Pronounced: a-lo-EE-zee-a
Rating: 58% based on 10 votes
German feminine form of ALOYSIUS.
ÁLVARO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: AL-ba-ro(Spanish)
Rating: 43% based on 15 votes
Spanish form of a Germanic name, perhaps ALFHER. Verdi used this name in his opera The Force of Destiny (1862).
AMALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Greek, Swedish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic (Latinized) [1]
Other Scripts: Αμαλια(Greek)
Pronounced: a-MA-lya(Spanish, German) ah-MAH-lee-ah(Dutch)
Rating: 75% based on 17 votes
Latinized form of the Germanic name Amala, a short form of names beginning with the element amal meaning "work".
AMALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish, German (Rare)
Pronounced: a-MA-lyə(Danish, German)
Rating: 69% based on 13 votes
Norwegian, Danish and German form of AMALIA.
AMÉLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-MEH-LEE
Rating: 72% based on 18 votes
French form of AMELIA.
ANATOLIY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Анатолий(Russian) Анатолій(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: u-nu-TO-lyee(Russian) ah-nah-TAW-lee(Ukrainian)
Rating: 44% based on 16 votes
Russian and Ukrainian form of ANATOLIUS.
ANDREI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian, Russian, Bulgarian, Belarusian, Old Church Slavic
Other Scripts: Андрей(Russian, Bulgarian) Андрэй(Belarusian) Андреи(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: un-DRYAY(Russian)
Rating: 51% based on 16 votes
Romanian form of ANDREW, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Андрей or Belarusian Андрэй (see ANDREY).
ANSELM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: AN-zelm(German) AN-selm(English)
Rating: 42% based on 10 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements ans "god" and helm "helmet, protection". This name was brought to England in the late 11th century by Saint Anselm, who was born in northern Italy. He was archbishop of Canterbury and a Doctor of the Church.
ANTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Russian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Dutch, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Slovene, Slovak, Macedonian, Croatian, Romanian, Estonian, Finnish, English
Other Scripts: Антон(Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: AN-ton(German) un-TON(Russian) AHN-tawn(Dutch) ahn-TON(Ukrainian) an-TON(Slovene) AHN-ton(Finnish) AN-tahn(English)
Rating: 50% based on 15 votes
Form of Antonius (see ANTHONY) used in various languages.
ANTONIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Croatian
Pronounced: an-TO-nyo(Spanish, Italian)
Rating: 55% based on 15 votes
Spanish and Italian form of Antonius (see ANTHONY). This has been a common name in Italy since the 14th century. In Spain it was the most popular name for boys in the 1950s and 60s.

A famous bearer was the Italian Renaissance painter Antonio Pisanello (c. 1395-1455). It is also the name of the main character in The Merchant of Venice (1596) by William Shakespeare.

ARCHELAUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized), Biblical Latin, Biblical
Other Scripts: Αρχελαος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ahr-ki-LAY-əs(English)
Rating: 35% based on 15 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Αρχελαος (Archelaos), which meant "master of the people" from αρχος (archos) meaning "master" and λαος (laos) meaning "people". This was the name of a son of Herod the Great. He ruled over Judea, Samaria and Idumea.
ARIADNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Catalan, Russian, Polish
Other Scripts: Ариадна(Russian)
Pronounced: a-RYADH-na(Spanish) ə-RYADH-nə(Catalan) a-RYAD-na(Polish)
Rating: 62% based on 15 votes
Spanish, Catalan, Russian and Polish form of ARIADNE.
ARKADIY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Аркадий(Russian)
Pronounced: ur-KA-dyee
Rating: 47% based on 13 votes
Russian form of ARKADIOS. This is the name of one of the main characters in Ivan Turgenev's Fathers and Sons (1862).
ARKADY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Аркадий(Russian)
Pronounced: ur-KA-dyee
Rating: 44% based on 13 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian Аркадий (see ARKADIY).
ARTEMISIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αρτεμισια(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 51% based on 15 votes
Feminine form of ARTEMISIOS. This was the name of the 4th-century BC builder of the Mausoleum, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. She built it in memory of her husband, the Carian prince Mausolus.
ASTRID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French
Pronounced: AS-trid(Swedish, English) AH-stree(Norwegian) A-strit(German) AS-TREED(French)
Rating: 73% based on 15 votes
Modern form of ÁSTRÍÐR. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of Pippi Longstocking.
BASILIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: ba-ZEE-lyo(Italian) ba-SEE-lyo(Spanish)
Rating: 34% based on 13 votes
Italian and Spanish form of BASIL (1).
BORISLAV
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Russian, Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Борислав(Bulgarian, Serbian, Russian, Church Slavic)
Pronounced: bə-ryi-SLAF(Russian)
Rating: 35% based on 13 votes
Derived from the Slavic element borti "battle" combined with slava "glory".
CAITRIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 56% based on 5 votes
Possibly a form of CAITRÍONA.
CECILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Romanian, Finnish, German
Pronounced: seh-SEE-lee-ə(English) seh-SEEL-yə(English) cheh-CHEE-lya(Italian) theh-THEE-lya(European Spanish) seh-SEE-lya(Latin American Spanish) seh-SEEL-yah(Danish, Norwegian)
Rating: 72% based on 17 votes
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus meaning "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.

Due to the popularity of the saint, the name became common in the Christian world during the Middle Ages. The Normans brought it to England, where it was commonly spelled Cecily - the Latinate form Cecilia came into use in the 18th century.

CEDRIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SEHD-rik
Rating: 56% based on 13 votes
Invented by Sir Walter Scott for a character in his novel Ivanhoe (1819). Apparently he based it on the actual name Cerdic, the name of the semi-legendary founder of the kingdom of Wessex in the 6th century. The meaning of Cerdic is uncertain, but it does not appear to be Old English in origin. It could be connected to the Brythonic name CARATACOS. The name was also used by Frances Hodgson Burnett for the main character in her novel Little Lord Fauntleroy (1886).
CLARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: KLA-ra(German, Spanish, Italian) KLA-ru(Portuguese) KLA-RA(French) KLEHR-ə(American English) KLAR-ə(American English) KLAH-rə(British English)
Rating: 81% based on 11 votes
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus, which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.
CONSTANTINE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: KAHN-stən-teen(English)
Rating: 61% based on 15 votes
From the Latin name Constantinus, a derivative of CONSTANS. Constantine the Great (272-337) was the first Roman emperor to adopt Christianity. He moved the capital of the empire from Rome to Byzantium, which he renamed Constantinople (modern Istanbul).
DIEGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: DYEH-gho
Rating: 38% based on 13 votes
Possibly a shortened form of SANTIAGO. In medieval records Diego was Latinized as Didacus, and it has been suggested that it in fact derives from Greek διδαχη (didache) meaning "teaching". Saint Didacus (or Diego) was a 15th-century Franciscan brother based in Alcalá, Spain. Other famous bearers of this name include Mexican muralist Diego Rivera (1886-1957) and Argentine soccer player Diego Maradona (1960-).
DMITRI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Дмитрий(Russian)
Pronounced: DMEE-tree
Rating: 59% based on 13 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian Дмитрий (see DMITRIY).
DOBROSLAV
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Czech, Bulgarian, Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Доброслав(Serbian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: DO-bro-slaf(Czech)
Rating: 28% based on 12 votes
Derived from the Slavic elements dobru "good" and slava "glory".
DUBRAVKO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Дубравко(Serbian)
Rating: 37% based on 6 votes
From the old Slavic word dubrava meaning "oak grove".
EINAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian, Icelandic, Swedish, Danish, Estonian
Pronounced: AY-nahr(Swedish)
Rating: 43% based on 12 votes
From the Old Norse name Einarr, derived from the elements ein "one, alone" and arr "warrior". This name shares the same roots as einherjar, the word for the slain warriors in Valhalla.
EIRIK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian
Pronounced: AY-rik
Rating: 55% based on 12 votes
Norwegian form of Eiríkr (see ERIC).
EIRÍKR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Scandinavian [1]
Rating: 36% based on 8 votes
Old Norse form of ERIC.
ELIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Welsh
Pronounced: EH-lin(Swedish, Norwegian, Welsh)
Rating: 47% based on 12 votes
Scandinavian and Welsh form of HELEN.
ELISABETA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian
Rating: 65% based on 13 votes
Romanian form of ELIZABETH.
EMILIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Czech
Pronounced: eh-MEE-lyə(German) eh-MEE-lee-eh(Norwegian) EHM-i-lee(Swedish)
Rating: 67% based on 9 votes
German, Scandinavian and Czech feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
ENRICO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ehn-REE-ko
Rating: 31% based on 11 votes
Italian form of HENRY. Enrico Fermi (1901-1954) was an Italian physicist who did work on the development of the nuclear bomb.
ERIK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, German, Dutch, English
Pronounced: EH-rik(Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, German, Dutch) EH-reek(Finnish, Slovak, Slovene, Hungarian) EHR-ik(English)
Rating: 75% based on 13 votes
Scandinavian form of ERIC. This was the name of kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway. King Erik IX of Sweden (12th century) is the patron saint of that country.
ERLING
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: EHR-ling
Rating: 39% based on 11 votes
Means "descendant of the jarl", a derivative of the Old Norse word jarl meaning "chieftain, nobleman, earl".
ESTELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: ehs-TEHL(English) EHS-TEHL(French)
Rating: 62% based on 13 votes
From an Old French name meaning "star", ultimately derived from Latin stella. It was rare in the English-speaking world in the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due to the character Estella Havisham in Charles Dickens' novel Great Expectations (1860).
EVŽEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech
Pronounced: EHV-zhehn
Rating: 28% based on 12 votes
Czech form of EUGENE.
FERNANDO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: fehr-NAN-do(Spanish)
Rating: 41% based on 12 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of FERDINAND.
FRANCISCO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: fran-THEES-ko(European Spanish) fran-SEES-ko(Latin American Spanish) frun-SEESH-koo(Portuguese) frun-SEES-koo(Portuguese)
Rating: 44% based on 12 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS). This is the Spanish name of Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552). Other notable bearers include the Spanish painter and engraver Francisco de Goya (1746-1828) and the Spanish dictator Francisco Franco (1892-1975).
FRANCISZEK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: fran-CHEE-shehk
Rating: 43% based on 12 votes
Polish form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRANTIŠEK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Slovak
Pronounced: FRAN-kyi-shehk(Czech) FRAN-kyee-shehk(Slovak)
Rating: 31% based on 11 votes
Czech and Slovak form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRANZ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: FRANTS
Rating: 59% based on 14 votes
German form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS). This name was borne by the influential author Franz Kafka (1883-1924), writer of The Trial and The Castle among other works. Also, rulers of Austria and the Holy Roman Empire have had this name.
FRÉDÉRIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: FREH-DEH-REEK
Rating: 68% based on 10 votes
French form of FREDERICK.
FREDERICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FREHD-ə-rik, FREHD-rik
Rating: 73% based on 11 votes
English form of a Germanic name meaning "peaceful ruler", derived from frid "peace" and ric "ruler, mighty". This name has long been common in continental Germanic-speaking regions, being borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire, Germany, Austria, Scandinavia, and Prussia. Notables among these rulers include the 12th-century Holy Roman emperor and crusader Frederick I Barbarossa, the 13th-century emperor and patron of the arts Frederick II, and the 18th-century Frederick II of Prussia, known as Frederick the Great.

The Normans brought the name to England in the 11th century but it quickly died out. It was reintroduced by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century. A famous bearer was Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), an American ex-slave who became a leading advocate of abolition.

FREYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norse Mythology, English (British, Modern), German
Pronounced: FRAY-ə(English) FREH-ya(German)
Rating: 69% based on 14 votes
From Old Norse Freyja meaning "lady". This was the name of the goddess of love, beauty, war and death in Norse mythology. She claimed half of the heroes who were slain in battle and brought them to her realm of Fólkvangr. Along with her brother Freyr and father Njord, she was one of the Vanir (as opposed to the Æsir). Some scholars connect her with the goddess Frigg.

This is not the usual spelling in any of the Scandinavian languages (in Sweden and Denmark it is Freja and in Norway it is Frøja) but it is the common spelling of the goddess's name in English. In the 2000s it became popular in Britain.

FRIEDRICH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: FREE-drikh
Rating: 62% based on 10 votes
German form of FREDERICK. This was the name of kings of Germany. The socialist Friedrich Engels (1820-1895) and the philosopher Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900) are two famous bearers of this name.
FRYDERYK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: fri-DEH-rik
Rating: 45% based on 11 votes
Polish form of FREDERICK.
GEORG
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Estonian
Pronounced: GEH-awrk(German) YEH-awry(Swedish) KYEH-awrk(Icelandic) GEH-org(Estonian)
Rating: 48% based on 12 votes
Form of GEORGE in several languages. This name was borne by the German idealist philosopher Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831).
HALLVARÐR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Scandinavian [1]
Rating: 40% based on 10 votes
Old Norse form of HALVARD.
HANNES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Swedish, Dutch, Finnish
Pronounced: HA-nəs(German) HAHN-nehs(Swedish, Finnish) HAH-nəs(Dutch)
Rating: 56% based on 16 votes
Short form of JOHANNES.
HANS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: HANS(German) HAHNS(Dutch)
Rating: 67% based on 9 votes
German short form of JOHANNES, now used independently. This name has been very common in German-speaking areas of Europe since the late Middle Ages. From an early period it was transmitted to the Low Countries and Scandinavia. Two famous bearers were Hans Holbein (1497-1543), a German portrait painter, and Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), a Danish writer of fairy tales.
HARALD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, German
Pronounced: HAH-rahl(Norwegian, Danish) HA-ralt(German)
Rating: 56% based on 10 votes
Scandinavian and German cognate of HAROLD. This was the name of several kings of Norway and Denmark.
HEINRICH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: HIEN-rikh(German)
Rating: 43% based on 12 votes
German form of HENRY. This was the name of several German kings.
HERNÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ehr-NAN
Rating: 33% based on 10 votes
Short form of HERNANDO.
HERNANDO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ehr-NAN-do
Rating: 27% based on 10 votes
Medieval Spanish form of FERDINAND. A famous bearer of this name was Hernando Cortés (1485-1547), a Spanish conquistador.
HJALMAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: YAL-mar(Swedish)
Rating: 45% based on 12 votes
From the Old Norse name Hjálmarr meaning "helmeted warrior" from the element hjalmr "helmet" combined with arr "warrior".
IAGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, Galician, Portuguese
Pronounced: ee-A-gaw(Welsh) ee-AH-go(English) ee-A-ghuw(Galician)
Rating: 23% based on 10 votes
Welsh and Galician form of JACOB. This was the name of two early Welsh kings of Gwynedd. It is also the name of the villain in Shakespeare's tragedy Othello (1603).
INGA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Icelandic, Latvian, Lithuanian, German, Russian, Ancient Scandinavian [1], Ancient Germanic
Other Scripts: Инга(Russian)
Pronounced: ING-ah(Swedish) ING-a(German) EEN-gə(Russian)
Rating: 66% based on 12 votes
Strictly feminine form of INGE.
INGEMAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: ING-eh-mar
Rating: 44% based on 11 votes
From the Old Norse name Ingimárr, derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with mærr "famous".
IRINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Romanian, Finnish, Georgian
Other Scripts: Ирина(Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian) ირინა(Georgian)
Pronounced: i-RYEE-nə(Russian) EE-ree-nah(Finnish)
Rating: 61% based on 10 votes
Form of IRENE in several languages.
ISOLDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-SOL-də(English) i-ZOL-də(English) i-SOLD(English) i-ZOLD(English) ee-ZAWL-də(German)
Rating: 60% based on 8 votes
The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, perhaps from a hypothetic name like Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice, iron" and hild "battle".

In medieval Arthurian legend Isolde was an Irish princess betrothed to King Mark of Cornwall. After accidentally drinking a love potion, she became the lover of his knight Tristan, which led to their tragic deaths. The story was popular during the Middle Ages and the name became relatively common in England at that time. It was rare by the 19th century, though some interest was generated by Richard Wagner's opera Tristan und Isolde (1865).

IVAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Macedonian, Slovene, English, Italian, Romanian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Other Scripts: Иван(Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian) Іван(Ukrainian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: i-VAN(Russian) ee-WAHN(Ukrainian) EE-van(Serbian, Croatian, Slovak, Slovene) I-van(Czech) IE-vən(English) ee-VAN(Romanian)
Rating: 63% based on 12 votes
Newer form of the old Slavic name Іѡаннъ (Ioannu), which was derived from Greek Ioannes (see JOHN). This was the name of six Russian rulers, including the 15th-century Ivan III the Great and 16th-century Ivan IV the Terrible, the first tsar of Russia. It was also borne by nine emperors of Bulgaria. Other notable bearers include the Russian author Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883), who wrote Fathers and Sons, and the Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), who is best known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex.
JAROMÍR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Slovak
Pronounced: YA-ro-meer(Czech) YA-raw-meer(Slovak)
Rating: 33% based on 10 votes
Derived from the Slavic elements yaru meaning "fierce, energetic" and miru meaning "peace, world".
JAROSLAV
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Slovak
Pronounced: YA-ro-slaf(Czech) YA-raw-slow(Slovak)
Rating: 45% based on 11 votes
Czech and Slovak form of JAROSŁAW.
JIŘÍ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech
Pronounced: YI-ree
Rating: 21% based on 12 votes
Czech form of GEORGE.
JOHANN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: YO-han
Rating: 61% based on 14 votes
German form of Iohannes (see JOHN). Famous bearers include German composer Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750), German novelist and poet Johann Goethe (1749-1832), and Austrian composers Johann Strauss the Elder (1804-1849) and his son Johann Strauss the Younger (1825-1899).
JOHANNES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Late Roman
Pronounced: yo-HA-nəs(German) yo-HAH-nəs(Dutch) yo-HAN-əs(Danish) YO-hahn-nehs(Finnish)
Rating: 71% based on 16 votes
Latin form of Ioannes (see JOHN). Notable bearers include the inventor of the printing press Johannes Gutenberg (1398-1468), astronomer Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) and composer Johannes Brahms (1833-1897).
KATARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Sorbian
Other Scripts: Катарина(Serbian)
Pronounced: ka-ta-REE-na(Swedish, German)
Rating: 71% based on 7 votes
Form of KATHERINE in several languages.
LEBERECHT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German (Rare)
Pronounced: LEH-bə-rekht
Rating: 30% based on 10 votes
Means "live rightly" from German lebe "live" and recht "right". This name was created in the 17th century.
LEIF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: LAYF
Rating: 48% based on 12 votes
From the Old Norse name Leifr meaning "descendant, heir". Leif Eriksson was a Norse explorer who reached North America in the early 11th century. He was the son of Erik the Red.
MAIRÉAD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: MA-ryehd, mah-RYEHD
Rating: 55% based on 10 votes
Irish form of MARGARET.
MALCOLM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: MAL-kəm(English)
Rating: 60% based on 12 votes
From Scottish Gaelic Máel Coluim, which means "disciple of Saint COLUMBA". This was the name of four kings of Scotland starting in the 10th century, including Malcolm III, who became king after killing Macbeth, the usurper who had murdered his father. The character Malcolm in Shakespeare's tragedy Macbeth (1606) is based on him. Another famous bearer was Malcolm X (1925-1965), an American civil rights leader.
MARCO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Pronounced: MAR-ko(Italian, Spanish, German) MAR-koo(European Portuguese) MAKH-koo(Brazilian Portuguese) MAHR-ko(Dutch)
Rating: 38% based on 11 votes
Italian form of Marcus (see MARK). During the Middle Ages this name was common in Venice, where Saint Mark was supposedly buried. A famous bearer was the Venetian explorer Marco Polo, who travelled across Asia to China in the 13th century.
MARIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Other Scripts: Μαρια(Greek) Мария(Russian, Bulgarian) Марія(Ukrainian) Маріа(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: ma-REE-a(Italian, German, Swedish, Dutch, Greek, Romanian) mu-REE-u(European Portuguese) ma-REE-u(Brazilian Portuguese) mə-REE-ə(Catalan, English) mah-REE-ah(Norwegian, Danish) MAR-ya(Polish) MAH-ree-ah(Finnish) mu-RYEE-yə(Russian) mu-RYEE-yu(Ukrainian)
Rating: 75% based on 12 votes
Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.

This was the name of two ruling queens of Portugal. It was also borne by the Habsburg queen Maria Theresa (1717-1780), whose inheritance of the domains of her father, the Holy Roman emperor Charles VI, began the War of the Austrian Succession.

MARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Greek, Finnish, Estonian, Russian, Ukrainian, Romanian, Czech, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Latvian, Georgian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Μαρινα(Greek) Марина(Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian) მარინა(Georgian)
Pronounced: ma-REE-na(Italian, Spanish, German) mə-REE-nə(Catalan) mə-REEN-ə(English) mu-RYEE-nə(Russian) MA-ri-na(Czech)
Rating: 74% based on 12 votes
Feminine form of MARINUS.
MARIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, German, Croatian
Pronounced: MA-ryo(Italian, Spanish, German)
Rating: 46% based on 10 votes
Italian and Spanish form of MARIUS. Famous bearers include American racecar driver Mario Andretti (1940-) and Canadian hockey player Mario Lemieux (1965-).
MARIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Romanian, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, French, Lithuanian
Pronounced: MA-ree-oos(Classical Latin) MEHR-ee-əs(English) MAR-ee-əs(English) MA-ryuws(German) MA-RYUYS(French)
Rating: 78% based on 12 votes
Roman family name that was derived either from MARS, the name of the Roman god of War, or else from the Latin root mas, maris meaning "male". Gaius Marius was a famous Roman consul of the 2nd century BC. Since the start of the Christian era, it has occasionally been used as a masculine form of MARIA.
MENELAUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Μενελαος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: mehn-i-LAY-əs(English)
Rating: 36% based on 9 votes
From the Greek name Μενελαος (Menelaos), derived either from μενω (meno) meaning "to stay, to wait" or μενος (menos) meaning "mind, strength, force" combined with λαος (laos) meaning "the people". In Greek legend he was a king of Sparta and the husband of Helen. When his wife was taken by Paris, the Greeks besieged the city of Troy in an effort to get her back. After the war Menelaus and Helen settled down to a happy life.
MILAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Милан(Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: MI-lan(Czech) MEE-lan(Slovak)
Rating: 35% based on 11 votes
From the Slavic element milu meaning "gracious, dear", originally a short form of names that began with that element. A city in Italy bears this name, though it originates from a different source.
MINA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch, Limburgish
Pronounced: MEE-nə(English) MEE-nah(Dutch, Limburgish)
Rating: 60% based on 8 votes
Short form of WILHELMINA and other names ending in mina. This was the name of a character in the novel Dracula (1897) by Bram Stoker.
MIREILLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MEE-RAY
Rating: 64% based on 12 votes
From the Occitan name Mirèio, which was first used by the poet Frédéric Mistral for the main character in his poem Mirèio (1859). He probably derived it from the Occitan word mirar meaning "to admire".
MIROSLAV
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Мирослав(Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Church Slavic)
Pronounced: MI-ro-slaf(Czech) MEE-raw-slow(Slovak) myi-ru-SLAF(Russian)
Rating: 46% based on 10 votes
Derived from the Slavic elements miru "peace, world" and slava "glory". This was the name of a 10th-century king of Croatia who was deposed by one of his nobles after ruling for four years.
NADEZHDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Надежда(Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: nu-DYEZH-də(Russian)
Rating: 35% based on 11 votes
Means "hope" in Slavic.
NJORD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Rating: 38% based on 10 votes
From Old Norse Njǫrðr, which was possibly derived from the Indo-European root *ner meaning "strong, vigorous". Njord was the Norse god of the sea, sailing, fishing and fertility. With his children Freyr and Freya he was a member of the Vanir.
ODYSSEUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Οδυσσευς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: O-DUYS-SEWS(Classical Greek) o-DIS-ee-əs(English)
Rating: 34% based on 10 votes
Perhaps derived from Greek οδυσσομαι (odyssomai) meaning "to hate". In Greek legend Odysseus was one of the Greek heroes who fought in the Trojan War. In the Odyssey Homer relates Odysseus's misadventures on his way back to his kingdom and his wife Penelope.
OKSANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ukrainian, Russian
Other Scripts: Оксана(Ukrainian, Russian)
Pronounced: uk-SA-nə(Russian)
Rating: 53% based on 10 votes
Ukrainian form of XENIA.
OLAV
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish
Rating: 38% based on 11 votes
Variant of OLAF.
OLOF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: OO-lawf
Rating: 40% based on 11 votes
Swedish form of OLAF.
OLUF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish
Rating: 40% based on 8 votes
Danish variant of OLAF.
ORESTES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ορεστης(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: O-REHS-TEHS(Classical Greek) aw-REHS-teez(English)
Rating: 22% based on 10 votes
Derived from Greek ορεστιας (orestias) meaning "of the mountains". In Greek myth he was the son of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra. He killed his mother and her lover Aegisthus after they killed his father.
OSIRIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Other Scripts: Οσιρις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: o-SIE-ris(English)
Rating: 33% based on 10 votes
Greek form of the Egyptian Asar, which is of unknown meaning. In Egyptian mythology Osiris was the god of the dead and the judge of the underworld. He was slain by his brother Seth, but revived by his wife Isis.
OTTILIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: aw-TEE-lyə
Rating: 39% based on 7 votes
German form of ODILIA.
PARTHENIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Παρθενια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: par-THEE-nee-ə(English)
Rating: 38% based on 11 votes
Derived from Greek παρθενος (parthenos) meaning "maiden, virgin". This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Athena.
PEDRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: PEH-dhro(Spanish) PEH-droo(Portuguese)
Rating: 38% based on 10 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of PETER. This was the name of the only two emperors of Brazil.
PERICLES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Περικλης(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PEHR-ə-kleez(English)
Rating: 27% based on 10 votes
From the Greek name Περικλης (Perikles), which was derived from the Greek elements περι (peri) meaning "around, exceedingly" and κλεος (kleos) meaning "glory". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Athenian statesman and general.
ROSALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German, Dutch, English
Pronounced: RAW-ZA-LEE(French) ro-za-LEE(German) RO-zə-lee(English)
Rating: 78% based on 9 votes
French, German and Dutch form of ROSALIA. In the English-speaking this name received a boost after the release of the movie Rosalie (1938), which was based on an earlier musical.
SANTIAGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: san-TYA-gho(Spanish) sun-tee-A-goo(European Portuguese) sun-chee-A-goo(Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 46% based on 11 votes
Means "Saint James", derived from Spanish santo "saint" combined with Yago, an old Spanish form of JAMES, the patron saint of Spain. This is the name of the capital city of Chile, as well as several other cities in the Spanish-speaking world.
SEPTIMUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: SEHP-tee-moos
Rating: 24% based on 10 votes
Roman praenomen, or given name, which meant "seventh" in Latin.
SERGE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SEHRZH
Rating: 23% based on 9 votes
French form of SERGIUS.
SERGEI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Сергей(Russian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: syir-GYAY(Russian)
Rating: 38% based on 11 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Сергей (see SERGEY).
SIEGFRIED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Germanic Mythology
Pronounced: ZEEK-freet(German)
Rating: 39% based on 13 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and frid "peace". Siegfried was a hero from Germanic legend, chief character in the Nibelungenlied. He secretly helped the Burgundian king Günther overcome the challenges set out by the Icelandic queen Brünhild so that Günther might win her hand. In exchange, Günther consented to the marriage of Siegfried and his sister Kriemhild. Years later, after a dispute between Brünhild and Kriemhild, Siegfried was murdered by Hagen with Günther's consent. He was stabbed in his one vulnerable spot on the small of his back, which had been covered by a leaf while he bathed in dragon's blood. His adventures were largely based on those of the Norse hero Sigurd. The story was later adapted by Richard Wagner to form part of his opera The Ring of the Nibelung (1876).
SIGRID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Estonian, Finnish (Archaic)
Pronounced: SEE-grid(Swedish) SEEG-reed(Finnish)
Rating: 55% based on 13 votes
From the Old Norse name Sigríðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and fríðr "beautiful, fair".
SLAVOMÍR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Slovak
Pronounced: SLA-vo-meer(Czech) SLA-vaw-meer(Slovak)
Rating: 21% based on 10 votes
Czech and Slovak form of SŁAWOMIR.
SŁAWOMIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: swa-vaw-MYEE-ra
Rating: 36% based on 9 votes
Polish feminine form of SŁAWOMIR.
SØREN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish, Norwegian
Pronounced: SUUW-ən(Danish) SUU-rehn(Norwegian)
Rating: 46% based on 14 votes
Danish form of SEVERINUS. Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) was a Danish philosopher who is regarded as a precursor of existentialism.
SPARTACUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: SPAHR-tə-kəs(English)
Rating: 19% based on 10 votes
Means "from the city of Sparta" in Latin. Spartacus was the name of a Thracian-born Roman slave who led a slave revolt in Italy in the 1st century BC. He was eventually killed in battle and many of his followers were crucified.
SVEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: SVEH-ah
Rating: 48% based on 13 votes
From a personification of the country of Sweden, in use since the 17th century. It is a derivative of Svear, the Swedish name for the ancient Germanic tribe the Swedes. The Swedish name of the country of Sweden is Sverige, a newer form of Svear rike meaning "the realm of the Svear".
SVEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
Pronounced: SVEHN
Rating: 58% based on 12 votes
From the Old Norse byname Sveinn meaning "boy". This was the name of kings of Denmark, Norway and Sweden.
SVERRE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian
Rating: 30% based on 12 votes
From the Old Norse name Sverrir meaning "wild, swinging, spinning".
SVETLANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Slovak, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Светлана(Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: svyit-LA-nə(Russian)
Rating: 63% based on 12 votes
Derived from Slavic svet meaning "light, world". It was popularized by the poem Svetlana (1813) by the Russian poet Vasily Zhukovsky. It is sometimes used as a translation of Photine.
SVYATOSLAV
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Святослав(Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: svyi-tu-SLAF(Russian)
Rating: 29% based on 9 votes
Derived from the Slavic elements svetu "blessed, holy" and slava "glory".
THEIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Θεια(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 53% based on 12 votes
Possibly derived from Greek θεα (thea) meaning "goddess". In Greek myth this was the name of a Titan goddess of light, glittering and glory. She was the wife of Hyperion and the mother of the sun god Helios, the moon goddess Selene, and the dawn goddess Eos.
ÞÓRVALDR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Scandinavian [1]
Rating: 23% based on 9 votes
Old Norse form of TORVALD.
TORBJØRN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish, Norwegian
Rating: 37% based on 12 votes
Danish and Norwegian form of TORBJÖRN.
TORLEIF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian
Rating: 38% based on 8 votes
From the Old Norse name Þórleifr meaning "Thor's descendant" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with leifr "descendant, heir".
TORSTEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Danish, German
Pronounced: TOSH-tehn(Swedish) TAWRS-tən(German)
Rating: 56% based on 12 votes
From the Old Norse name Þórsteinn, which meant "Thor's stone" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with steinn "stone".
TORVALD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Rating: 40% based on 11 votes
From the Old Norse name Þórvaldr, which meant "Thor's ruler" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with valdr "ruler".
ULRIKE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: uwl-REE-kə
Rating: 40% based on 8 votes
German feminine form of ULRICH.
VÁCLAV
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Slovak
Pronounced: VATS-laf(Czech) VATS-low(Slovak)
Rating: 21% based on 10 votes
Contracted form of the older name Veceslav, from the Slavic elements veche "more" and slava "glory". Saint Václav (known as Wenceslas in English) was a 10th-century duke of Bohemia murdered by his brother. He is the patron saint of the Czech Republic. This was also the name of several Bohemian kings.
VALERIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, German, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: va-LEH-rya(Italian) ba-LEH-rya(Spanish)
Rating: 61% based on 10 votes
Feminine form of VALERIUS. This was the name of a 2nd-century Roman saint and martyr.
VALERIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Georgian, Romanian, History
Other Scripts: Валериан(Russian) Валеріан(Ukrainian) ვალერიან(Georgian)
Pronounced: və-LIR-ee-ən(English)
Rating: 53% based on 10 votes
From the Roman cognomen Valerianus, which was itself derived from the Roman name VALERIUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century Roman emperor. Several saints also had this name, including a 2nd-century martyr of Lyons.
VALTER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Croatian, Estonian
Pronounced: VAL-tehr(Italian, Swedish)
Rating: 50% based on 10 votes
Form of WALTER used in several languages.
VALTO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: VAHL-to
Rating: 40% based on 9 votes
Finnish short form of VALDEMAR and other names containing vald.
VALTTERI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: VAHLT-teh-ree
Rating: 43% based on 9 votes
Finnish form of WALTER.
VASCO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese, Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: VASH-koo(European Portuguese) VAS-koo(Brazilian Portuguese) BAS-ko(Spanish)
Rating: 33% based on 11 votes
From the medieval Spanish name Velasco, which possibly meant "crow" in Basque. A famous bearer was the 15th-century Portuguese explorer Vasco da Gama, the first person to sail from Europe around Africa to India.
VASILIY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Василий(Russian)
Pronounced: vu-SYEE-lyee
Rating: 53% based on 10 votes
Russian form of BASIL (1).
VAVŘINEC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech
Pronounced: VA-vri-nehts
Rating: 26% based on 10 votes
Czech form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
VELASCO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval Spanish
Rating: 23% based on 9 votes
Medieval Spanish form of VASCO.
VINCENT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak
Pronounced: VIN-sənt(English, Dutch) VEHN-SAHN(French) VEEN-tsent(Slovak)
Rating: 68% based on 12 votes
From the Roman name Vincentius, which was derived from Latin vincere meaning "to conquer". This name was popular among early Christians, and it was borne by many saints. As an English name, Vincent has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 19th century. Famous bearers include the French priest Saint Vincent de Paul (1581-1660) and the post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890).
VLADIMIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Владимир(Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: vlu-DYEE-myir(Russian) VLA-dee-meer(Serbian, Croatian)
Rating: 54% based on 12 votes
Derived from the Slavic element vladeti "rule" combined with meru "great, famous". The second element has also been associated with miru meaning "peace, world". This was the name of an 11th-century grand prince of Kiev who is venerated as a saint because of his efforts to Christianize his realm (Kievan Rus). It was also borne by the founder of the former Soviet state, Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (1870-1924).
VLADISLAV
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Владислав(Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian)
Pronounced: vlə-dyi-SLAF(Russian) VLA-ji-slaf(Czech) VLA-jee-slow(Slovak)
Rating: 33% based on 10 votes
Derived from the Slavic elements vladeti "rule" and slava "glory".
VLASTISLAV
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Medieval Slavic [1]
Pronounced: VLAS-kyi-slaf(Czech)
Rating: 30% based on 10 votes
Derived from the Slavic elements vlasti meaning "rule, sovereignty" and slava meaning "glory". In modern Czech vlast means "homeland" (a descendant word of vlasti).
VYACHESLAV
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Вячеслав(Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: vyi-chi-SLAF(Russian) wyah-cheh-SLOW(Ukrainian)
Rating: 28% based on 10 votes
Russian and Ukrainian form of VÁCLAV.
WILHELM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Polish, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: VIL-helm(German) VYEEL-khelm(Polish)
Rating: 68% based on 14 votes
German cognate of WILLIAM. This was the name of two German emperors. It was also the middle name of several philosophers from Germany: Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831), Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900), and Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz (1646-1716), who was also a notable mathematician.
WOLFRAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: VAWL-fram
Rating: 70% based on 6 votes
Derived from the Germanic element wulf meaning "wolf" combined with hramn meaning "raven".
YEVGENIY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Евгений(Russian)
Pronounced: yiv-GYEH-nyee, iv-GYEH-nyee
Rating: 35% based on 10 votes
Russian form of EUGENE.
ZDENĚK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech
Pronounced: ZDEH-nyehk
Rating: 20% based on 10 votes
Czech form of ZDENKO.
ZINAIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Зинаида(Russian)
Pronounced: zyi-nu-EE-də
Rating: 40% based on 10 votes
Russian form of ZENAIDA.
ZLATAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Bosnian, Macedonian, Bulgarian, Slovene
Other Scripts: Златан(Serbian, Macedonian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: ZLA-tan(Croatian, Serbian)
Rating: 26% based on 10 votes
Means "golden", a derivative of the Slavic word zlato "gold".
ZVONIMIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Medieval Slavic [1]
Rating: 28% based on 10 votes
Derived from the Slavic elements zvonu "sound, chime" and miru "peace, world".
ZVONIMIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian
Rating: 32% based on 10 votes
Feminine form of ZVONIMIR.
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